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Sample records for radial slurry flow

  1. Turbulence in slurry pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.A. ); Crowe, C.T. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of liquid-solid flows (slurries) is far behind than that for single phase flows. Very few geometries have been examined with a slurry and only with a limited variation of system parameters i.e. fluid viscosity, particle diameter, etc. This paper presents the first part of a study which examines the effects of the addition of a solid to the flow through a confined coaxial jet. Presented here will be the initial conditions for the jet which correspond to fully developed pipe flow. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Fluidization mechanisms in slurry flow

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    There are two mechanisms by which heavy settling particles may be suspended in a horizontal slurry flow: (1) by particle-particle interactions (e.g. Bagnold dispersive stresses) and (2) by particle-fluid interactions (e.g. entrainment of the particles by turbulent eddies.) The purpose of this investigation is to determine to what extent each fluidization mechanism is active and the effect of the fluidization mechanism on the global properties of the slurry. The technique employs the understanding that the particles entrained in the turbulence of the fluid will appear as an increased hydrostatic head across the channel. This may be directly measured and can be related to the fraction of the mass of particles that are supported by fluid-particle forces. (The rest must therefore be supported by particle-particle forces.) 17 refs., 26 figs.

  3. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  4. Fluidization mechanisms in slurry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles S.

    1988-08-01

    A transducer is developed to measure particle pressures independently from fluid pressure. Initially it was thought that particle pressure was the only path by which the fluidization mechanism could be determined. The particle pressure transducer has been described in previous reports. A secondary project was developed to test these transducers and use them to measure the particle pressures generated against the side walls of gas-fluidized beds. This was a way to gain experience with the particle pressure transducer while awaiting the delivery of the pump and other components for the slurry pipe loop. Earlier this year, there was great difficulty in gaining repeatable results from the experiments. The culprit turned out to be static charge buildup in the granular mass. Hence, steam was injected into the air stream to help dissipate the charge buildup. This produced a further source of error that was eventually traced to the fiberoptic displacement transducer inside the probe. It developed that the transducer was sensitive to humidity. It has been suggested that this reaction might be a byproduct of the absorption of water onto the sensing surface changes its optical properties and hence its output signal.

  5. Pulsating slurry flow in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Masry, O. A.; El Shobaky, K.

    1989-07-01

    An experimental study on pulsating turbulent flow of sand-water suspension was carried out. The objective was to investigate the effect of pulsating flow parameters, such as, frequency and amplitude on the critical velocity, the pressure drop per unit length of pipeline and hence the energy requirements for hydraulic transportation of a unit mass of solids. The apparatus was constructed as a closed loop of 11.4 m length and 3.3 cm inner diameter of steel tubing. Solid volumetric concentrations of up to 20% were used in turbulent flow at a mean Reynolds number of 33,000 82,000. Pulsation was generated using compressed air in a controlled pulsation unit. Frequencies of 0.1 1.0 Hz and amplitude ratios of up to 30% were used. Instantaneous pressure drop and flow rate curves were digitized to calculate the energy dissipation associated with pulsation. The critical velocity in pulsating flow was found to be less than that for the corresponding steady flow at the same volumetric concentration. Energy dissipation for pulsating flow was found to be a function of both frequency and amplitude of pulsation. A possible energy saving was indicated at frequencies of 0.4 0.8 Hz and moderate amplitudes ratios of less than 25%.

  6. Numerical simulation of turbulent slurry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Spiteri, Reymond J.; Bergstrom, Donlad J.

    2016-11-01

    Slurry flows, i.e., the flow of an agglomeration of liquid and particles, are widely employed in many industrial applications, such as hydro-transport systems, pharmaceutical batch crystallizers, and wastewater disposal. Although there are numerous studies available in the literature on turbulent gas-particle flows, the hydrodynamics of turbulent liquid-particle flows has received much less attention. In particular, the fluid-phase turbulence modulation due to the particle fluctuating motion is not yet well understood and remains challenging to model. This study reports the results of a numerical simulation of a vertically oriented slurry pipe flow using a two-fluid model based on the kinetic theory of granular flows. The particle stress model also includes the effects of frictional contact. Different turbulence modulation models are considered, and their capability to capture the characteristic features of the turbulent flow is assessed. The model predictions are validated against published experimental data and demonstrate the significant effect of the particles on the fluid-phase turbulence.

  7. Geotechnical properties of debris-flow sediments and slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Iverson, R.M.; McTigue, D.F.; Macias, S.; Fiedorowicz, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of geotechnical properties of various poorly sorted debris-flow sediments and slurries (??? 32 mm diameter) emphasize their granular nature, and reveal that properties of slurries can differ significantly from those of compacted sediments. Measurements show that: (1) cohesion probably offers little resistance to shear in most debris flows under low confining stresses normally found in nature; (2) intrinsic hydraulic permeabilities of compacted debris-flow sediments vary from about 10-14-10-9 m2; permeabilities of 'typical' debris-flow slurries fall toward the low end of the range; (3) debris-flow slurries are characterized by very large values of 'elastic' compressibility (C approx. 10-2 kPa-1); and (4) hydraulic diffusivities of quasistatically consolidating slurries are approx. 10-4-10-7 m2/s. Low hydraulic diffusivity of debris slurries permits excess fluid pressure and low effective strength to persist during sediment transport and deposition.

  8. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  9. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  10. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  11. Generalized radial flow in synthetic flow systems.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dale O; Roberts, Randall M; Holt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Traditional analysis methods used to determine hydraulic properties from pumping tests work well in many porous media aquifers, but they often do not work in heterogeneous and fractured-rock aquifers, producing non-plausible and erroneous results. The generalized radial flow model developed by Barker (1988) can reveal information about heterogeneity characteristics and aquifer geometry from pumping test data by way of a flow dimension parameter. The physical meaning of non-integer flow dimensions has long been a subject of debate and research. We focus on understanding and interpreting non-radial flow through high permeability conduits within fractured aquifers. We develop and simulate flow within idealized non-radial flow conduits and expand on this concept by simulating pumping in non-fractal random fields with specific properties that mimic persistent sub-radial flow responses. Our results demonstrate that non-integer flow dimensions can arise from non-fractal geometries within aquifers. We expand on these geometric concepts and successfully simulate pumping in random fields that mimic well-test responses seen in the Culebra Dolomite above the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Fluid mechanics of slurry flow through the grinding media in ball mills

    SciTech Connect

    Songfack, P.K.; Rajamani, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    The slurry transport within the ball mill greatly influences the mill holdup, residence time, breakage rate, and hence the power draw and the particle size distribution of the mill product. However, residence-time distribution and holdup in industrial mills could not be predicted a priori. Indeed, it is impossible to determine the slurry loading in continuously operating mills by direct measurement, especially in industrial mills. In this paper, the slurry transport problem is solved using the principles of fluid mechanics. First, the motion of the ball charge and its expansion are predicted by a technique called discrete element method. Then the slurry flow through the porous ball charge is tackled with a fluid-flow technique called the marker and cell method. This may be the only numerical technique capable of tracking the slurry free surface as it fluctuates with the motion of the ball charge. The result is a prediction of the slurry profile in both the radial and axial directions. Hence, it leads to the detailed description of slurry mass and ball charge within the mill. The model predictions are verified with pilot-scale experimental work. This novel approach based on the physics of fluid flow is devoid of any empiricism. It is shown that the holdup of industrial mills at a given feed percent solids can be predicted successfully.

  13. Results of sludge slurry pipeline pluggage tests. [Simulation of Radioactive Slurry Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, J.M.

    1987-02-06

    Test results of sludge slurry transport through the Interarea Transfer Line (IAL) Mock-up Facility showed little risk of plugging the interarea pipelines with sludge slurry. Plug-free operation of the pipeline was successfully demonstrated by worst case IAL operating scenarios. Pipeline pressure gradients were measured vs. flow rate for comparison with a computer model over a range of sludge slurry rheological properties. A mathematical computer model developed by L. M. Lee is included in this report which will predict pressure drop for Bingham plastic fluid flow in a pipeline. IAL pluggage situations and pumping requirements may be realized from this model. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  15. Waste Slurry Particle Properties for Use in Slurry Flow Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J. R.; Conrads, T. J.; Julyk, L. J.; Reynolds, D. A.; Jensen, L.; Kirch, N. W.; Estey, S. D.; Bechtold, D. B.; Callaway III, W. S.; Cooke, G. A.; Herting, D. L.; Person, J. C.; Duncan, J. B.; Onishi, Y.; Tingey, J. M.

    2003-02-26

    Hanford's tank farm piping system must be substantially modified to deliver high-level wastes from the underground storage tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction. Improved knowledge of the physical properties of the solids was required to support the design of the modified system. To provide this additional knowledge, particle size distributions for composite samples from seven high-level waste feed tanks were measured using two different laser lightscattering particle size analyzers. These measurements were made under a variety of instrumental conditions, including various flow rates through the sample loop, various stirring rates in the sample reservoir, and before and after subjecting the particles to ultrasonic energy. A mean value over all the tanks of 4.2 {micro}m was obtained for the volume-based median particle size. Additional particle size information was obtained from sieving tests, settling tests and microscopic observations.

  16. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  17. Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ting; Lei, Hong

    2014-11-01

    With magnetic heads operating closer to hard disks, the hard disks must be ultra-smooth. The abrasive-free polishing (AFP) performance of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) as the initiator in H2O2-based slurry for hard disk substrate was investigated in our work, and the results showed that the slurry including CHP could improve the material removal rate (MRR) and also reduce surface roughness. Electron spin-resonance spectroscopy (EPR), electrochemical measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were conducted to investigate the acting mechanism with CHP during the polishing process. Compared with the H2O2 slurry, the EPR analysis shows that the CHP-H2O2 slurry provides a higher concentration of the HOO free radical. In addition, the AES analysis shows the oxidization reaction occurs in the external layer of the substrate surface. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements reveal that CHP can promote the electrochemical effect in AFP and lead to the increase of MRR.

  18. Effect of Groove Pattern of Chemical Mechanical Polishing Pad on Slurry Flow Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Doi, Toshiro K.; Uneda, Michio; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Seshimo, Kiyoshi; Aida, Hideo

    2012-05-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), the slurry flow behavior on the polishing pad is very important both for improving polishing effectiveness and for reducing the slurry consumption. In this study, we aim to evaluate two types of CMP pad that have unique special groove patterns, slurry outflow and inflow pads, for controlling the slurry flow behavior. We describe the effect of the groove patterns on the slurry flow behavior observed using images recorded using a high-speed digital camera. The results of the study indicate several advantages of the proposed pads over the conventional pads from the viewpoint of slurry flow behavior.

  19. MULTIPHASE FLOW CONCENTRATION CHARACTERIZATION IN SLURRIES DURING PULSE JET MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.

    2012-07-08

    Obtaining real-time, in situ slurry concentration measurements during unsteady mixing can provide increased understanding into mixer performance. During tests of an operating pulse jet mixing system, an ultrasonic attenuation sensor was inserted into a mixing vessel to measure the slurry concentration during unsteady mixing in real time. Pulse jet mixing tests to suspend noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales. To understand the solids suspension process and resulting solids distribution, the concentration of solids in the cloud was measured at various elevations and radial positions during the pulse jet mixer cycle. This paper presents transient concentration data obtained at three scales at the tank center to provide insight into pulse jet mixer performance.

  20. Debris flow rheology: Experimental analysis of fine-grained slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The rheology of slurries consisting of ≤2-mm sediment from a natural debris flow deposit was measured using a wide-gap concentric-cylinder viscometer. The influence of sediment concentration and size and distribution of grains on the bulk rheological behavior of the slurries was evaluated at concentrations ranging from 0.44 to 0.66. The slurries exhibit diverse rheological behavior. At shear rates above 5 s−1 the behavior approaches that of a Bingham material; below 5 s−1, sand exerts more influence and slurry behavior deviates from the Bingham idealization. Sand grain interactions dominate the mechanical behavior when sand concentration exceeds 0.2; transient fluctuations in measured torque, time-dependent decay of torque, and hysteresis effects are observed. Grain rubbing, interlocking, and collision cause changes in packing density, particle distribution, grain orientation, and formation and destruction of grain clusters, which may explain the observed behavior. Yield strength and plastic viscosity exhibit order-of-magnitude variation when sediment concentration changes as little as 2–4%. Owing to these complexities, it is unlikely that debris flows can be characterized by a single rheological model.

  1. Flow resistance of ice slurry in bends and elbow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko, B.; Żelasko, J.

    2014-08-01

    The present paper covers the flow of ice slurry made of a 10.6% ethanol solution through small-radius bends and elbow pipes. The paper presents the results of experimental research on the flow resistances of Bingham-fluid ice slurry in bends and elbows. The research, performed for three pipe diameters and a relative bend radius of 1<=D/di<=2, has made it possible to take into consideration the influence of friction resistances as well the of the flow geometry on the total local resistance coefficients. The study attempts to make the local resistance coefficient dependent on the Dean number defined for a generalized Reynolds number according to Metzner-Reade

  2. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  3. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  4. Structures Formation In Slurry Flow In A Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilchherr, R.; Koenders, M. A.

    A finely-grained, densely packed material is mixed with a Newtonian fluid and made to flow upwards through a porous medium. The slurry percolates through the medium and, because slurries are inherently non-Newtonian, structures formation takes place (see Koenders 1998). To visualise the effect, the fluid is chosen to be Rizella oil, while the porous medium is constituted of very heterogeneous Pyrex elements. The latter have virtually the same refractive index as the oil, which enables the study of the distribution of the solid fraction of the slurry, as this is the only non-transparent phase in the system. Pictures of the experiments are presented; using various forms of image processing, it is demonstrated that predominantly horizontal structures are formed in the flow process. The multiphase flow in the heterogeneous matrix has also been described theoretically using granular temperature theory (McTigue and Jenkins 1992) and the structures formation has been obtained in this way too. References Koenders M.A. 1998, Effects of microstructure and non-linearity in heterogeneous materials. J. Appl Phys 31, 1875-1882 McTigue D. and Jenkins J.T. 1992, Channel flow of a concentrated suspensions. In: Advances in Micromechanics of Granular Materials, Shen H.H. et al. (Eds.), pp 381 - 390, Elsevier, Oxford.

  5. Modeling flow and sedimention of slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Altobelli, S.; Ingber, M.; Graham, A.

    2002-12-01

    Many natural processes involve flows of sediments at high particle concentrations. The equations describing such two-phase flows are highly nonlinear. We will give an overview of the performance of a continuum constitutive model of suspensions of particles in liquid for low Reynolds number flows. The diffusive flux model (Leighton and Acrivos, J. Fluid Mech., 1987, and Phillips et al., Phys. Fluids A, 1992) is implemented in a general purpose finite element computational program. This constitutive description couples a Newtonian stress/shear-rate relationship (where the local viscosity of the suspension is dependent on the local volume fraction of solids) with a shear-induced migration model of the suspended particles. The momentum transport, continuity, and diffusive flux equations are solved simultaneously. The formulation is fully three-dimensional and can be run on a parallel computer platform. Recent work introducing a flow-aligned tensor correction to this model has had success in representing the anisotropic force that is seen in curvilinear flows. Gravity effects are added in an approach similar to that of Zhang and Acrivos (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 1994). The model results are compared with laboratory data obtained with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of evolving particle concentration profiles in complex flows, as well as in batch sedimentation. Interesting secondary flows appear both in the experiment and model. Overall, good agreement is found between the experiments and the simulations. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy. The authors would like to acknowledge support for this work by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Engineering and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. Modeling flow of mineralized carbon dioxide slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Larry R.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Saha, K.K.

    2005-04-01

    Direct mineral carbonation was investigated at Albany Research Center (US DOE) as a means to sequester carbon dioxide into stable mineral matrices. Although previous work focused on treating Mg-containing minerals in conventional autoclaves, recent work has been done using pipeline-reactor technology for the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) reaction of the minerals in aqueous/CO2 media. Sequestration of CO2 using above-ground reactors may be uneconomical, but the technology may also be applicable in geological sequestration of CO2. Progress is described in using a prototype HTHP flow-loop reactor to model flow in the dynamic three-phase system to help determine the pumping-energy requirements to optimize reactivity.

  7. Instrumentation to Monitor Transient Developing Periodic Flow in Newtonian Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2014-08-03

    This paper describes measurement techniques developed and applied to characterize solids mobilization and mixing of Newtonian slurries that are subjected to transient, periodic, developing flows. Metrics to characterize mobilization and mixing are the just suspended velocity (UJS) and the cloud height (HC). Two ultrasonic instruments to characterize pulse jet mixing of slurries were developed and deployed to measure related metrics: the thickness of the settled bed (used to determine mobilization) and the concentration within the cloud as a function of elevation [C(Z)]. A second method, continuous sample extraction, characterization, and reinsertion was successfully used to measure average density and characterize the concentration within the cloud. Testing focused on mixing vessels using intermitent jet mixers oriented vertically downward. Descriptions of the instruments and instrument performance are presented. These techniques were an effective approach to characterize mixing phenomena, determine mixing energy required to fully mobilize vessel contents, and to determine mixing times for process evaluation.

  8. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  9. Analysis of the polishing slurry flow of chemical mechanical polishing by polishing pad with phyllotactic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yushan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Li, Nan; Duan, Min; Xing, Xue-Ling

    2010-12-01

    In order to make the polishing slurry distribution more uniform over the polishing region, a new kind of polishing pad, which has sunflower seed pattern, has been designed based on the phyllotaxis theory of biology, and the boundary conditions of polishing slurry flow have been established. By the help of computational fluid dynamics software (FLUENT), the flow state of the polishing slurry is simulated and the effects of the phyllotactic parameters of polishing pad on the flow field of polishing slurry are analyzed. The results show that when the polishing slurry is imported from the center of phyllotaxis polishing pad, the slurry flows along the counterclockwise and clockwise spiral grooves of phyllotatic pattern, which make fluid flow divergence around, and the flow field becomes more uniform.

  10. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  11. Calculation of transonic flow in radial turbine blade cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, Straka

    2017-09-01

    Numerical modeling of transonic centripetal turbulent flow in radial blade cascade is described in this paper. Attention is paid to effect of the outlet confusor on flow through the radial blade cascade. Parameters of presented radial blade cascade are compared with its linear representation

  12. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheimer, R. J.; Grimley, T. A.; Park, J. T.; Morrow, T. B.

    1987-04-01

    The structure of non-Newtonian slurries in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes in pipes is studied. Experiments are conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside pipe diameter of 51 mm. Flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress are taken with a two-component laser-Doppler velocimeter in a transparent test section with a transparent model slurry. Two transparent model slurries have been developed with non-Newtonian rheological properties. Silica gel particles with diameters on the order of one micron are suspended in two different hydrocarbon liquid mixtures with viscosities of 1.19 and 6.39 cS. In rheological measurements with a concentric cylinder viscometer, slurries from both liquid mixtures exhibited slip. From a linear regression analysis with a power-law model, slurries with the higher viscosity fluid had yield values of 80 and 30 dyn/sq cm for silica gel concentrations of 5.6 and 4.0% by weight, respectively, and the exponents were 0.584 and 0.763. The measured refractive index for the transparent slurries is 1.454 where the difference in refractive index between the fluid and silica gel is estimated to be less than 0.001. Bench scale tests with large diameter silica gel particles on the order of 100 microns have produced slurries with excessive turbidity. A silica gel manufactured by a different process which may form a less turbid slurry is currently under investigation.

  13. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. T.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Grimley, T. A.; Morrow, T. B.

    1988-02-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and full turbulent pipe flow regimes is the primary objective of this research. Measurements include rheological characterization of the fluid and local fluid velocity measurements with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Optical access to the flow is gained through a test section and model slurry which are both transparent. The model slurry is formulated from silica gel particles and hydrocarbon liquid mixture whose indices of refraction are matched so that light is not scattered from the particles. Experiments are being conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside pipe diameter of 51 mm (2 inches). Detailed flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress were measured with a two-component two-color LDV. The present research indicates that non-Newtonian slurries are possible with concentrations of a few percent by weight of small particles whose sizes are one micron or less. A non-Newtonian slurry from small particles could maintain large particles (100 micron size) at high concentrations in suspension almost indefinitely. Such a slurry would prevent particle fallout and its associated problems. Velocity profiles were acquired by the LDV in the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes. The velocity profile for laminar flow was in agreement with theory. The range of the transition region was 21 percent of the transition velocity in comparison to 50 percent for a Newtonian fluid.

  14. Scaling thermal effects in radial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Guenther, R. B.; Roley, K. L.; McDougal, W. G.

    To adequately evaluate the environmental impact of siting nuclear waste repositories in basalt aquicludes, it is essential to know the effects on parameter identification algorithms of thermal gradients that exist in these basaltic aquicludes. Temperatures of approximately 60°C and pressures of approximately 150 atm can be expected at potential repository sites located at depths of approximately 1000 m. The phenomenon of over-recovery has been observed in some pumping tests conducted at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation located in the Pasco Basin adjacent to the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. This over-recovery phenomenon may possibly be due to variations in the fluid density caused by thermal gradients. To assess the potential effects of these thermal gradients on indirect parameter identification algorithms, a systematic scaling of the governing field equations is required in order to obtain dimensionless equations based on the principle of similarity. The constitutive relationships for the specific weight of the fluid and for the porosity of the aquiclude are shown to be exponentially dependent on the pressure gradient. The dynamic pressure is converted to the piezometric head and the flow equation for the piezometric head is then scaled in radial coordinates. Order-of-magnitude estimates are made for all variables in unsteady flow for a typical well test in a basaltic aquiclude. Retaining all nonlinear terms, the parametric dependency of the flow equation on the classical dimensionless thermal and hydraulic parameters is demonstrated. These classical parameters include the Batchelor, Fourier, Froude, Grashof, and Reynolds Numbers associated with thermal flows. The flow equation is linearized from order-of-magnitude estimates based on these classical parameters for application in parameter identification algorithms.

  15. Intraoperative in situ radial artery conduit flow assessment.

    PubMed

    Canver, Charles C; Yousafzai, Sajjad M

    2008-01-01

    A technique is described for simple flow assessment of the in situ radial artery conduit during coronary bypass via a small incision. This technique allows morphologic and physiologic direct intraoperative assessment of radial artery quality and expands the use of radial artery during coronary artery surgery.

  16. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. T.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Grimley, T. A.; Morrow, T. B.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and full turbulent pipe flow regimes is the primary objective of this research. Measurements include rheological characterization of the fluid and local fluid velocity measurements with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Optical access to the flow is gained through a test section and model slurry which are both transparent. The model slurry is formulated from silica gel particles and hydrocarbon liquid mixture whose indices of refraction are matched so that light is not scattered from the particles. Experiments are being conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry flow facility with an inside pipe diameter of 51 mm (2 inches). Detailed flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress will be taken with a two-component two-color LDV. The present research indicates that non-Newtonian slurries are possible with concentrations of a few percent by weight of small particles whose sizes are one micron or less. A non-Newtonian slurry from small particles could maintain large particles (100 micron size) at high concentrations in suspension almost indefinitely. Such a slurry would prevent particle fallout and its associated problems.

  17. Slurry electrodes for iron plating in an all-iron flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Tyler J.; Hoyt, Nathaniel C.; Savinell, Robert F.; Wainright, Jesse S.

    2015-10-01

    Slurry electrodes are investigated in order to decouple the energy storage capacity from the power delivery capability in an all-iron flow battery. For the slurry electrode to perform effectively, the battery negative reaction must occur on the slurry particles at reasonably high current densities. Mathematical modeling is used to investigate the current distribution in a slurry electrode as a function of the slurry specific area and electrical conductivity in order to achieve >95% plating in the slurry electrode (not on the flat plate) at > 200 mA cm-2. From the mathematical modeling, MWCNTs are selected to demonstrate slurry electrode performance. The experimental performance of all-iron batteries charged using the MWCNT slurry electrodes is found to improve while increasing the battery state-of-charge. Two possible mechanisms contributing to this effect are an increase in electronic conductivity of the slurry and an increase in plating kinetics. After cycling the battery, <5% of the total battery charge was observed to have plated onto the current collector.

  18. Characterization of Flow Behavior of Semi-Solid Slurries with Low Solid Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chucheep, Thiensak; Wannasin, Jessada; Canyook, Rungsinee; Rattanochaikul, Tanate; Janudom, Somjai; Wisutmethangoon, Sirikul; Flemings, Merton C.

    2013-10-01

    Semi-solid slurry casting is a metal-forming process that involves transforming liquid metal into slurry having a low solid fraction and then forming the slurry into solid parts. To successfully apply this slurry-forming process, it is necessary to fully understand the flow behavior of semi-solid slurries. This present work applied the rapid quenching method and the modified gravity fluidity casting to investigate the flow behavior, which involves characterizations of the initial solid fraction, fluidity, and microstructure of semi-solid slurries. Three commercial aluminum alloys were used in this study: 383 (Al-Si11Cu), 356 (Al-Si7MgFe), and 7075 (Al-Zn6MgCu) alloys. The results show that the initial solid fractions can be controlled by varying the rheocasting time. The rapid quenching mold can be used to determine the initial solid fractions. In this method, it is important to apply the correcting procedure to account for growth during quenching and to include all the solid phases. Results from the fluidity study of semi-solid slurries show that the fluidity decreases as the initial solid fraction increases. The decrease is relatively rapid near the low end of the initial solid fraction curves, but is quite slow near the high end of the curves. All the three alloys follow this trend. The results also demonstrate that the slurries that contain high solid fractions of up to 30 pct can still flow well. The microstructure characterization results show that the solid particles in the slurries flow uniformly in the channel. A uniform and fine microstructure with limited phase segregation is observed in the slurry cast samples.

  19. Experiments on densely-loaded non-Newtonian slurries in laminar and turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. T.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Grimley, T. A.; Morrow, T. B.

    1988-05-01

    An experimental description of the flow structure of non-Newtonian slurries in the laminar, transitional, and full turbulent pipe flow regimes is the primary objective of this research. Measurements include rheological characterization of the fluid and local fluid velocity measurements with a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Optical access to the flow is gained through a test section and model slurry which are both transparent. The model slurry is formulated from silica gel particles and hydrocarbon liquid mixture whose indices of refraction are matched so that light is not scattered from the particles. Experiments are being conducted in a large-scale pipe slurry. Flow measurements including turbulence quantities such as Reynolds stress were measured with a two-component two-color LDV. The present research indicates that non-Newtonian slurries are possible with concentrations of a few percent by weight of small particles whose sizes are two microns or less. A non-Newtonian slurry from small particles could maintain large particles (one millimeter size) at high concentrations in suspension almost indefinitely. Such a slurry would prevent particle fallout and its associated problems.

  20. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, David; Fairweather, Michael; Biggs, Simon; Rhodes, Dominic

    2007-07-01

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  1. X-Ray Visualization Measurement of Slurry Flow in Solid Propellant Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Toru; Habu, Hiroto; Seike, Yoshio; Ooya, Seiji; Miyachi, Hideo; Ishikawa, Masaaki

    2007-06-01

    Simulated solid propellant slurry containing lead sphere tracers is experimentally cast into a double circular cylinder container. During the casting, the temperature and the pressure environment has been mimicked to an actual composite solid propellant casting of solid rocket motors. X-rays are projected on to the slurry flow from two directions and penetration images are recorded by a flat panel detector and an X-ray image intensifier. By suppressing the mutual interference of the X-rays, the two-directional X-ray photography has been successfully conducted. Using the time series data of the X-ray images from the two directions, the identification of each tracer particle in space and time has been done and their three-dimensional paths have been computed. From these procedures, the flow field or the velocity field inside the slurry flow, which is invisible usually, has been estimated.

  2. Effects of flow cell design on charge percolation and storage in the carbon slurry electrodes of electrochemical flow capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, C. R.; Beidaghi, M.; Hatzell, K. B.; Campos, J. W.; Gogotsi, Y.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2014-02-01

    The electrochemical flow capacitor (EFC) is an electrical energy storage concept recently introduced for grid-scale energy storage applications. The EFC utilizes flowable carbon-based electrodes as the active material in a flow battery type architecture for capacitive storage and recovery of energy. Charged slurry can be stored in external reservoirs until it is needed, enabling scalable energy storage to satisfy a variety of large-scale applications. Here, the capacitance and conductivity of EFC slurry electrodes were measured as a function of flow rate (from 0 to 10 ml min-1) and flow cell channel depth (electrode 'thickness', ranging from 0.5 to 3 mm). The effect of salt concentration in the electrolyte was also explored. The interfacial resistance associated with the current collector|slurry interface was found to constitute a large portion of the total cell resistance. Bulk slurry conductivity was found to vary significantly with changes in electrolyte concentration, flow rate and channel depth. Very respectable capacitance values of up to ∼30 F ml-1 (150 F g-1) were obtained during intermittent flow operation. However, significant underutilization of the slurry due to increased ohmic losses at larger channel depths was observed, as evidenced by a rapid decay in capacitance with increasing channel depth.

  3. Simulation of Reynolds number influence on heat exchange in turbulent flow of medium slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosik, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with the numerical simulation of mass and heat exchange in turbulent flow of solid-liquid mixture in the range of averaged solid particle diameter from 0.10mm to 0.80mm, named further as the medium slurry. Physical model assumes that dispersed phase is fully suspended and a turbulent flow is hydro-dynamically, and thermally developed in a straight horizontal pipeline. Taking into account the aforementioned assumptions the slurry is treated as a single-phase flow with increased density, while viscosity is equals to a carrier liquid viscosity. The mathematical model constitutes time averaged momentum equation in which the turbulent stress tensor was designated using a two-equation turbulence model, which makes use of the Boussinesq eddy-viscosity hypothesis. Turbulence damping function in the turbulence model was especially designed for the medium slurry. In addition, an energy equation has been used in which a convective term was determined from the energy balance acting on a unit pipe length, assuming linear changes of temperature in main flow direction. Finally, the mathematical model of non-isothermal medium slurry flow comprises four partial differential equations, namely momentum and energy equations, equations of kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate. Four partial differential equations were solved by a finite difference scheme using own computer code. The objective of the paper is to examine the influence of Reynolds number on temperature profiles and Nusselt number in turbulent flow of medium slurry in the range of solids concentration from 0% to 30% by volume. The effect of influential factors on heat transfer between the pipe and slurry is analysed. The paper demonstrates substantial impact of Reynolds number and solids volume fraction on the Nusselt number. The results of numerical simulation are reviewed.

  4. Gas/slurry flow in coal-liquefaction processes (fluid dynamics in 3 phase flow columns)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, D. H. S.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Givens, E. N.

    1980-12-01

    The 6000 T/D SRC-I demonstration plant will employ vertical tublar reactors feeding slurry and gas concurrently upward. This reactor is essentially an empty vessel with only a distributor plate located near the inlet. Because the commercial plant represents a considerable scale-up over either Wilsonville or Ft. Lewis, this program is addressing the need for additional data on the behavior of three phase systems in large vessels. Parameters are being studied at conditions that relate directly to the projected demonstration plant operating conditions. Air/water/sand three phase flow system in both a 5-inch diameter and a 12-inch diameter column is used in this cold-flow simulation study program.

  5. Accretion, radial flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The metal-poor gas continuously accreting on to the discs of spiral galaxies is unlikely to arrive from the intergalactic medium (IGM) with exactly the same rotation velocity as the galaxy itself and even a small angular momentum mismatch inevitably drives radial gas flows within the disc, with significant consequences to galaxy evolution. Here, we provide some general analytic tools to compute accretion profiles, radial gas flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies as a function of the angular momentum of the accreting material. We generalize existing solutions for the decomposition of the gas flows, required to reproduce the structural properties of galaxy discs, into direct accretion from the IGM and a radial mass flux within the disc. We then solve the equation of metallicity evolution in the presence of radial gas flows with a novel method, based on characteristic lines, which greatly reduces the numerical demand on the computation and sheds light on the crucial role of boundary conditions on the abundance profiles predicted by theoretical models. We also discuss how structural and chemical constraints can be combined to disentangle the contributions of inside-out growth and radial flows in the development of abundance gradients in spiral galaxies. Illustrative examples are provided throughout with parameters plausible for the Milky Way. We find that the material accreting on the Milky Way should rotate at 70-80 per cent of the rotational velocity of the disc, in agreement with previous estimates.

  6. Comparison of Deterministic and Probabilistic Radial Distribution Systems Load Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Atma Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-08-01

    Distribution system network today is facing the challenge of meeting increased load demands from the industrial, commercial and residential sectors. The pattern of load is highly dependent on consumer behavior and temporal factors such as season of the year, day of the week or time of the day. For deterministic radial distribution load flow studies load is taken as constant. But, load varies continually with a high degree of uncertainty. So, there is a need to model probable realistic load. Monte-Carlo Simulation is used to model the probable realistic load by generating random values of active and reactive power load from the mean and standard deviation of the load and for solving a Deterministic Radial Load Flow with these values. The probabilistic solution is reconstructed from deterministic data obtained for each simulation. The main contribution of the work is: Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on balanced radial distribution load flow. Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on unbalanced radial distribution load flow. Compare the voltage profile and losses with probable realistic ZIP load modeling for balanced and unbalanced radial distribution load flow.

  7. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  9. Longitudinal Dispersivity in a Radial Diverging Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, J. C.; Wilson, M.; Bertsch, P. M.; Aburime, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive data sets exist for evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion under non-uniform flow conditions. In addition, anionic tracers are often used to estimate physical transport parameters based on an erroneous assumption of conservative (i.e., non-reactive) behavior. Therefore, a series of field experiments using tritiated water and several other commonly used hydrologic tracers (Br, Cl, FBAs) were conducted in the water-table aquifer on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) to evaluate solute transport processes in a diverging radial flow field. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 hours at a fixed rate of 56.7 L/min (15 gpm) to establish a forced radial gradient prior to the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using non-labeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 meters from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were monitored continuously throughout the course of the tracer experiment. At various time intervals, discrete groundwater samples were collected from all 18 sampling ports for tritium analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity for tritium breakthrough at each sampling location was estimated using analytical approximations of the convection dispersion equation (CDE) for radial flow assuming an instantaneous Dirac pulse and a pulse of known duration. The results were also compared to dispersivity values derived from fitting the tracer data to analytical solutions derived from assuming uniform flow conditions. Tremendous variation in dispersivity values and tracer arrival

  10. Non-radial flow near the cometary surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, M. L.; Mendis, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that, as a consequence of the non-uniform temperature distribution of the cometary nucleus, large lateral pressure gradients are set up, which in turn drive strong lateral flows. However, at small heliocentric distances the onset of turbulence within a thin boundary layer destroys these steady lateral flows and the eventual outflow of gas from within the outer boundary of this layer is expected to be more or less radial. On the other hand, at large heliocentric distances, turbulence is unlikely to set in, and the lateral flows that are set up, may persist. Consequently, it is expected that the gas flow out of the cometary nucleus at these large distances to be highly non-radial.

  11. Development of radial optic flow pattern sensitivity at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh Raj; Falkenberg, Helle K

    2015-05-01

    The development of sensitivity to radial optic flow discrimination was investigated by measuring motion coherence thresholds (MCTs) in school-aged children at two speeds. A total of 119 child observers aged 6-16years and 24 young adult observers (23.66+/-2.74years) participated. In a 2AFC task observers identified the direction of motion of a 5° radial (expanding vs. contracting) optic flow pattern containing 100 dots with 75% Michelson contrast moving at 1.6°/s and 5.5°/s and. The direction of each dot was drawn from a Gaussian distribution whose standard deviation was either low (similar directions) or high (different directions). Adult observers also identified the direction of motion for translational (rightward vs. leftward) and rotational (clockwise vs. anticlockwise) patterns. Motion coherence thresholds to radial optic flow improved gradually with age (linear regression, p<0.05), with different rates of development at the two speeds. Even at 16years MCTs were higher than that for adults (independent t-tests, p<0.05). Both children and adults had higher sensitivity at 5.5°/s compared to 1.6°/s (paired t-tests, p<0.05). Sensitivity to radial optic flow is still immature at 16years of age, indicating late maturation of higher cortical areas. Differences in sensitivity and rate of development of radial optic flow at the different speeds, suggest that different motion processing mechanisms are involved in processing slow and fast speeds.

  12. Turbulent slurry flow measurement using ultrasonic Doppler method in rectangular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareš, V.; Krupička, J.; Picek, T.; Brabec, J.; Matoušek, V.

    2014-03-01

    Distribution of velocity and Reynolds stress was measured using ultrasonic velocimetry in flows of water and Newtonian water-ballotini slurries in a pressurized Plexiglas pipe. Profiles of the measured parameters were sensed in the vertical plane at the centreline of a rectangular cross section of the pipe. Reference measurements in clear water produced expected symmetrical velocity profiles the shape of which was affected by secondary currents developed in the rectangular pipe. Slurry-flow experiments provided information on an effect of the concentration of solid grains on the internal structure of the flow. Strong attenuation of velocity fluctuations caused by a presence of grains was identified. The attenuation increased with the increasing local concentration of the grains.

  13. Method and centrifugal apparatus for slurry testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1984-04-17

    In accordance with the centrifugal erosion testing method of the invention, a material specimen is rotated with a flat surface facing the direction of rotation and a narrow stream of an abrasive particle slurry is concurrently flowed at a preselected rate in a radial direction across the flat surface, the rotating step being at sufficiently high angular velocity to urge the abrasive particles by Coriolis acceleration into a compacted mass against the flat surface and erode material therefrom by scouring type action as the particles flow radially outward. The rotating and flowing steps are continued for a sufficient preselected duration to erode material to a measurable depth, and the depth to which the flat surface is worn by the abrasive particles is measured as an indication of the erosion resistance of the specimen material. The centrifugal slurry erosion testing apparatus includes a rotatable cylindrical vessel into the interior of which the abrasive slurry is fed and a specimen holder extending radially from the vessel having a cavity for receiving the specimen and a radial slurry flow passage communicating with the interior of the vessel. One of the radial passage longitudinal walls is defined by the flat surface of the specimen. Preferably the specimen holder comprises mating semicylindrical halves one of which has a specimen-receiving cavity in its abutting surface and the other has a narrow rectangular-in-cross section groove in its abutting surface which communicates with the interior of the vessel and together with the flat surface of the specimen defines the radial slurry flow passage. The mating semicylindrical halves are enclosed by a sleeve having an annular rim disposed interiorly of the vessel to prevent radially outward movement of the specimen holder.

  14. Gas/slurry flow in coal liquefaction processes (fluid dynamics in 3-phase flow columns)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, D. H. S.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Givens, E. N.

    1981-02-01

    The need for additional data on behavior of three phase systems in large vessels was addressed. Parameters are investigated at conditions that relate directly to the projected demonstration plant operating conditions. Air/water/sand three phase flow system in both a 5 inch diameter and a 12 inch diameter column is used in this cold flow simulation program. The type of distributor used does not seem to affect the solids distribution profiles. The amount of solids retained in the column increases linearly with decreasing slurry velocity while changes in linear gas velocity does not affect the solids distribution profiles for the conditions studied. It is indicated that withdrawing solids from the bottom of the column results in a decreased amount of solids in the column and the solids concentration profile changes accordingly. It is shown that large particles were preferentially removed by virtue of their faster settling rate. The effects of settled particles and particle/particle interaction on solids accumulation were investigated. It it indicated that the presence of large particles does not influence the accumulation or distribution of fine particles. The column enclosure was completed and tested to identify the organic liquid/liquid which is to be used in the 12 inch diameter column.

  15. FUEL SUBASSEMBLY CONSTRUCTION FOR RADIAL FLOW IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1962-12-25

    An assembly of fuel elements for a boiling water reactor arranged for radial flow of the coolant is described. The ingress for the coolant is through a central header tube, perforated with parallel circumferertial rows of openings each having a lip to direct the coolant flow downward. Around the central tube there are a number of equally spaced concentric trays, closely fitiing the central header tube. Cylindrical fuel elements are placed in a regular pattern around the central tube, piercing the trays. A larger tube encloses the arrangement, with space provided for upward flow of coolart beyond the edge of the trays. (AEC)

  16. Taylor-Couette flow with radial fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Dutcher, Cari S.

    2017-08-01

    Taylor-Couette cells have been shown to improve a number of industrial processes due to the wide variety of hydrodynamic flow states accessible. Traditional designs, however, limit the ability to introduce new fluids into the annulus during device operation due to geometric confinement and complexity. In this paper, a co- and counter-rotating Taylor-Couette cell with radial fluid injection has been constructed. The incorporation of 16 ports in the inner cylinder enables radial fluid injection during rotation of both cylinders. The design is also capable of continuous axial flow, enabling large injection volumes. The new inner cylinder design does not modify the critical Re for flow instabilities and can precisely inject a desired mass at a desired flow rate. A range of injection rates and masses were explored to quantify the effect of radial injection on the stability of the turbulent Taylor vortex structure. Only the highest injection rate and total mass studied (5.9 g/s, 100 g) modified the turbulent Taylor vortex structure after injection for a sustained period. The post-injection vortices remained larger than the pre-injection vortices, whereas at lower injection rates or masses, the vortex structure quickly returned to the pre-injection structure. This new system allows for in situ study of hydrodynamic effects on fluid-fluid (gas and liquid) mixing and multiphase complexation, growth, and structure. We demonstrated this new design's potential for studying the flocculation of bentonite using cationic polyacrylamide for enhancing water treatment operations.

  17. Macrodispersion by diverging radial flows in randomly heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Severino, Gerardo; Santini, Alessandro; Sommella, Angelo

    2011-04-01

    Radial flow takes place in a heterogeneous porous formation where the transmissivity T is modelled as a stationary random space function (RSF). The steady flow is driven by a given rate, and the mean velocity is radial. A pulse-like of a tracer is injected in the porous formation, and the thin plume spreads due to the fluctuations of the velocity which results a RSF as well. Transport is characterized by the mean front, and by the second spatial moment of the plume. We are primarily interested in tracer macrodispersion modelling. With the neglect of pore-scale dispersion, macrodispersion coefficients are computed at the second order of approximation, without neglecting the head-gradient fluctuations. Although transport is non-ergodic at the source, it is shown that ergodicity is achieved at small distances from the source. This is due to the fact that close to the source local velocities are quite large, and therefore solute particles become uncorrelated very soon. Under ergodic conditions, we compare macrodispersion mechanism in radial flows with that occurring in mean uniform flows. At short distances the spreading effect is highly enhanced by the large variability of the flow field, whereas at large distances transport exhibits a lesser dispersion due to the reduction of velocities. This supports the explanation provided by Indelman and Dagan (1999) to justify why the macrodispersivity is found smaller than that pertaining to mean uniform flows. The model is tested against a tracer transport experiment (Fernàndez-Garcia et al., 2004) by comparing the theoretical and experimental breakthrough curves. The accordance with real data, that is achieved without any fitting to concentration values, strengthens the capability of the proposed model to grasp the main features of such an experiment, the approximations as well as experimental uncertainties notwithstanding.

  18. Rapid Analysis of Copper Ore in Pre-Smelter Head Flow Slurry by Portable X-ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Brandon J; Lawrence, Neil J; Abourahma, Jehad N; Walker, Edward B

    2016-05-01

    Copper laden ore is often concentrated using flotation. Before the head flow slurry can be smelted, it is important to know the concentration of copper and contaminants. The concentration of copper and other elements fluctuate significantly in the head flow, often requiring modification of the concentrations in the slurry prior to smelting. A rapid, real-time analytical method is needed to support on-site optimization of the smelter feedstock. A portable, handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was utilized to determine the copper concentration in a head flow suspension at the slurry origin. The method requires only seconds and is reliable for copper concentrations of 2.0-25%, typically encountered in such slurries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Flow in nonrotating passages of radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.; Tabakoff, W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of irrotational incompressible flow field in the stator unit of a radial inflow turbine is presented. The solution in the combined scroll-nozzle assembly is complicated by the domain geometry and by its multiconnectivity. This model is necessary, however, in order to provide a better understanding of the mutual interaction effects of these two components on the flow field. The finite element method is used in the solution which is limited to the two dimensional case. A substructuring technique is adopted in the computational procedure and results in considerable savings in both computer time and core storage requirements. The results are presented for the flow velocity magnitude and direction in the scroll and through the various nozzles, for two nozzle blade geometries. In addition, the mass flow rates in the different nozzles are computed and their deviations from the mean value determined.

  20. Dynamics of particulate flow through radial-flow compressor and annular combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Elfeki, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the particulate flows through a radial-flow compressor with two different-size splitters and an annular combustion chamber. Three elements of the radial-flow compressor are investigated, namely: the inlet part, the impeller with the two splitter, and the vaneless diffuser. For the annular combustion chamber, only the chamber is of concern. The three-dimensional flow-field analysis for the radial-flow compressor is presented with the corresponding solid-particle trajectories through the compressor. The well-known theory describing the particles' motion in a gas flow media is applied with accurate representation of the particle-trajectory paths. This accuracy is achieved by solving the three-dimensional flow field through the compressor. One new design concept is suggested for the radial-flow compressor with splitters. This concept is that the tangential spacing of the splitters with the full blades is selected on non-equally spaced basis with the spacing being equal at the impeller exit such that the flow rate is equally splitted among different channels in the cascade. In addition, a study of the particulate flows through the annular combustor is investigated. The nature of the flow in the combustor is three-dimensional turbulent and with reacting recirculating-flow characteristics.

  1. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; ...

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  2. Improving Energy Efficiency Via Optimized Charge Motion and Slurry Flow in Plant Scale Sag Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Jose Angel Delgadillo

    2006-07-21

    A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and Outokumpu Technology. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling and operators had to learn more. Now the power consumption is 0.3-1.3 kWh/ton lower than before. The actual SAG mill power draw is 230-370 kW lower. Mill runs 1 rpm lesser in speed on the average. The recirculation to the cone crusher is reduced by 1-10%, which means more efficient grinding of critical size material is taking place in the mill. All of the savings have resulted in reduction of operating cost be about $0.023-$0.048/ ton. After completing the shell lifter design, the pulp lifter design was taken up. Through a series of mill surveys and

  3. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  4. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  5. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  6. Using the refractive index matched technique to study the flow properties of slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D J; Ekmann, J M; Kadambi, J R; Chen, R C

    1991-01-01

    In this study, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) is used to measure liquid and solid axial velocity profiles for slurries with solids loadings as great as 25 volume percent. Axial velocity profiles were measured during flow through straight horizontal pipe and through concentric contractions. These results are presented and compared. These same solid-liquid mixtures have been rheologically characterized. Yield stresses and shear thinning behavior have been observed in mixtures with solids loadings of 15 volume percent or greater. The theoretical analyses of Hanks and Dadia and Hanks and Ricks were applied to the flow data though the constant-diameter pipe where appropriate. The effect of the rheological properties on the flow properties through horizontal, constant-diameter pipe and concentric contraction geometry are discussed.

  7. Skin effect in generalized radial flow model in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Chi; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2011-04-01

    A generalized radial flow model, treating the flow dimension as an arbitrary number and taking into account the well skin effect, is presented to describe the transient head distribution in a fractured medium under the Robin condition during constant-head tests. The Laplace-domain solution for the head distribution is first developed via the Laplace transforms; and the corresponding time-domain solution in terms of the hydraulic head is then obtained using the Bromwich integral method. In addition, based on the head solution and Darcy's law, the solution for the wellbore flux is further developed to investigate the skin effect. It is found that the skin effect on the wellbore flux is significant at early times. Under this circumstance, it would not be appropriate to neglect the skin effect in the model in determining the hydraulic parameters from the analysis of field data. Our solutions will be useful for the predictions of the spatial and temporal head distribution and wellbore flux or in investigating the skin effect on the head distribution and wellbore flux for flow with various dimensions in fractured media.

  8. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  9. An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

  10. A visual study of radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Data and high speed movies were acquired on pressurized subcooled liquid nitrogen flowing radially inward through a 0.0076 cm gap. The stagnation pressure ranged from 0.7 to 4 MN/sq m. Steady radial inward choked flow appears equivalent to steady choked flow through axisymmetric nozzles. Transient choked flows through the radial gap are not uniform and the discharge pattern appears as nonuniform impinging jets. The critical mass flow rate data for the transient case appear different from those for the steady case. On the mass flow rate vs pressure map, the slope and separation of the isotherms appear to be less for transient than for steady radial choked flow.

  11. Radial Gas Flows in Colliding Galaxies: Connecting Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Mihos, J. Christopher

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the detailed response of gas to the formation of transient and long-lived dynamical structures induced in the early stages of a disk-disk collision and identify observational signatures of radial gas inflow through a detailed examination of the collision simulation of an equal-mass bulge-dominated galaxy. Our analysis and discussion mainly focuses on the evolution of the diffuse and dense gas in the early stages of the collision, when the two disks are interacting but have not yet merged. Stars respond to the tidal interaction by forming both transient arms and long-lived m=2 bars, but the gas response is more transient, flowing directly toward the central regions within about 108 yr after the initial collision. The rate of inflow declines when more than half of the total gas supply reaches the inner few kiloparsecs, where the gas forms a dense nuclear ring inside the stellar bar. The average gas inflow rate to the central 1.8 kpc is ~7 Msolar yr-1 with a peak rate of 17 Msolar yr-1. Gas with high volume density is found in the inner parts of the postcollision disks at size scales close to the spatial resolution of the simulations, and this may be a direct result of shocks traced by the discontinuity in the gas velocity field. The evolution of gas in a bulgeless progenitor galaxy is also discussed, and a possible link to the ``chain galaxy'' population observed at high redshifts is inferred. The evolution of the structural parameters such as asymmetry and concentration of both stars and gas are studied in detail. Further, a new structure parameter (the compactness parameter K) that traces the evolution of the size scale of the gas relative to the stellar disk is introduced, and this may be a useful tracer to determine the merger chronology of colliding systems. Noncircular gas kinematics driven by the perturbation of the nonaxisymmetric structure can produce distinct emission features in the ``forbidden velocity quadrants'' of the position

  12. Infant-specific gaze patterns in response to radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The focus of a radial optic flow is a valid visual cue used to perceive and control the heading direction of animals. Gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow were measured in human infants (N = 100, 4–18 months) and in adults (N = 20) using an eye-tracking technique. Overall, although the adults showed an advantage in detecting the focus of an expansion flow (representing forward locomotion) against that of a contraction flow (representing backward locomotion), infants younger than 1 year showed an advantage in detecting the focus of a contraction flow. Infants aged between 13 and 18 months showed no significant advantage in detecting the focus in either the expansion or in the contraction flow. The uniqueness of the gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow in infants shows that the visual information necessary to perceive heading direction potentially differs between younger and mature individuals. PMID:27708361

  13. The Radial Flow Speed of the Neutral Hydrogen in the Oval Distortion of NGC 4736

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason; Benton, Allen; Reimer, Rebecca; Lemaire, Robert; Godwin, Caleb

    2017-01-01

    Radial flows are difficult to measure in the presence of elliptical flows. This is because the model describing the observed velocity field when both kinds of flows are present is degenerate in the unknown parameters. In this poster we show that the degeneracy can be overcome if the pattern speed and position angle of the elliptical flows are known. The method is demonstrated for NGC 4736 using 3.6 micrometer and neutral hydrogen data. We find a mean inward radial flow speed of 5.6 +/- 1.7 km/s in the region of the oval distortion.

  14. Radial gas flow in the upper shaft and its influence on blast furnace performance

    SciTech Connect

    Beppler, E.; Kowalski, W.; Langner, K.; Wachsmuth, H.

    1996-12-31

    Knowledge of and control of gas flow in the upper shaft and over the blast furnace radius is an important factor for constant optimization of blast furnace performance in terms of fuel consumption and productivity. Radial gas flow in the blast furnace is generally controlled by the radial distribution of burden and coke. However, there are other influencing variables which determine radial gas flow, in particular central gas flow: (a) Increased sinter degradation displaces the cohesive zone downwards, constricting the gas flow between the dead man and the cohesive zone. This hinders central gas flow. (b) Lower coke strengths also lead to deterioration in gas flow between the dead man and the cohesive zone and hence to decline in central gas flow. (c) Decreasing coke layers in the blast furnace hinder central gas flow. (d) Increasing coal injection rates produce higher coke degradation in the blast furnace and hence also hinder central gas flow. (e) High coal rates and lower CSR values lead to shortening of combustion zone, which hinders the gas flow to the blast furnace center. (f) Finally, increasing hot metal-slag levels divert the gas to the outside. As the significance of the question of the central gas flow is growing,and because radial gas flow at Thyssen Stahl AG can only be measured sporadically with an in-burden probe, an inclined probe (inclination 35{degree}) just above the stock line was developed for simultaneous temperature measurement and gas sampling at 9 points along the radius.

  15. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  16. Computer program for the analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used to solve the governing of the potential flow in the cross sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll. A list of the main program, the subroutines, and typical output example are included.

  17. On the Problem of Theoretical Pressure of a Radial-Flow Pump Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Protasov, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the velocity of motion of a medium in the wheel of a radial-flow pump unit under the action of a centrifugal force and overcoming the medium's inertial force with its blades. Relations for the pressure produced by the radial-flow pump unit as a function of the angle of inclination of its blades have been derived. The well-known Euler equation describing the dynamic pressure of the radial-flow pump unit has been supplemented to determine its static pressure. An analysis of the obtained results has shown that the pressure of the radial-flow pump unit is maximum at an angle of inclination of its blades of 110o and negative at 140o or larger angles.

  18. Radial Motions in Disk Stars: Ellipticity or Secular Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; González-Fernández, C.

    2016-06-01

    Average stellar orbits of the Galactic disk may have some small intrinsic ellipticity which breaks the exact axisymmetry and there may also be some migration of stars inwards or outwards. Both phenomena can be detected through kinematic analyses. We use the red clump stars selected spectroscopically from the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment, with known distances and radial velocities, to measure the radial component of the Galactocentric velocities within 5 kpc < R < 16 kpc, | b| \\lt 5^\\circ , and within 20° from the Sun-Galactic center line. The average Galactocentric radial velocity is VR = (1.48 ± 0.35)[R(kpc) - (8.8 ± 2.7)] km s-1 outwards in the explored range, with a higher contribution from stars below the Galactic plane. Two possible explanations can be given for this result: (i) the mean orbit of the disk stars is intrinsically elliptical with a Galactocentric radial gradient of eccentricity around 0.01 kpc-1 or (ii) there is a net secular expansion of the disk, in which stars within R ≈ 9-11 kpc are migrating to the region R ≳ 11 kpc at the rate of ˜2 M⊙ yr-1, and stars with R ≲ 9 kpc are falling toward the center of the Galaxy. This migration ratio would be unattainable for a long time and should decelerate, otherwise the Galaxy would fade away in around 1 Gyr. At present, both hypotheses are speculative and one would need data on the Galactocentric radial velocities for other azimuths different to the center or anticenter in order to confirm one of the scenarios.

  19. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  20. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY VIA OPTIMIZED CHARGE MOTION AND SLURRY FLOW IN PLANT SCALE SAG MILLS

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Sravan K. Prathy; Trilokyanath Patra

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. mining industry operates approximately 80 semi-autogenesis grinding mills (SAG) throughout the United States. Depending on the mill size the SAG mills draws between 2 MW and 17 MW. The product from the SAG mill is further reduced in size using pebble crushers and ball mills. Hence, typical gold or copper ore requires between 2.0 and 7.5 kWh per ton of energy to reduce the particle size. Considering a typical mining operation processes 10,000 to 100,000 tons per day the energy expenditure in grinding is 50 percent of the cost of production of the metal. A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and others. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling

  1. A flow study in radial inflow turbine scroll-nozzle assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Baskharone, E.; Tabakoff, W.

    1978-01-01

    The present analysis describes the flow behavior in the combined scroll-nozzle assembly of a radial inflow turbine. This model was chosen to provide a better understanding of the mutual interaction effects of these two components on the flow. The finite element method is used in the solution of the flow field in this multiply connected domain. The mass flow rates in the different nozzle channels is not presumed constant, but is determined from the solution.

  2. A generalized Forchheimer radial flow model for constant-rate tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Chen, Yi-Feng; Zhan, Hongbin; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2017-09-01

    Models used for data interpretation of constant-rate tests (CRTs) are commonly derived with the assumption of Darcian flow in an idealized integer flow dimension, where the non-Darcian nature of fluid flow and the complexity of flow geometry are disregarded. In this study, a Forchheimer's law-based analytical model is proposed with the assumption of buildup (or drawdown) decomposition for characterizing the non-Darcian flow in a generalized radial formation where the flow dimension n may become non-integer. The proposed model immediately reduces to Barker's (1988) model for Darcian flow in the generalized radial formation and to Mathias et al.'s (2008) model for non-Darcian flow in a two-dimensional confined aquifer. A comparison with numerical simulations shows that the proposed model behaves well at late times for flow dimension n > 1.5. The proposed model is finally applied for data interpretation of the constant-rate pumping tests performed at Ploemeur (Le Borgne et al., 2004), showing that the intrinsic hydraulic conductivity of formations will be underestimated and the specific storage will be overestimated if the non-Darcian effect is ignored. The proposed model is an extension of the generalized radial flow (GRF) model based on Forchheimer's law, which would be of significance for data interpretation of CRTs in aquifers of complex flow geometry in which non-Darcian flow occurs.

  3. Experimental study of fluid dynamics in the pebble bed in a radial coolant flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorchkova, Y. V.; Varava, A. N.; Dedov, A. V.; Komov, A. T.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental studies of pebble bed hydrodynamics are presented. For the first time experimental data on the pressure loss in a radial flow of fluid through the pebble bed was obtained. Experiments were carried out in the liquid flow rate ranging from 0.09 to 0.4 kg / s, fluid temperature is 20°C.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  5. Mathematical modeling of three-phase slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Soong, Y.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The behavior of gas-solid-liquid flow in a slurry bubble column reactor was simulated using a well-posed hydrodynamic model. The three phases under study are nitrogen, 5-{mu}m iron oxide, and SASOL wax. The phases volume fractions at various axial and radial positions in the column were computed. Preliminary results of axial solid volume fractions are consistent with experimental observations and demonstrate the potential of this method for design of such reactors. The overall objective of this study is to develop experimentally verified hydrodynamic and Fisher-Tropsch reaction models for slurry bubble column reactors.

  6. Analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    Equations of motion were derived, and a computational procedure is presented, for determining the nonviscous flow characteristics in the cross-sectional planes of a curved channel due to continuous mass discharge or mass addition. An analysis was applied to the radial inflow turbine scroll to study the effects of scroll geometry and the through flow velocity profile on the flow behavior. The computed flow velocity component in the scroll cross-sectional plane, together with the through flow velocity profile which can be determined in a separate analysis, provide a complete description of the three dimensional flow in the scroll.

  7. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  8. Transient radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Zhu, Ming.

    1991-08-01

    The analytic solutions of Boulton (1954) and Neuman (1972) for transient flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer are based on the assumption that the role of the unsaturated zone can be adequately accounted for by restricting attention to the release of water from the zone through which the water table moves. Both researchers mathematically treat this released water as a time-dependent source term. The differences between the models of Boulton and Neuman are that the former neglects vertical components of flow in the aquifer, but allows for an exponential process for the release of water as a function of time, whereas the latter assumes instantaneous release from storage, but accounts for vertical components of flow. Given this set of assumptions, we examine the applicability of these two methods using a general purpose numerical model through a process of verification extension and comparison. The issues addressed include: the role of well-bore storage in masking intermediate-time behavior, combined effects of exponential release as well as vertical flow, logic for vertical averaging of drawdowns, and the sensitivity of system response to the magnitude of specific yield. The issue of how good the assumptions of Boulton and Neuman are in the context of the general theory of unsaturated flow is addressed in part 2 of this two-part series of reports.

  9. Radial variation in sap flow in five laurel forest tree species in Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M. Soledad; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Cermák, Jan; Morales, Domingo

    2000-11-01

    Variations in radial patterns of xylem water content and sap flow rate were measured in five laurel forest tree species (Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco, Persea indica (L.) Spreng., Myrica faya Ait., Erica arborea L. and Ilex perado Ait. ssp. platyphylla (Webb & Berth.) Tutin) growing in an experimental plot at Agua García, Tenerife, Canary Islands. Measurements were performed around midday during warm and sunny days by the heat field deformation method. In all species, water content was almost constant (around 35% by volume) over the whole xylem cross-sectional area. There were no differences in wood color over the whole cross-sectional area of the stem in most species with the exception of E. arborea, whose wood became darker in the inner layers. Radial patterns of sap flow were highly variable and did not show clear relationships with tree diameter or species. Sap flow occurred over the whole xylem cross-sectional area in some species, whereas it was limited to the outer xylem layers in others. Sap flow rate was either similar along the xylem radius or exhibited a peak in the outer part of the xylem area. Low sap flow rates with little variation in radial pattern were typical for shaded suppressed trees, whereas dominant trees exhibited high sap flow rates with a peak in the radial pattern. Stem damage resulted in a significant decrease in sap flow rate in the outer xylem layers. The outer xylem is more important for whole tree water supply than the inner xylem because of its larger size. We conclude that measurement of radial flow pattern provides a reliable method of integrating sap flow from individual measuring points to the whole tree.

  10. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  12. Flow behavior in inlet guide vanes of radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokhey, J.; Tabakoff, W.; Hosny, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    Scroll flow is discussed. Streamline pattern and velocity distribution in the guide vanes are calculated. The blade surface temperature distribution is also determined. The effects of the blade shapes and the nozzle channel width on the velocity profiles at inlet to the guide vanes are investigated.

  13. Influence of blade thickness on transient flow characteristics of centrifugal slurry pump with semi-open impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yi; Yuan, Shouqi; Liu, Jianrui; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    As the critical component, the impellers of the slurry pumps usually have blades of a large thickness. The increasing excretion coefficient of the blades affects the flow in the impeller resulting in a relatively higher hydraulic loss, which is rarely reported. In order to investigate the influence of blade thickness on the transient flow characteristics of a centrifugal slurry pump with a semi-open impeller, transient numerical simulations were carried out on six impellers, of which the meridional blade thickness from the leading edge to trailing edge varied from 5-10 mm, 5-15 mm, 5-20 mm, 10-10 mm, 10-15 mm, and 10-20 mm, respectively. Then, two of the six impellers, namely cases 4 and 6, were manufactured and experimentally tested for hydraulic performance to verify the simulation results. Results of these tests agreed reasonably well with those of the numerical simulation. The results demonstrate that when blade thickness increases, pressure fluctuations at the outlet of the impeller become severe. Moreover, the standard deviation of the relative velocity in the middle portion of the suction sides of the blades decreases and that at the outlet of the impeller increases. Thus, the amplitude of the impeller head pulsation for each case increases. Meanwhile, the distribution of the time-averaged relative flow angle becomes less uniform and decreases at the outlet of the impeller. Hence, as the impeller blade thickness increases, the pump head drops rapidly and the maximum efficiency point is offset to a lower flow rate condition. As the thickness of blade trailing edge increases by 10 mm, the head of the pump drops by approximately 5 m, which is approximately 10 % of the original pump head. Futhermore, it is for the first time that the time-averaged relative flow angle is being considered for the analysis of transient flow in centrifugal pump. The presented work could be a useful guideline in engineering practice when designing a centrifugal slurry pump with thick

  14. 3-D model of a radial flow sub-watt methanol fuel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    A 3-D model is presented for a novel sub-watt packed bed reactor. The reactor uses an annular inlet flow combined with a radial flow packed bed reactor. The baseline reactor is compared to a reactor with multiple outlets and a reactor with 3 internal fins. Increasing the outlets from 1 to 4 did improve the flow distribution, but did not increase the performance in the simulation. However, inserting fins allowed a decrease in temperature with same inlet flow of approximately 35K. Or the inlet flow rate could be increased by a factor of 2.8x while maintaining >99% conversion.

  15. Slurry wall containment performance: monitoring and modeling of unsaturated and saturated flow.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Daniele; Masetti, Marco; Marangoni, Tomaso; Beretta, Giovanni Pietro

    2012-01-01

    A specific 2-year program to monitor and test both the vadose zone and the saturated zone, coupled with a numerical analysis, was performed to evaluate the overall performance of slurry wall systems for containment of contaminated areas. Despite local physical confinement (slurry walls keyed into an average 2-m-thick aquitard), for at least two decades, high concentrations of chlorinated solvents (up to 110 mg l(-1)) have been observed in aquifers that supply drinking water close to the city of Milan (Italy). Results of monitoring and in situ tests have been used to perform an unsaturated-saturated numerical model. These results yielded the necessary quantitative information to be used both for the determination of the hydraulic properties of the different media in the area and for the calibration and validation of the numerical model. Backfill material in the shallower part of the investigated aquifer dramatically affects the natural recharge of the encapsulated area. A transient simulation from wet to drought periods highlights a change in the ratio between leakages from lateral barriers that support a specific scenario of water loss through the containment system. The combination of monitoring and modelling allows a reliable estimate of the overall performance of the physical confinement to be made without using any invasive techniques on slurry wall.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COHERENT, RADIALLY-SHEARED ZONAL FLOWS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    MCKEE,GR; FONCK,RJ; JAKUBOWSKI,M; BURRELL,KH; HALLATSCHEK,K; MOYER,RA; NEVINS,W; PORTER,GD; RUDAKOV,DL; XU,X

    2002-11-01

    A271 EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COHERENT, RADIALLY-SHEARED ZONAL FLOWS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Application of time-delay-estimation techniques to two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations, obtained with beam emission spectroscopy in DIII-D plasmas, has provided temporally and spatially resolved measurements of the turbulence flow-field. Features that are characteristic of self-generated zonal flows are observed in the radial region near 0.85 {<=} r/a {<=} 1.0. These features include a coherent oscillation (approximately 15 kHz) in the poloidal flow of density fluctuations that has a long poloidal wavelength, possibly m = 0, narrow radial extent (k{sub r}{rho}{sub I} < 0.2), and whose frequency varies monotonically with the local temperature. The approximate effective shearing rate, dv{sub {theta}}/dr, of the flow is of the same order of magnitude as the measured nonlinear decorrelation rate of the turbulence, and the density fluctuation amplitude is modulated at the frequency of the observed flow oscillation. Some phase coherence is observed between the higher wavenumber density fluctuations and low frequency poloidal flow fluctuations, suggesting a Reynolds stress contribution. These characteristics are consistent with predicted features of zonal flows, specifically identified as geodesic acoustic modes, observed in 3-D Braginskii simulations of core/edge turbulence.

  17. Flow Visualization and Radial Velocity Measurements of Entrainment in an Axisymmetric Turbulent Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Anthony M.; Cataldo, Joseph C.

    1998-11-01

    A submerged, axisymmetric turbulent jet of water was studied using a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA). Mean radial and turbulent radial velocity profiles within the irrotational ambient region (external to the jet) and rotational region (within the jet) were measured up to 40 jet diameters. Flow visualization studies (photographs and video) were conducted using incandescent light sheets with LDA tracer particles. These visual observations reveal detailed turbulent flow structure. Trailing ends of turbulent eddies at the jet edge travel opposite to the mean axial flow. The intermittency surface undulates irregularly and resembles a violently perturbed boundary layer between two immiscible liquids. Irrotational ambient fluid follows parabolic streamlines into the jet, but only when perceived as a time average. Mean radial velocity profiles, measured with an LDA, followed typical "Double S" curves. The mean radial velocity in the irrotational region of the jet was found to be an inverse function of radial distance measured from the jet axis, for any given axial location. This evidence proves there is no entrainment velocity that is directly proportional to the local axial velocity: the key assumption to jet entrainment theory.

  18. Travel time statistics under radially converging flow in single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Kekez, Toni; Malenica, Luka

    2015-04-01

    A stochastic methodology based on Adaptive Fup Monte Carlo Method is used to investigate transport of a conservative solute by steady flow to a single pumping well in two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous single fractures. The spatially variable hydraulic transmissivity is modeled as a stationary random function for three different correlation structures (multi-Gaussian, connected and disconnected fields with correlated mean, high and low lnT values, respectively, according to the Zinn and Harvey, 2003) and heterogeneity levels (lnT variance is 1 and 8). Initially, solute particles are injected at outer circle located at 32 correlation lengths from well according to the in flux and resident injection mode. Therefore, breakthrough curve (BTC) statistics in single well due to different spatial structures, heterogeneity levels, injection modes and dispersion influence is considered. For small heterogeneity, all considered effects have small influences on BTC and related moments. As expected in single fractures, high lnT variance is more usual case which considerably changes flow patterns including channelling effect and fact that only few narrow channels carry out most pumping flow rate. Channelling implies significant differences between different injection modes. Resident mode uniformly injects particles implying that most particles pass through "slower" zones that especially increase late arrivals and contribute to the non-Fickian behaviour of transport. Contrary, "in flux" mode drastically reduces first arrivals and mean values, especially for connected correlation fields. The results from two injection modes lie on different sides of homogeneous mean travel time solution and give complementary information for complete representation of conservative transport. For advection transport, correlation structure and especially lnT variance seems to have major influence on BTC characteristics. On the other side, influence of longitudinal and lateral local scale

  19. Retrograde blood flow in the brachial and axillary arteries during routine radial arterial catheter flushing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S; Kubasiak, John

    2006-09-01

    Flushing of radial arterial catheters may be associated with retrograde embolization of air or thrombus into the cerebral circulation. For embolization into the central circulation to occur, sufficient pressure must be generated during the flushing process to reverse antegrade blood flow in the arterial blood vessels of the upper extremity. This ultrasound study was designed to examine whether routine radial catheter flushing practices produce retrograde blood flow patterns in the brachial and proximal axillary arteries. Duplex ultrasound examinations of the brachial and axillary arteries were conducted in 100 surgical patients to quantify direction and velocity of blood flow during catheter flushing. After obtaining Doppler spectral images of brachial and axillary arterial flow patterns, manual flushing was performed by injecting 10 ml flush solution using a syringe at a rate reflecting standard clinical practices. The flow-regulating device on the pressurized (300 mmHg) arterial flushing-sampling system was then opened for 10 s to deliver a rapid bolus of fluid (flush valve opening). The rate of manual flush solution injection through the radial arterial catheter was related to the probability of retrograde flow in the axillary artery (P < 0.001). Reversed arterial flow was noted in the majority of subjects (33 of 51) at a manual flush rate of less than 9 s and in no subjects (0 of 48) at a rate 9 s or greater. Retrograde flow was observed less frequently during flush valve opening (2 of 99 patients; P < 0.001 vs. manual flushing). Rapid manual flushing of radial arterial catheters at rates faster than 1 ml/s produces retrograde flow in the proximal axillary artery.

  20. Temperature gradients drive radial fluid flow in Petri dishes and multiwell plates.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Stephen M; Yin, John

    2016-06-01

    Liquid in a Petri dish spontaneously circulates in a radial pattern, even when the dish is at rest. These fluid flows have been observed and utilized for biological research, but their origins have not been well-studied. Here we used particle-tracking to measure velocities of radial fluid flows, which are shown to be linked to evaporation. Infrared thermal imaging was used to identify thermal gradients at the air-liquid interface and at the bottom of the dish. Two-color ratiometric fluorescence confocal imaging was used to measure thermal gradients in the vertical direction within the fluid. A finite-element model of the fluid, incorporating the measured temperature profiles, shows that buoyancy forces are sufficient to produce flows consistent with the measured particle velocity results. Such flows may arise in other dish or plate formats, and may impact biological research in positive or negative ways.

  1. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  2. Determination of radial electric field from Pfirsch–Schlüter flows in the HSX stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Talmadge, J. N.; Dobbins, T. J.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Anderson, D. T.

    2017-03-01

    Inboard/outboard asymmetry in the impurity ion parallel flow is observed in the HSX stellarator using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). This observation shows the presence of counter-streaming Pfirsch–Schlüter flow predicted by neoclassical theory. The asymmetry of the flow is used to calculate the magnitude and direction of the radial electric field (E r), as well as the mean flow, using computed magnetic geometry factors. This method enables calculation of E r near the core of the HSX plasma where the E r obtained from the radial force balance equation has large uncertainties due to the relatively large width of the diagnostic neutral beam with respect to the plasma minor radius.

  3. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  4. Solids removal from a coldwater recirculating system - comparison of swirl separator and radial-flow settlers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solids removal across two settling devices, i.e., a swirl separator and a radial-flow settler, and across a microscreen drum filter was evaluated in a fully recirculating system containing a single 150 m3 'Cornell-type' dual-drain tank during the production of food-size Arctic char and rainbow trout...

  5. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  6. Diurnal and seasonal variability in the radial distribution of sap flow: predicting total stem flow in Pinus taeda trees.

    PubMed

    Ford, Chelcy R; Goranson, Carol E; Mitchell, Robert J; Will, Rodney E; Teskey, Robert O

    2004-09-01

    We monitored the radial distribution of sap flux density (v; g H2O m(-2) s(-1)) in the sapwood of six plantation-grown Pinus taeda L. trees during wet and dry soil periods. Mean basal diameter of the 32-year-old trees was 33.3 cm. For all trees, the radial distribution of sap flow in the base of the stem (i.e., radial profile) was Gaussian in shape. Sap flow occurred maximally in the outer 4 cm of sapwood, comprising 50-60% of total stem flow (F), and decreased toward the center, with the innermost 4 cm of sapwood (11-15 cm) comprising less than 10% of F. The percent of flow occurring in the outer 4 cm of sapwood was stable with time (average CV < 10%); however, the percentage of flow occurring in the remaining sapwood was more variable over time (average CV > 40%). Diurnally, the radial profile changed predictably with time and with total stem flow. Seasonally, the radial profile became less steep as the soil water content (theta) declined from 0.38 to 0.21. Throughout the season, daytime sap flow also decreased as theta decreased; however, nighttime sap flow (an estimate of stored water use) remained relatively constant. As a result, the percentage of stored water use increased as theta declined. Time series analysis of 15-min values of F, theta, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (D) showed that F lagged behind D by 0-15 min and behind PAR by 15-30 min. Diurnally, the relationship between F and D was much stronger than the relationship between F and PAR, whereas no relationship was found between F and theta. An autoregressive moving average (ARIMA) model estimated that 97% of the variability in F could be predicted by D alone. Although total sap flow in all trees responded similarly to D, we show that the radial distribution of sap flow comprising total flow could change temporally, both on daily and seasonal scales.

  7. Response of a radial-bladed centrifugal pump to sinusoidal disturbances for noncavitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Blade, R. J.; Stevans, W.

    1971-01-01

    A radial-bladed centrifugal pump was run in water with sinusoidal fluctuations of pressure and flow rate imposed at the pump inlet. Since the flow was noncavitating, zero gain was assumed in computing pump impedance. The inertive reactance became greater than the resistance at relatively low frequencies. An electric circuit model was developed in order to explain the trends of inertance and resistance with frequency.

  8. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  9. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-05-01

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Experimental characterization of the Taylor-Couette flow submitted to a radial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, Arnaud; Guillerm, Rapha"El; Mutabazi, Innocent; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a non-intrusive velocity and temperature fields measurement technique using thermochromic liquid crystals which allows to fully characterize the flow produced in a narrow gap and large aspect ratio Couette-Taylor system submitted to a radial temperature gradient. The aspect ratio and radius ratio of the system are respectively equal to 112 and 0.8. The control parameters are the Grashof number Gr, related to the radial temperature gradient, and the Taylor number Ta, related to the rotation of the inner cylinder. Here, Gr is fixed and Ta is gradually increased. For small values of Ta, the base flow is composed of the circular Couette flow and a vertical flow induced by the radial temperature gradient. Above a critical value of Ta, the destabilization of the base flow gives rise to a spiral pattern. While for small Gr values it corresponds to traveling inclined vortices, for large Gr values it corresponds to a modulated wave-like pattern filling the whole length of the system and rotating at the mean angular velocity of the flow. When Ta is further increased, this wave-like pattern is progressively replaced by a counter-rotating vortices pattern. Numerical simulations of the corresponding Boussinesq-Oberbeck equations provide results in good agreement with experiments.

  11. Breakdown of Burton Prim Slichter approach and lateral solute segregation in radially converging flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priede, J.; Gerbeth, G.

    2005-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the effect of a radially converging melt flow, which is directed away from the solidification front, on the radial solute segregation in simple solidification models. We show that the classical Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) solution describing the effect of a diverging flow on the solute incorporation into the solidifying material breaks down for the flows converging along the solidification front. The breakdown is caused by a divergence of the integral defining the effective boundary layer thickness which is the basic concept of the BPS theory. Although such a divergence can formally be avoided by restricting the axial extension of the melt to a layer of finite height, radially uniform solute distributions are possible only for weak melt flows with an axial velocity away from the solidification front comparable to the growth rate. There is a critical melt velocity for each growth rate at which the solution passes through a singularity and becomes physically inconsistent for stronger melt flows. To resolve these inconsistencies we consider a solidification front presented by a disk of finite radius R0 subject to a strong converging melt flow and obtain an analytic solution showing that the radial solute concentration depends on the radius r as ˜ln(R0/r) and ˜ln(R0/r) close to the rim and at large distances from it. The logarithmic increase of concentration is limited in the vicinity of the symmetry axis by the diffusion becoming effective at a distance comparable to the characteristic thickness of the solute boundary layer. The converging flow causes a solute pile-up forming a logarithmic concentration peak at the symmetry axis which might be an undesirable feature for crystal growth processes.

  12. Lapping slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Upchurch, V.S.; Leitten, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina work pieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid. 1 fig.

  13. Lapping slurry

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Upchurch, Victor S.; Leitten, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina workpieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid.

  14. Laminar flow between a stationary and a rotating disk with radial throughflow

    SciTech Connect

    Nesreddine, H.; Nguyen, C.T.; Vo-Ngoc, D.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of axisymmetric laminar flow of a viscous incompressible fluid that occurs between a stationary and a rotating disk subjected to a uniform radial throughflow has been numerically investigated for a large range of flow parameters. Results show that the basic flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the throughflow Reynolds numbers. In general, the basic unicellular structure has been observed. With the increase of the throughflow Reynolds number, a multicellular flow structure may be found. The phenomenon of multiple solutions has been clearly observed for cases with sufficiently high rational Re and/or high throughflow Re. Among these solutions, stable as well as unstable solutions have been determined by applying Rayleigh`s stability criterion. The influence of the starting conditions on the stability of the flow has also been investigated for various ranges of flow parameters.

  15. Three-dimensional inviscid analysis of radial turbine flow and a limited comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y. K.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional inviscid DENTON code is used to analyze flow through a radial-inflow turbine rotor. Experimental data from the rotor are compared with analytical results obtained by using the code. The experimental data available for comparison are the radial distributions of circumferentially averaged values of absolute flow angle and total pressure downstream of the rotor exit. The computed rotor-exit flow angles are generally underturned relative to the experimental values, which reflect the boundary-layer separation at the trailing edge and the development of wakes downstream of the rotor. The experimental rotor is designed for a higher-than-optimum work factor of 1.126 resulting in a nonoptimum positive incidence and causing a region of rapid flow adjustment and large velocity gradients. For this experimental rotor, the computed radial distribution of rotor-exit to turbine-inlet total pressure ratios are underpredicted due to the errors in the finite-difference approximations in the regions of rapid flow adjustment, and due to using the relatively coarser grids in the middle of the blade region where the flow passage is highly three-dimensional. Additional results obtained from the three-dimensional inviscid computation are also presented, but without comparison due to the lack of experimental data. These include quasi-secondary velocity vectors on cross-channel surfaces, velocity components on the meridional and blade-to-blade surfaces, and blade surface loading diagrams. Computed results show the evolution of a passage vortex and large streamline deviations from the computational streamwise grid lines. Experience gained from applying the code to a radial turbine geometry is also discussed.

  16. A model of unsteady spatially inhomogeneous flow in a radial-axial blade machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozhevich, A. V.; Munshtukov, D. A.

    A two-dimensional model of the gasdynamic process in a radial-axial blade machine is proposed which allows for the instantaneous local state of the field of flow parameters, changes in the set angles along the median profile line, profile losses, and centrifugal and Coriolis forces. The model also allows for the injection of cooling air and completion of fuel combustion in the flow. The model is equally applicable to turbines and compressors. The use of the method of singularities provides for a unified and relatively simple description of various factors affecting the flow and, therefore, for computational efficiency.

  17. Study on gas permeability coefficient measurement of coal seam by radial flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuchuan

    2017-08-01

    For the accurate measurement of the coal seam permeability coefficient, the application range of the coal seam permeability coefficient was studied under various gas flow conditions with the guidance of the coal seam gas flow theory. Adopting the radial flow method, the measurement and calculation of the permeability coefficient of the coal seam C13-1 in Xinji No.1 Coal Mine shows that the permeability coefficient of the original coal seam C13-1 is less than 0.1, and the coal seam is difficult to extract.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  19. Simulating MODFLOW-based reactive transport under radially symmetric flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Ilka; Prommer, Henning; Post, Vincent; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Simmons, Craig T

    2013-01-01

    Radially symmetric flow and solute transport around point sources and sinks is an important specialized topic of groundwater hydraulics. Analysis of radial flow fields is routinely used to determine heads and flows in the vicinity of point sources or sinks. Increasingly, studies also consider solute transport, biogeochemical processes, and thermal changes that occur in the vicinity of point sources/sinks. Commonly, the analysis of hydraulic processes involves numerical or (semi-) analytical modeling methods. For the description of solute transport, analytical solutions are only available for the most basic transport phenomena. Solving advanced transport problems numerically is often associated with a significant computational burden. However, where axis-symmetry applies, computational cost can be decreased substantially in comparison with full three-dimensional (3D) solutions. In this study, we explore several techniques of simulating conservative and reactive transport within radial flow fields using MODFLOW as the flow simulator, based on its widespread use and ability to be coupled with multiple solute and reactive transport codes of different complexity. The selected transport simulators are MT3DMS and PHT3D. Computational efficiency and accuracy of the approaches are evaluated through comparisons with full 2D/3D model simulations, analytical solutions, and benchmark problems. We demonstrate that radial transport models are capable of accurately reproducing a wide variety of conservative and reactive transport problems provided that an adequate spatial discretization and advection scheme is selected. For the investigated test problems, the computational load was substantially reduced, with the improvement varying, depending on the complexity of the considered reaction network.

  20. Rapid determination of zinc and iron in foods by flow-injection analysis with flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry and slurry nebulization.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, J C; Strong, F C; Martin, N J

    1990-07-01

    A rapid method of determining zinc and iron in food by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with slurry nebulization into an air-acetylene flame has been developed. A V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer, coupled to a single-line flow-injection analysis (FIA) system, was employed to introduce the slurry into the spray chamber. Under the FIA conditions described, an injection frequency of 120/hr is possible, with negligible carry-over and memory effects. The calibration graphs were obtained by using various concentrations (up to 0.1 g/ml) of white bean homogenate as standards, rather than solutions. The method has been applied to various kinds of foods, including grains, vegetables, fruits and sausage. Homogenization of semi-prepared samples to form slurries took only 4 min. Relative deviations between results by the slurry and solution methods for both elements averaged 2-3%. Detection limits by the slurry method were 0.3 mug/ml Zn and 0.6 mug/ml Fe.

  1. Reactive solute transport in a filled single fracture-matrix system under unilateral and radial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Zhan, Hongbin; Chen, Kewei

    2017-06-01

    The study of transport processes in a single fracture is the basis of understanding transport in complex fractured networks. Many single fractures in the field are filled with sediments, and the transport in such filled single fractures has received much less attention up to present. When the fracture is partially filled with sediments, a mobile-immobile approach is considered necessary. This study deals with a coupled three-domain transport problem using mobile and immobile domains to characterize a filled single fracture and a matrix domain to characterize the rock body. Mathematical models are developed for such a coupled three-domain transport problem with new semi-analytical solutions to analyze the spatial-temporal concentration and mass distributions in the fracture and rock matrix with the help of Laplace transforms. This study addresses transport in a filled fracture-matrix system under two different flow conditions: unilateral flow, and radial flow. The new solutions have been tested extensively against previous solutions under various special settings and are proven to be robust and accurate. This study has the following findings: 1) Longitudinal dispersion in the fracture often plays an important role in such a coupled system in unilateral flow, 2) Mass partitions in three domains follow similar patterns in respect to the influence of fracture apertures, mobile/immobile ratios, and first-order mass transfer rates, 3) The system is most sensitive to the dispersivity and least sensitive to the first-order mass transfer rate and the mobile/immobile ratio in the unilateral flow model over a wide range of time scales (if the longitudinal dispersivity and Darcian flow velocity remain constant), 4) The system is most sensitive to the dispersivity, less sensitive to the mobile/immobile ratio, and least sensitive to the first-order mass transfer rate in the radial flow model (if the radial dispersivity and injection rate remain constant).

  2. Stability results for multi-layer radial Hele-Shaw and porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Craig; Daripa, Prabir

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by stability problems arising in the context of chemical enhanced oil recovery, we perform linear stability analysis of Hele-Shaw and porous media flows in radial geometry involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluids. Key stability results obtained and their relevance to the stabilization of fingering instability are discussed. Some of the key results, among many others, are (i) absolute upper bounds on the growth rate in terms of the problem data; (ii) validation of these upper bound results against exact computation for the case of three-layer flows; (iii) stability enhancing injection policies; (iv) asymptotic limits that reduce these radial flow results to similar results for rectilinear flows; and (v) the stabilizing effect of curvature of the interfaces. Multi-layer radial flows have been found to have the following additional distinguishing features in comparison to rectilinear flows: (i) very long waves, some of which can be physically meaningful, are stable; and (ii) eigenvalues can be complex for some waves depending on the problem data, implying that the dispersion curves for one or more waves can contact each other. Similar to the rectilinear case, these results can be useful in providing insight into the interfacial instability transfer mechanism as the problem data are varied. Moreover, these can be useful in devising smart injection policies as well as controlling the complexity of the long-term dynamics when drops of various immiscible fluids intersperse among each other. As an application of the upper bound results, we provide stabilization criteria and design an almost stable multi-layer system by adding many layers of fluid with small positive jumps in viscosity in the direction of the basic flow.

  3. Enhanced mixing via alternating injection in radial Hele-Shaw flows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, José A

    2015-10-01

    Mixing at low Reynolds numbers, especially in the framework of confined flows occurring in Hele-Shaw cells, porous media, and microfluidic devices, has attracted considerable attention lately. Under such circumstances, enhanced mixing is limited due to the lack of turbulence, and absence of sizable inertial effects. Recent studies, performed in rectangular Hele-Shaw cells, have demonstrated that the combined action of viscous fluid fingering and alternating injection can dramatically improve mixing efficiency. In this work, we revisit this important fluid mechanical problem, and analyze it in the context of radial Hele-Shaw flows. The development of radial fingering instabilities under alternating injection conditions is investigated by intensive numerical simulations. We focus on the impact of the relevant physical parameters of the problem (Péclet number Pe, viscosity contrast A, and injection time interval Δt) on fluid mixing performance.

  4. Radial flow from electromagnetic probes and signal of quark gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Payal; Nayak, Jajati K.; Alam, Jan-e; Das, Santosh K.

    2010-09-15

    An attempt has been made to extract the evolution of radial flow from the analysis of the experimental data on electromagnetic probes measured at the energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra of photons and dileptons measured by the WA98 and NA60 Collaborations, respectively, at the SPS and the photon and dilepton spectra obtained by the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC have been used to constrain the theoretical models. We use the ratio of photon to dilepton spectra to extract the flow, where some model dependence is canceled out. Within the ambit of the present analysis we argue that the variation of the radial velocity with invariant mass is indicative of a phase transition from the initially produced partons to hadrons at SPS and RHIC energies.

  5. Coal slurry fuel supply and purge system

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, Robert E.; Basic, Steven L.; Smith, Russel M.

    1994-01-01

    A coal slurry fuel supply and purge system for a locomotive engines is disclosed which includes a slurry recirculation path, a stand-by path for circulating slurry during idle or states of the engine when slurry fuel in not required by the engine, and an engine header fluid path connected to the stand-by path, for supplying and purging slurry fuel to and from fuel injectors. A controller controls the actuation of valves to facilitate supply and purge of slurry to and from the fuel injectors. A method for supplying and purging coal slurry in a compression ignition engine is disclosed which includes controlling fluid flow devices and valves in a plurality of fluid paths to facilitate continuous slurry recirculation and supply and purge of or slurry based on the operating state of the engine.

  6. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Arnold D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  7. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety.

  8. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety. PMID:27729703

  9. Technique to Measure the Coronal Electron Temperature and Radial Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginald, N. L.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2011-12-01

    During the March 2006 total solar eclipse we conducted an imaging experiment using the Imaging Spectrograph of Coronal Electrons (ISCORE) to determine the coronal electron temperature and its radial flow speed in the low solar corona. This technique required taking images of the solar eclipse through four broadband filters centered at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm. The K-coronal temperature is determined from intensity ratios from the 385.0 and 410.0 nm filters, and the K-coronal radial flow speed is determined from intensity ratios from the 398.7 and 423.3 nm filters. The theoretical model for this technique assumes a symmetric corona devoid of any features like streamers that might alter the coronal symmetry. The model also requires an isothermal temperature and a uniform outflow speed all along the line of sight. We will call this the Constant Parameter Thomson Scattering Model (CPTSM). The latter assumption may sound unreasonable but in the symmetric corona with rapid fall of the electron density with height in the solar corona, the major contributions to the K-coronal intensity along a given line of sight comes from the plasma properties in the vicinity of the plane of the sky. But the pressing question is how is the derived plasma properties by ISCORE compare with the nature of the true corona. For this we turn to the CORHEL model by Predictive Science Inc. which used magnetogram data to create a realistic model of the solar corona that are made available through the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at GSFC. That team has consistently produced the expected coronal image days prior to many total eclipses where the major coronal features from their model matched actual coronal image on the day of the eclipse. Using the CORHEL model data we have calculated the K-coronal intensities at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm using the electron density, plasma temperature (assumed to be electron temperature) and the flow speeds of the plasma along the line

  10. Cyclic and radial variation of ultrasonic backscatter from flowing porcine blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Dong-Guk

    The ultrasonic backscattering from flowing blood was investigated using several hemodynamic parameters and a physiological parameter. Acceleration was hypothesized to enhance the aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs), and this is the first time that acceleration is suggested and experimentally verified as having an effect on aggregation of RBC. Two interesting phenomena, the 'Black Hole (BH)' phenomenon and the 'Bright Collapsing Ring (BCR)' phenomenon, were observed under pulsatile flow in B-mode cross sectional images. The BH phenomenon describes a dark hypoechoic hole at the center of the tube surrounded by a bright hyperechoic zone in B-mode cross sectional images, and the BCR phenomenon describes the appearance of a bright hyperechoic ring at the periphery of the tube at early systole and its convergence from the periphery to the center of the tube, finally collapsing as flow develops. Doppler power variation was observed only from porcine whole blood, which led to a conclusion that the ultrasonic backscattering was mainly dependent on the RBC aggregation under steady and pulsatile flow. The pattern of the cyclic variation of the Doppler power to have a maximum power at peak systole was mainly due to the enhanced rouleaux formation by acceleration. The BCR phenomenon was observed from the cyclic variation pattern of the Doppler power at different radial positions; the Doppler power peak was observed at early systole at the periphery of the tube and lagged the flow as close from the periphery to the center of the tube. The BCR phenomenon from porcine whole blood in a mock flow loop was further examined in real time in B-mode images under pulsatile flow. At low hematocrit of 12%, no BCR phenomenon was discernable although it was observed at higher hematocrits. The pattern of the nonlinear relationship between echogenicity and hematocrit varied with radial positions. The BH phenomenon was also observed under certain hemodynamic conditions and varied over a

  11. Influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity on convective flow in the radial force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travnikov, Vadim; Zaussinger, Florian; Beltrame, Philippe; Egbers, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The numerical investigation of convective flows in the radial force field caused by an oscillating electric field between spherical surfaces has been performed. A temperature difference (T1>T2 ) as well as a radial force field triggers a fluid flow similar to the Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The onset of convective flow has been studied by means of the linear stability analysis as a function of the radius ratio η =R1/R2 . The influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity has been investigated in detail. We found that a varying viscosity contrast β =ν (T2) /ν (T1) between β =1 (constant viscosity) and β =50 decreases the critical Rayleigh number by a factor of 6. Additionally, we perform a bifurcation analysis based on numerical simulations which have been calculated using a modified pseudospectral code. Numerical results have been compared with the GeoFlow experiment which is located on the International Space Station (ISS). Nonturbulent three-dimensional structures are found in the numerically predicted parameter regime. Furthermore, we observed multiple stable solutions in both experiments and numerical simulations, respectively.

  12. High Enthalpy Air Flows Radial Temperatures Profiles Measurements During on Ground Hypesonic Facilities Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Federico; Cipullo, Alessio; Gerro, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Aim of this paper is to present and discuss activities carried out in CIRA (Centro Italiano Ricerche Aerospaziali) relevant to on ground hypersonic flow experimental characterisation. In particular, valid and innovative results have been obtained not only in no- intrusive measurements at the jet centreline, but also in the reconstruction of radial profiles in axial-symmetric geometries. The test campaigns have been realised using the Scirocco Plasma Wind Tunnel huge power facility, 70 MW arc-jet plant. Emission spectroscopy good quality data have been acquired into the facility reservoir (arc heater column) and at the hypersonic nozzle exit. Opportune advanced mathematical treatment of these spectra allowed temperature measurements at the nozzle exit center-line and also the reconstruction of the temperature and total enthalpy profiles at the nozzle inlet. Abel inversion procedure allows also experimental temperature radial re-costruction at the nozzle exit. Data obtained seems to be coherent with respect the expectations.

  13. Convection in rotating flows with simultaneous imposition of radial and vertical temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ayan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments, with a rotating cylindrical annulus and thermal gradient in both radial and vertical directions (so that radial temperature difference decreases with the elevation), were conducted to study the convection dynamics and heat transport. Temperature data captured using thermocouples, combined with ANSYS Fluent simulation hinted at the co-existence of thermal plume and baroclinicity (inclined isotherms). Presence of columnar plume structure parallel to the rotation axis was found, which had a phase velocity and aided in vertical heat transport. Nusselt number (Nu) plotted as a function of Taylor number (Ta) showed the effect of rotation on heat transport in such systems, where the interplay of plumes and baroclinic waves control the scalar transport. Laser based PIV imaging at a single vertical plane also showed evidence of such flow structures.

  14. On the nature of radial transport across sheared zonal flows in electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient gyrokinetic tokamak turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Raul; Newman, David E; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Carreras, Benjamin A; Decyk, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    It is argued that the usual understanding of the suppression of radial turbulent transport across a sheared zonal flow based on a reduction in effective transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found instead that the character of the radial transport is altered fundamentally by the presence of a sheared zonal flow, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Furthermore, if the flows are self-consistently driven by the turbulence via the Reynolds stresses (in contrast to being induced externally), radial transport becomes non-Gaussian as well. These results warrant a reevaluation of the traditional description of radial transport across sheared flows in tokamaks via effective transport coefficients, suggesting that such description is oversimplified and poorly captures the underlying dynamics, which may in turn compromise its predictive capabilities.

  15. On the nature of radial transport across sheared zonal flows in electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient gyrokinetic tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Leboeuf, J.-N.; Carreras, B. A.; Decyk, V. K.

    2009-05-15

    It is argued that the usual understanding of the suppression of radial turbulent transport across a sheared zonal flow based on a reduction in effective transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found instead that the character of the radial transport is altered fundamentally by the presence of a sheared zonal flow, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Furthermore, if the flows are self-consistently driven by the turbulence via the Reynolds stresses (in contrast to being induced externally), radial transport becomes non-Gaussian as well. These results warrant a reevaluation of the traditional description of radial transport across sheared flows in tokamaks via effective transport coefficients, suggesting that such description is oversimplified and poorly captures the underlying dynamics, which may in turn compromise its predictive capabilities.

  16. Effect of geometry and scale for axial and radial flow membrane chromatography-Experimental study of bovin serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Teepakorn, Chalore; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine

    2015-07-17

    During the last 10 years, membrane chromatography (MC) has been increasingly reported for biomolecule purification at both small and large scales. Although, several axial and radial flow MC devices are commercialized, the effect of the device dimensions on the adsorption performance has not been fully investigated. In this study, axial and radial flow anion ion-exchange MC devices were used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. For both axial and radial flow, three devices at different scales were compared, two having similar diameter and two similar bed height. The pressure drop and the flow distribution using acetone as a non-binding solute were measured, as well as BSA breakthrough curves at different flow rates and BSA loading concentrations. For all devices, it was observed that the flow rate had no effect on the breakthrough curve, which confirms the advantage of MC to be used at high flow rates. In addition, the BSA binding capacity increased with increasing BSA concentration, which suggests that it could be preferable to work with concentrated solutions rather than with very dilute solutions, when using buffer at high phosphate concentration. For both axial and radial flow, the bed height had a negative impact on the binding capacity, as the lowest binding capacities per membrane volume were obtained with the devices having the highest bed height. Radial flow MC has potential at large-scale applications, as a short bed thickness can be combined with a large inlet surface area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng Lu, Xiyun; Khomami, Bamin

    2015-12-15

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Re{sub i} (inner cylinder) =1000 and Re{sub o} (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, −500 < Re{sub o} < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Re{sub i} = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress R{sub rz} are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Re{sub o} = − 300 and −500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation

  18. The numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow with radial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuliszka-Sznitko, E.; Kiełczewski, K.

    2016-10-01

    The Taylor-Couette flow with radial temperature gradient is a canonical problem for the study of heat transfer in engineering issues. However, gaining insight into the transitional Taylor-Couette flow with temperature gradient still requires detailed experimental and numerical investigations. In the present paper we have performed computations for the cavity of aspect ratio Γ= 3.76 and radii ratios η= 0.82 and 0.375 with the heated rotating bottom disk and stationary outer cylinder. We analyse the influence of the end-wall boundary conditions and the thermal conditions on the flow structure, and on the distributions of the Nusselt number and torque along the inner and outer cylinders. The averaged values along the inner cylinder of the Nusselt number and torque obtained for different Re are analysed in the light of the results published in [2, 16, 17].

  19. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  20. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  1. Application of radial-equilibrium condition to axial-flow compressor and turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chung-Hua; Wolfenstein, Lincoln

    1950-01-01

    Basic general equations governing the three-dimensional compressible flow of gas through a compressor or turbine are given in terms of total enthalpy, entropy, and velocity components of the gas. Two methods of solution are obtained for the simplified, steady axially symmetric flow; one involves the use of a number of successive planes normal to the axis of the machine and short distances apart, and the other involves only three stations for a stage in which an appropriate radial-flow path is used. Methods of calculation for the limiting cases of zero and infinite blade aspect ratios and an approximate method of calculation for finite blade aspect ratio are also given. In these methods, the blade loading and the shape of the annular passage wall may be arbitrarily specified.

  2. Rheology and Multiphase Flow in Congested Ammonia-Water-Ice Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.

    2005-03-01

    Cryomagmas are natural examples of complex multiphase fluids. Some preliminary statements are made about the rheology of densely packed suspensions that have important bearing on their flow rates and eruptive style.

  3. NMR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of neutrally buoyant non-Newtonian slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.; Sinton, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The flow of solids loaded suspension in cylindrical pipes has been the object of intense experimental and theoretical investigations in recent years. These types of flows are of great interest in chemical engineering because of their important use in many industrial manufacturing processes. Such flows are for example encountered in the manufacture of solid-rocket propellants, advanced ceramics, reinforced polymer composites, in heterogenous catalytic reactors, and in the pipeline transport of liquid-solids suspensions. In most cases, the suspension microstructure and the degree of solids dispersion greatly affect the final performance of the manufactured product. For example, solid propellant pellets need to be extremely-well dispersed in gel matrices for use as rocket engine solid fuels. The homogeneity of pellet dispersion is critical to allow good uniformity of the burn rate, which in turn affects the final mechanical performance of the engine. Today`s manufacturing of such fuels uses continuous flow processes rather than batch processes. Unfortunately, the hydrodynamics of such flow processes is poorly understood and is difficult to assess because it requires the simultaneous measurements of liquid/solids phase velocities and volume fractions. Due to the recent development in pulsed Fourier Transform NMR imaging, NMR imaging is now becoming a powerful technique for the non intrusive investigation of multi-phase flows. This paper reports and exposes a state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodology that can be used to study such flows. The hydrodynamic model developed for this study is a two-phase flow shear thinning model with standard constitutive fluid/solids interphase drag and solids compaction stresses. this model shows good agreement with experimental data and the limitations of this model are discussed.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2011-12-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory was established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective of reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions are performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime, which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer. Our team is developing a research tool to aid in understanding the physicochemical processes occurring in the SBCR. A robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) consisting of thirteen species, which are CO reactant, H2 reactant, hydrocarbon product, and H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid plus catalyst is outlined. Mechanistic submodels for interfacial momentum transfer in the churn-turbulent flow regime are incorporated, along with bubble breakup/coalescence and two-phase turbulence submodels. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield. The model includes heat generation produced by the exothermic chemical reaction, as well as heat removal from a constant temperature heat exchanger. A property method approach is employed to incorporate vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) in a robust manner. Physical and thermodynamic properties as functions of changes in both pressure and temperature are obtained from VLE calculations performed external to the CMFD solver. The novelty of this approach is in its simplicity, as well as its

  5. Tracer Migration in a Radially Divergent Flow Field: Longitudinal Dispersivity and Anionic Tracer Retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, J.C., P.M. Bertsch, M. Wilson, J. Singer, F. Majs and S.A. Aburime

    2007-01-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion, the combined effects of chemical diffusion and differences in solute path length and flow velocity, is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive three-dimensional datasets exist for critically evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion, and the conservative nature of several commonly used groundwater tracers is still in question. Therefore, we conducted a series of field-scale experiments using tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sup 1}HO), bromide (Br{sup -}), and two fluorobenzoates (2,4 Di-FBA, 2,6 Di-FBA) as tracers in the water-table aquifer on the USDOE's Savannah River Site (SRS), located on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 h (56.7 L min{sup -1}) to establish a steady-state forced radial gradient before the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, which lasted from 256 to 560 min, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using nonlabeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using six multilevel monitoring wells, radially spaced at approximate distances of 2.0, 3.0, and 4.5 m from the central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were pumped continuously ({approx}0.1 L min{sup -1}) throughout the course of the experiments. Longitudinal dispersivity ({alpha}{sub L}) and travel times for {sup 3}H{sup 1}HO breakthrough were estimated by fitting the field data to analytical approximations of the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) for uniform and radial flow conditions. Dispersivity varied greatly between wells located at similar transport distances and even between zones within a given well, which we attributed to variability in the hydraulic conductivity at the study site. The radial flow equation generally described tritium breakthrough better than the

  6. Radial Dupuit interface flow to assess the aquifer storage and recovery potential of saltwater aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark

    2010-02-01

    A new accurate numerical solution is presented for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems in coastal aquifers; flow is approximated as radial Dupuit interface flow. The radial velocities of points on the interface are a function of time, the vertical coordinate, and the dimensionless parameter D (the discharge of the well divided by the product of the hydraulic conductivity, the square of the aquifer thickness, and the dimensionless density difference). The recovery efficiency of an ASR system (the ratio of the recovered volume of water divided by the injected volume of water) is determined by D and by the relative lengths of the injection, storage and recovery periods. Graphs are produced for the recovery efficiency as a function of parameter D for ASR operations with and without storage periods and for multiple cycles. The presented solutions and graphs are to be used as screening tools to assess the feasibility of specific injection, storage and recovery scenarios of planned ASR systems in saltwater aquifers without having to run complicated flow and transport models. When the screening tool indicates that recovery efficiencies are acceptable, the consideration of other features such as mixing and chemistry is warranted.

  7. Radial flow fuel nozzle for a combustor of a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Means, Gregory Scott; Boardman, Gregory Allen; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2016-07-05

    A combustor for a gas turbine generally includes a radial flow fuel nozzle having a fuel distribution manifold, and a fuel injection manifold axially separated from the fuel distribution manifold. The fuel injection manifold generally includes an inner side portion, an outer side portion, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced fuel ports that extend through the outer side portion. A plurality of tubes provides axial separation between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold. Each tube defines a fluid communication path between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold.

  8. Design, construction and mechanical optimisation process of electrode with radial current flow in the scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Deman, P R; Kaiser, T M; Dirckx, J J; Offeciers, F E; Peeters, S A

    2003-09-30

    A 48 contact cochlear implant electrode has been constructed for electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The stimulating contacts of this electrode are organised in two layers: 31 contacts on the upper surface directed towards the habenula perforata and 17 contacts connected together as one longitudinal contact on the underside. The design of the electrode carrier aims to make radial current flow possible in the cochlea. The mechanical structure of the newly designed electrode was optimised to obtain maximal insertion depth. Electrode insertion tests were performed in a transparent acrylic model of the human cochlea.

  9. Effect of dextran 500 on radial migration of erythrocytes in postcapillary venules at low flow rates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangho; Ong, Peng Kai; Johnson, Paul C

    2009-06-01

    Recently, we reported that collision efficiency (fraction of total collisions that result in the formation of aggregates) between red blood cells was an important factor in the formation of aggregates in postcapillary venules. In the present study, we focus on how high molecular weight dextran influences the overall radial migration trend of red blood cells in the postcapillary venule along a longitudinal distance of 50 microm from the bifurcation which would in turn affect collision behavior of these cells. A radial migration index, which defines the extent of radial migration of individual cells relative to the vessel center, was found to have a larger magnitude after infusion of dextran (1.9 +/- 2.73) compared to that before dextran infusion (1.48 +/- 3.89). This implied that dextran-induced aggregation might provide an external force to actively move cells towards the centerline of the vessel, which could contribute to the greater number of red blood cells participating in collision (16% increase) and aggregate formation. Further analysis of the collision behavior of individual red blood cells revealed that collision frequencies of individual cells decreased from a wide range (1 to 14) to a narrow range (1 to 5) after dextran treatment, indicating the alteration of collision behavior of red blood cells by the presence of aggregates along the flow stream.

  10. Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration with a Shear-Thinning Organic Based Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2001-01-10

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring the River Protection Project, which includes the design of a facility to stabilize liquid radioactive waste that is stored at the Hanford Site. Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company was contracted to develop and test parts of the waste treatment process. One part of the process is the separation of highly radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by precipitation and cross-flow filtration. A cross-flow filter was tested with simulated wastes made to represent typical waste chemical and physical characteristics. This paper discusses the results of cross-flow filter operation in a pilot-scale facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids SRTC.

  11. Investigation of two-phase flow processes in coal slurry/hydrogen heaters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.G.; Crowley, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for two-phase slug flow in a horizontal, transparent pipe at large diameter (6.75 in.) at high gas density (20 times the density of air at atmospheric pressure) and at liquid viscosities ranging from 1 to 1000 centipoise. The test section replicates 1 1/2 rectangular coils (40 ft by 10 ft) of a fired heater in a coal liquefaction plant. Regime transtion, pressure drop, void fraction, and slug characteristic data have been obtained for liquid superficial velocities ranging from 0.2 to 6 ft/s and gas superficial velocities ranging from 0.2 to 12 ft/s. Regime transition results have been compared with the Taitel-Dukler analytical flow regime map. The transition from stratified to slug flow, which is underpredicted by the original analysis, has been studied in particular. Comparison with the dimensionless transition criterion (gas Froude number) shows that increased liquid viscosity increases the liquid level at which the transition occurs. Pressure drop data at the transition have been used to evaluate the interfacial shear and to show that it is greater than is assumed in the Taitel-Dukler analysis. Sensitivity studies for the transition criterion and interfacial shear illustrate exactly why the transition is underpredicted on the flow regime map and how the predictions can be improved. Photos of the flow patterns illustrate the mechanism of slug formation at high viscosity compared with low viscosity. Pressure drop, void fraction, and slug characteristic results are compared with an analysis for pressure drop in slug flow, demonstrating better predictive capability of this model at large pipe size, high gas density, and high viscosity, compared with correlations from the literature. The pressure drop model is also shown to be in excellent agreement with coal liquefaction pilot plant data. 34 refs.

  12. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  13. Radially-Inflowing Molecular Gas Deposited by a X-ray Cooling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Ao, Y.; Dinh, V.

    2006-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are immersed in hot X-ray-emitting gas that constitutes a large fraction of their baryonic mass. Radiative cooling of this gas, if not adequately balanced by heat input, should result in an inflow of cooler gas to the central dominant giant elliptical (cD) galaxy. Although a straightforward prediction made nearly twenty years ago, the occurrence of such X-ray cooling flows is widely questioned as gas at lower temperatures is often not found at the predicted quantities. The exceptions are cD galaxies harbouring large quantities of cool molecular gas, but the origin of this gas is uncertain as ram-pressure stripping or cannibalism of gas-rich cluster galaxies provide viable alternatives to cooling flows. Here, we present the most direct evidence yet for the deposition of molecular gas in a cD galaxy, Perseus A, from a X-ray cooling flow. The molecular gas detected in this galaxy is concentrated in three radial filaments with projected lengths of at least 2 kpc, one extending inwards close to the active nucleus and the other two extending outwards to at least 8 kpc on the east and west. All three filaments coincide with bright Hα features, and lie along a central X-ray ridge where any cooling flow is strongest. The two outer filaments exhibit increasingly blueshifted velocities at smaller radii that we show trace radial inflow along the gravitational potential of the galaxy. The innermost filament appears to be settling into the potential well, and may fuel the central supermassive black hole whose radio jets heat gas over a large solid angle in the north-south direction. Our results demonstrate that X-ray cooling flows can indeed deposit large quantities of cool gas, but only intermittently along directions where the X-ray gas is not being reheated.

  14. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  15. Modeling Particle Concentration In Slurry Flows Using Shear-Induced Migration: Theory vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kanhui; Latterman, Paul; Koch, Trystan; Hu, Vincent; Ho, Joyce; Mata, Matthew; Murisic, Nebojsa; Bertozzi, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Different flow regimes observed in our experimental study of particle-laden thin film flows are characterized by differing particle concentration profiles. We develop a theoretical model for particle concentration in order to capture our experimental observations. Our model is based on equilibrium assumption and it incorporates all relevant physical mechanisms, including shear-induced particle migration and settling due to gravity. It leads to a coupled system of ordinary differential equations for particle volume fraction and shear, which are solved numerically for various parameter sets. We find excellent agreement between our numerical results and experimental data. Our model is not only successful in reproducing the experimentally observed regimes, but also in capturing the connection between these regimes and the experimental parameters.

  16. A PC-based inverse design method for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoe, Ivar Helge

    1991-01-01

    An Inverse Design Method suitable for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery is presented. The codes are based on the streamline curvature concept; therefore, it is applicable for current personal computers from the 286/287 range. In addition to the imposed aerodynamic constraints, mechanical constraints are imposed during the design process to ensure that the resulting geometry satisfies production consideration and that structural considerations are taken into account. By the use of Bezier Curves in the geometric modeling, the same subroutine is used to prepare input for both aero and structural files since it is important to ensure that the geometric data is identical to both structural analysis and production. To illustrate the method, a mixed flow turbine design is shown.

  17. A study of radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibration measurements using Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2014-05-01

    The structural integrity of blades is critical to the health of turbomachinery. Since operational failure of these blades can possibly lead to catastrophic failure of the machine, it is important to have knowledge of blade conditions in an online fashion. Due to several practical implications, it is desired to measure blade vibration with a non-contact technique. The application of laser Doppler vibrometry towards the vibration based condition monitoring of axial-flow turbomachinery blades has been successfully demonstrated in previous work. In this paper the feasibility of using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibrations is investigated with the aid of digital image correlation and strain gauge telemetry.

  18. Radial basis functions in mathematical modelling of flow boiling in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Hożejowski, Leszek; Piasecka, Magdalena

    The paper addresses heat transfer processes in flow boiling in a vertical minichannel of 1.7 mm depth with a smooth heated surface contacting fluid. The heated element for FC-72 flowing in a minichannel was a 0.45 mm thick plate made of Haynes-230 alloy. An infrared camera positioned opposite the central, axially symmetric part of the channel measured the plate temperature. K-type thermocouples and pressure converters were installed at the inlet and outlet of the minichannel. In the study radial basis functions were used to solve a problem concerning heat transfer in a heated plate supplied with the controlled direct current. According to the model assumptions, the problem is treated as twodimensional and governed by the Poisson equation. The aim of the study lies in determining the temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient. The results were verified by comparing them with those obtained by the Trefftz method.

  19. Evidence for Radial Flow of Thermal Dileptons in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2008-01-18

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter T{sub eff} extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the {rho}, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  20. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (pT) spectra of identified particles (π^{±}, K^{±}, p, and \\bar{p}) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √{s_{NN}} (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow pT range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide pT range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T0) and radial flow velocity (βT) increase with the increase of √{s_{NN}}, which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T0 and βT in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass.

  1. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  2. Revealing the source of the radial flow patterns in proton-proton collisions using hard probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Antonio; Bencédi, Gyula; Bello, Héctor

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we propose a tool to reveal the origin of the collective-like phenomena observed in proton-proton collisions. We exploit the fundamental difference between the underlying mechanisms, color reconnection and hydrodynamics, which produce radial flow patterns in Pythia 8 and Epos 3, respectively. Specifically, we proceed by examining the strength of the coupling between the soft and hard components which, by construction, is larger in Pythia 8 than in Epos 3. We study the transverse momentum ({p}{{T}}) distributions of charged pions, kaons and (anti) protons in inelastic pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV produced at mid-rapidity. Specific selections are made on an event-by-event basis as a function of the charged particle multiplicity and the transverse momentum of the leading jet ({p}{{T}}{jet}) reconstructed using the FastJet algorithm at mid-pseudorapidity (| η | < 1). From our studies, quantitative and qualitative differences between Pythia 8 and Epos 3 are found in the {p}{{T}} spectra when (for a given multiplicity class) the leading jet {p}{{T}} is increased. In addition, we show that for low-multiplicity events the presence of jets can produce radial flow-like behavior. Motivated by our findings, we propose to perform a similar analysis using experimental data from RHIC and LHC.

  3. The BTL2 process of biomass utilization entrained-flow gasification of pyrolyzed biomass slurries.

    PubMed

    Raffelt, Klaus; Henrich, Edmund; Koegel, Andrea; Stahl, Ralph; Steinhardt, Joachim; Weirich, Friedhelm

    2006-01-01

    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe has developed a concept for the utilization of cereal straw and other thin-walled biomass with high ash content. The concept consists of a regional step (drying, chopping, flash-pyrolysis, and mixing) and a central one (pressurized entrained-flow gasification, gas cleaning, synthesis of fuel, and production of byproducts). The purpose of the regional plant is to prepare the biomass by minimizing its volume and producing a stable and safe storage and transport form. In the central gasifier, the pyrolysis products are converted into syngas. The syngas is tar-free and can be used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis after gas cleaning.

  4. Flow patterns in a slurry-bubble-column reactor under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Toselane, B.A.; Brown, D.M.; Zou, B.S.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    The gas and liquid radioactive tracer response curves obtained in an industrial bubble column reactor of height to diameter ratio of 10 are analyzed and the suitability of the axial dispersion model for interpretation of the results is discussed. The relationship between the tracer concentration distribution and measured detector response of the soluble gas tracer (Ar-41) is possibly dominated by the dissolved gas. The one dimensional axial dispersion model cannot match all the experimental observations well and the flow pattern of the undissolved gas cannot be determined with certainty.

  5. Mapping the fluid flow and shear near the core surface using the radial and horizontal components of the magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Bloxham, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating the temporal evolution of both the radial and horizontal poloidal components of a field, given an initial field and the flow and shear, is first considered. Attention is then given to the inverse problem of determining the flow and shear, given an initial field and its temporal evolution. The nonuniqueness inherent in such inversions is discussed, and it is shown that part of the nonuniqueness in the shear is closely related to that in the flow derived from just the radial induction equation.

  6. On the flow between a rotating and a coaxial fixed disc - Numerical validation of the radial similarity hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L. A.; Pecheux, J.; Restivo, A. O.

    1991-06-01

    The rotating flow between coaxial disks in a radially confined geometry is studied by numerical integration of the full Navier-Stokes equations. The results indicate that both Batchelor's and Stewartson's flow structures can be observed near the axis of rotation, depending on what conditions are set at the peripheral boundary.

  7. Transport characteristics of slurries in pipelines: Flow regimes and pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acrivos, A.

    1985-03-01

    Unrelated phenomena pertaining to the rheology of concentrated suspensions are discussed. Explanations that shed new light on the understanding of such systems are provided. The principal phenomena in question are: (1) the observed resuspension of a settled bed of particles in a viscous fluid upon being sheared, (2) the existence of a shear induced anisotropy in a concentrated suspension which manifests itself in measurable normal stresses; and (3) slow decay with time of the effective viscosity of a concentrated suspension, as measured in a Couette viscometer, together with a shear thinning behavior in such systems. Evidence is provided which proves that these phenomena arise as a result of the existence of shear induced diffusion mechanism which produces a flux of particles from regions of high particle concentration to low, or from regions of high shear to low. The overall goal of this combined experimental and theoretical program is a theoretical framework, currently lacking, for modelling the flow behavior of concentrated suspensions quantitatively.

  8. Tribological Properties Of Coal Slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Schrubens, Dale L.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of tribological properties of coal/methanol slurries with pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficients of friction, rates of wear of steel pin, and morphological studies of worn surfaces conducted on pins and disks of AISI 440C HT stainless steel and M-50 tool steel, both used as bearing steels. Coal slurries considered as replacement fuels in terrestrial oil-burning facilities and possible fuels for future aircraft turbine engines. Rates of wear of metallic components through which slurries flow limit such practical applications.

  9. Red blood cells radial dispersion in blood flowing through microchannels: The role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Rodrigues, Raquel O; Faustino, Vera; Yaginuma, Tomoko; Exposto, José; Lima, Rui

    2016-07-26

    The behavior of suspensions of individual blood cells, such as red blood cells (RBCs), flowing through microvessels and microfluidic systems depend strongly on the hematocrit (Hct), microvessel topology and cell properties. Although it is well known that blood rheological properties are temperature dependent, to the best of our knowledge no work has studied the role of the temperature on the RBCs dispersion. A powerful way to investigate this latter effect is through a high-speed video microscopy system, which provides detailed flow measurements of each individual RBC. Hence, the effect of temperature on the RBCs dispersion flowing through a 100μm glass capillary was examined by means of a confocal micro-PTV system. Hundreds of labeled RBCs were tracked at moderate Hct (12%) and at four different temperatures, i.e., 25°C, 32°C, 37°C and 42°C. The results yielded an enhancement of the RBCs diffusion as the temperature increases. Hence, our findings show that RBCs radial dispersion is temperature dependent and as a result the temperature should not be ignored in future blood flow studies. We believe that this finding is important for a better understanding of blood mass transport mechanisms under both physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical analysis of radial inward flow turbine for CO2 based closed loop Brayton cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisan, Jadhav Amit; Govardhan, M.

    2017-06-01

    Last few decades have witnessed a phenomenal growth in the demand for power, which has driven the suppliers to find new sources of energy and increase the efficiency of power generation process. Power generation cycles are either steam based Rankine cycle or closed loop Brayton cycles providing an efficiency of 30 to 40%. An upcoming technology in this regard is the CO2 based Brayton cycle operating near the critical region which has applications in vast areas. Power generation of CO2 based Brayton cycle can vary from few kilowatts for waste heat recovery to hundreds of megawatts in sodium cooled fast reactors. A CO2 based Brayton cycle is being studied for power generation especially in mid-sized concentrated solar power plants by numerous research groups around the world. One of the main components of such a setting is its turbine. Simulating the flow conditions inside the turbine becomes very crucial in order to accurately predict the performance of the system. The flow inside radial inflow turbine is studied at various inlet temperatures and mass flow rates in order to predict the behavior of the turbine under various boundary conditions. The performance investigation of the turbine system is done on the basis of parameters such as total efficiency, pressure ratio, and power coefficient. Effect of different inlet stagnation temperature and exit mass flow rates on these parameters is also studied. Results obtained are encouraging for the use of CO2 as working fluid in Brayton cycle.

  11. Radial Spreading of Drift Wave-Zonal Flow Turbulence via Soliton Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zehua; Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2009-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that turbulence spreading is responsible for the local turbulence intensity dependence on the global nonuniform equilibrium properties, i.e. the size scaling of turbulent transport coefficients. In the present work, first we investigate the slab model for the spatio-temporal evolution of the drift wave(DW) radial envelope and zonal flow(ZF) amplitude. Stationary solution of the coupled partial differential equations in a simple limit yields formation of DW-ZF solitons. It is shown that the DW-ZF soliton structures propagate at group velocity which depends on the envelope peak amplitude. Additional interesting physics, e.g. birth/death, collision, and reflection of solitons, as well as turbulence bursting can also be observed due to effects of linear growth/damping, dissipation, equilibrium nonuniformities and soliton dynamics. The propagation of soliton causes significant radial spreading of DW turbulence and therefore can affect transport scaling by increasing the turbulent region. Discussion on the correspondence to the two-field DW-ZF description in toroidal geometry will also be presented.

  12. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  13. Three-dimensional flow in radial turbomachinery and its impact on design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Hawthorne, William

    1993-01-01

    In the two papers on the 'Theory of Blade Design for Large Deflections' published in 1984, a new inverse design technique was presented for designing the shape of turbomachinery blades in three-dimensional flow. The technique involves the determination of the blade profile from the specification of a distribution of the product of the radius and the pitched averaged tangential velocity (i.e., r bar-V(sub theta), the mean swirl schedule) within the bladed region. This is in contrast to the conventional inverse design technique for turbomachinery blading in two dimensional flow in which the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution is specified and the blade profile determined as a result; this is feasible in two-dimensional flow because the streamlines along the blade surfaces are known a priori. However, in three-dimensional flow, the stream surface is free to deform within the blade passage so that the streamlines on the blade surfaces are not known a priori; thus it is difficult and not so useful to prescribe the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution and determine the resulting blade profile. It therefore seems logical to prescribe the swirl schedule within the bladed region for designing a turbomachinery blade profile in three-dimensional flow. Furthermore, specifying r bar-V(sub theta) has the following advantages: (1) it is related to the circulation around the blade (i.e., it is an aerodynamic quantity); (2) the work done or extracted is approximately proportional to the overall change in r bar-V(sub theta) across a given blade row (Euler turbine equation); and (3) the rate of change of r bar-V(sub theta) along the mean streamline at the blade is related to the pressure jump across the blade and therefore the blade loading. Since the publications of those two papers, the technique has been applied to the design of a low speed as well as a high speed radial inflow turbine (for turbocharger applications) both of which showed definite

  14. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  15. Estimated Performance of Radial-Flow Exit Nozzles for Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Gerald W.; Kochendorfer, Fred D.

    1959-01-01

    The thrust, boundary-layer, and heat-transfer characteristics were computed for nozzles having radial flow in the divergent part. The working medium was air in chemical equilibrium, and the boundary layer was assumed to be all turbulent. Stagnation pressure was varied from 1 to 32 atmospheres, stagnation temperature from 1000 to 6000 R, and wall temperature from 1000 to 3000 R. Design pressure ratio was varied from 5 to 320, and operating pressure ratio was varied from 0.25 to 8 times the design pressure ratio. Results were generalized independent of divergence angle and were also generalized independent of stagnation pressure in the temperature range of 1000 to 3000 R. A means of determining the aerodynamically optimum wall angle is provided.

  16. Perception of heading speed from radial flow depends on visual field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Kaori; Ujike, Hiroyasu; Okajima, Katsunori; Saida, Shinya

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the effects that the visual field has on the perception of heading speed. The stimulus was a radial flow pattern simulating a translational motion through a cylindrical tunnel. Observers evaluated the perception of heading speed by using a temporal two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) staircase method. In the first experiment, we manipulated the stimulus area by cutting the visual field along the longitudinal direction. The results showed that the perceived heading speed increases with the stimulus area. In the second experiment, we manipulated both the stimulus area and the eccentricity by cutting the visual field along the longitudinal direction. The results showed that the perception of heading speed increases when the stimulus occupies a large portion of the peripheral visual field. These findings suggest that the effect of eccentricity is a consequence of an incorrect translation of two-dimensional visual information into three-dimensional scaling.

  17. Effect of blade modifications on the torque and flow field of radial impellers in stirred tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiros, K.; Bruce, P. J. K.; Buxton, O. R. H.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2017-09-01

    We perform both high- and low-speed particle image velocimetry and torque measurements to characterize eight radial impeller types in an unbaffled stirred tank. The blade types consist of a set of regular flat blades, used as a baseline, regular blades of increased thickness, perforated blades, and fractal blades. We find a qualitative correlation between the blades' torque coefficient and both vortex coherence and turbulent kinetic energy, possibly explaining the torque differences of the tested impellers. Furthermore, we find that the proposed modifications increase the bulk turbulence levels and mass flow rates while at the same time reducing the shaft torque, showing promise for applications. Finally, we attempt a comparison between fractal and perforated geometries using data from this study and the literature.

  18. Experiments on Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells With Radial Gravity: The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments designed to study the fluid dynamics of buoyancy driven circulations in rotating spherical shells were conducted on the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 spacelab mission. These experiments address several aspects of prototypical global convection relevant to large scale motions on the Sun, Earth, and on the giant planets. The key feature is the consistent modeling of radially directed gravity in spherical geometry by using dielectric polarization forces. Imagery of the planforms of thermally driven flows for rapidly-rotating regimes shows an initial separation and eventual merger of equatorial and polar convection as the heating (i.e. the Rayleigh number) is increased. At low rotation rates, multiple-states of motion for the same external parameters were observed.

  19. Comparisons between seismic Earth structures and mantle flow models based on radial correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, T.H.; Puster, P. ); Glatzmaier, G.A. ); Tackley, P.J. )

    1993-09-10

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted of mantle convection in which flow through the transition zone is impeded by either a strong chemical change or an endothermic phase change. The temperature fields obtained from these models display a well defined minimum in the vertical correlation length at or near the radius where the barrier is imposed, even when the fields were filtered to low angular and radial resolutions. However, evidence for such a feature is lacking in the shear-velocity models derived by seismic tomography. This comparison suggests that any stratification induced by phase or chemical changes across the mid-mantle transition zone has a relatively small effect on the large-scale circulation of mantle material.

  20. Comparisons between seismic Earth structures and mantle flow models based on radial correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T H; Puster, P; Glatzmaier, G A; Tackley, P J

    1993-09-10

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted of mantle convection in which flow through the transition zone is impeded by either a strong chemical change or an endothermic phase change. The temperature fields obtained from these models display a well-defined minimum in the vertical correlation length at or near the radius where the barrier is imposed, even when the fields were filtered to low angular and radial resolutions. However, evidence for such a feature is lacking in the shear-velocity models derived by seismic tomography. This comparison suggests that any stratification induced by phase or chemical changes across the mid-mantle transition zone has a relatively small effect on the large-scale circulation of mantle material.

  1. Aerodynamic design of turbomachinery blading in three-dimensional flow: An application to radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.L.; Tan, C.S.; Hawthorne, W.R. . Gas Turbine Lab.)

    1993-07-01

    A computational method based on a theory for turbomachinery blading design in three-dimensional inviscid flow is applied to a parametric design study of a radial inflow turbine wheel. As the method requires the specification of swirl distribution, a technique for its smooth generation within the blade region is proposed. Excellent agreements have been obtained between the computed results from this design method and those from direct Euler computations, demonstrating the correspondence and consistency between the two. The computed results indicate the sensitivity of the pressure distribution to a lean in the stacking axis and a minor alteration in the hub/shown profiles. Analysis based on a Navier-Stokes solver shows no breakdown of flow within the designed blade passage and agreement with that from a design calculation; thus the flow in the designed turbine rotor closely approximates that of an inviscid one. These calculations illustrate the use of a design method coupled to an analysis tool for establishing guidelines and criteria for designing turbomachinery blading.

  2. Performance back-deduction from a loading to flow coefficient map: Application to radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonneau, Xavier; Binder, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Radial turbine stages are often used for applications requiring off-design operation, as turbocharging for instance. The off-design ability of such stages is commonly analyzed through the traditional turbine map, plotting the reduced mass-flow against the pressure-ratio, for reduced-speed lines. However, some alternatives are possible, such as the flow-coefficient ( Ψ) to loading-coefficient ( φ) diagram where the pressure-ratio lines are actually straight lines, very convenient property to perform prediction. A robust method re-creating this map from a predicted Ψ-φ diagram is needed. Recent work has shown that this back-deduction quality, without the use of any loss models, depends on the knowledge of an intermediate pressure-ratio. A modelization of this parameter is then proposed. The comparison with both experimental and CFD results is presented, with quite good agreement for mass flow rate and rotational speed, and for the intermediate pressure ratio. The last part of the paper is dedicated to the application of the intermediate pressure-ratio knowledge to the improvement of the deduction of the pressure ratio lines in the Ψ-φ diagram. Beside this improvement, the back-deduction method of the classical map is structured, applied and evaluated.

  3. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-08-12

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals using flow injection chemical vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 6% m/v flour, 0.7% m/v thiourea, 0.4 microg mL(-1) Co(II), and 2.5% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the elements studied in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, a standard addition method and an isotope dilution method were used for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in selected cereal samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. The effectiveness of the vapor generation sample introduction technique in alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour reference material, NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour reference material, and cereal samples obtained from local market. The As, Cd, and Hg analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 0.10, 0.16, and 0.07 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, and Hg, respectively, in the original cereal samples.

  4. PIV investigation of the flow induced by a passive surge control method in a radial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann; Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Mohamed, Ashraf

    2012-09-01

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratios. Unfortunately, increasing the impeller rotational speed of turbocharger radial compressors tends to reduce their range of operation, which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extend the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device such as a "ported shroud." This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance the surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the system remain not well understood. Hence, in order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. From the full dynamic survey of the compressor performance characteristics obtained with and without ported shroud, specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow visualization. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to evaluate instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields at the inlet of the compressor. At incipient and full surge, phase-locked PIV measurements were added. As a result, satisfying characterization of the compressor instabilities was provided at different operational speeds. Combining transient pressure data and PIV measurements, the time evolution of the complex flow patterns occurring at surge was reconstructed and a better insight into the bypass mechanism was achieved.

  5. The propagation direction of mafic radial dikes inferred from flow-direction analysis of an exposed radial dike sequence, Summer Coon Volcano, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.; Valentine, G.

    2016-12-01

    Mafic eruptions along the flanks of stratovolcanoes pose significant hazards to life and property due to the uncertainty linked to new vent locations and their potentially close proximity to inhabited areas. Flank eruptions are often fed by radial dikes with magma supplied either laterally from the central conduit or vertically from a deeper storage location. The highly eroded Oligocene age Summer Coon stratovolcano, Colorado reveals over 700 mafic dikes surrounding a series of intrusive stocks (inferred conduit). The exposure provides an opportunity to study radial dike propagation directions and their relationship with the conduit in the lower portions of a volcanic edifice. Detailed geologic mapping and a geophysical survey revealed that little or no direct connection exists between the mafic radial dikes and the inferred conduit at the current level of exposure. Oriented samples collected from the chilled margins of 29 mafic dikes were analyzed for flow fabrics and emplacement directions. Among them, 20 dikes show flow angles greater than 30 degrees from horizontal, and a single dike had flow fabrics oriented at approximately 20 degrees. Of the dikes with steeper fabrics nine dikes were emplaced up and toward the volcano's center between 30-75 degrees from horizontal, and 11 dikes emplaced up and away from the volcano's center between 35-60 degrees. The two groups of dikes likely responded to the stress field within the edifice, where steepest-emplaced had relatively high magma overpressure and were focused toward the volcano's summit, while dikes with lower overpressures propagated out toward the flanks. At Summer Coon, the lack of connection between mafic dikes and the inferred conduit and presence of only one sub-horizontally emplaced dike implies the stresses within lower edifice impeded lateral dike nucleation and propagation while promoting and influencing the emplacement direction of upward propagating dikes.

  6. Influence of punch face angle and reduction on flow mode in backward and combined radial backward extrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jeong-hoon; Hwang, Beong Bok; Lee, Ho Yong

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis on the flow mode which determines lubrication limit such as stiction onto or sliding over punch face. The main goal of this study is to examine the influence of geometrical parameters such as punch face angle, reduction in area, and the gap height in radial direction in backward and combined radial-backward extrusion process on the flow mode and surface stresses such as sliding velocity, sliding distance and surface expansion. Annealed steel 17Cr3 was selected as a model material, a rigid-plastic material, for simulation, which was conducted using a commercially available FEA tool, Deform 2-D, programmed in a rigid plasticity theory. Change of flow mode during deformation was also investigated to find under which conditions of process parameter adopted the flow mode changes from stiction to transition or transition to sliding. In this paper, sliding velocities were quantitatively analyzed to determine the flow mode.

  7. The hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow: A new model and new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, B. L.

    1996-02-01

    A new model for the hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow is presented. The equation of motion for a liquid annulus spreading out under the influence of hydrostatic pressure gradient and Frictional drag is developed. The resulting nonlinear differential equation for the liquid depth, h(r), is solved by computer simulation. The jump is assumed to begin when the laminar flow is engulfed by the underlying boundary layer liquid, as suggested recently in the literature. This complicated mixing process is crudely modeled by a drag term which slows the flow and initiates a positive feedback mechanism culminating at a new critical depth, beyond which the depth increases asymptotically to a final value. The model predicts a new relationship between the laminar flow depth just before the jump and the final depth. An experimental apparatus was built to make detailed measurements of the depth h(r), both in the region before the jump and beyond the jump. The theoretical predictions were compared to the experimental data, and gave surprisingly good agreement by suitable adjustment of the two parameters k and C of the model. The parameter k determines the growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, and C determines the drag force. The results suggest that the usual textbook assumption of zero momentum loss across the jump is not appropriate for this type of hydraulic jump. The case of a hydraulic jump in the absence of gravity is considered also and a much different behavior is predicted, which could be tested by experiment in a microgravity environment.

  8. Radial pressure profiles in a cold‐flow gas‐solid vortex reactor

    PubMed Central

    Pantzali, Maria N.; Kovacevic, Jelena Z.; Marin, Guy B.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    A unique normalized radial pressure profile characterizes the bed of a gas‐solid vortex reactor over a range of particle densities and sizes, solid capacities, and gas flow rates: 950–1240 kg/m3, 1–2 mm, 2 kg to maximum solids capacity, and 0.4–0.8 Nm3/s (corresponding to gas injection velocities of 55–110 m/s), respectively. The combined momentum conservation equations of both gas and solid phases predict this pressure profile when accounting for the corresponding measured particle velocities. The pressure profiles for a given type of particles and a given solids loading but for different gas injection velocities merge into a single curve when normalizing the pressures with the pressure value downstream of the bed. The normalized—with respect to the overall pressure drop—pressure profiles for different gas injection velocities in particle‐free flow merge in a unique profile. © 2015 The Authors AIChE Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 61: 4114–4125, 2015 PMID:27667827

  9. The Potential Effects of a Biofeedback Writing Exercise on Radial Artery Blood Flow and Neck Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Krullaards, Rob L.; Pel, Johan J. M.; Snijders, Chris J.; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that sustained contraction of the deep neck muscles may reduce axial cervical range of motion (CROM) and radial artery blood flow velocity (vrad.art.mean). No studies have reported both phenomena in relation to acute hand, shoulder or neck trauma. Procedures: The CROM and vrad.art.mean were measured in 20 police officers prior to and immediately after a 2-hours drive on a motorcycle and immediately after a 1-minute writing exercise using biofeedback. The CROM was measured using separate inclinometers and the vrad.art.mean was measured in both arms just proximal to the wrist using echo-Doppler. Findings: During the study, one officer had a motorcycle accident resulting in acute symptoms of neck trauma. His vrad.art.mean was acutely reduced by 73% (right arm) and 45% (left arm). Writing with biofeedback increased his vrad.art.mean by 150% (right arm) and 80% (left arm). In the remaining 19 officers, the CROM to the right was significantly increased after the 2-hours driving task (p<0.05; paired subject t-test). Writing with biofeedback increased their CROM in both directions and vrad.art.mean in both arms (p<001). Conclusions: A 2-hours drive showed modest physical changes in the upper extremities. Biofeedback in writing tasks might relate to the influence of relaxation and diverting attention for neck mobility and arterial blood flow improvement. PMID:23675136

  10. Experimental study of convective heat transfer of compressed air flow in radially rotating ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.J,; Tzeng, S.C.; Mao, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    The convective heat transfer of pressurized air flow in radially rotating serpentine channel is investigated experimentally in the present study. The main governing parameters are the Prandtl number, the Reynolds number for forced convection, the rotation number for the Coriolis force induced cross stream secondary flow and the Grashof number for natural convection. To simulate the operation conditions of a real gas turbine, the present study kept the parameters in the test rig approximately the same as those in a real engine. The air in the present serpentine channel was pressurized to increase the air density for making up the low rotational speed in the experiment. Before entering the rotating ducts, the air was also cooled to gain a high density ratio of approximately 1/3 in the ducts. This high density ratio will give a similar order of magnitude of Grashof number in a real operation condition. The local heat transfer rate on the four channel walls are present and compared with that in existing literature.

  11. Efficient purification of antiproliferative polysaccharides from Hypsizigus marmoreus with radial flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pei-Sheng; Cao, Li-Xin; Zhang, Bing-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    The increasing commercial significance of natural polysaccharides for use in medicinal products is stimulating the development of efficient and easy scale-up techniques for polysaccharide purification. In this research, the crude polysaccharides from submerged cultivation broth of Hypsizigus marmoreus were purified using radial flow chromatography (RFC), and the antiproliferative activity of the purified fractions was evaluated in vitro. DEAE Sepharose CL-6B was selected to be packed in the RFC column based on its good resolution, physical stability, and low cost. Compared with axial flow chromatography (AFC), an efficient chromatographic process with significantly less time and buffer consumption but yielding higher polysaccharide recovery and resolution was established in RFC, which could clearly purify the crude polysaccharides into different fractions. An acceptable linear scale-up effect of RFC from 100 to 500 mL was successfully achieved without loss of resolution and enhancement of time consumption. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays in cell cultures indicated that the purified polysaccharide fractions possess moderate antiproliferative activities in three different human cancer cell lines, but have significantly lower cytotoxicity in normal human cell lines in vitro. Among the polysaccharide fractions, the main purified acidic fraction W-I could be considered as a novel potential antitumor agent candidate for several tumors, especially for human alveolar epithelial tumors. This research confirmed for the first time that RFC would be a new fast and efficient tool for purification of polysaccharides into different fractions, both at laboratory and commercial scales.

  12. Flow-Mediated Change in Viscoelastic Property of Radial Arterial Wall Measured by 22 MHz Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshita, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Additionally, it was reported that the smooth muscle, which constructs the media of the artery, changes its characteristics owing to atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method of assessing the regional endothelial function and mechanical properties of the arterial wall. To evaluate the endothelial function, a conventional technique of measuring the transient change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after the release of avascularization is used. However, this method can not evaluate the mechanical properties of the wall. We previously developed a method for the simultaneous measurements of waveforms of radial strain and blood pressure in the radial artery. In this study, the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall was estimated from the measured stress-strain relationship using the least-squares method and the transient changes in the mechanical properties of the arterial wall ware revealed. From in vivo experimental results, the stress-strain relationship showed a hysteresis loop and viscoelasticity was estimated by the proposed method. The slope of the loop decreased owing to FMD, which resulted in the decrease in estimated elastic modulus. The increase in the area of the loop occurred after recirculation, which corresponds to the increase in the ratio of the loss modulus (depends on viscosity) to the elastic modulus when the Voigt model is assumed. In this study, the variance in estimates was evaluated by in vivo measurement for 10 min. The temporal decrease in static elasticity after recirculation due to FMD was much larger than the evaluated variance. These results show a potential of the proposed method for the thorough analysis of the transient change in viscoelasticity due to FMD.

  13. Study of Radially Varying Magnetic Field on Blood Flow through Catheterized Tapered Elastic Artery with Overlapping Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S.

    2015-11-01

    A precise model has been developed for studying the influence of metallic nanoparticles on blood flow through catheterized tapered elastic arteries with radially varying magnetic field. The model is solved under the mild stenosis approximation by considering blood as viscous fluid. The influence of different flow parameters associated with this problem such as Hartmann number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Grashof number and heat source or sink parameter is analyzed by plotting the graphs of the wall shear stress, resistance impedance to blood flow and stream lines. The influence of the radially varying magnetic field on resistance impedance to flow is analyzed and it is observed that the significantly strong magnetic force tends to increase in resistance.

  14. Evaluation of Radial Flow Fluidized Filter (R3F) Followed by Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Systems in Calimesa, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA coordinated a field study with South Mesa Water Utility to look for treatment alternatives for California State Project Water in the small community of Calimesa, California. EPA evaluated the performance of a system comprised of Radial Flow Fluidized Filtration (R3f) fo...

  15. Evaluation of Radial Flow Fluidized Filter (R3F) Followed by Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Systems in Calimesa, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA coordinated a field study with South Mesa Water Utility to look for treatment alternatives for California State Project Water in the small community of Calimesa, California. EPA evaluated the performance of a system comprised of Radial Flow Fluidized Filtration (R3f) fo...

  16. 1r2dinv: A finite-difference model for inverse analysis of two dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a program for inverse analysis of two-dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow problems. The program, 1r2dinv, uses standard finite difference techniques to solve the groundwater flow equation for a horizontal or vertical plane with heterogeneous properties. In radial mode, the program simulates flow to a well in a vertical plane, transforming the radial flow equation into an equivalent problem in Cartesian coordinates. The physical parameters in the model are horizontal or x-direction hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy ratio (vertical to horizontal conductivity in a vertical model, y-direction to x-direction in a horizontal model), and specific storage. The program allows the user to specify arbitrary and independent zonations of these three parameters and also to specify which zonal parameter values are known and which are unknown. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate parameters from observed head values. Particularly powerful features of the program are the ability to perform simultaneous analysis of heads from different tests and the inclusion of the wellbore in the radial mode. These capabilities allow the program to be used for analysis of suites of well tests, such as multilevel slug tests or pumping tests in a tomographic format. The combination of information from tests stressing different vertical levels in an aquifer provides the means for accurately estimating vertical variations in conductivity, a factor profoundly influencing contaminant transport in the subsurface. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative radial artery volume flow is predictive of arteriovenous fistula outcomes.

    PubMed

    Masengu, Agnes; McDaid, James; Maxwell, Alexander P; Hanko, Jennifer B

    2016-02-01

    Guidelines recommend the creation of a wrist radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (RAVF) as initial hemodialysis vascular access. This study explored the potential of preoperative ultrasound vessel measurements to predict AVF failure to mature (FTM) in a cohort of patients with end-stage renal disease in Northern Ireland. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients who had preoperative ultrasound mapping of upper limb blood vessels carried out from August 2011 to December 2014 and whose AVF reached a functional outcome by March 2015. There were 152 patients (97% white) who had ultrasound mapping and an AVF functional outcome recorded; 80 (54%) had an upper arm AVF created, and 69 (46%) had a RAVF formed. Logistic regression revealed that female gender (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-5.55; P = .025), minimum venous diameter (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.39-0.95; P = .029), and RAVF (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.18-0.89; P = .026) were associated with FTM. On subgroup analysis of the RAVF group, RAVFs with an arterial volume flow <50 mL/min were seven times as likely to fail as RAVFs with higher volume flows (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 2.35-20.87; P < .001). In this cohort, a radial artery flow rate <50 mL/min was associated with a sevenfold increased risk of FTM in RAVF, which to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature. Preoperative ultrasound mapping adds objective assessment in the clinical prediction of AVF FTM. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Organization in Granular Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino, Julio M.; Jain, Nitin; Lueptow, Richard M.; Khakhar, Devang V.

    2000-11-01

    Mixtures of tumbled granular materials under flow exhibit various intriguing types of un-mixing or self-organization. Small differences in particles' density, size or shape may trigger the effect. Nearly all studies to date have addressed the case of dry granular media, where the interparticle fluid is typically air. Here we report the existence of self-organization in wet granular media or slurries, mixtures of particles of different sizes dispersed in a lower density liquid. Technological examples appear in cement, ceramics, fine chemicals, and in the food industry; examples in nature appear in evolution of landslides and transport in river sediments. In spite of significantly different physics at the particle level, both axial banding (alternating bands rich in small and large particles in a long rotating cylinder) and radial segregation (in quasi 2D containers) are observed in slurries. However, axial segregation is significantly faster and the spectrum of outcomes is richer. Moreover, experiments with suitable fluids, reveal, for the first time, the internal structure of axially segregated systems, something that up to now has been accessible only via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experimentation.

  19. Proximal radial artery ligation after distalization of a high flow brachio-cephalic fistula. A novel approach to inflow reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J B; Calder, F R

    2008-01-01

    High flow fistulae present a common challenge to vascular access (VA) surgeons and many strategies have been described, each with their benefits and limitations. There are no NK-DOQI guidelines for the management of high flow fistulae or indeed the management of those refractory to more conventional approaches. We discuss a novel technique to inflow reduction in a previously distalized brachiocephalic fistula and recommend the technique of proximal radial artery ligation.

  20. Theoretical analysis of inertially irrotational and solenoidal flow in two-dimensional radial-flow pump and turbine impellers with equiangular blades

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, F.C.; Brouwers, J.J.H.; Badie, R.

    1994-06-01

    Using the theory of functions of a complex variable, in particular the method of conformal mapping, the irrotational and solenoidal flow in two-dimensional radial-flow pump and turbine impellers fitted with equiangular blades is analyzed. Exact solutions are given for the fluid velocity along straight radial pump and turbine impeller blades, while for logarithmic spiral pump impeller blades solutions are given which hold asymptotically as (r(sub 1)/r(sub 2))(exp n) approaches 0, in which r(sub 1) is impeller inner radius, r(sub 2) is impeller outer radius, and n is the number of blades. Both solutions are given in terms of a Fourier series, with the Fourier coefficients being given by the (Gauss) hypergeometric function and the beta function respectively. The solutions are used to derive analytical expressions for a number of parameters which are important for practical design of radial turbomachinery, and which reflect the two-dimensional nature of the flow field. Parameters include rotational slip of the flow leaving radial impellers, conditions to avoid reverse flow between impeller blades, and conditions for shockless flow at impeller entry, with the number of blades and blade curvature as variables. Furthermore, analytical extensions to classical one-dimensional Eulerian-based expressions for developed head of pumps and delivered work of turbines are given. 30 refs.

  1. Experimental evaluation of connectivity influence on dispersivity under confined and unconfined radial convergent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Silvia; Molinari, Antonio; Fallico, Carmine; Pedretti, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneity and connectivity have a significant impact on the fate and transport of contaminants due to the occurrence of formations with largest permeability than the surrounding geological materials, which can originate preferential pathways in groundwater system. These issues are usually addressed by tracer tests and a radial convergent (RC) flow setting is typically selected for convenience but more complicated for model interpretation than uniform flow transport. An experimental investigation was performed using RC tracer tests in a 3D intermediate scale physical model to illustrate the role of connected features on the estimation of dispersivity using the classical Sauty solution and the method of moments, under confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. The physical model consists of 26 piezometers located at difference distances from a constant-discharge central pumping well. The box is filled with gravel channels embedded in a sandy matrix and organized in different layers. Materials have been well characterized before and after the test. For the confined configuration, a silt layer was placed above the previous layers. Tracer tests were performed using potassium iodide solutions with concentration of 3•10-3 M and under a constant pumping flow rate of 0.05 L/s. To mimic a pulse injection in each piezometer we used syringes and pipes, whereas a probe allowed continuous measuring of tracer concentration. Average velocity and longitudinal dispersion coefficient were defined from the first and second central moment of the observed breakthrough curves for each piezometer (integrated over the outflow boundary of the domain) and using the classical curve matching from the Sauty's solution at different Péclet numbers. Results reveal in some cases that estimates of hydrodynamic parameters from the Sauty solution and the method of moments seem to be different. This is related to the different basic assumptions of the two methods applied, and especially because

  2. Investigations of Particle Velocities in a Slurry Pump Using PIV. Part 1; The Tongue and Adjacent Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Charoenngam, Pathom; Subramanian, Amirthaganesh; Wernet, Mark P.; Sankovic, John M.; Addie, Graeme; Courtwright, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Transport of solid-liquid slurries in pipeline transport over short and medium distances is very important in many industries, including mining related processes. The particle image velocimetry technique was successfully utilized to investigate the velocities and kinetic energy fluctuations of slurry particles at the tongue region of an optically-clear centrifugal pump. The experiments were conducted using 500 micron glass beads at volumetric Concentrations of 2.5% and 5% and at pump speeds of 725 rpm and 1000 rpm. The fluctuation kinetic energy increased approximately 200% to 500% as the pump speed was increased from 725 rpm to IO00 rpm. The directional impingement mechanism is more significant at the pressure side of the blade, tongue and the casing. This mechanism becomes more important as the speed increases. This suggests that the impeller; tongue and the casing of the slurry pump can wear out quickly, especially with an increase in speed. In this paper the emphasis is on the tongue region. The random impingement mechanism caused by the fluctuation kinetic energy of the solids can play an important role on the erosion of the tongue area.

  3. Investigations of Particle Velocities in a Slurry Pump Using PIV. Part 1; The Tongue and Adjacent Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Charoenngam, Pathom; Subramanian, Amirthaganesh; Wernet, Mark P.; Sankovic, John M.; Addie, Graeme; Courtwright, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Transport of solid-liquid slurries in pipeline transport over short and medium distances is very important in many industries, including mining related processes. The particle image velocimetry technique was successfully utilized to investigate the velocities and kinetic energy fluctuations of slurry particles at the tongue region of an optically-clear centrifugal pump. The experiments were conducted using 500 micron glass beads at volumetric Concentrations of 2.5% and 5% and at pump speeds of 725 rpm and 1000 rpm. The fluctuation kinetic energy increased approximately 200% to 500% as the pump speed was increased from 725 rpm to IO00 rpm. The directional impingement mechanism is more significant at the pressure side of the blade, tongue and the casing. This mechanism becomes more important as the speed increases. This suggests that the impeller; tongue and the casing of the slurry pump can wear out quickly, especially with an increase in speed. In this paper the emphasis is on the tongue region. The random impingement mechanism caused by the fluctuation kinetic energy of the solids can play an important role on the erosion of the tongue area.

  4. The galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way and M31 from chemical evolution models with gas radial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitoni, E.; Matteucci, F.; Sozzetti, A.

    2014-05-01

    The galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with sufficient abundance of heavy elements to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life, after surviving to close supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. We apply detailed chemical evolution models including radial gas flows to study the galactic habitable zones in our Galaxy and M31. We compare the results to the relative galactic habitable zones found with `classical' (independent ring) models, where no gas inflows were included. For both the Milky Way and Andromeda, the main effect of the gas radial inflows is to enhance the number of stars hosting a habitable planet with respect to the `classical' model results, in the region of maximum probability for this occurrence, relative to the classical model results. These results are obtained by taking into account the supernova destruction processes. In particular, we find that in the Milky Way the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic Centre, and the model with radial flows predicts a number which is 38 per cent larger than what was predicted by the classical model. For Andromeda we find that the maximum number of stars with habitable planets is at 16 kpc from the centre and that in the case of radial flows this number is larger by 10 per cent relative to the stars predicted by the classical model.

  5. Axisymmetric flow and heat transfer to modified second grade fluid over a radially stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Rahman, Masood ur; Manzur, Mehwish

    In the present work, an analysis is made to the two-dimensional axisymmetric flow and heat transfer of a modified second grade fluid over an isothermal non-linear radially stretching sheet. The momentum and energy equations are modelled and the boundary layer equations are derived. The governing equations for velocity and temperature are turned down into a system of ordinary differential equations by invoking appropriate transformations which are then solved numerically via fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method. Moreover, the influence of the pertinent parameters namely the generalized second grade parameter, stretching parameter, the power-law index and the generalized Prandtl number is graphically portrayed. It is inferred that the generalized second grade parameter uplifted the momentum boundary layer while lessened the thermal boundary layer. Furthermore, the impact of stretching parameter is more pronounced for the second grade fluid (m = 0) in contrast with the power-law fluid (k = 0). For some special cases, comparisons are made with previously reported results and an excellent agreement is established.

  6. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  7. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, Walter A.; Gorski, Alan; Jaehnig, Leo J.; Moskal, Clifford J.; Naylor, Joseph D.; Parimi, Krishnia; Ward, John V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

  8. Linear stability of a circular Couette flow under a radial thermoelectric body force.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H N; Meyer, A; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2015-03-01

    The stability of the circular Couette flow of a dielectric fluid is analyzed by a linear perturbation theory. The fluid is confined between two concentric cylindrical electrodes of infinite length with only the inner one rotating. A temperature difference and an alternating electric tension are applied to the electrodes to produce a radial dielectrophoretic body force that can induce convection in the fluid. We examine the effects of superposition of this thermoelectric force with the centrifugal force including its thermal variation. The Earth's gravity is neglected to focus on the situations of a vanishing Grashof number such as microgravity conditions. Depending on the electric field strength and of the temperature difference, critical modes are either axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric, occurring in either stationary or oscillatory states. An energetic analysis is performed to determine the dominant destabilizing mechanism. When the inner cylinder is hotter than the outer one, the circular Couette flow is destabilized by the centrifugal force for weak and moderate electric fields. The critical mode is steady axisymmetric, except for weak fields within a certain range of the Prandtl number and of the radius ratio of the cylinders, where the mode is oscillatory and axisymmetric. The frequency of this oscillatory mode is correlated with a Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the stratification of both the density and the electric permittivity of the fluid. Under strong electric fields, the destabilization by the dielectrophoretic force is dominant, leading to oscillatory nonaxisymmetric critical modes with a frequency scaled by the frequency of the inner-cylinder rotation. When the outer cylinder is hotter than the inner one, the instability is again driven by the centrifugal force. The critical mode is axisymmetric and either steady under weak electric fields or oscillatory under strong electric fields. The frequency of the oscillatory mode is also correlated with the

  9. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  10. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  11. Three-dimensional inviscid analysis of radial-turbine flow and a limited comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y. K.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional inviscid DENTON code is used to analyze flow through a radial-inflow turbine rotor. Experimental data from the rotor are compared with analytical results obtained by using the code. The experimental data available for comparison are the radial distributions of circumferentially averaged values of absolute flow angle and total pressure downstream of the rotor exit. The computed rotor-exit flow angles are generally underturned relative to the experimental values, which reflect the boundary-layer separation at the trailing edge and the development of wakes downstream of the rotor. The experimental rotor is designed for a higher-than-optimum work factor of 1.126 resulting in a nonoptimum positive incidence and causing a region of rapid flow adjustment and large velocity gradients. For this experimental rotor, the computed radial distribution of rotor-exit to turbine-inlet total pressure ratios are underpredicted due to the errors in the finite-difference approximations in the regions of rapid flow adjustment, and due to using the relatively coarser grids in the middle of the blade region where the flow passage is highly three-dimensional. Additional results obtained from the three-dimensional inviscid computation are also presented, but without comparison due to the lack of experimental data. These include quasi-secondary velocity vectors on cross-channel surfaces, velocity components on the meridional and blade-to-blade surfaces, and blade surface loading diagrams. Computed results show the evolution of a passage vortex and large streamline deviations from the computational streamwise grid lines. Experience gained from applying the code to a radial turbine geometry is also discussed.

  12. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  13. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-12-31

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  14. Multi-stage slurry system used for grinding and polishing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hed, P. Paul; Fuchs, Baruch A.

    2001-01-01

    A slurry system draws slurry from a slurry tank via one of several intake pipes, where each pipe has an intake opening at a different depth in the slurry. The slurry is returned to the slurry tank via a bypass pipe in order to continue the agitation of the slurry. The slurry is then diverted to a delivery pipe, which supplies slurry to a polisher. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is stopped in order for the slurry in the slurry tank to begin to settle. As the polishing continues, slurry is removed from shallower depths in order to pull finer grit from the slurry. When the polishing is complete, the flow in the delivery pipe is ceased. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is resumed to start agitating the slurry. In another embodiment, the multiple intake pipes are replaced by a single adjustable pipe. As the slurry is settling, the pipe is moved upward to remove the finer grit near the top of the slurry tank as the polishing process continues.

  15. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively.

  16. The origins of radial fracture systems and associated large lava flows on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, Elisabeth A.; Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Magellan images have revealed the existence of systems of radial fractures on venus that are very similar in form to terrestrial dike swarms such as the Mackenzie swarm in Northern Canada. The association of many of the fracture systems with lava flows, calderas, and volcanic edifices further support the idea of a dike emplacement origin. A global survey of the Magellan images has allowed the location of 300 such fracture systems. Two types of fracture systems are defined. A series of models were developed to simulate the emplacement of dikes on Venus. Observations of fracture lengths and widths were then used to constrain the emplacement conditions. The model results show that the great length and relatively large width of the fractures can only be explained if the dikes that produce them were emplaced in high driving pressure (pressure buffered) conditions. Such conditions imply high rates of melt production, which is consistent with the melt being derived directly from a plume head. We have recently modeled the vertical emplacement of a dike from the top of a mantle plume and calculated the eruption rates such a dike would produce on reaching the surface. This modeling shows that eruption rates of approximately 0.1 cu km/hr can readily be generated by such a dike, consistent with the above results. However, the sensitivity of the model to dike width and therefore driving pressure means that eruption rates from dikes emplaced from the base of the crust or the head of a mantle plume could be orders of magnitude higher than this. Clearly, therefore, the model needs to be refined in order to better constrain eruption conditions. However, it is worth noting here that the initial results do show that even for moderate dike widths, eruption rates could be at least on the order of those estimated for terrestrial flood basalts.

  17. Full-scale cold-flow modelling of the SRC-I slurry fired heater at Creare, Inc. mixing and 1/sup 0/ downslope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    One of the major pieces of equipment in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant is the slurry fired heater. Because of the absence of any plant data at comparable combinations of operating severity, a cold-flow modelling experimental program was initiated at Creare, Inc. The first phase of the test program confirmed the fired heater design and established reliable boundaries of flow rates for proper operation of the fired heater. An experimental setup was designed and built at Creare to duplicate the piping arrangement and flow conditions of the fired heater. The pipe dimensions, flow rates, and fluid properties were selected to minimize areas of scale-up and extrapolation. This follow-up test program was developed to resolve concerns raised from the observations made in the first phase. Tests were conducted to establish the extent of mixing between the liquid carpet and the fast-moving liquid slugs above it. The other segment of the test program was designed to develop the flow regime and pressure drop data in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. The results demonstrated a significant amount of mixing between the liquid carpet and the liquid slugs for water and the 400-cP fluid at the design flow conditions. The extent of mixing improved with increasing liquid and gas velocities and decreasing liquid viscosities. Adequate mixing was observed at liquid flow rates as low as 50% of the design flow conditions. Slug flow was observed at design conditions in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. Although adequate mixing is expected in heater pipes, different techniques should be investigated to improve the extent of mixing, especially near the transition boundary. 4 references, 5 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Anatomical features that facilitate radial flow across growth rings and from xylem to cambium in Cryptomeria japonica

    PubMed Central

    Kitin, Peter; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Abe, Hisashi; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the lateral movement of water and gas in tree stems is an important issue for understanding tree physiology, as well as for the development of wood preservation technologies, little is known about the vascular pathways for radial flow. The aim of the current study was to understand the occurrence and the structure of anatomical features of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) wood including the tracheid networks, and area fractions of intertracheary pits, tangential walls of ray cells and radial intercellular spaces that may be related to the radial permeability (conductivity) of the xylem. Methods Wood structure was investigated by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of traditional wood anatomical preparations and by a new method of exposed tangential faces of growth-ring boundaries. Key Results Radial wall pitting and radial grain in earlywood and tangential wall pitting in latewood provide a direct connection between subsequent tangential layers of tracheids. Bordered pit pairs occur frequently between earlywood and latewood tracheids on both sides of a growth-ring boundary. In the tangential face of the xylem at the interface with the cambium, the area fraction of intertracheary pit membranes is similar to that of rays (2·8 % and 2·9 %, respectively). The intercellular spaces of rays are continuous across growth-ring boundaries. In the samples, the mean cross-sectional area of individual radial intercellular spaces was 1·2 µm2 and their total volume was 0·06 % of that of the xylem and 2·07 % of the volume of rays. Conclusions A tracheid network can provide lateral apoplastic transport of substances in the secondary xylem of sugi. The intertracheid pits in growth-ring boundaries can be considered an important pathway, distinct from that of the rays, for transport of water across growth rings and from xylem to cambium. PMID:19258338

  19. Radial dispersion of red blood cells in blood flowing through glass capillaries: the role of hematocrit and geometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rui; Ishikawa, Takuji; Imai, Yohsuke; Takeda, Motohiro; Wada, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2008-07-19

    The flow properties of blood in the microcirculation depend strongly on the hematocrit (Hct), microvessel geometry, and cell properties. Previous in vitro studies have measured the radial displacement of red blood cells (RBCs) at concentrated suspensions using conventional microscopes. However, to measure the RBCs motion they used transparent suspensions of ghost red cells, which may have different physical properties than normal RBCs. The present study introduces a new approach (confocal micro-PTV) to measure the motion of labeled RBCs flowing in concentrated suspensions of normal RBCs. The ability of confocal systems to obtain thin in-focus planes allowed us to measure the radial position of individual RBCs accurately and to consequently measure the interaction between multiple labeled RBCs. All the measurements were performed in the center plane of both 50 and 100 microm glass capillaries at Reynolds numbers (Re) from 0.003 to 0.005 using Hcts from 2% to 35%. To quantify the motion and interaction of multiple RBCs, we used the RBC radial dispersion (D(yy)). Our results clearly demonstrate that D(yy) strongly depends on the Hct. The RBCs exhibited higher D(yy) at radial positions between 0.4 and 0.8R and lower D(yy) at locations adjacent to the wall (0.8-1R) and around the middle of the capillary (0-0.2R). The present work also demonstrates that D(yy) tends to decrease with a decrease in the diameter. The information provided by this study not only complements previous investigations on microhemorheology of both dilute and concentrated suspensions of RBCs, but also shows the influence of both Hct and geometry on the radial dispersion of RBCs. This information is important for a better understanding of blood mass transport mechanisms under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  20. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  1. Sound fields in a lined annular flow duct with lined radial splitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungur, P.; Kapur, A.

    1974-01-01

    High attenuation in the inlet duct of fan-jet engines is limited mainly because of two factors: the duct length is short and the frequency is high giving rise to a large duct width to wavelength ratio. Lined radial splitters may be installed. In this configuration not only is the absorbing surface area increased, the acoustic propagation properties in each of the segmented ducts are different to those in a cylindrical or annular duct without radial splitters. Such differences in properties can be used to advantage for mismatching the acoustic source. A lower order spinning mode must propagate as a higher order (integral or fractional) spinning mode. Cut-off phenomena may also be used to advantage. A theoretical modal analysis is made of the sound inside one segment of the annular duct with lined radial splitters.

  2. Impact behavior of a high viscosity magnetorheological fluid-based energy absorber with a radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Benyuan; Liao, Changrong; Li, Zhuqiang; Xie, Lei; Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    High viscosity linear polysiloxane magnetorheological fluid (HVLP MRF) was demonstrated with excellent suspension stability. Such material is suitable for application in the magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) under axial impact loading conditions. On this basis, a new energy absorber incorporating a radial valve with high magnetic field utilization and a corrugated tube is proposed. In energy absorption applications where the MREA is rarely if ever used, our MREA takes the ultra-stable HVLP MRF as controlled medium in order for a long-term stability. For MREA performing at very high shear rates where the minor losses are important contributing factors to damping, a nonlinear analytical model, based on the Herschel-Bulkley flow model (HB model), is developed taking into account the effects of minor losses (called HBM model). The HB model parameters are determined by rheological experiments with a commercial shear rheometer. Then, continuity equation and governing differential equation of the HVLP MRF in radial flow are established. Based on the HB model, the expressions of radial velocity distribution are deduced. The influences of minor losses on pressure drop are analyzed with mean fluid velocities. Further, mechanical behavior of the corrugated tube is investigated via drop test. In order to verify the theoretical methodology, a MREA is fabricated and tested using a high-speed drop tower facility with a 600 kg mass at different drop heights and in various magnetic fields. The experiment results show that the HBM model is capable of well predicting the impact behavior of the proposed MREA.

  3. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  4. Experimental characterization of slurry bubble-column reactor hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.; Jackson, N.B.; O`Hern, T.J.

    1997-09-01

    Sandia`s program to develop, implement, and apply diagnostics for hydrodynamic characterization of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) at industrially relevant conditions is discussed. Gas liquid flow experiments are performed on an industrial scale. Gamma densitometry tomography (GDT) is applied to measure radial variations in gas holdup at one axial location. Differential pressure (DP) measurements are used to calculate volume averaged gas holdups along the axis of the vessel. The holdups obtained from DP show negligible axial variation for water but significant variations for oil, suggesting that the air water flow is fully developed (minimal flow variations in the axial direction) but that the air oil flow is still developing at the GDT measurement location. The GDT and DP gas holdup results are in good agreement for the air water flow but not for the air oil flow. Strong flow variations in the axial direction may be impacting the accuracy of one or both of these techniques. DP measurements are also acquired at high sampling frequencies (250 Hz) and are interpreted using statistical analyses to determine the physical mechanism producing each frequency component in the flow. This approach did not yield the information needed to determine the flow regime in these experiments. As a first step toward three phase material distribution measurements, electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and GDT are applied to a liquid solid flow to measure solids holdup. Good agreement is observed between both techniques and known values.

  5. Eulerian-Lagrangian large eddy simulations of dense liquid-solid slurry flow through a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    A high-fidelity large eddy simulation based Eulerian-Lagrangian methodology is used to investigate the detailed dynamics of liquid-solid slurries in a horizontal pipe. A dynamic Smagorinsky model based on Lagrangian averaging is employed to account for the sub-grid scale effects in the liquid phase. A fully conservative immersed boundary method is used to account for the pipe geometry on a uniform cartesian grid. The liquid and solid phases are coupled through volume fraction and the momentum exchange terms. Particle-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere approach. Mean particle concentration and velocity profiles are computed, showing excellent agreement with experimental data. Covariance statistics are extracted and compared against multiphase turbulence models in the literature. When the bulk liquid velocity is below the critical deposition velocity, particles form a static bed at the bottom that exhibits strong size segregation. Based on our numerical simulations, a critical value for the Froude number is proposed below which the solid particles starts depositing.

  6. System and method for continuous solids slurry depressurization

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas Frederick; Steele, Raymond Douglas; Cordes, Stephen Michael

    2017-07-11

    A system includes a first pump having a first outlet and a first inlet, and a controller. The first pump is configured to continuously receive a flow of a slurry into the first outlet at a first pressure and to continuously discharge the flow of the slurry from the first inlet at a second pressure less than the first pressure. The controller is configured to control a first speed of the first pump against the flow of the slurry based at least in part on the first pressure, wherein the first speed of the first pump is configured to resist a backflow of the slurry from the first outlet to the first inlet.

  7. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  8. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7 TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.

  9. Step Flow Model of Radial Growth and Shape Evolution of Semiconductor Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, S. N.; Hervieu, Yu. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    A model of radial growth of vertically aligned nanowires (NW) via formation and propagation of monoatomic steps at nanowire sidewalls is developed. The model allows to describe self-consistently the step dynamics and the axial growth of the NW. It is shown that formation of NWs with an abrupt change of wire diameter and a non-tapered section at the top might be explained by the bunching of sidewall steps due to the presence of a strong sink for adatoms at the NW top. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier for the attachment of adatoms to the descending step favors the step bunching at the beginning of the radial growth and promotes the decay of the bunch at a later time of the NW growth.

  10. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  11. Application of fluid mechanic and kinetic models to characterize mammalian cell detachment in a radial-flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A S; Dimilla, P A

    1997-08-20

    The strength of adhesion and dynamics of detachment of murine 3T3 fibroblasts from self-assembled monolayers were measured in a radial-flow chamber (RFC) by applying models for fluid mechanics, adhesion strength probability distributions, and detachment kinetics. Four models for predicting fluid mechanics in a RFC were compared to evaluate the accuracy of each model and the significance of inlet effects. Analysis of these models indicated an outer region at large radial positions consistent with creeping flow, an intermediate region influenced by inertial dampening, and an inner region dominated by entrance effects from the axially-oriented inlet. In accompanying experiments patterns of the fraction of cells resisting detachment were constructed for individual surfaces as a function of the applied shear stress and evaluated by comparison with integrals of both a normal and a log-normal distribution function. The two functions were equally appropriate, yielding similar estimates of the mean strength of adhesion. Further, varying the Reynolds number in the inlet, Re(d), between 630 and 1480 (corresponding to volumetric flow rates between 0.9 and 2.1 mL/s) did not affect the mean strength of adhesion. For these same experiments, analysis of the dynamics of detachment revealed three temporal phases: 1) rapid detachment of cells at the onset of flow, consistent with a first-order homogeneous kinetic model; 2) time-dependent rate of detachment during the first 30 sec. of exposure to hydrodynamic shear, consistent with the first-order heterogeneous kinetic model proposed by Dickinson and Cooper (1995); and 3) negligible detachment, indicative of pseudo-steady state after 60 sec. of flow. Our results provide rigorous guidelines for the measurement of adhesive interactions between mammalian cells and prospective biomaterial surfaces using a RFC. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 616-629, 1997.

  12. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  13. A mathematical model linking tree sap flow dynamics to daily stem diameter fluctuations and radial stem growth.

    PubMed

    Steppe, Kathy; De Pauw, Dirk J W; Lemeur, Raoul; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2006-03-01

    To date, models for simulating sap flow dynamics in individual trees with a direct link to stem diameter variation include only the diameter fluctuation driven by a change in stem water storage. This paper reports results obtained with a comprehensive flow and storage model using whole-tree leaf transpiration as the only input variable. The model includes radial stem growth based on Lockhart's equation for irreversible cell expansion. It was demonstrated that including growth is essential to obtaining good simulation results. To model sap flow dynamics, capacitance of storage tissues was assumed either constant (i.e., electrical analogue approach) or variable and dependent on the water content of the respective storage tissue (i.e., hydraulic system approach). These approaches resulted in different shapes for the desorption curve used to calculate the capacitance of storage tissues. Comparison of these methods allowed detection of specific differences in model simulation of sap flow at the stem base (F(stem)) and stem diameter variation (D). Sensitivity analysis was performed to select a limited subset of identifiable parameters driving most of the variability in model predictions of F(stem) and D Both the electrical analogue and the hydraulic system approach for the flow and storage model were successfully calibrated and validated for the case of a young beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.). Use of an objective model selection criterion revealed that the flow and storage model based on the electrical analogue approach yielded better predictions.

  14. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  15. Particle simulations of divergent and convergent radial electron flows in cylindrical Pierce diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, M.V.; Gratton, F.T.; Gnavi, G.; Moreno, C.H.

    1997-08-01

    A special class of Pierce diodes, that consists of a pair of grounded coaxial cylindrical electrodes, with electrons streaming radially between them, is studied. The full set of roots of the dispersion relation of the Pierce instability is obtained by solving the dispersion relation numerically. The nonlinear behaviour of the system is then investigated using particle simulation. It is shown that the behaviour of cylindrical systems depends on two nondimensional parameters. Linear and nonlinear properties are different for convergent and divergent configurations. Several remarkable differences between cylindrical and planar Pierce diodes are reported. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Adhesion of nonmotile Pseudomonas aeruginosa on "soft" polyelectrolyte layer in a radial stagnation point flow system: measurements and model predictions.

    PubMed

    de Kerchove, Alexis J; Weroński, Paweł; Elimelech, Menachem

    2007-11-20

    Prediction of bacterial deposition rates onto substrates in natural aquatic systems is quite challenging because of the inherent complexity of such systems. In this study, we compare experimental deposition kinetics of nonmotile bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) on an alginate-coated substrate in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system to predictions based on DLVO theory. The "softness" of the surface layer of the bacteria and alginate-coated substrate was considered in the calculations of their electrokinetic surface properties, and the relevance of both the classical zeta potential and the outer surface potential as surrogates for surface potential was investigated. Independent of the used electrical potentials, we showed that significant discrepancies exist between theory and experiments. Analysis of microscopic images in the RSPF system has demonstrated, for the first time, that irreversible deposition of particles or cells entrapped in the secondary energy minimum can occur on the alginate layer, despite the hydrodynamic forces resulting from the radial flow in the RSPF system. It is suggested that polymeric structures associated with the surface of the particle/cell and the alginate-coated substrate are responsible for the transition between the secondary minimum and primary energy well. This mode of deposition is likely to be important in the deposition of microorganisms in complex aquatic systems.

  17. A Radial Flow Microfluidic Device for Ultra-high-throughput Affinity-based Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Zeinali, Mina; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Wicha, Max S.; Simeone, Diane M.; Ramnath, Nithya; Reddy, Rishindra M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to play an important role in metastasis, a process responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. But their rarity in the bloodstream makes microfluidic isolation complex and time-consuming. Additionally the low processing speeds can be a hindrance to obtaining higher yields of CTCs, limiting their potential use as biomarkers for early diagnosis. Here we report a high throughput microfluidic technology, the OncoBean Chip, employing radial flow that introduces a varying shear profile across the device enabling efficient cell capture by affinity at high flow rates. The recovery from whole blood was validated with cancer cell lines H1650 and MCF7, achieving a mean efficiency >80% at a throughput of 10 mL hr−1 in contrast to a flow rate of 1 mL hr−1 standardly reported with other microfluidic devices. Cells were recovered with a viability rate of 93% at these high speeds, increasing the ability to use captured CTCs for downstream analysis. Broad clinical application was demonstrated using comparable flow rates from blood specimens obtained from breast, pancreatic and lung cancer patients. Comparable CTC numbers were recovered in all the samples at the two flow rates demonstrating the ability of the technology to perform at high-throughputs. PMID:25074448

  18. A radial flow microfluidic device for ultra-high-throughput affinity-based isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Zeinali, Mina; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Wicha, Max S; Simeone, Diane M; Ramnath, Nithya; Reddy, Rishindra M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2014-12-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to play an important role in metastasis, a process responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. But their rarity in the bloodstream makes microfluidic isolation complex and time-consuming. Additionally the low processing speeds can be a hindrance to obtaining higher yields of CTCs, limiting their potential use as biomarkers for early diagnosis. Here, a high throughput microfluidic technology, the OncoBean Chip, is reported. It employs radial flow that introduces a varying shear profile across the device, enabling efficient cell capture by affinity at high flow rates. The recovery from whole blood is validated with cancer cell lines H1650 and MCF7, achieving a mean efficiency >80% at a throughput of 10 mL h(-1) in contrast to a flow rate of 1 mL h(-1) standardly reported with other microfluidic devices. Cells are recovered with a viability rate of 93% at these high speeds, increasing the ability to use captured CTCs for downstream analysis. Broad clinical application is demonstrated using comparable flow rates from blood specimens obtained from breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer patients. Comparable CTC numbers are recovered in all the samples at the two flow rates, demonstrating the ability of the technology to perform at high throughputs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Slurry Supplying Method for Large Quartz Glass Substrate Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajornrungruang, Panart; Kimura, Keiichi; Yui, Ryuji; Wada, Nagisa; Suzuki, Keisuke

    2011-05-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) has been used in polishing a photomask substrate in flat-panel display (FPD) manufacture. Moreover, the quadrilateral geometry of quartz glass used as the photomask substrate has been enlarged. However, the slurry cannot flow throughout the glass surface evenly owing to the enlarged substrate covering the center of the platen in the polishing process. In this work, we verified the beneficial of spreading slurry into a non-inflow region by the reinforced suction of the slurry supplied to the polishing pad through a hole at center of the platen. A fluorescent agent was used instead of the slurry for flow visualization.

  20. Ultrasound Analysis of Slurries

    DOEpatents

    Soong, Yee and Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N, gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  1. Ultrasound Analysis Of Slurries

    DOEpatents

    Soong, Yee; Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N.sub.2 gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  2. Radial Hele-Shaw flow with suction: Fully nonlinear pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, José A.

    2014-05-01

    We study the development of intricate, fully nonlinear immiscible interfacial patterns in the suction-driven radial Hele-Shaw problem. The complex-shaped, contracting fluid-fluid interface arises when an initially circular blob of more viscous fluid, surrounded by less viscous one, is drawn into an eccentric point sink. We present sophisticated numerical simulations, based on a diffuse interface model, that capture the most prominent interfacial features revealed by existing experimental studies of the problem. The response of the system to changes in the capillary number is investigated, accurately revealing the occurrence of finger competition phenomena, and correctly describing the velocity behavior of both inward- and outward-pointing fingers. For the large-capillary-number regime, a set of complex interfacial features (finger merging, shielding, and pinch-off) whose experimental realization is still not available, are predicted.

  3. Large eddy simulations of the flow field of a radially lobed nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2016-11-01

    Lobed nozzles have been a studied over the past couple of decades due to their enhanced mixing capabilities. Despite experimental (Hu et al., 2000) and numerical studies (Cooper et al., 2005), the nature of the jet is yet to be fully understood. This numerical study intends to carry out a thorough analysis of the flow field within and downstream of a six lobed nozzle. The study aims to confirm vortical interaction mechanisms and establish the role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the mixing process. This was inspired by a prior study by the authors wherein the same flow was studied using hot-wire anemometry. Although this helped obtain a qualitative idea of the flow, the 2D data was incapable of visualizing streamwise structures and the flow within the nozzle. Previous numerical simulations have used RANS and to simulate a single lobe of the nozzle; these results show some deficiencies in predicting the potential core length. Previous simulations done by authors indicated that RANS models qualitatively capture the flow structures but do not accurately represent the values of key parameters in the flow field. The present study aims to perform a 3D LES study of the flow field within and downstream of the nozzle to follow the ensuing free jet and thus analyze various mechanisms.

  4. The investigation of flow instabilities on a rotating disk with curvature in the radial direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intemann, P. A.; Clarkson, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective is to explore any visible differences of the flow field with wall curvature of the test body, including possible interaction between Taylor-Gortler instabilities present along concave walls and the inflexional instabilities investigated here. An experimental study was conducted with emphasis placed on making visual observations and recording photographically the flow instabilities present under three different rotating bodies: a flat disk, a concave paraboloid, and a convex paraboloid. The data collected for the three test bodies lead to the conclusion that the wall curvature of the concave and convex paraboloids did not alter the observed flow field significantly from that observed on the flat disk.

  5. Method for varying the cross-sectional flow area in a radial gas turbine inlet

    SciTech Connect

    Stroem, S.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a method for varying the effective flow area of combustion gases in a gas turbine engine comprising the steps of: passing the combustion gases through a confined area; separating the gas flowing through the confined area into at least first and second streams of gas; injecting fluid under pressure into one of the first and second streams for closing off the flow of combustion gases in one of the streams; and channeling the remaining gas stream directly onto a turbine rotor.

  6. Presentation of the MERC work-flow for the computation of a 2D radial reflector in a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, T.; Hebert, A.; Leroyer, H.; Argaud, J. P.; Poncot, A.; Bouriquet, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a work-flow for computing an equivalent 2D radial reflector in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core, in adequacy with a reference power distribution, computed with the method of characteristics (MOC) of the lattice code APOLLO2. The Multi-modelling Equivalent Reflector Computation (MERC) work-flow is a coherent association of the lattice code APOLLO2 and the core code COCAGNE, structured around the ADAO (Assimilation de Donnees et Aide a l'Optimisation) module of the SALOME platform, based on the data assimilation theory. This study leads to the computation of equivalent few-groups reflectors, that can be spatially heterogeneous, which have been compared to those obtained with the OPTEX similar methodology developed with the core code DONJON, as a first validation step. Subsequently, the MERC work-flow is used to compute the most accurate reflector in consistency with all the R and D choices made at Electricite de France (EDF) for the core modelling, in terms of number of energy groups and simplified transport solvers. We observe important reductions of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using equivalent reflectors obtained with the MERC work-flow. (authors)

  7. Cold Flow Diluent Mixing Study Using Radial High Density Ratio Jets into a Circular Freestream

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    CAD) solid models. From the CAD model, computational grids are generated for the CFD simulations using Gridgen v.15. Appropriate flow modeling...release, Distribution is unlimited 4 Figure 2: Geometry and Mesh Boundaries in Water Jet Simulations Grid Generation and Flow Model GRIDGEN v.15...generated using GRIDGEN v.15. Figure 4 shows the computational domain for the dual-jet configuration. The modeled domain contains 1.3 to 1.8

  8. Swirling Flow Computation at the Trailing Edge of Radial-Axial Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan-Resiga, Romeo; Muntean, Sebastian; Popescu, Constantin

    2016-11-01

    Modern hydraulic turbines require optimized runners within a range of operating points with respect to minimum weighted average draft tube losses and/or flow instabilities. Tractable optimization methodologies must include realistic estimations of the swirling flow exiting the runner and further ingested by the draft tube, prior to runner design. The paper presents a new mathematical model and the associated numerical algorithm for computing the swirling flow at the trailing edge of Francis turbine runner, operated at arbitrary discharge. The general turbomachinery throughflow theory is particularized for an arbitrary hub-to-shroud line in the meridian half-plane and the resulting boundary value problem is solved with the finite element method. The results obtained with the present model are validated against full 3D runner flow computations within a range of discharge value. The mathematical model incorporates the full information for the relative flow direction, as well as the curvatures of the hub-to-shroud line and meridian streamlines, respectively. It is shown that the flow direction can be frozen within a range of operating points in the neighborhood of the best efficiency regime.

  9. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Chris M.; Musich, Mark A.; Mann, Michael D.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Richter, John J.; Potas, Todd A.; Willson, Warrack G.

    2000-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  10. An experimental and computational investigation of flow in a radial inlet of an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.; Rainsberger, R.

    1996-04-01

    The flow field of a complex three-dimensional radial inlet for an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor has been experimentally determined on a half-scale model. Based on the experimental results, inlet guide vanes have been designed to correct pressure and swirl angle distribution deficiencies. The unvaned and vaned inlets are analyzed with a commercially available fully three-dimensional viscous Navier-Stokes code. Since experimental results were available prior to the numerical study, the unvaned analysis is considered a postdiction while the vaned analysis is considered a prediction. The computational results of the unvaned inlet have been compared to the previously obtained experimental results. The experimental method utilized for the unvaned inlet is repeated for the vaned inlet and the data have been used to verify the computational results. The paper will discuss experimental, design, and computational procedures, grid generation, boundary conditions, and experimental versus computational methods. Agreement between experimental and computational results is very good, both in prediction and postdiction modes. The results of this investigation indicate that CFD offers a measurable advantage in design, schedule, and cost and can be applied to complex, three-dimensional radial inlets.

  11. Experimental Study and Theoretical Analysis of the Rotating Stall in a Vaneless Diffuser of Radial Flow Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Y. G.; Dazin, A.; Ouarzazi, M. N.; Si, Q. R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports an experimental and theoretical study of rotating stall in a vaneless diffuser which is coupled with a radial impeller. The experiments were conducted at 22 flow rates for two rotating speed: 1200rpm and 1800rpm. The measurements have consisted of: i/ unsteady pressure measurements delivered by two microphones flush mounted on the vaneless diffuser, ii/ 9 steady pressure taps mounted in one radial line on the diffuser to measure the pressure recovery in the vaneless diffuser. The stability of each stall mode was also studied by a 2D linear analysis; and the theoretical prediction was compared to experimental observations. The capabilities and limits of such an approach to predict the development of rotating stall have been evaluated. A non-dimensional analysis of the pressure losses at outlet was conducted to evaluate the effect of the instability development on the performance of the diffuser. It has shown that the arising of rotating stall has a positive effect on the diffuser performance.

  12. A system for intravascular, radially orientation-independent electromagnetic flow- and diameter-sensing.

    PubMed

    Kolin, A

    1977-11-25

    The difficulty of optimally orienting an intravascular loop probe of an extracorporeal field electromagnetic flow meter is circumvented by uniting 2 mutually perpendicular loop sensors into a single flow-diameter probe. When one of the loops is unfavorably oriented in the magnetic field, the orientations of the other loop is more favorable. The most unfavorable case is a 45 degrees angle between the magnetic field and the planes of the loops, when the signal drops to 70.7% of the optimal value. By taking the square root of the sum of the squares of the 2 loop transducer signals, one obtains an output for flow and diameter measurements which is independent of the probe orientation. This operation can be accomplished electronically.

  13. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  14. Axisymmetric flow of a nanofluid over a radially stretching/shrinking sheet with a convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soid, Siti Khuzaimah; Ishak, Anuar

    2017-04-01

    An axisymmetric flow of a nanofluid past a radially stretching or shrinking sheet with a convective boundary condition is investigated. The effects of suction, Brownian motion and thermophoresis on the shear stress, heat and mass transfer are analyzed and discussed. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of ordinary (similarity) differential equations by a similarity transformation. These equations along with the corresponding boundary conditions are solved numerically using the boundary value problem solver (bvp4c) in Matlab. It is found that the magnitude of the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number increase as suction increases. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases as the Brownian motion parameter as well as the thermophoresis parameter increases.

  15. Motion of micrometer sized spherical particles exposed to a transient radial flow: attraction, repulsion, and rotation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Avila, S Roberto; Huang, Xiaohu; Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Wu, Tom; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2011-08-12

    It is now accepted that the physical forces in ultrasonic cleaning are due to strongly pulsating bubbles driven by the sound field. Here we have a detailed look at bubble induced cleaning flow by analyzing the transport of an individual particle near an expanding and collapsing bubble. The induced particulate transport is compared with a force balance model. We find two important properties of the flow which explain why bubbles are effectively cleaning: During bubble expansion a strong shear layer loosens the particle from the surface through particle spinning and secondly an unsteady boundary layer generates an attractive force, thus collecting the contamination in the bubble's close proximity.

  16. Microwave signal amplification and Pierce instability on radial electron flows in cylindrical and spherical diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnavi, G.; Gratton, F.T. )

    1994-11-01

    Linear space charge perturbations of focused electron beams flowing between cylindrical and spherical electrodes on convergent or divergent trajectories are studied, and the amplification of high-frequency signals when the flow is modulated at one electrode is computed. It is shown that divergent beams give the largest amplification effect. The instability of electron beams drifting through grounded grids (Pierce instability in cylindrical or spherical diodes) is also considered. The instability threshold occurs at higher critical currents when the curvature of the electrodes is large. Results for planar electrodes are recovered in the limit of zero curvature devices. Spherical configurations have better signal amplification and stability properties than similar planar or cylindrical systems.

  17. Mn2O3 Slurry Achieving Reduction of Slurry Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishii, Sadahiro; Nakamura, Ko; Hanawa, Kenzo; Watanabe, Satoru; Arimoto, Yoshihiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro K.

    2012-04-01

    Fumed silica is widely used for SiO2 chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In semiconductor processes, only fresh slurry is used, the used slurry being disposed of. We have demonstrated that Mn2O3 abrasive slurry polishes dielectric SiO2 film, giving 4 times the removal rate of conventional fumed silica slurry. The higher removal rate reduces the total amount of slurry used, consequently reducing the amount of used slurry waste. The removal rate of Mn2O3 slurry remains constant for solid concentrations between l and 10 wt %, and stays constant without pad conditioning. These characteristics are very useful for slurry reuse. Remanufacture of Mn2O3 slurry from used slurry has been demonstrated, and the removal rates of the remanufactured and fresh slurries are the same. Reuse and remanufacturing drastically reduce the amount of waste.

  18. Axisymmetric flow and heat transfer of the Carreau fluid due to a radially stretching sheet: Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Hashim

    2017-05-01

    The prime objective of this article is to study the axisymmetric flow and heat transfer of the Carreau fluid over a radially stretching sheet. The Carreau constitutive model is used to discuss the characteristics of both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. The momentum equations for the two-dimensional flow field are first modeled for the Carreau fluid with the aid of the boundary layer approximations. The essential equations of the problem are reduced to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using local similarity transformations. Numerical solutions of the governing differential equations are obtained for the velocity and temperature fields by using the fifth-order Runge-Kutta method along with the shooting technique. These solutions are obtained for various values of physical parameters. The results indicate substantial reduction of the flow velocity as well as the thermal boundary layer thickness for the shear-thinning fluid with an increase in the Weissenberg number, and the opposite behavior is noted for the shear-thickening fluid. Numerical results are validated by comparisons with already published results.

  19. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes stage analysis of the flow through a compact radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1991-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine stage. The code is based upon the average passage set of equations for turbomachinery, whereby the flow fields for all passages in a given blade row are assumed to be identical while retaining their three-dimensionality. A stage solution is achieved by alternating between stator and rotor calculations, while coupling the two solutions by means of a set of axisymmetric body forces which model the absent blade row. Results from the stage calculation are compared with experimental data and with results from an isolated rotor solution having axisymmetric inlet flow quantities upstream of the vacated stator space. Although the mass-averaged loss through the rotor is comparable for both solutions, the details of the loss distribution differ due to stator effects. The stage calculation predicts smaller spanwise variations in efficiency, in closer agreement with the data. The results of the study indicate that stage analyses hold promise for improved prediction of loss mechanisms in multi-blade row turbomachinery, which could lead to improved designs through the reduction of these losses.

  20. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes stage analysis of the flow through a compact radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1991-01-01

    A steady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine stage. The code is based upon the average passage set of equations for turbomachinery, whereby the flow fields for all passages in a given blade row are assumed to be identical while retaining their three-dimensionality. A stage solution is achieved by alternating between stator and rotor calculations, while coupling the two solutions by means of a set of axisymmetric body forces which model the absent blade row. Results from the stage calculation are compared with experimental data and with results from an isolated rotor solution having axisymmetric inlet flow quantities upstream of the vacated stator space. Although the mass-averaged loss through the rotor is comparable for both solutions, the details of the loss distribution differ due to stator effects. The stage calculation predicts smaller spanwise variations in efficiency, in closer agreement with the data. The results of the study indicate that stage analyses hold promise for improved prediction of loss mechanisms in multi-blade row turbomachinery, which could lead to improved designs through the reduction of these losses.

  1. Rotor cavity flow and heat transfer with inlet swirl and radial inflow of cooling air

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    To improve the reliability of turbine disc life prediction, experimental verification is required of analytical tools that calculate the flow field and heat transfer coefficients in turbine-stator cavities. In these experiments a full-scale model of the aft (downstream) cavity of a typical aircraft gas turbine was employed using a high-molecular-weight gas (Refrigerant-12) at ambient pressure and temperature conditions to match the dimensionless parameters at engine conditions. The cavity temperature and selected cavity velocity profiles were measured. Electrical heat addition was employed with liquid crystal surface temperature measurement to obtain local disc heat transfer coefficients. Cooling gas flow was added with inlet swirl near the outer diameter of the rotor and discharged near the rotor hub. Rotational Reynolds numbers were varied up to 8 {times} 10{sup 6} with the swirl Reynolds number variation up to 1.4 {times} 10{sup 5}. Rotor heat transfer coefficients are larger when they are dominated by either the inlet swirl flow or by the rotor angular velocity and are the lowest when neither inlet swirl flow nor the rotor velocity are dominant. A CFD code was employed to illustrate the effect of the velocity field on disc heat transfer.

  2. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kauffeld, M.; WANG, M. J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  3. Performance simulation of a radial flow type impeller of centrifugal pumps using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Chávez, S.; García., M.

    2017-01-01

    The numerical simulation of a centrifugal impeller that had previously been designed and manufactured is presented in this paper. The following operating conditions were determined: 0.50 m3/min volumetric flow at a load of 25 m, velocity of rotation of 1750 rpm, and specific velocity of 0. 27. The ANSYS CFX 14.5 software with the k-ε turbulence model was used for simulation with appropriate boundary conditions. The distributions of velocities in the flow field in addition to the distribution of pressures on the entire impeller were obtained. The simulation showed no negative values for the pressure at the entrance of the impeller. The curve of hydrodynamic behaviour of the impeller, which contains the point of operation in which the pump will work was also developed.

  4. Numerical simulation of the flow field from a radially lobed nozzle and validation via HWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    With a constant need for higher performance and efficiency in engineering (particularly aerospace) applications, lobed nozzles have experienced a regained interest in the recent past, owing to their superior mixing capabilities. Although previous experimental studies (Hu et al. 1999, Hu et al. 2008) have analyzed the flow field from lobed nozzles and made conjectures about the physics and flow mechanisms involved, the absence of a ``complete'' 3D dataset elicits unanswered questions. The present numerical study is intended as a complement to an existing experimental (single component hot wire anemometry) investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (N. Amini et al., 2012). A full 3D URANS simulation of the lobed nozzle is carried out, initially validated with experimental data, and then used to examine the stream-wise vortices and obtain a visual corroboration of the structure formation and breakup mechanism as described earlier (Hu et al., 2008). Further, the study takes a close look at the nature of the instabilities which trigger and enhance the mixing process in lobed nozzles in order to determine the precise role of the lobes and eventually obtain more effective mixing in industrial applications.

  5. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W.L. ); Swanson, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The numerical solution of a thin film flow is difficult since the free surface geometry changes along the path of the flow, is unknown ahead of time, and cannot be fitted in a regular Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate system. Therefore, most theoretical studies in this area were related to the development of approximate analytical models (Faghri and Seban, 1981; Chaudhury, 1964). The finite-difference solution was attempted only for a falling film (Faghri and Payvar, 1979) where the film thickness could be approximated to be uniform. Recently, Rahman et al. (1990a) have developed a finite-difference solution method applicable for the fluid mechanics of thin film flows under zero and normal gravity. A body-fitted coordinate system was used where the free surface was approximated by a curve and iterated for the best possible solution. The present study is intended to incorporate the energy equation in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990a) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. In addition to the enhancement of the knowledge of thin film heat transfer, the results of the present study may be directly applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  6. [Radial variation and time lag of sap flow of Populus gansuensis in Minqin Oasis, Northwest].

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Zhang, You-Yan; Li, Chang-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sap flow of tree trunk is very important to reflect the dynamics of physiological activities, as well as to estimate the water consumption of individual plant. In the present study, we used the thermal dissipation technique to monitor the sap flow velocity (J) at four depth loci (i. e. 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm) of three Populus gansuensis trees (30 year-old) in Minqin Oasis for two consecutive growing seasons. The results showed that there were significant differences among J values at four depth loci under tree trunk cambium. J value at the 3 cm depth locus (J3) of the tree trunk was the highest, and then in sequences, were 2 cm, 5 cm and 8 cm depth loci (J2, J5 and J8). J value (J3) on typical sunny days in June with the highest atmospheric potential evapotranspiration (ET0) was up to 28.53 g · cm(-2) · h(-1), which was 1.42, 2.74 and 4.4 times of J2, J5 and J8, respectively. In the process of diurnal variation of sap flow velocity, the peak value time of J at the four depth loci of the tree trunk was different, but the differences among them were within 20 min. Furthermore, the peak value time of sap flow velocity was very different to that of solar radiation (Rs) and air vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The time lag between J and Rs was from 55 to 88 min on typical sunny days during the main growing seasons (from June to August), and, positively related to the depth of the locus under tree trunk cambium, while the time lag between J and VPD reached 60-96 min, and was negatively related to the depth of the locus. The seasonal variation patterns of J were consistent with ET0. With the increase of tree physiological activities, there was a trend that the major water transportation layer extended to the interior sapwood. The most important meteorological factor was the solar radiation, which primarily drove sap flow at different depths of tree trunk. However, the secondary factor changed along with the depth, and VPD became increasingly important with increasing the

  7. Approximate analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The streams with low-permeability streambeds fully penetrate the aquifer. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. Robin boundary conditions are adopted to describe fluxes across the streambeds. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of finite integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length, and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow for the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  8. Analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2015-08-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of double-integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  9. Gypsum crystal size distribution in four continuous flow stirred slurry boric acid reactors in series compared with the batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakal, G. Ö.; Eroğlu, İ.; Özkar, S.

    2006-04-01

    Colemanite, one of the important boron minerals, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid. In this reaction, gypsum is obtained as a by-product. Gypsum crystals are in the shape of thin needles. These crystals should be grown to an easily filterable size in order to increase the production yield and purity of boric acid. In this paper, the particle size distributions and the volume-weighted mean diameters of the gypsum crystals obtained in batch and continuous flow systems were compared. Experiments in both batch and continuous reactors were performed at a temperature of 85 °C, a stirring rate of 400 rpm, and the inlet CaO to SO42- molar ratio of 1.0 using colemanite mineral in particle size smaller than 150 μm. The average diameter of the gypsum crystals obtained at 3.5 h from the batch reactor was found to be 37-41 μm. This value for the continuous system at steady state was observed to change between 44-163 μm. The particle size of the gypsum crystals was found to increase with the residence time of the solid in the continuous system.

  10. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  11. Large Eddy Simulations and an Analysis of the Flow Field of a Radially Lobed Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2015-11-01

    Lobed nozzles have been a subject of regained interest over the past couple of decades owing to their established mixing capabilities. Despite experimental (Hu et al., 1999 and Hu et al., 2008) and limited numerical studies (Boulenouar et al. 2011 and Cooper et al., 2005), the exact nature of the jet ensuing from this nozzle is yet to be completely understood. The present numerical study is intended to complement prior experimental investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (Amini et al., 2012). Preliminary results (presented at DFD 2014, Amin and Sekaran), which involved three dimensional simulations of the full domain via URANS and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were used to assess the domain extents and simulation technique. Based on these results it was seen that LES were able to capture the region of interest satisfactorily and a qualitative corroboration with previous studies was obtained. The study is thus extended to analyzing the flow originating from within the nozzle, following it downstream in order to confirm the vortical interaction mechanisms inside the lobed nozzle.

  12. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  13. Radial, mixed and axial-flow pumps: Size estimation and specification, amendment A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    This Data Item is available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Fluid Mechanics Internal Flow. Performance estimates for a wide range of rotodynamic pumps are provided in order to anticipate the salient features of a suitable standard pump. This information which would otherwise only be available from a bulky collection of manufacturers' catalogs is complemented by a methodical procedure to pinpoint the most suitable pump configuration. Charts giving rapid estimates of size and efficiency (with formulae to allow easy programming for calculators or computers) are given together with approximate correlations of suction and discharge flange sizes, and data showing the effects that liquids of high viscosity have on pump performance. The information is supported by a comprehensive example which is backed up by numerous cross references to ESDU 80030 which provides a general introduction to pump performance considerations.

  14. RPP-WTP Slurry Wear Evaluation: Slurry Abrasivity

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2002-06-03

    This report deals with the task of evaluating wear in the cross-flow ultrafiltration system and specifically the need to define a representative slurry in order to obtain prototypic wear rates. The filtration system will treat many different wastes, but it is not practical to run a test for each one. This is especially true when considering that the planned period for testing is 2000 hours long and procurement of appropriate simulants is costly. Considering time and cost, one waste stream needs to be chosen to perform the wear test.

  15. Numerical study of cavitation and pinning effects due to gas injection through a bed of particles: application to a radial-flow moving-bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay, Guillaume; Vasquez, Felaurys; Richard, Florence; Applied Mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    In the petroleum and chemical industries, radial-flow moving-bed reactors are used to carry out chemical reactions such as catalytic reforming. Radial-flow reactors provide high capacity without increased pressure drop or greatly increased vessel dimensions. This is done by holding the catalyst in a basket forming an annular bed, and causing the gas to flow radially between the outer annulus and the central tube. Catalyst enter the top of the reactor, move through the vessel by gravity to the bottom where it is removed and then regenerated. Within the catalytic bed, the combined effects of particles motion and radial injection of the gas may lead to cavitation and pinning phenomenon that may clearly damage the reactor. We study both cavitation and pinning effects using an in-house numerical software, named PeliGRIFF (www.peligriff.com/), designed to simulate particulate flows at different scales; from the particle scale, where fluid/particle interactions are directly solved, to the particles suspension scale where the fluid/solid interactions are modeled. In the past, theoretical and experimental studies have already been conducted in order to understand the way cavitation and pinning occur. Here, we performed simulations involving a few thousands of particles aiming at reproducing experimental experiments. We will present comparisons between our numerical results and experimental results in terms of pressure drop, velocity, porosity.

  16. Slurry pumping techniques for feeding high-pressure coal gasification reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, W. G.; Tarman, P. B.

    1977-01-01

    Operating experience in pumping coal and coal char slurries at pressures up to 1500 psig is discussed. The design specifications for the mixing tanks, pumps, piping, and slurry heaters are given along with pressure drop and minimum flow velocity data on water-lignite slurries.

  17. Radial diffusion and penetration of gas molecules and aerosol particles through laminar flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-07

    Flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes are essential tools for many applications in analytical and physical chemistry and engineering. We derive a new method for determining radial diffusion effects and the penetration or transmission of gas molecules and aerosol particles through cylindrical tubes under laminar flow conditions using explicit analytical equations. In contrast to the traditional Brown method [Brown, R. L. J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U. S.) 1978, 83, 1-8] and CKD method (Cooney, D. O.; Kim, S. S.; Davis, E. J. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1974, 29, 1731-1738), the new approximation developed in this study (known as the KPS method) does not require interpolation or numerical techniques. The KPS method agrees well with the CKD method under all experimental conditions and also with the Brown method at low Sherwood numbers. At high Sherwood numbers corresponding to high uptake on the wall, flow entry effects become relevant and are considered in the KPS and CKD methods but not in the Brown method. The practical applicability of the KPS method is demonstrated by analysis of measurement data from experimental studies of rapid OH, intermediate NO3, and slow O3 uptake on various organic substrates. The KPS method also allows determination of the penetration of aerosol particles through a tube, using a single equation to cover both the limiting cases of high and low deposition described by Gormley and Kennedy (Proc. R. Ir. Acad., Sect. A. 1949, 52A, 163-169). We demonstrate that the treatment of gas and particle diffusion converges in the KPS method, thus facilitating prediction of diffusional loss and penetration of gases and particles, analysis of chemical kinetics data, and design of fluid reactors, denuders, and sampling lines.

  18. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a radial air flow discharged from the compressor section

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.; McQuiggan, Gerard; Wasdell, David L.

    2016-10-25

    A midframe portion (213) of a gas turbine engine (210) is presented, and includes a compressor section (212) configured to discharge an air flow (211) directed in a radial direction from an outlet of the compressor section (212). Additionally, the midframe portion (213) includes a manifold (214) to directly couple the air flow (211) from the compressor section (212) outlet to an inlet of a respective combustor head (218) of the midframe portion (213).

  19. Redundant Vasodilator Pathways Underlying Radial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation Are Preserved in Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Tschakovsky, Michael E.; Zaleski, Amanda L.; Polk, Donna M.; Thompson, Paul D.; Kiernan, Francis J.; Parker, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Blocking nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilator prostanoids (PN) does not consistently reduce flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in young adults. The impact of aging on the contribution of NO and PG to FMD is unknown. Methods. FMD was measured in older adults (n = 10, 65 ± 3 y) after arterial infusion of saline, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and ketorolac + L-NMMA. Data were compared to published data in young adults. Results. L-NMMA reduced FMD in older adults (8.9 ± 3.6 to 5.9 ± 3.7%) although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.08) and did not differ (P = 0.74) from the reduction observed in young adults (10.0 ± 3.8 to 7.6 ± 4.7%; P = 0.03). Blocking PN did not affect FMD in young or older adults. In older adults, L-NMMA reduced (n = 6; range = 36–123% decrease), augmented (n = 3; 10–122% increase), or did not change FMD (n = 1; 0.4% increase). After PN blockade, FMD responses were reduced (n = 2), augmented (n = 6), or unaffected (n = 1). Conclusions. NO or PN blockade did not consistently reduce FMD in healthy older adults, suggesting the existence of redundant vasodilator phenotypes as observed previously in young adults. PMID:24963406

  20. The Radial Temperature Gradient in the Gleeble® Hot-Torsion Test and Its Effect on the Interpretation of Plastic-Flow Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Levkulich, N. C.; Senkov, O. N.

    2017-08-01

    The radial temperature gradient developed via direct-resistance heating of round-bar hot-torsion specimens in a Gleeble® machine and its effect on the interpretation of plastic-flow behavior were established using a suite of experimental, analytical, and numerical-simulation tools. Observations of the microstructure variation developed within a γ'-strengthened nickel-base superalloy were used to infer the temperature gradient as well as differences between the temperature at the outer diameter and that indicated by thermocouples welded to the surface. At temperatures of the order of 1375 K (1102 °C), the radial variation of temperature was typically 20 K ( 20 °C). Such variations were in agreement with an analytical heat-conduction model based on the balance of input thermal energy and radiation heat loss at the free surface. Using a constitutive model for LSHR, the effect of the radial temperature gradient on plastic flow during hot torsion was assessed via numerical integration of the torque as a function of radial position for such cases as well as that corresponding to a uniformly-heated sample. These calculations revealed that the torque generated in the non-uniform case is almost identical to that developed in a sample uniformly preheated to a temperature corresponding to that experienced at a fractional radial location of 0.8 in the former case.

  1. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  2. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  3. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  4. System for pressure letdown of abrasive slurries

    DOEpatents

    Kasper, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for releasing erosive slurries from containment at high pressure without subjecting valves to highly erosive slurry flow. The system includes a pressure letdown tank disposed below the high-pressure tank, the two tanks being connected by a valved line communicating the gas phases and a line having a valve and choke for a transfer of liquid into the letdown tank. The letdown tank has a valved gas vent and a valved outlet line for release of liquid. In operation, the gas transfer line is opened to equalize pressure between tanks so that a low level of liquid flow occurs. The letdown tank is then vented, creating a high-pressure differential between the tanks. At this point, flow between tanks is controlled by the choke. High-velocity, erosive flow through a high-pressure outlet valve is prevented by equalizing the start up pressure and thereafter limiting flow with the choke.

  5. Rocketdyne's advanced coal slurry pumping program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. E.; Wong, G. S.; Gilman, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation is conducting a program for the engineering, fabrication, and testing of an experimental/prototype high-capacity, high-pressure centrifugal slurry feed pump for coal liquefaction purposes. The abrasion problems in a centrifugal slurry pump are primarily due to the manner in which the hard, solid particles contained in the slurry are transported through the hydraulic flow passages within the pump. The abrasive particles can create scraping, grinding, cutting, and sandblasting effects on the various exposed parts of the pump. These critical areas involving abrasion and impact erosion wear problems in a centrifugal pump are being addressed by Rocketdyne. The mechanisms of abrasion and erosion are being studied through hydrodynamic analysis, materials evaluation, and advanced design concepts.

  6. Rheological characterization of hydraulic fracturing slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N. . Research and Engineering Dept.)

    1993-05-01

    Few studies have dealt with the flow behavior of concentrated suspensions or slurries prepared with non-Newtonian carrier fluids. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to present experimental results obtained by pumping various hydraulic fracturing slurries into a fracture model and gathering data on differential pressure vs. flow rate. Several concentrations of hydroxypropyl guard (HPG), a wide range of proppant concentrations, and three test temperatures were studies. The effects of such variables as polymer gelling-agent concentration, proppant concentration, test temperature, and fracture-flow shear rate on the rheological properties of slurries were investigated. The correlations for predicting the relative slurry viscosity for these HPG fluids are presented. Substantial increases in viscosity of fracturing gels were observed, and results are discussed in light of several affecting variables. Results also are compared with those available for Newtonian and non-Newtonian concentrated suspensions. Applications of these correlations to estimate the hindered particle-settling velocity in the fracture caused by the presence of surrounding particles also is discussed. The correlations presented can easily be included in any currently available 2D or 3D fracture-design simulators; thus, the information can be applied directly to predict fracture geometry and extension.

  7. Influence of growth phase on bacterial deposition: interaction mechanisms in packed-bed column and radial stagnation point flow systems.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sharon L; Redman, Jeremy A; Elimelech, Menachem

    2005-09-01

    The influence of bacterial growth stage on cell deposition kinetics has been examined using a mutant of Escherichia coli K12. Two experimental techniques--a packed-bed column and a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system--were employed to determine bacterial deposition rates onto quartz surfaces over a wide range of solution ionic strengths. Stationary-phase cells were found to be more adhesive than mid-exponential phase cells in both experimental systems. The divergence in deposition behavior was notably more pronounced in the RSPF than in the packed-bed system. For instance, in the RSPF system, the deposition rate of the stationary-phase cells at 0.03 M ionic strength was 14 times greater than that of the mid-exponential cells. The divergence in the packed-bed system was most significant at 0.01 M, where the deposition rate for the stationary-phase cells was nearly 4 times greater than for the mid-exponential cells. To explain the observed adhesion behavior, the stationary and mid-exponential bacterial cells were characterized for their size, surface charge density, electrophoretic mobility, viability, and hydrophobicity. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that the stationary cells have a more heterogeneous distribution of charged functional groups on the bacterial surface than the mid-exponential cells, which results in higher deposition kinetics. Furthermore, because the RSPF system enumerates only bacterial cells retained in primary minima, whereas the packed column captures mostly cells deposited in secondary minima, the difference in the stationary and mid-exponential cell deposition kinetics is much more pronounced in the RSPF system.

  8. Spatial analysis of aquifer response times for radial flow processes: Nondimensional analysis and laboratory-scale tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazaei, Farhad; Simpson, Matthew J.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental concept in groundwater hydrology is the notion of steady state, or equilibrium conditions. When a system at some initial steady state condition is perturbed by pumping, a transient cone of depression will develop and the system will approach a new steady state condition. Understanding the time scale required for the transient process to occur is of practical interest since it would help practitioners decide whether to use a steady state model or a more complicated transient model. Standard approaches to estimate the response time use simple scaling relationships which neglect spatial variations. Alternatively, others define the response time to be the amount of time taken for the difference between the transient and steady state solutions to fall below some arbitrary tolerance level. Here, we present a novel approach and use the concept of mean action time to predict aquifer response time scales in a two-dimensional radial geometry for pumping, injection and recovery processes. Our approach leads to relatively simple closed form expressions that explicitly show how the time scale depends on the hydraulic parameters and position. Furthermore, our dimensionless framework allows us to predict the response time scales for a range of applications including small scale laboratory problems and large scale field problems. Our analysis shows that the response time scales vary spatially, but are equivalent for pumping, injection and associated recovery processes. Furthermore, the time scale is independent of the pumping or injection flow rate. We test these predictions in a laboratory scale aquifer and find that our physical measurements corroborate the theoretical predictions.

  9. Feasibility of 4D flow MR imaging of the brain with either Cartesian y-z radial sampling or k-t SENSE: comparison with 4D Flow MR imaging using SENSE.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Amano, Yasuo; Takagi, Ryo; Matsumura, Yoshio; Murai, Yasuo; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    A drawback of time-resolved 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance (4D Flow MR) imaging is its lengthy scan time for clinical application in the brain. We assessed the feasibility for flow measurement and visualization of 4D Flow MR imaging using Cartesian y-z radial sampling and that using k-t sensitivity encoding (k-t SENSE) by comparison with the standard scan using SENSE. Sixteen volunteers underwent 3 types of 4D Flow MR imaging of the brain using a 3.0-tesla scanner. As the standard scan, 4D Flow MR imaging with SENSE was performed first and then followed by 2 types of acceleration scan-with Cartesian y-z radial sampling and with k-t SENSE. We measured peak systolic velocity (PSV) and blood flow volume (BFV) in 9 arteries, and the percentage of particles arriving from the emitter plane at the target plane in 3 arteries, visually graded image quality in 9 arteries, and compared these quantitative and visual data between the standard scan and each acceleration scan. 4D Flow MR imaging examinations were completed in all but one volunteer, who did not undergo the last examination because of headache. Each acceleration scan reduced scan time by 50% compared with the standard scan. The k-t SENSE imaging underestimated PSV and BFV (P < 0.05). There were significant correlations for PSV and BFV between the standard scan and each acceleration scan (P < 0.01). The percentage of particles reaching the target plane did not differ between the standard scan and each acceleration scan. For visual assessment, y-z radial sampling deteriorated the image quality of the 3 arteries. Cartesian y-z radial sampling is feasible for measuring flow, and k-t SENSE offers sufficient flow visualization; both allow acquisition of 4D Flow MR imaging with shorter scan time.

  10. Fuel injection of coal slurry using vortex nozzles and valves

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Allen B.

    1989-01-01

    Injection of atomized coal slurry fuel into an engine combustion chamber is achieved at relatively low pressures by means of a vortex swirl nozzle. The outlet opening of the vortex nozzle is considerably larger than conventional nozzle outlets, thereby eliminating major sources of failure due to clogging by contaminants in the fuel. Control fluid, such as air, may be used to impart vorticity to the slurry and/or purge the nozzle of contaminants during the times between measured slurry charges. The measured slurry charges may be produced by a diaphragm pump or by vortex valves controlled by a separate control fluid. Fluidic circuitry, employing vortex valves to alternatively block and pass cool slurry fuel flow, is disclosed.

  11. Deposition of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts on natural organic matter surfaces: microscopic evidence for secondary minimum deposition in a radial stagnation point flow cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Janjaroen, Dao; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2009-02-03

    A radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system combined with a microscope was used to determine the deposition kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts on quartz surfaces and silica surfaces coated with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) in solutions with different ionic strengths. Microscopic evidence of C. parvum oocysts entrapped in the secondary minimum energy well was presented to show that among the entrapped C. parvum oocysts some were washed away by the radial flow and some were able to transfer to deep primary minima and become irreversibly deposited. Experimental data were compared with simulation results obtained by the convective-diffusion equation and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The experimental results suggested that surface charge heterogeneity led to a higher attachment efficiency at low ionic strength. In addition, the maximum attachment efficiency was less than 1 at high ionic strength due to steric interaction.

  12. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these

  13. A stationary flow of a viscous liquid in radial clearances of rotor bearings in the turbocompressor of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharinov, V. G.

    1994-01-01

    Both stationary and floating rotating bushes are used in bearings of turbo-compressors applied in systems for supercharging internal combustion engines. The paper investigates the effect of geometric parameters on the work of bearings with a floating bush. Also, the distribution of friction losses in lubricant layers of bearings with floating bushes is studied. The solution of the problem concerning the stationary flow of a viscous liquid in radial clearances of plain bearings with rotating bushes has been presented.

  14. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Wang, W.; Shi, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  15. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengwang Li; Wenlie Wang; Zhongyin Shi

    1998-04-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  16. The use of a non-Newtonian fluid to visualize the mixing of a pseudo-homogeneous slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, L.; Welsh, M.C.; Hamilton, N.; Baillie, K.; Kam, P.

    1994-12-31

    The efficient mixing of suspensions is important t many mineral processing extraction operations. A flow visualization study was undertaken by CSIRO using a pseudo-plastic yield stress fluid in a one-ninth scale model mixing vessel with impellers. The non-Newtonian viscosity characteristics of the model fluid matched those of a slurry encountered in the alumina industry. Flow visualization showed that the fluid foil blades on the impellers were stalled and generated radial flows rather than axial flows, leading to massive scaling in the mixing vessel. Repositioning the impellers brought the blades out of stall and oiled to near ideal mixing. Subsequent installation of the modified agitator configuration in the full size vessel confirmed the scale model results.

  17. Coal slurry rheology and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A.W.; Cook, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    Three well-characterized, generic surfactants (nonionic, anionic and cationic) were used to modify coal/water mixtures by changing the interaction between several coals of different rank and the slurry liquor. Each experiment involved one coal and one surfactant per experiment. The analytical and rheological results from these experiments have been previously reported. The thrust of the current program is to extend the work to shear rates expected during atomization. The program consists of the following elements: (1) design, fabricate and test a helical screw rheometer capable of developing shear rates to 10,000 sec/sup -1/; (2) establish a capability to atomize slurries and monitor the spray using high speed photography; and (3) initiate a collaborative program with the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories Livermore for the purpose of analyzing particulates in atomized and burned sprays. The helical screw rheometer was designed using technology developed for polymer processing. The rheometer acts as an extrusion pump when there is discharge of fluid, but when flow is interrupted a differential pressure develops across the length of the screw. Using the mathematical analysis developed for screw pumps, the rotation rate of the screw may be translated to shear rate and the differential pressure translated to shear stress. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Slurry transport medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, W.; Schiffman, L.

    1980-06-03

    This invention provides for an improvement in slurry transport systems, especially coal slurry lines. Instead of the usual use of fresh water resources which, in some geographic areas, are scarce for slurry transport, concentrated brine is used which is prepared from abundant salt water resources. Because of the higher density of this concentrated brine, it is a superior carrier of pulverized material. It diminishes the separation and settling tendency of slurry components during transport and particularly during shutdown. Other advantages in the use of concentrated brine include: freezing point depression which permits ease of transport during winter and at lower temperatures; dust suppression of stored coal; avoidance of spontaneous combustion of stored coal; inhibit freeze packing of dewatered pipeline coal; and diminished extent of corrosion in ferrous metal pipelines as compared to that which might occur with lower concentration brines. Important in the economy of the process is that the concentrated brine can be recycled. An inexpensive method for producing the concentrated brine is given.

  20. Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    ELEMENT NO. NO. N ACCESSION NO. 1 62203F 3048 I 05 I 34 11 TITLE (Include Securty Clasification ) Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...density, size, and induction time. Any continuing program in this area should attempt to keep these criteria in mind . IV. VOLATILE ADDITIVE STUDIES 1

  1. High pressure slurry pump. Sand slurry test loop design and results. Wear parts lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fongaro, S.; Severini, P.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper shows the experimental phase, following previous work presented at the Sixth International Conference on ``Multiphase Flow in Industrial Plants'', Milan, September 98. A Sand Water Slurry Test Loop has been tested using different sand percentages for a total power of 680 HP with a flow-rate of 35,000 [gpm] and pressure of 2300 [psig]. Its design considered, carefully, the particles build-up effect respecting flow velocity and dead space along the loop and into the hydraulics. The test pump is a TRIPLEX SINGLE ACTING that is one third of the COAL SLURRY SEPTUPLEX PUMP designed for a CHINA PROJECT. Wear rate on the main parts of an high pressure slurry pump have been analyzed running at 145 rpm (piston mean speed of 3.3 [ft/s]) with a net flow of 33,290 [gpm] and pressures between 1216 and 1575 [psig]. Tests gave indications of a damaging process on valves, piston seals and the relative weight on the overall damages. Design changes of piston-seal and its material have been done, results being a longer parts lifetime. The authors compared the results with literature on coal slurry and other sand tests. The pump speed, i.e., valve cycle, isn't the main wear factor, while the fluid speed under the valve is. Their goals are to improve the wear parts lifetime and define functions to relate the wear to operating parameters, design choice, and materials used.

  2. Azimuthal ExB drift of electrons induced by the radial electric field flowing through a longitudinal magnetic channel with non-magnetized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Takeda, Jun; Nezu, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    To examine of the effect of the radial electric field on the azimuthal electron motion under E × B field for plasmas with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions, an experimental study is conducted by a stationary plasma flow. The argon plasma flow is generated by a DC arc generator under atmospheric pressure, followed by a cw expansion into a rarefied gas-wind tunnel with a uniform magnetic field 0 . 16 T. Inside one of the magnets, we set a ring electrode to apply the radial electric field. We applied an up-down probe for the analysis of the electron motion, where one of the tips is also used as a Langmuir probe to measure electron temperature, density and the space potential. We found that the order of the radial electric field is about several hundred V/m, which should be caused by the difference in the magnetization between electrons and ions. Electron saturation current indicates the existence of the E × B rotation of electrons, whose order is about 2000 - 4000 m/s. The order of the observed electron drift velocity is consistent with the theoretical value calculated from the applied magnetic field and the measured electric field deduced from the space potential.

  3. Consideration of Inner and Outer Phase Configuration in Tube Radial Distribution Phenomenon Based on Viscous Dissipation in a Microfluidic Flow Using Various Types of Mixed Solvent Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    When mixed solvent solutions, such as ternary water-hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic solvents, water-surfactant, and water-ionic liquid, are delivered into a microspace under laminar flow conditions, the solvent molecules radially distribute in the microspace, generating inner and outer phases. This specific fluidic behavior is termed "tube radial distribution phenomenon", and has been used in separation technologies such as chromatography and extraction. The factors influencing the configuration of the inner and outer phases in "tube radial distribution phenomenon" using the above-mentioned mixed solvent solutions were considered from the viewpoint of viscous dissipation in fluidic flows. When the difference in the viscosity between the two phases was large (approximately >0.73 mPa·s), the phase with the higher viscosity formed as an inner phase regardless of the volume ratio. The distribution pattern of the solvents was supported by the viscous dissipation principle. Contrarily, when the difference was small (approximately <0.49 mPa·s), the phase with the larger volume formed as the inner phase. The distribution pattern of the solvents did not always correspond to the viscous dissipation principle. The current findings are expected to be useful in analytical science including microflow analysis research.

  4. Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure

    DOEpatents

    Loth, John L.; Smith, William C.; Friggens, Gary R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

  5. The coal slime slurry combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the coal slime slurry combustion technology in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. The technique is that the slurry-based flow from the concentrator in the coal washery plant directly feeds into the fluidized bed by pump for combustion after a simple filtration and enrichment to an approximate concentration of 50% of coal. The coal slime slurry can burn in a CFB boiler alone or jointly with coal refuse. The technique has been used in a 35 t/h (6MWe) CFB for power generation. The result shows that the combustion efficiency is over 96% and boiler thermal efficiency is over 77%. As compared with burning coal refuse alone, the thermal efficiency was improved by 3--4 percent. This technology is simple, easy to operate and reliable. It is an effective way to utilize coal slime slurry. It has a practical significance for saving coal resources and reducing environmental pollution near coal mine areas. As a clean coal technology, it will result in great social, environmental and economic benefits.

  6. Metal Slurry Droplet and Spray Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-15

    Thermophoresis on the Oxide Condensation 156 ii Appendix E Numerical Modeling of a Slurry Droplet Containing a Spherical Particle...Williams [110]. Thermophoresis can cause the condensed particles to move outwards, from the radius of condensation. However, convection would drive the...Here, the thermophoresis effect may drive the condensed particles outwards. However, since the bulk flow in the outer zone is negative (towards the

  7. System and method for slurry handling

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Raymond Douglas; Oppenheim, Judith Pauline

    2015-12-29

    A system includes a slurry depressurizing system that includes a liquid expansion system configured to continuously receive a slurry at a first pressure and continuously discharge the slurry at a second pressure. For example, the slurry depressurizing system may include an expansion turbine to expand the slurry from the first pressure to the second pressure.

  8. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  9. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, Dennis G.; Walker, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

  10. Suspended-slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  11. Comparison of radial 4D Flow-MRI with perivascular ultrasound to quantify blood flow in the abdomen and introduction of a porcine model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Frydrychowicz, A; Roldan-Alzate, A; Winslow, E; Consigny, D; Campo, C A; Motosugi, U; Johnson, K M; Wieben, O; Reeder, S B

    2017-06-27

    Objectives of this study were to compare radial time-resolved phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow-MRI) with perivascular ultrasound (pvUS) and to explore a porcine model of acute pre-hepatic portal hypertension (PHTN). Abdominal 4D Flow-MRI and pvUS in portal and splenic vein, hepatic and both renal arteries were performed in 13 pigs of approximately 60 kg. In six pigs, measurements were repeated after partial portal vein (PV) ligature. Inter- and intra-reader comparisons and statistical analysis including Bland-Altman (BA) comparison, paired Student's t tests and linear regression were performed. PvUS and 4D Flow-MRI measurements agreed well; flow before partial PV ligature was 322 ± 30 ml/min in pvUS and 297 ± 27 ml/min in MRI (p = 0.294), and average BA difference was 25 ml/min [-322; 372]. Inter- and intra-reader results differed very little, revealed excellent correlation (R (2) = 0.98 and 0.99, respectively) and resulted in BA differences of -5 ml/min [-161; 150] and -2 ml/min [-28; 25], respectively. After PV ligature, PV flow decreased from 356 ± 50 to 298 ± 61 ml/min (p = 0.02), and hepatic arterial flow increased from 277 ± 36 to 331 ± 65 ml/min (p = n.s.). The successful in vivo comparison of radial 4D Flow-MRI to perivascular ultrasound revealed good agreement of abdominal blood flow although with considerable spread of results. A model of pre-hepatic PHTN was successfully introduced and acute responses monitored. • Radial 4D Flow-MRI in the abdomen was successfully compared to perivascular ultrasound. • Inter- and intra-reader testing demonstrated excellent reproducibility of upper abdominal 4D Flow-MRI. • A porcine model of acute pre-hepatic portal hypertension was successfully introduced. • 4D Flow-MRI successfully monitored acute changes in a model of portal hypertension.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  13. INEZ, KENTUCKY COAL SLURRY SPILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 11th, 2000, a breach of a coal slurry impoundment released approximately 210 million gallons of coal slurry ( a mixture of fine coal particles, silt, clay, sand and water) into the Big Andy Branch, Wolf Creek, and Coldwater Fork. Approximately 75 river miles were affec...

  14. DEHYDRATION OF DEUTERIUM OXIDE SLURRIES

    DOEpatents

    Hiskey, C.F.

    1959-03-10

    A method is presented for recovering heavy water from uranium oxide-- heavy water slurries. The method consists in saturating such slurries with a potassium nitrate-sodium nitrate salt mixture and then allowing the self-heat of the slurry to raise its temperature to a point slightly in excess of 100 deg C, thus effecting complete evaporation of the free heavy water from the slurry. The temperature of the slurry is then allowed to reach 300 to 900 deg C causing fusion of the salt mixture and expulsion of the water of hydration. The uranium may be recovered from the fused salt mixture by treatment with water to leach the soluble salts away from the uranium-containing residue.

  15. Rheometry of natural sediment slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental analyses of natural sediment slurries yield diverse results yet exhibit broad commonality of rheological responses under a range of conditions and shear rates. Results show that the relation between shear stress and shear rate is primarily nonlinear, that the relation can display marked hysteresis, that minimum shear stress can occur following yield, that physical properties of slurries are extremely sensitive to sediment concentration, and the concept of slurry yield strength is still debated. New rheometric analyses have probed viscoelastic behavior of sediment slurries. Results show that slurries composed of particles ??? 125 ?? m exhibit viscoelastic responses, and that shear stresses are relaxed over a range of time scales rather than by a single response time.

  16. Study On Numerical Simulation And Experiment Of Fabrication Magnesium Semisolid Slurry By Damper Cooling Tube Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuisheng; Huang, Guojie; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Haoqiang

    2007-05-01

    Damper Cooling Tube (DCT) Method to fabricate the semi-solid metal slurry has been studied in this paper. Firstly, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the flow process in order to optimize the technical parameters. The temperature effects on the rheological properties of the slurries are also considered. The effects of technical parameters on the slurry properties are studied in detail. Then the experiment was carried out with AZ91 magnesium alloy in order to examine the numerical simulation results. The results of numerical simulation are consistent with the experimental results. According to the numerical and experiment results, the DCT device can fabricate fine semisolid slurry with primary globular phase.

  17. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25[degrees]C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  18. MHD flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid over a radially stretching power-law sheet with suction/injection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Munir, A.; Shahzad, A.; Shah, A.

    2015-03-01

    A steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a radially stretching isothermal porous sheet is analyzed. Stretching is assumed to follow a radial power law, and the fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with a very small magnetic Reynolds number. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations, which are solved analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and numerically by employing the shooting method with the adaptive Runge-Kutta method and Broyden's method in the domain [0,∞). Analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature fields are derived. The influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles is discussed in detail. The skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are calculated as functions of several influential parameters. The results predicted by both methods are demonstrated to be in excellent agreement. Moreover, HAM results for a particular problem are also compared with exact solutions.

  19. Improvement in Accuracy of Ultrasonic Measurement of Transient Change in Viscoelasticity of Radial Arterial Wall Due to Flow-Mediated Dilation by Adaptive Low-Pass Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshita, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    In our previous study, the stress-strain relationship of the radial arterial wall was measured and the viscoelasticity of the intima-media region was estimated from the stress-strain relationship. Furthermore, the transient change in viscoelasticity due to flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was estimated by the automated detection of wall boundaries. In the present study, the strain rate was adaptively filtered to improve the accuracy of viscoelasticity estimation by decreasing the high-frequency noise. Additionally, in a basic experiment, this method was validated using a silicone tube (simulating artery). In the basic experiment, the elasticity was estimated with a mean error of 1.2%. The elasticity measured at each beam position was highly reproducible among measurements, whereas there was a slight variation in measured elasticity among beams. Consequently, in in vivo measurements, the normalized mean square error (MSE) was clearly decreased. Additionally, the stress-strain relationship of the radial arterial wall was obtained and the viscoelasticity was estimated accurately. The inner small loop, which corresponds to the negative pressure wave caused by the closure of the aortic valve, can be observed using the adaptive low-pass filtering (LPF). Moreover, the transient changes in these parameters were similar to those in the previous study. These results show the potential of the proposed method for the thorough analysis of the transient change in viscoelasticity due to FMD.

  20. Transient radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer. Part 1, An evaluation of some conceptual methods

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Zhu, Ming

    1991-08-01

    The analytic solutions of Boulton (1954) and Neuman (1972) for transient flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer are based on the assumption that the role of the unsaturated zone can be adequately accounted for by restricting attention to the release of water from the zone through which the water table moves. Both researchers mathematically treat this released water as a time-dependent source term. The differences between the models of Boulton and Neuman are that the former neglects vertical components of flow in the aquifer, but allows for an exponential process for the release of water as a function of time, whereas the latter assumes instantaneous release from storage, but accounts for vertical components of flow. Given this set of assumptions, we examine the applicability of these two methods using a general purpose numerical model through a process of verification extension and comparison. The issues addressed include: the role of well-bore storage in masking intermediate-time behavior, combined effects of exponential release as well as vertical flow, logic for vertical averaging of drawdowns, and the sensitivity of system response to the magnitude of specific yield. The issue of how good the assumptions of Boulton and Neuman are in the context of the general theory of unsaturated flow is addressed in part 2 of this two-part series of reports.

  1. Coal slurry pipelining

    SciTech Connect

    Chassagne, P.J.

    1980-02-05

    A method is disclosed for preparing industrial ores, e.g., coal, for pipelining and pipelining the ores to a site for subsequent processing or use. Ore from a mine is screened into two fractions, one having a large size particle distribution and one having a small size particle distribution, each fraction retaining both the ore and the refuse. The large size particle fraction is cleaned of refuse and the clean ore therefrom crushed to a size distribution of the smaller size or small size ore fraction. The separated refuse from the large size particle fraction is ground to provide superfines to the extent required for the proper particle size distribution for pipelining. The ore and superfine refuse are combined in a water slurry for pipelining. After pipelining the ore, the ore is cleaned and dewatered conveniently as known in the art for fine ore. The resulting ore may then be stockpiled or directly used.

  2. Manifold Coal-Slurry Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Estus, J. M.; Lavin, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding several slurry pipes into main pipeline reduces congestion in coal mines. System based on manifold concept: feeder pipelines from each working entry joined to main pipeline that carries coal slurry out of panel and onto surface. Manifold concept makes coal-slurry haulage much simpler than existing slurry systems.

  3. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  4. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1985-11-05

    The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

  5. Axisymmetric rotational stagnation point flow impinging radially a permeable stretching/shrinking surface in a nanofluid using Tiwari and Das model.

    PubMed

    Roşca, Natalia C; Pop, Ioan

    2017-01-12

    In this paper, the problem of normal impingement rotational stagnation-point flow on a radially permeable stretching sheet in a viscous fluid, recently studied in a very interesting paper, is extended to a water-based nanofluid. A similarity transformation is used to reduce the system of governing nonlinear partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, which is then solved numerically using the function bvp4c from Matlab. It is found that dual (upper and lower branch) solutions exist for some values of the governing parameters. From the stability analysis, it is found that the upper branch solution is stable, while the lower branch solution is unstable. Sample velocity and temperature profiles along both solution branches are graphically presented.

  6. Axisymmetric rotational stagnation point flow impinging radially a permeable stretching/shrinking surface in a nanofluid using Tiwari and Das model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşca, Natalia C.; Pop, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of normal impingement rotational stagnation-point flow on a radially permeable stretching sheet in a viscous fluid, recently studied in a very interesting paper, is extended to a water-based nanofluid. A similarity transformation is used to reduce the system of governing nonlinear partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, which is then solved numerically using the function bvp4c from Matlab. It is found that dual (upper and lower branch) solutions exist for some values of the governing parameters. From the stability analysis, it is found that the upper branch solution is stable, while the lower branch solution is unstable. Sample velocity and temperature profiles along both solution branches are graphically presented.

  7. Axisymmetric rotational stagnation point flow impinging radially a permeable stretching/shrinking surface in a nanofluid using Tiwari and Das model

    PubMed Central

    Roşca, Natalia C.; Pop, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of normal impingement rotational stagnation-point flow on a radially permeable stretching sheet in a viscous fluid, recently studied in a very interesting paper, is extended to a water-based nanofluid. A similarity transformation is used to reduce the system of governing nonlinear partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, which is then solved numerically using the function bvp4c from Matlab. It is found that dual (upper and lower branch) solutions exist for some values of the governing parameters. From the stability analysis, it is found that the upper branch solution is stable, while the lower branch solution is unstable. Sample velocity and temperature profiles along both solution branches are graphically presented. PMID:28079124

  8. NACA Research on Slurry Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, M L; Olson, W T; Barnett, H C; Breitwieser, R

    1958-01-01

    An extensive program was conducted to investigate the use of concentrated slurries of boron and magnesium in liquid hydrocarbon as fuels for afterburners and ramjet engines. Analytical calculations indicated that magnesium fuel would give greater thrust and that boron fuel would give greater range than are obtainable from jet hydrocarbon fuel alone. It was hoped that the use of these solid elements in slurry form would permit the improvement to be obtained without requiring unconventional fuel systems or combustors. Small ramjet vehicles fueled with magnesium slurry were flown successfully, but the test flights indicated that further improvement of combustors and fuel systems was needed.

  9. Microchannel Heat Sink with Micro Encapsulated Phase Change Material (MEPCM) Slurry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-31

    concentrations and Reynolds number and the results will be compared with those of using water in the same test setup. Since MEPCM slurry flow in...fluid is valid for the slurry flow mechanisms for the particle loading range of 0-25% volume [8]. The effective specific heat during phase change... slurry , for the same temperature rises, the flow rate can be reduced to one-tenth (or by 90%) and the pumping power to one-hundredth (or by 99%) for a

  10. The effects of the secondary fluid temperature on the energy transfer in an unsteady ejector with a radial-flow diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Amer Khalil; Jawarneh, Ali M.; Tlilan, Hitham M.; Ababneh, Mohammad K.

    2009-11-01

    Unsteady ejectors are devices whereby energy is exchanged between directly interacting fluids. Unlike steady ejectors, the mechanism responsible for the energy transfer is reversible in nature and thus higher efficiencies are perceivable. A potential application for PEE is for enhancement in output power per weight as in turbochargers. The unsteady ejector when used as a turbocharger the device is expected to perform under wide range of ambient temperatures. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of the temperature of the induced ambient air on the energy transfer. The radial-flow ejector, which usually leads to higher-pressure ratios with fewer stages, was selected for the investigation. The flow field is investigated at two Mach numbers 2.5 and 3.0 utilizing rectangular short-length supersonic nozzles for accelerating the primary fluid. Fundamental to the enhancement of these devices performance relies on the management of the flow field in such a way to minimize entropy production. The numerical analyses were conducted utilizing a package of computational fluid dynamics.

  11. ANALYTICAL APPROXIMATION OF THE BIODEGRADATION RATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER UNDER IDEAL RADIAL FLOW CONDITIONS. (R824785)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We derive the long-term biodegradation rate of an organic contaminant (substrate) for an in situ bioremediation model with axisymmetric flow conditions. The model presumes that a nonsorbing electron acceptor is injected into a saturated homogeneous porous medium which initially c...

  12. ANALYTICAL APPROXIMATION OF THE BIODEGRADATION RATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER UNDER IDEAL RADIAL FLOW CONDITIONS. (R824785)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We derive the long-term biodegradation rate of an organic contaminant (substrate) for an in situ bioremediation model with axisymmetric flow conditions. The model presumes that a nonsorbing electron acceptor is injected into a saturated homogeneous porous medium which initially c...

  13. Suspension Electrodes Combining Slurries and Upflow Fluidized Beds.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagai; Eli, Shaked Ein; Jõgi, Morten; Suss, Matthew E

    2016-11-09

    Carbon-based suspension electrodes are currently intensively investigated for emerging electrochemical systems, such as flow batteries, flow capacitors, and capacitive deionization cells. The main limitation of such electrodes is their low electric conductivity, which is typically orders of magnitude lower than that of traditional static carbon electrodes. Two main categories of suspension electrodes exist: 1) slurry electrodes where particles are not significantly affected by gravity, and 2) fluidized bed electrodes where particles are affected by gravity. We introduce a novel category that we term "combined" suspension electrodes, which combine dilute slurries and dense fluidized beds. We present experimental measurements of the electrochemical impedance and electric conductivity of two combined electrodes. For one set of materials, the measured electric conductivity of the combined electrode is at least an order of magnitude above the fluidized bed and slurry components alone, demonstrating that a synergetic effect can be achieved when adding dilute slurry to dense fluidized bed. For a second set of materials, results show that the combined electrode conductivity is lower than the slurry component alone, a counter-intuitive result, demonstrating that increasing electrode carbon loading does not always enhance the electric conductivity. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Rheology of sludge-slurry grouts

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E. W.

    1980-10-01

    A series of rheograms was developed that relates the critical velocity (velocity where flow changes from laminar to turbulent) of a cementitious grout that incorporates a suspended sludge-slurry to the critical velocity of a reference grout made with a simulated waste solution. The sludge that is now in the Gunite waste tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be suspended and pumped to the new waste storage tanks in Melton Valley. The sludge will then be blended with a cement mix base to form a grout which will be injected underground by the shale fracturing process. This report describes the materials, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory studies to suspend sludges and mix sludge-slurry grouts that have flow properties similar to those of current shale fracturing grouts. Bentonite clay is an effective suspender in dilute NaNO/sub 3/ solutions; 15 wt % solids can be suspended with 2.0 wt % bentonite in a 0.1 M NaNO/sub 3/ solution. Other suspending materials were evaluated, but bentonite gave the best results. If a slurry grout becomes too viscous to pump, methods must be available to thin the mixture. A number of thinners, friction reducers, and plasticizers were examined. Q-Broxin, a thinner supplied by Baroid, reduced the velocity of a grout required for turbulent flow in a 5.0-cm (2-in.)-diam tube from 1.76 to 1.20 m/s (5.79 to 3.95 ft/s); FX-32C, a plasticizer supplied by Fox Industries, Inc., reduced the velocity from 1.76 to 0.75 m/s (5.6 to 2.45 ft/s).

  15. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  16. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, Robert J.; Shadbolt, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  17. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOEpatents

    Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL; Oras, John [Des Plaines, IL; Son, HyunJin [Naperville, IL

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  18. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.; Anderson, M.S.; Van Essen, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  19. Effects of cattle slurry acidification on ammonia and methane evolution during storage.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Søren O; Andersen, Astrid J; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification before storage is known to reduce NH(3) emissions, but recent observations have indicated that CH(4) emissions are also reduced. We investigated the evolution of CH(4) from fresh and aged cattle slurry during 3 mo of storage as influenced by pH adjustment to 5.5 with sulfuric acid. In a third storage experiment, cattle slurry acidified with commercial equipment on two farms was incubated. In the manipulation experiments, effects of acid and sulfate were distinguished by adding hydrochloric acid and potassium sulfate separately or in combination, rather than sulfuric acid. In one experiment sulfur was also added to slurry as the amino acid methionine in separate treatments. In each treatment 20-kg portions of slurry (n = 4) were stored for 95 d. All samples were subsampled nine to 10 times for determination of NH(3) and CH(4) evolution rates using a 2-L flow-through system. In all experiments, the pH of acidified cattle slurry increased gradually to between 6.5 and 7. Acidification of slurry reduced the evolution of CH(4) by 67 to 87%. The greatest reduction was observed with aged cattle slurry, which had a much higher potential for CH(4) production than fresh slurry. Sulfate and methionine amendment to cattle slurry without pH adjustment also significantly inhibited methanogenesis, probably as a result of sulfide production. The study suggests that complex microbial interactions involving sulfur transformations and pH determine the potential for CH(4) emission during storage of cattle slurry, and that slurry acidification may be a cost-effective greenhouse gas mitigation option. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, S. T.; Bordelon, W. J., Jr.; Smith, A. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this test was to obtain detailed radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbine model using three-hole cobra probes, hot-film probes, and a laser velocimeter. The test was designed to meet several objectives. First, the techniques for making laser velocimeter, hot-film probe, and cobra probe measurements in turbine flows were developed and demonstrated. The ability to use the cobra probes to obtain static pressure and, therefore, velocity had to be verified; insertion techniques had to be established for the fragile hot-film probes; and a seeding method had to be established for the laser velocimetry. Once the measurement techniques were established, turbine inlet and exit velocity profiles, temperature profiles, pressure profiles, turbulence intensities, and boundary layer thicknesses were measured at the turbine design point. The blockage effect due to the model inlet and exit total pressure and total temperature rakes on the turbine performance was also studied. A small range of off-design points were run to obtain the profiles and to verify the rake blockage effects off-design. Finally, a range of different Reynolds numbers were run to study the effect of Reynolds number on the various measurements.

  1. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  2. Rheological properties of concentrated aqueous injectable calcium phosphate cement slurry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changsheng; Shao, Huifang; Chen, Feiyue; Zheng, Haiyan

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the steady and dynamic rheological properties of concentrated aqueous injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) slurry were investigated. The results indicate that the concentrated aqueous injectable CPC showed both plastic and thixotropic behavior. As the setting process progressed, the yield stress of CPC slurry was raised, the area of the thixotropic hysteresis loop was enlarged, indicating that the strength of the net structure of the slurry had increased. The results of dynamic rheological behavior indicate that the slurry presented the structure similar to viscoelastic body and the property of shear thinning at the beginning. During the setting process, the slurry was transformed from a flocculent structure to a net structure, and the strength increased. Different factors had diverse effects on the rheological properties of the CPC slurry in the setting process, a reflection of the flowing properties (or injection), and the microstructure development of this concentrated suspension. Raising the powder-to-liquid ratio decreased the distance among the particles, increased the initial strength, and shortened the setting time. In addition, raising the temperature improved the initial strength, increased the order of reaction, and shortened the setting time, which was favorable to the setting process. The particle size of the raw material had much to do with the strength of original structure and setting time. The storage module G' of CPC slurry during the setting process followed the rule of power law function G'=A exp(Bt), which could be applied to forecast the setting time, and the calculated results thereafter are in agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Effects of climatic conditions on radial growth and sap-flow along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obojes, Nikolaus; Newesely, Christian; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Tassser, Erich; Oberhuber, Walter; Mayr, Stefan; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in mountain forests might change in the future due to rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns, affecting tree water relations and growth conditions. Changing temperature and precipitation along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley in South Tyrol-Italy were used to investigate possible effects of climate change on the transpiration and growth of European Larch (Larix decidua). Stem circumference variation of European Larch was measured for 4 years (2012-2015) with automatic band dendrometers and sap flow for 2 years (2013-2014) with trunk heat balance sensors at 3 sites at elevations of 1115 m, 1715 m, and 1990 m above sea level at a SE-exposed slope. During the first two, rather dry, years, transpiration and stem circumference were reduced during dry periods of one to three weeks at the two lower but not at the highest site. As a consequence, overall yearly radial growth was largest at the highest site in those two years. In 2014, with very high precipitation and colder summer temperatures no correlation of elevation, transpiration, and radial growth was observed. In 2015, with a dry and hot summer, initially high growth rates were strongly reduced after the end of May at the two lower sites. Overall the radial growth of Larix decidua seems to be limited by water scarcity up to an elevation of more than 1700 m a.s.l. in our study area except for unusually wet years. Our 4-year measurements were confirmed by dendro-climatic analysis of stem cores taken at five sites (the three original ones plus two additional sites at 1070 and at the forest line at 2250m) covering the last 50 to 150 years. Year ring widths were lower and highly correlated to precipitation at the lowest sites, and overall highest at the 1990 m site. Our results show that the growth of Larix decidua, which is often considered as more drought resistant than e.g. Picea abies, is limited by water availability at dry conditions in the Alps which might

  4. Time dependent behavior of impact angle in turbulkent pipe flows experience erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Amador; Oyarzun, Diego; Walczak, Magdalena; Aguirre, Javiera

    Erosion-corrosion in pipe systems transporting slurry turbulent flows is of a great importance in industrial and mining applications, where large volumes of suspended solids are sent up to hundreds of kilometers, to be further processed. The slurry is typically sent over large diameter steel pipes, which not always have an anti-abrasion coating. During the transport, the thickness of the pipe diminishes and eventually leaks and breaks, due to the combined effects of wear and corrosion. The processes of pipe degradation are further enhanced by the content of the slurry electrolytes that might switch from neutral to aggressive. The understanding of these processes in terms of operational parameters is critical for anticipating and mitigating a catastrophic outcome. This paper describes turbulent flow numerical simulations in a slurry transporting steel pipe with an emphasis on the correlation between the time dependent impact angle in the vicinity of the steel pipe and the rate of material loss. Full numerical simulations in a 3D long domain by using an Eulerian -Eulerian two phase flow approach coupled to a κ-epsilon turbulent model are performed for different solid particle concentration and flow velocity and compared to existing experimental and numerical results for validation with and without gravity. Time-dependent axisymmetric turbulent flow simulations are performed for determining both the time dependent behavior of the axial and radial velocities near the pipe wall and the impact angle. Finantial support from Conicyt through the Fondecyt proposal 1141107 is acknowledged.

  5. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and

  6. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  7. Tape casting of cobalt ferrite from nonaqueous slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Gang; Zhou, Dongxiang; Yang, Junyou; Fu, Qiuyun

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of CoFe2O4 thick films using the tape casting method from nonaqueous slurry. CoFe2O4 particles with average size of ˜800 nm were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. Sediment volumes and viscosity were tested to study the effects of dispersant in reducing aggregations in slurry. Slurry with 0.25 wt% dispersant amounts and 41.3 wt% solid content showed the optimal stability and rheological properties. A tape velocity of 8 cm/s was used in this study considering the non-Newtonian flow behavior at low shear rate. CoFe2O4 ceramic films sintered at 1150 °C for 2 h have dense structure (relative density of 94%) and exhibited ferromagnetic properties with in-plane saturation magnetization of ˜324 emu/cm3.

  8. Mud management, special slurries improve deepwater cementing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.; Faul, R.

    1997-10-20

    Successful deepwater cementing requires improved mud-management techniques to reduce fluid loss, shorten slurry transition times, and make mud and cement slurry weights compatible with formation pore pressure and fracture gradients. If any one of these conditions is not met, the cementing job is less likely to be successful. Previous attempts to drill in deep water have had a low success rate, and failures have cost operators an average $2 million/well. By using new mud-management techniques and specially designed cement mixtures, operators in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are effectively setting conductor casing in deepwater conditions and are greatly improving the success rate in cementing deepwater wells. Recent case histories in the GOM describe these new techniques and the advantages of using a specially formulated, lightweight, foamed cement slurry to avoid cement-sheath damage caused by shallow-water flow.

  9. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the effects of interparticle forces on the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry (CWS). We found that the CWS flow behavior index is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The former intensifies as the Hamaker constant increases and the interparticle distance reduces while the latter increases as the particle surface charge density increases. The interparticle attraction causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior. In contrast, the interparticle repulsion prevents particle aggregation and thus leads to Newtonian behavior. Both atomized at low atomizing air pressures (less than 270 kPa) using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. The effects of coal volume fraction, coal particle surface charge, liquid composition and liquid viscosity on slurry atomization can be accounted for by their effects on slurry rheology. 26 refs.

  10. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Development and validation of a radial inflow turbine model for simulation of the SNL S-CO2 split-flow loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.

    2012-07-31

    A one-dimensional model for a radial inflow turbine has been developed for super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle applications. The model accounts for the main phenomena present in the volute, nozzle, and impeller of a single-stage turbine. These phenomena include internal losses due to friction, blade loading, and angle of incidence and parasitic losses due to windage and blade-housing leakage. The model has been added as a component to the G-PASS plant systems code. The model was developed to support the analysis of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in conjunction with small-scale loop experiments. Such loops operate at less than a MWt thermal input. Their size permits components to be reconfigured in new arrangements relatively easily and economically. However, the small thermal input combined with the properties of carbon dioxide lead to turbomachines with impeller diameters of only one to two inches. At these sizes the dominant phenomena differ from those in larger more typical machines. There is almost no treatment in the literature of turbomachines at these sizes. The present work therefore is aimed at developing turbomachine models that support the task of S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis using small-scale tests. Model predictions were compared against data from an experiment performed for Sandia National Laboratories in the split-flow Brayton cycle loop currently located at Barber-Nichols Inc. The split-flow loop incorporates two turbo-alternator-compressor (TAC) units each incorporating a radial inflow turbine and a radial flow compressor on a common shaft. The predicted thermodynamic conditions at the outlet of the turbine on the main compressor shaft were compared with measured values at different shaft speeds. Two modifications to the original model were needed to better match the experiment data. First, a representation of the heat loss from the volute downstream of the sensed inlet temperature was added. Second, an empirical multiplicative factor was

  12. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  13. Critical parameters for coarse coal underground slurry haulage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Factors are identified which must be considered in meeting the requirements of a transportation system for conveying, in a pipeline, the coal mined by a continuous mining machine to a storage location neat the mine entrance or to a coal preparation plant located near the surface. For successful operation, the slurry haulage the system should be designed to operated in the turbulent flow regime at a flow rate at least 30% greater than the deposition velocity (slurry flow rate at which the solid particles tend to settle in the pipe). The capacity of the haulage system should be compatible with the projected coal output. Partical size, solid concentration, density, and viscosity of the suspension are if importance as well as the selection of the pumps, pipes, and valves. The parameters with the greatest effect on system performance ar flow velocity, pressure coal particle size, and solids concentration.

  14. Rheological properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, March 15, 1995--June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ohene, F.

    1995-10-01

    The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

  15. Development of biodiesel slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Suppes, G.J.; Ng, C.; Srinivasan, B.

    1994-12-31

    As an alternative to diesel, the DOE has recently supported research which developed coal-water-slurries to the extent that they have demonstrated in low-, medium-, and high-speed diesel engines. Coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuels would be an American-made alternative to diesel distilled from imported crude oil. Such alternatives to imported oil are particularly desirable as 1994 crude oil imports will most likely exceed those disastrously high levels of the early 1980`s which led to a major recession. This paper is on the testing and development of biodiesel slurry fuels (e.g. corn flour and water) as an alternative to diesel for use in a modified diesel engine. While the economics for CWS`s are not favorable until bulk, tax-free diesel prices exceed $0.80 per gallon, a preliminary analysis of biodiesel slurries shows economic viability at today`s diesel prices. This paper presents advantages of biodiesel slurries over CWS`s due to different ash compositions and economics specific to applications on farm tractors. Engine modifications, fuel costs, fuel processing, fuel performance, and on-going research are discussed.

  16. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  17. Microstructure Evolution and Rheological Behavior of Cooling Slope Processed Al-Si-Cu-Fe Alloy Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Samanta, Sudip K.; Bera, Supriya; Dutta, Pradip

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, microstructure evolution during semi-solid slurry generation of Al-Si-Cu-Fe alloy, using a cooling slope, was studied and the effect of microstructural morphology of the slurry on its rheological behavior was investigated. Microstructure evolution during melt flow along the slope was studied by extracting samples from various locations of the slope and performing rapid oil quenching experiments. Quantitative investigation was performed to evaluate primary phase shape and size for different process conditions of the semi-solid slurry, and subsequently rheological investigations were performed to correlate slurry morphology with its flow behavior. Three different types of rheological experiments were performed: isothermal test, shear jump test, and shear time test, in order to investigate rheological behavior of the semi-solid slurry. In addition, effect of melt treatment, by adding modifier (0.1 wt pct of Al-10Sr) and grain refiner (0.15 wt pct of Al-5Ti-1B), on the microstructure evolution during slurry generation, flow behavior of the slurry, and intermetallics formation was studied.

  18. Coal-oil slurry preparation

    DOEpatents

    Tao, John C.

    1983-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

  19. Effect of reactive hyperemia on carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in hypertensive participants and direct comparison with flow-mediated dilation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Haroon; Salciccioli, Louis; Ko, Eun Hee; Qureshi, Ghazanfar; Kazmi, Haris; Kassotis, John; Lazar, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the effects of hyperemia on carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 39 normotensive (NT) and 23 hypertensive (HT) participants using applanation tonometry. Pulse wave velocity was measured at 1- and at 2-minute intervals. Baseline PWV was similar between the groups (P = .59). At 1 minute, PWV decreased (8.5 +/- 1.2 to 7.1 +/- 1.4 m/s, P < .001) in NT but not in HT (P = .83). Hyperemic PWV (DeltaPWV) response differed between the groups (-16% vs + 1.0%, P < .001). On multivariate analysis, HT, not age or blood pressure was independently related to DeltaPWV (R(2) = .43, P < .01). Among patients with cardiovascular risk factors/disease, DeltaPWV was inversely related to flow-mediated dilation (FMD; R( 2) = .43, P < .003). hyperemia decreases PWV(1min) in NT but not in HT. DeltaPWV is inversely related to FMD. Blunted hyperemic PWV response may represent impaired vasodilatory reserve.

  20. Deposition kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 on a silica surface coated with natural organic matter in a radial stagnation point flow cell.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baoling; Pham, Mai; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2008-10-15

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) coupled with a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) cell was used to study deposition kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 on silica surface coated with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM). Three stocks of MS2 stored in 1 mM NaHCO3, deionized (DI) water or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution were studied. MS2 stored in PBS solution were found to aggregate at all studied ionic strengths from 3 mM to 200 mM, while MS2 stored in DI water and bicarbonate solutions remained monodispersed. Isoelectric points of MS2 storedin PBS solution were lower than for those stored in DI water and 1 mM NaHCO3 solution. Nonrepulsive deposition rates of MS2 on silica surface coated with poly-L-lysine (PLL) were independent of ionic strength. In contrast MS2 deposition rates on bare silica surface or silica surface coated with SRNOM increased gradually and stabilized at an ionic strength of 60 mM. MS2 deposition rates on bare silica surface were higher than those on silica surface coated with SRNOM at low ionic strengths. Deposition rates on these two surfaces were similar at high ionic strengths. Experimental data suggest that electrostatic and steric interactions were the two main deposition mechanisms of MS2 on either bare silica or silica surface coated with SRNOM.

  1. Simulations of the Neutral-beam-induced Rotation, Radial Electric Field, and Flow Shearing Rate in Next-step Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2002-08-13

    Toroidal rotation of plasmas in present tokamaks is beneficial for increasing the stability to wall-induced MHD and appears to reduce the anomalous transport associated with micro-turbulence. This paper calculates the toroidal rotation expected from neutral-beam injection in the proposed FIRE and ITER-FEAT tokamak reactors. Self-consistent burning plasmas for these tokamaks have been constructed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Neutral-beam injection has been proposed for FIRE and ITER-FEAT. The neutral-beam-induced torques are computed, and assumptions for the anomalous transport of toroidal angular momentum are used to calculate the toroidal rotation profiles. The central Mach numbers are about 3-8%. The ratio of the rotation speed to the Alfvin speed is less than 1%. Assuming neoclassical poloidal rotation and force balance, the radial electric field and flow shearing rate are calculated. Peak shearing rates near the outboard edge are in the 10-100 krad/s range.

  2. Effect of uneven wall temperature on local heat transfer in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J.-C.; Zhang, Y. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of uneven wall temperature on the local heat transfer coefficient in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow is investigated for Reynolds numbers from 2500 to 25,000 and rotation numbers from 0 to 0.352. Three cases of thermal boundary conditions are studied: (1) four walls uniform temperature, (2) four walls uniform heat flux, and (3) leading and trailing walls hot and two side walls cold. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficients on the leading surface are much lower than that of the trailing surface due to rotation. For case 1, the leading surface heat transfer coefficient decreases and then increases with increasing rotation numbers, and the trailing surface heat transfer coefficient increases monotonically with rotation numbers. The trailing surface heat transfer coefficients, as well as those for the side walls, for case 2 are higher than for case 1, and the leading surface heat transfer coefficients for cases 2 and 3 are significantly higher than for case 1.

  3. Application of a radial-flow bioreactor in the production of beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-2 fused with GFPuv using stably transformed insect cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mi Sun; Kato, Tatsuya; Dojima, Takashi; Park, Enoch Y

    2005-08-01

    An RFB (radial-flow bioreactor) with a reactor volume of 5 ml was applied to produce human beta3GnT (beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase) using two stably transformed insect cell lines. When air was supplied to the RFB, cell growth stopped at 4 days of culture and beta3GnT was not detected. However, with a supply of pure oxygen, the cell concentration, assumed from glucose consumption, increased by 1.3x10(7) cells/ml. Insect cells attached to poly(vinyl alcohol) matrixes packed in the RFB and grew confluently; 5.6 m-units/ml beta3GnT was produced under the conditions of pure oxygen supply and addition of glucose and glutamine. This RFB was first applied in beta3GnT production using stably transformed insect cells. The amount of beta3GnT production in only a 5 ml-scale RFB was comparable with that of a 100 ml shaking flask culture.

  4. Measurement of the Critical Deposition Velocity in Slurry Transport through a Horizontal Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Furfari, Daniel J.; Kellogg, Michael I.; Park, Walter R.

    2001-03-01

    Critical Deposition Velocity (CDV) is an important design and operational parameter in slurry transport. Almost all existing correlations that are used to predict this parameter have been obtained experimentally from slurry transport tests featuring single solid species in the slurry mixture. No correlations have been obtained to describe this parameter when the slurry mixture contains more than one solid species having a wide range of specific gravities, particle size distributions, and volume concentrations within the overall slurry mixture. There are no physical or empirical bases that can justify the extrapolation or modification of the existing single species correlations to include all these effects. New experiments must be carried out to obtain new correlations that would be suited for these types of slurries, and that would clarify the mechanics of solids deposition as a function of the properties of the various solid species. Our goal in this paper is to describe a robust experimental technique for the accurate determination of the critical deposition velocity associated with the transport of slurries in horizontal or slightly inclined pipes. Because of the relative difficulty encountered during the precise determination of this useful operational parameter, it has been the practice to connect it with some transitional behavior of more easily measurable flow parameters such as the pressure drop along the slurry pipeline. In doing so, the critical deposition velocity loses its unique and precise definition due to the multitude of factors that influence such transitional behaviors. Here, data has been obtained for single species slurries made up of washed garnet and water and flowing through a 1- inch clear pipe. The selected garnet had a narrow particle size distribution with a mean diameter of 100 mm, approximately. The critical deposition velocity was measured for garnet/water slurries of 10, 20, and 30 percent solids concentration by volume.

  5. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  6. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SLURRY BIODEGRADATION, International Technology Corporation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology uses a slurry-phase bioreactor in which the soil is mixed with water to form a slurry. Microorganisms and nutrients are added to the slurry to enhance the biodegradation process, which converts organic wastes into relatively harmless byproducts of microbial metabo...

  8. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  9. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    Sap flow measurement is a key aspect for understanding how plants use water and their impacts on the ecosystems. A variety of sensors have been developed to measure sap flow, each one with its unique characteristics. When the aim of a research is to have accurate tree water use calculations, with high temporal and spatial resolution (i.e. scaled), a sensor with high accuracy, high measurement efficiency, low signal-to-noise ratio and low price is ideal, but such has not been developed yet. Granier's thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been widely used in many studies and various environmental conditions because of its simplicity, reliability, efficiency and low cost. However, it has two major flaws when is used in semi-arid environments and broad-stem tree species: it is often affected by high natural thermal gradients (NTG), which distorts the measurements, and it cannot measure the radial variability of sap-flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than two centimeters. The new, multi point heat field deformation sensor (HFD) is theoretically not affected by NTG, and it can measure the radial variability of the sap flow at different depths. However, its high cost is a serious limitation when simultaneous measurements are required in several trees (e.g. catchment-scale studies). The underlying challenge is to develop a monitoring schema in which HFD and TDP are combined to satisfy the needs of measurement efficiency and accuracy in water accounting. To assess the level of agreement between TDP and HFD methods in quantifying sap flow rates and temporal patterns on Quercus ilex (Q.i ) and Quercus pyrenaica trees (Q.p.), three measurement schemas: standard TDP, TDP-NTG-corrected and HFD were compared in dry season at the semi-arid Sardon area, near Salamanca in Spain in the period from June to September 2009. To correct TDP measurements with regard to radial sap flow variability, a radial sap flux density correction factor was applied and tested by adjusting TDP

  10. Tribological properties of coal slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Schrubens, Dale L.

    1987-01-01

    A pin-on-disk tribometer was used to study the tribological properties of methyl alcohol-coal slurries. Friction coefficients, steel pin wear rates and wear surface morphological studies were conducted on AISI 440C HT and M-50 bearing steels which were slid dry and in solutions of methyl alcohol, methyl alcohol-fine coal particles, and methyl alcohol-fine coal particles-flocking additive. The latter was an oil derived from coal and originally intended to be added to the coal slurry to improve the sedimentation and rheology properties. The results of this study indicated that the addition of the flocking additive to the coal slurry markedly improved the tribological properties, especially wear. In addition, the type of steel was found to be very important in determining the type of wear that took place. Cracks and pits were found on the M-50 steel pin wear surfaces that slid in the coal slurries while 440C HT steel pins showed none.

  11. Whether radial receptive field organization of the fourth extrastriate crescent (area V4A) gives special advantage for analysis of the optic flow. Comparison with the first crescent (area V2).

    PubMed

    Levichkina, E V; Loshkarev, A A; Rodionova, E I; Popova, E P; Pigarev, I N

    2007-09-01

    Recently, elongated comet-shaped receptive fields were discovered in the fourth extrastriate crescent (area V4A) of cats and monkeys. It was shown that the long axes of these receptive fields were oriented radially toward the centre of the retina. Such unusual "radial" organization of this extrastriate area led to the assumption that these neurons may contribute to the analysis of optic flow. To investigate this assumption we recorded activity of neurons in the V4A of cats during real motion in depth toward or away from a stationary visual scene. Responses of neurons in area V4A were compared with activity of neurons in area V2 under similar conditions of stimulation. Area V2 is known to be sensitive to motion but does not have radial organization. It was found that a substantial number of visual neurons in both areas did not fire at all when cats were exposed to motion in depth. Nevertheless, neurons with selective activation to direction of motion in depth were identified, but comparable numbers were found in both areas studied. We conclude that radial organization of the fourth extrastriate crescent does not provide any special advantage for the analysis of optic flow information.

  12. Assessment of natural fluorescence as a tracer of diffuse agricultural pollution from slurry spreading on intensely-farmed grasslands.

    PubMed

    Naden, Pamela S; Old, Gareth H; Eliot-Laize, Caroline; Granger, Steve J; Hawkins, Jane M B; Bol, Roland; Haygarth, Phil

    2010-03-01

    The value of natural fluorescence in tracing diffuse pollution, in liquid phase, following slurry application to land was assessed by field experiment using twelve one hectare lysimeters on a heavy clay soil in Devon, UK, during autumn 2007. A strong linear relationship was found between natural fluorescence intensity and slurry concentration. The ratio of indices of tryptophan-like and fulvic/humic-like fluorescence (TI:FI) varied between 2 and 5 for a range of slurries sampled from Devon farms and allowed slurry to be distinguished from uncontaminated drainage waters (TI:FI<1). Incidental losses of slurry, indicated by significantly enhanced TI:FI ratios, high TI and high ammonium levels, occurred via the drain flow pathway of the drained lysimeters during the first small event following slurry-spreading. The maximum estimated loss from a single lysimeter was 2-8kg or 0.004-0.016% of the applied slurry. In the second larger storm event, some five weeks later, significantly enhanced TI:FI ratios in the drain flows were not associated with high TI but with high nitrate levels and, compared to the earlier storm, an increase in the humification index. This implies the loss of slurry decomposition products during this event but further work is needed to validate this. There was no significant enhancement of TI:FI in the surface/throughflow pathways of the drained or undrained lysimeters in either of the events. The observed change over a period of weeks in the strength and nature of the fluorescence signal from spread slurry restricts quantification of slurry losses to those immediately after slurry spreading. Nonetheless, this study demonstrates the utility of fluorescence as an indicator of slurry in drainage waters and the importance of field drains in diffuse agricultural pollution. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rheological properties of the product slurry of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mattus, A.J.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing the liquid from Low Level radioactive Waste (LLW). An experimental study was conducted to measure the rheological properties of the pipe flow of the NAC product slurry. Test results indicate that the NAC product slurry has a profound rheological behavior. At low solids concentration, the slurry exhibits a typical dilatant fluid (or shear thinning)fluid. The transition from dilatant fluid to pseudo-plastic fluid will occur at between 25% to 30% solids concentration in temperature ranges of 50--80{degree}C. Correlation equations are developed based on the test data.

  14. The capability of radial basis function to forecast the volume fractions of the annular three-phase flow of gas-oil-water.

    PubMed

    Roshani, G H; Karami, A; Salehizadeh, A; Nazemi, E

    2017-11-01

    The problem of how to precisely measure the volume fractions of oil-gas-water mixtures in a pipeline remains as one of the main challenges in the petroleum industry. This paper reports the capability of Radial Basis Function (RBF) in forecasting the volume fractions in a gas-oil-water multiphase system. Indeed, in the present research, the volume fractions in the annular three-phase flow are measured based on a dual energy metering system including the (152)Eu and (137)Cs and one NaI detector, and then modeled by a RBF model. Since the summation of volume fractions are constant (equal to 100%), therefore it is enough for the RBF model to forecast only two volume fractions. In this investigation, three RBF models are employed. The first model is used to forecast the oil and water volume fractions. The next one is utilized to forecast the water and gas volume fractions, and the last one to forecast the gas and oil volume fractions. In the next stage, the numerical data obtained from MCNP-X code must be introduced to the RBF models. Then, the average errors of these three models are calculated and compared. The model which has the least error is picked up as the best predictive model. Based on the results, the best RBF model, forecasts the oil and water volume fractions with the mean relative error of less than 0.5%, which indicates that the RBF model introduced in this study ensures an effective enough mechanism to forecast the results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of surface heating condition on local heat transfer in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.C.; Zhang, Y.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lee, C.P. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a surface heating condition on the local heat transfer coefficient in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow was investigated for Reynolds numbers from 2,500 to 25,000 and rotation numbers from 0 to 0.352. The square channel, composed of six isolated copper sections, has a length-to-hydraulic diameter ratio of 12. The mean rotating radius to the channel hydraulic diameter ratio is kept at a constant value of 30. Four surface heating conditions were tested: (1) four walls at uniform temperature, (2) temperature ratio of leading surface to side wall and trailing surface to side wall is 1.05 and 1.10, respectively, (3) trailing surface hot and remaining three walls cold, and (4) leading surface not and remaining three walls cold. The results show that the heat transfer coefficients on the leading surface are much lower than that of the trailing surface due to rotation. For case (1) of four walls at uniform temperature, the leading surface heat transfer coefficient decreases and then increases with increasing rotation numbers, and the trailing surface heat transfer coefficient increases monotonically with rotation numbers. However, the trailing surface heat transfer coefficients for cases (2) and (3) are slightly lower than case (1), and the leading surface heat transfer coefficients for cases (2) and (4) are significantly higher than for case (1). The results suggest that the local wall heating condition creates the local buoyancy forces, which reduce the effects of the bulk buoyancy and Coriolis forces. Therefore, the local heat transfer coefficients on the leading and trailing surfaces are altered by the surface local heating condition.

  16. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  17. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  18. Evaluation of abiotic fate mechanisms in soil slurry bioreactor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, J.A.; McCauley, P.T.; Dosani, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Biological treatment of contaminated soil slurries may offer a viable technology for soil bioremediation. Slurry bioreactor treatment of soils, however, has not sufficiently progressed to be a durable, reliable, and cost-effective treatment option. Critical to the evaluation of slurry bioreactors is a better description of pollutant mass transfer during the treatment phase. Losses attributable to abiotic means are generally overlooked in field application of the technology. Discussions with EPA regional personnel and inspection of active soil slurry bioreactor operations have identified operational problems such as foaming which could result in possible abiotic loss. Field bioslurry operations have adopted various approaches to reduce foaming: (1) the addition of defoaming agents, (2) the reduction of rotational speed of the agitator, and (3) the reduction of gas flow through the bioreactor system. We have conducted two bench-scale slurry bioreactor treatability studies, at the U.S. EPA Testing & Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, which were designed to investigate some of the operating factors leading to foam formation and identify the most advantageous means to deal with foaming. The initial study has been previously presented as a general treatability study for treatment of creosote contamination in a soil. During this study, foaming became a major problem for operation. The foaming conditions were mitigated by use of defoamer and, in the more extreme cases, through reduction of the mixer rotational speed and gas flow. A subsequent study which was devoted specifically to investigating the causes and conditions of foaming using a different batch of soil from the same site as the earlier study showed little foaming at the very beginning of the study.

  19. Radial inflow combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Shekleton, J.R.

    1991-12-03

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises: radial compressor means for compressing air entering through a compressor inlet opening; axial turbine means in axially spaced relation to the radial compressor means; the radial compressor means being operatively associated with the axial turbine means; radial combustor means intermediate the radial compressor means and axial turbine means; turbine nozzle means proximate the axial turbine means for directing gases of combustion thereto; the radial combustor means including a pair of axially spaced radially extending walls joined at radially outward extremes by a generally cylindrical wall, the walls defining a radial combustion space in communication with both the radial compressor means and the turbine nozzle means, and including means for introducing compressed air into the radial combustion space in a manner avoiding formation of an air film on the generally cylindrical wall.

  20. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  1. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program was developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface as well as approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference, stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method that uses information from a finite-difference, stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  2. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    to weeks. The unusual shape of the slurry flow curves was not an artifact of the rheometric measurement. Adjusting the user-specified parameters in the rheometer measurement jobs can alter the shape of the flow curve of these time dependent samples, but this was not causing the unusual behavior. Variations in the measurement parameters caused the time dependence of a given slurry to manifest at different rates. The premise of the controlled shear rate flow curve measurement is that the dynamic response of the sample to a change in shear rate is nearly instantaneous. When this is the case, the data can be fitted to a time independent rheological equation, such as the Bingham plastic model. In those cases where this does not happen, interpretation of the data is difficult. Fitting time dependent data to time independent rheological equations, such as the Bingham plastic model, is also not appropriate.

  3. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  4. Radial access - be prepared!

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Ioannis

    2008-10-01

    We present the case of a 46-year-old female patient that experienced recurrent stent thrombosis and underwent attempted primary PCI via the radial artery. Although radial artery cannulation with a 6 Fr sheath and the diagnostic angiography were successfully performed, the PCI could not be achieved because of failure to advance the 6 Fr guide through the radial artery, due to severe angulation of a high take-off radial artery, combined with a proximal radial artery stenosis.

  5. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media. [High-velocity, high-pressure gas flow through porous media near the wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Until recently, the visco-inertial flow equation, which is an adaptation of Forchheimer's quadratic equation, has been used to describe gas flow behavior at higher flow rates and pressures. The inability of this equation, in some cases, to fully describe high-velocity, high-pressure gas flow behavior, especially around the well bore, led to the consideration of other empirical equations. In this paper, formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes, i.e. Darcy type, inertial type, and turbulent. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is directly related to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime.

  6. Losses in radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, I. M.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine experimentally and theoretically the losses in radial inflow turbine nozzles. Extensive experimental data was obtained to investigate the flow behavior in a full-scale radial turbine stator annulus. A theoretical model to predict the losses in both the vaned and vaneless regions of the nozzle was developed. In this analysis, the interaction effects between the stator and the rotor are not considered. It was found that the losses incurred due to the end wall boundary layers can be significant, especially if they are characterized by a strong crossflow. The losses estimated using the analytical study are compared with the experimentally determined values.

  7. Preparation of coal slurry with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    In this study, various organic solvents were used to prepare coal slurries and the rheological and thermal properties of coal-organic solvent slurries were examined. Solvents with molecules containing unpaired electrons (high basicity) show high extraction power and cause swelling of coal. Therefore, coal-organic solvent slurries usually showed higher viscosities compared to coal-water slurry. In addition, coal slurries prepared by alcohols and cyclohexanone demonstrated lower settling rates but a high specific sedimentation volume presumably because these solvents swelled coal particles well and led to the formation of weak gel structures in the bulk. In addition, ethanol and cyclohexanone are capable of breaking a considerable amount of hydrogen bonds in coal and subsequently opening up the structures. Thus, more surface area is available for combustion and the combustion rate of coal slurries was increased.

  8. Indian Creek-AML: Coal slurry reclamation (Kansas case history)

    SciTech Connect

    Witthar, S.R.

    1998-12-31

    Black and Veatch, assisted by Jack Nawrot, developed conceptual and final designs and provided construction assistance to create grasslands and wetlands in order to reclaim an abandoned coal mine for the state of Kansas. The mine included spoils, a coal refuse dump, and slurry pond in the Indian Creek drainage basin in east central Kansas. The Indian Creek flowed from an off-site abandoned mine and through the coal slurry pond where its waters became more polluted. The intent of the reclamation project was to improve water quality and create a wildlife refuge. The coal refuse was covered and seeded with a diversity of vegetation including several grasses and legume. The slurry pond was developed into a series of large wetland cells to improve water quality. Prior to reclamation, the water leaving the site had a typical pH of 3.3, ranging from 2.4 to 5.6, an iron content which typically over 22 mg/L and ranging over 100 mg/L, and contained large amounts of coal slurry. The acid sediment in the slurry killed fish and caused visible damage to a new large concrete box culvert several miles downstream of the site. Post-reclamation water quality leaving the Indian Creek site showed immediate improvement even before vegetation was reestablished. The existing wetland treatment systems have been successfully treating water for over seven years with the pH of the water leaving the wetlands above 7 and soluble iron content less than 1 mg/L. Fish in the constructed wetlands support waterfowl which now nest onsite.

  9. An experimental investigation of the thermal/fluid properties of the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) product slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Lagos, L.; Yang, G.; Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Walker, J.W.; Hunt, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    Recently, a new immobilization technique for LLW, the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process, has been developed. Instead of mixing the liquid waste form directly with the cement to make concrete blocks, the NAC process eliminates the nitrate from the LLW by converting it to ammonia gas. Aluminum particles are used as a reductant to complete this conversion. The final product of the NAC process is gibbsite, which can be further sintered to a ceramic waste form. Experimental tests are conducted to measure the apparent viscosity, the pressure drop, and the heat transfer coefficient of the pipe flow of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process product slurry. The tests indicate that the NAC product slurry exhibits a typical pseudoplastic fluid behavior. The pressure drop in the pipe flow is a function of the Reynolds number and the slurry temperature. The results also indicate that at a low slurry temperature, the slurry is uniformly heated peripherally. At a high slurry temperature, however, the slurry may be thermally stratified. In a straight pipe, the Nusselt number is reduced as the slurry temperature increases.

  10. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.F.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Wang, Chi-Sheng.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the nonabrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  11. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  12. BOILING SLURRY REACTOR AND METHOD FO CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1963-05-01

    The control of a boiling slurry nuclear reactor is described. The reactor consists of a vertical tube having an enlarged portion, a steam drum at the top of the vertical tube, and at least one downcomer connecting the steam drum and the bottom of the vertical tube, the reactor being filled with a slurry of fissionabie material in water of such concentration that the enlarged portion of the vertical tube contains a critical mass. The slurry boils in the vertical tube and circulates upwardly therein and downwardly in the downcomer. To control the reactor by controlling the circulation of the slurry, a gas is introduced into the downcomer. (AEC)

  13. Feasibility Studies on Pipeline Disposal of Concentrated Copper Tailings Slurry for Waste Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senapati, Pradipta Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2017-06-01

    The conventional lean phase copper tailings slurry disposal systems create pollution all around the disposal area through seepage and flooding of waste slurry water. In order to reduce water consumption and minimize pollution, the pipeline disposal of these waste slurries at high solids concentrations may be considered as a viable option. The paper presents the rheological and pipeline flow characteristics of copper tailings samples in the solids concentration range of 65-72 % by weight. The tailings slurry indicated non-Newtonian behaviour at these solids concentrations and the rheological data were best fitted by Bingham plastic model. The influence of solids concentration on yield stress and plastic viscosity for the copper tailings samples were discussed. Using a high concentration test loop, pipeline experiments were conducted in a 50 mm nominal bore (NB) pipe by varying the pipe flow velocity from 1.5 to 3.5 m/s. A non-Newtonian Bingham plastic pressure drop model predicted the experimental data reasonably well for the concentrated tailings slurry. The pressure drop model was used for higher size pipes and the operating conditions for pipeline disposal of concentrated copper tailings slurry in a 200 mm NB pipe with respect to specific power consumption were discussed.

  14. Feasibility Studies on Pipeline Disposal of Concentrated Copper Tailings Slurry for Waste Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senapati, Pradipta Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2016-06-01

    The conventional lean phase copper tailings slurry disposal systems create pollution all around the disposal area through seepage and flooding of waste slurry water. In order to reduce water consumption and minimize pollution, the pipeline disposal of these waste slurries at high solids concentrations may be considered as a viable option. The paper presents the rheological and pipeline flow characteristics of copper tailings samples in the solids concentration range of 65-72 % by weight. The tailings slurry indicated non-Newtonian behaviour at these solids concentrations and the rheological data were best fitted by Bingham plastic model. The influence of solids concentration on yield stress and plastic viscosity for the copper tailings samples were discussed. Using a high concentration test loop, pipeline experiments were conducted in a 50 mm nominal bore (NB) pipe by varying the pipe flow velocity from 1.5 to 3.5 m/s. A non-Newtonian Bingham plastic pressure drop model predicted the experimental data reasonably well for the concentrated tailings slurry. The pressure drop model was used for higher size pipes and the operating conditions for pipeline disposal of concentrated copper tailings slurry in a 200 mm NB pipe with respect to specific power consumption were discussed.

  15. Yield Stress Reduction of DWPF Melter Feed Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.; Smith, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    , then quenched with a water spray. Approximately 90% of the frit was converted to beads by this process. Yield stress reduction was measured by preparing melter feed slurries (using nonradioactive HLW simulants) that contain beads and comparing the yield stress with melter feed containing frit. A second set of tests was performed with beads of various diameters to determine if a decrease in diameter affected the results. Smaller particle size was shown to increase yield stress when frit is utilized. The settling rate of the beads was required to match the settling rate of the frit, therefore a decrease in particle size was anticipated. Settling tests were conducted in water, xanthan gum solutions, and in non-radioactive simulants of the HLW. The tests used time-lapse video-graphy as well as solids sampling to evaluate the settling characteristics of beads compared to frit of the same particle size. A preliminary melt rate evaluation was performed using a dry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) developed by SRNL. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of beading the frit on the frit addition system were completed by conducting flow loop testing. A recirculation loop was built with a total length of about 30 feet. Pump power, flow rate, outlet pressure, and observations of the flow in the horizontal upper section of the loop were noted. The recirculation flow was then gradually reduced and the above items recorded until settling was noted in the recirculation line. Overall, the data shows that the line pressure increased as the solids were increased for the same flow rate. In addition, the line pressure was higher for Frit 320 than the beads at the same solids level and flow. With the observations, a determination of minimum velocity to prevent settling could be done, but a graph of the line pressures versus velocity for the various tests was deemed to more objective. The graph shows that the inflection point in pressure drop is about the same for the beads and Frit 320. This

  16. Characteristics of radial ion-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. M.; Korolev, C. V.; Movsesyants, Yu B.; Tyuryukanov, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of two-stage ion-plasma accelerators are presented. These accelerators are based on a discharge in a transverse highly-inhomogeneous magnetic field and can form radially converging and divergent flows. It is shown that for a radially convergent flow the width of the ion acceleration zone is limited by the condition of a transition through the ion sound point in the vicinity of the plasma ion emitting boundary.

  17. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  18. Effects of various factors on Doppler flow ultrasonic radial and coccygeal artery systolic blood pressure measurements in privately-owned, conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Allison P.; Mawby, Dianne I.; Price, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age, body condition score (BCS) and muscle condition score (MCS) on indirect radial and coccygeal Doppler systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) measurements in dogs. Methods Sixty-two privately-owned dogs were enrolled between June and July 2016. The BCS and MCS were determined by two investigators. Blood pressure was measured per published guidelines and using headphones, and the order of measurement site was randomized. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency for radial measurements and sternal recumbency or standing for coccygeal measurements. Associations between SAP and other variables were assessed by correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance. Results Radial and coccygeal SAP measurements were moderately correlated (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). Radial SAP measurements were higher than coccygeal SAP measurements (mean difference 9 mmHg, P < 0.01), but discordance occurred in both directions. No difference was observed between the first measurement taken, the average of measurements 2–6, or the average of all 6 measurements for either the radial (128, 129, and 129 mmHg; P = 0.36) or coccygeal (121, 122, and 122 mmHg; P = 0.82) site. Associations were not found between SAP measurements for either site and age, weight, BCS, MCS, anxiety score, or cuff size. Heart rate decreased significantly from the start of acclimation to the end of the first data collection series regardless of site (P < 0.01). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Initial measurement site can be based on patient and operator preference given lack of associations with patient variables, but the same site should be used for serial SAP measurements given discordant results between sites. PMID:28348930

  19. Effects of various factors on Doppler flow ultrasonic radial and coccygeal artery systolic blood pressure measurements in privately-owned, conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Allison P; Mawby, Dianne I; Price, Joshua M; Whittemore, Jacqueline C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age, body condition score (BCS) and muscle condition score (MCS) on indirect radial and coccygeal Doppler systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) measurements in dogs. Sixty-two privately-owned dogs were enrolled between June and July 2016. The BCS and MCS were determined by two investigators. Blood pressure was measured per published guidelines and using headphones, and the order of measurement site was randomized. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency for radial measurements and sternal recumbency or standing for coccygeal measurements. Associations between SAP and other variables were assessed by correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance. Radial and coccygeal SAP measurements were moderately correlated (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). Radial SAP measurements were higher than coccygeal SAP measurements (mean difference 9 mmHg, P < 0.01), but discordance occurred in both directions. No difference was observed between the first measurement taken, the average of measurements 2-6, or the average of all 6 measurements for either the radial (128, 129, and 129 mmHg; P = 0.36) or coccygeal (121, 122, and 122 mmHg; P = 0.82) site. Associations were not found between SAP measurements for either site and age, weight, BCS, MCS, anxiety score, or cuff size. Heart rate decreased significantly from the start of acclimation to the end of the first data collection series regardless of site (P < 0.01). Initial measurement site can be based on patient and operator preference given lack of associations with patient variables, but the same site should be used for serial SAP measurements given discordant results between sites.

  20. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  1. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  2. Apparent Benzene Solubility in Tetraphenylborate Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.; Peterson, R.A.; Crawford, C.L.

    1997-11-01

    Personnel conducted testing to determine the apparent solubility of benzene in potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) slurries. The lack of benzene vapor pressure suppression in these tests indicate that for a 6.5 wt percent solids KTPB slurry in 4.65 M Na+ salt solution at approximately 25 degrees Celsius, no significant difference exists between the solubility of benzene in the slurry and the solubility of benzene in salt solution without KTPB solids. The work showed similar results in slurry with 6,000 mg/L sludge and 2,000 mg/L monosodium titanate added. Slurries containing tetraphenylborate decomposition intermediates (i.e., 4,200 mg/L triphenylboron (3PB), 510 mg/L diphenylborinic acid (2PB) and 1,500 mg/L phenylboric acid (1PB) or 100 mg/L tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)) also showed no significant difference in benzene solubility form filtrate containing no KTPB solids. Slurry containing 2,000 mg/L Surfynol 420 did exhibit significant additional benzene solubility, as did irradiated slurries. The vapor pressure depression in the irradiated slurries presumably results from dissolution of biphenyl and other tetraphenylborate irradiation products in the benzene.

  3. Optimizing slurry separation in coal preparation

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; V.H. Fritsler; V.V. Bukhtiyarov

    2009-05-15

    In processing slurry with cationic polyelectrolytes, the final concentration of the suspended particulates in the water beyond the slurry tank in the coal-preparation shop is no more than 10 mg/l. Consequently, this water may be reused in industrial systems.

  4. Acceptance testing of the Lasentec focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) monitor for slurry transfer applications at Hanford and Oak Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daymo, Eric A.; Hylton, Tom D.; May, Thomas H.

    1999-01-01

    The Lasentec M600F FBRM particle size and population monitor (Lasentec, Redmond, WA) was selected for deployment on radioactive slurry transfer systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hanford after extensive testing with `physical simulants.' These tests indicated that the monitor is able to measure the change in particle size distribution of concentrated (up to 35 vol.%) slurries at flow rates greater than 2 m/sec. As well, the monitor provided relatively stable mean particle size values when air bubbles were introduced to the slurry pipe test loop and when the color of the slurry was altered. Slurry samples taken during each test were analyzed with a laboratory particle size monitor. For kaolin slurry samples (length-cubed weighted mean of around 55 micrometers ), the Lasentec M600F FBRM in-line monitor measured length-cubed weighted mean particle sizes within 25% of those measured by a laboratory Lasentec M500LF monitor. This difference is thought primarily to be the result of sample handling issues. Regardless, this accuracy is acceptable for radioactive slurry transfer applications. Once deployed, the in-line Lasentec monitor is expected to yield significant cost savings at Hanford and Oak Ridge through the possible reduction in risk of pipeline blockage. In addition, fewer samples of radioactive slurries will need to be measured in the laboratory, further reducing costs and increasing safety.

  5. Slurry-pressing consolidation of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Kiser, James D.; Freedman, Marc R.

    1988-01-01

    A baseline slurry-pressing method for a silicon nitride material is developed. The Si3N4 composition contained 5.8 wt percent SiO2 and 6.4 wt percent Y2O3. Slurry-pressing variables included volume percent solids, application of ultrasonic energy, and pH. Twenty vol percent slurry-pressed material was approximately 11 percent stronger than both 30 vol percent slurry-pressed and dry-pressed materials. The Student's t-test showed the difference to be significant at the 99 percent confidence level. Twenty volume percent (300 h) slurry-pressed test bars exhibited strengths as high as 980 MPa. Large, columnar beta-Si3N4 grains caused failure in the highest strength specimens. The improved strength correlated with better structural uniformity as determined by radiography, optical microscopy, and image analysis.

  6. Impact of radial artery cannulation for coronary angiography and angioplasty on radial artery function.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jason M; Gidrewicz, Dominica; Hutchison, Stuart J; Holmes, Kate; Jolly, Sanjit; Cantor, Warren J

    2007-02-15

    The radial artery is commonly used as a conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting. No data exist on the effects of radial sheath insertion on radial artery function. Because many patients considered for coronary artery bypass grafting have had previous radial procedures, it is important to understand any effects radial sheath insertion may have on radial artery function. Twenty-two patients who underwent elective coronary angiography or angioplasty with a 6Fr sheath through the right radial artery were studied. Radial artery function was assessed using ultrasound to measure flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Reactive hyperemia was produced by 5-minute cuff inflation on the arm to suprasystolic pressures. Radial artery diameter was measured at rest and 1 minute after cuff deflation. FMD was expressed as percent change in radial diameter compared with at rest. In all cases, the left radial artery was studied as a control. Patients were studied before sheath insertion, immediately after sheath insertion, and 6 weeks after sheath insertion. The FMD of the cannulated arm was 13.2% before sheath insertion versus 3.6% immediately after sheath insertion (p <0.01) and 0.2% (p <0.01) 9 weeks after sheath insertion. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the noncannulated arm at either time point. In conclusion, radial artery sheath insertion for coronary angiography or angioplasty results in immediate and persistent blunting of FMD, suggesting severe vasomotor dysfunction. Radial artery sheath insertion has important effects on radial artery function that must be considered when selecting radial conduits for coronary artery bypass grafting.

  7. Self-Organization of Electroactive Suspensions in Discharging Slurry Batteries: A Mesoscale Modeling Investigation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Garima; Del Olmo Diaz, Diego; Thangavel, Vigneshwaran; Franco, Alejandro A

    2017-05-31

    We report a comprehensive modeling-based study of electroactive suspensions in slurry redox flow batteries undergoing discharge. A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo model based on the variable step size method is used to describe the electrochemical discharge of a silicon/carbon slurry electrode in static mode (i.e., no fluid flow conditions). The model accounts for Brownian motion of particles, volume expansion of silicon upon lithium insertion, and formation and destruction of conducting carbon networks. Coupled to an electrochemical model, this study explores the impact of carbon fraction in the slurry and applied c-rate on the specific capacity. The trends obtained are analyzed by following the behavior of parameters such as number of contacts between electroactive particles and the percentage of electroactive silicon particles. Furthermore, instead of studying the bulk behavior of the slurry, here the focus is given to the slurry/current collector interface in order to illustrate its importance. Hereby, it is demonstrated how this modeling tool can lead to deeper understanding and optimization of electroactive particle suspensions in redox flow batteries.

  8. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25{degrees}C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  9. Research on numerical simulation and protection of transient process in long-distance slurry transportation pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G.; Jiang, J.; Li, D. D.; Yi, W. S.; Zhao, Z.; Nie, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    The calculation of water-hammer pressure phenomenon of single-phase liquid is already more mature for a pipeline of uniform characteristics, but less research has addressed the calculation of slurry water hammer pressure in complex pipelines with slurry flows carrying solid particles. In this paper, based on the developments of slurry pipelines at home and abroad, the fundamental principle and method of numerical simulation of transient processes are presented, and several boundary conditions are given. Through the numerical simulation and analysis of transient processes of a practical engineering of long-distance slurry transportation pipeline system, effective protection measures and operating suggestions are presented. A model for calculating the water impact of solid and fluid phases is established based on a practical engineering of long-distance slurry pipeline transportation system. After performing a numerical simulation of the transient process, analyzing and comparing the results, effective protection measures and operating advice are recommended, which has guiding significance to the design and operating management of practical engineering of longdistance slurry pipeline transportation system.

  10. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  11. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  12. Rheology of slurries and environmental impacts in the mining industry.

    PubMed

    Boger, David V

    2013-01-01

    The world's resource industries are the largest producers of waste. Much of this waste is produced as a fine particle slurry, which is pumped to a storage area, generally at a low concentration, where it behaves like a Newtonian fluid. Simply removing, reusing, and recycling water from the slurry represents a step toward a more sustainable practice in this industry. As the concentration of such a slurry is increased as a result of dewatering, the materials exhibit non-Newtonian behavior, which is characterized by shear thinning, a yield stress, and in some instances thixotropic behavior. Such high-concentration, nonideal (dirty) suspensions in the resource industries have meant that new rheological methods and techniques have been needed to measure and interpret the basic flow properties. Also, some older empirical techniques have needed to be modified and interpreted in a more fundamental way so that the results could be used in design. This article reviews these techniques and illustrates how the industry itself has motivated their development. Understanding and exploiting this rheology has resulted in dramatic improvement in the waste-disposal strategy for some industries, but many have failed to embrace the available technology. The reasons for this are discussed. The article concludes that a greater positive change in waste-management practice will occur in the future, motivated by several factors, including public perception, tighter regulation, and perhaps even commonsense life cycle accounting.

  13. Numerical modeling of a slurry droplet containing a spherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine M.; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-03-01

    A numerical investigation of the fundamental processes governing the momentum, energy, and mass exchanges between the solid, liquid, and gas phases of a vaporizing slurry droplet is presented. The axisymmetric configuration consists of an isolated slurry droplet with a large spherical solid particle in its core that is suddenly injected in a gaseous high-temperature, laminar, convective environmental. The model allows for independent motion of the solid particle along the axis of symmetry of the slurry droplet, and considers variable gas-phase thermophysical properties as well as variable liquid-phase viscosities and latent heat of vaporization. Additional features of the model include internal liquid circulation with transient droplet heating, droplet surface regression due to vaporization, and droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs an iterative solution procedure that has been successfully used previously for an isolated all-liquid droplet. We found that the relative motion of the solid particle and the liquid-carrier fluid is very significant during the early stages of the simulation. In that respect, the fluid mechanics dominate the heat and mass transport phenomena involved, thus strongly suggesting a high possibility of secondary atomization as a result of the penetration of the solid particle through the gas/liquid interface.

  14. Acidification of animal slurry--a review.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, David; Hjorth, Maibritt; Gioelli, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia emissions are a major problem associated with animal slurry management, and solutions to overcome this problem are required worldwide by farmers and stakeholders. An obvious way to minimize ammonia emissions from slurry is to decrease slurry pH by addition of acids or other substances. This solution has been used commonly since 2010 in countries such as Denmark, and its efficiency with regard to the minimization of NH3 emissions has been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the impact of such treatment on other gaseous emissions during storage is not clear, since the studies performed so far have provided different scenarios. Similarly, the impact of the soil application of acidified slurry on plant production and diffuse pollution has been considered in several studies. Also, the impact of acidification upon combination with other slurry treatment technologies (e.g. mechanical separation, anaerobic digestion …) is important to consider. Here, a compilation and critical review of all these studies has been performed in order to fully understand the global impact of slurry acidification and assess the applicability of this treatment for slurry management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Chisheng Wang.

    1993-03-16

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the non-abrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  16. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Wang, Chi-Sheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the non-abrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  17. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  18. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a…

  19. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a…

  20. Recommendations for rheological testing and modelling of DWPF melter feed slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The melter feed in the DWPF process is a non-Newtonian slurry. In the melter feed system and the sampling system, this slurry is pumped at a wide range of flow rates through pipes of various diameters. Both laminar and turbulent flows are encountered. Good rheology models of the melter feed slurries are necessary for useful hydraulic models of the melter feed and sampling systems. A concentric cylinder viscometer is presently used to characterize the stress/strain rate behavior of the melter feed slurries, and provide the data for developing rheology models of the fluids. The slurries exhibit yield stresses, and they are therefore modelled as Bingham plastics. The ranges of strain rates covered by the viscometer tests fall far short of the entire laminar flow range, and therefore hydraulic modelling applications of the present rheology models frequently require considerable extrapolation beyond the range of the data base. Since the rheology models are empirical, this cannot be done with confidence in the validity of the results. Axial pressure drop versus flow rate measurements in a straight pipe can easily fill in the rest of the laminar flow range with stress/strain rate data. The two types of viscometer tests would be complementary, with the concentric cylinder viscometer providing accurate data at low strain rates, near the yield point if one exists, and pipe flow tests providing data at high strain rates up to and including the transition to turbulence. With data that covers the laminar flow range, useful rheological models can be developed. In the Bingham plastic model, linear behavior of the shear stress as a function of the strain rate is assumed once the yield stress is exceeded. Both shear thinning and shear thickening behavior have been observed in viscometer tests. Bingham plastic models cannot handle this non-linear behavior, but a slightly more complicated yield/power law model can.

  1. High-flow bypass with radial artery graft followed by internal carotid artery ligation for large or giant aneurysms of cavernous or cervical portion: clinical results and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hideaki; Inoue, Tomohiro; Tanishima, Takeo; Tamura, Akira; Saito, Isamu; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-09-27

    High-flow bypass followed by ligation of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is an effective treatment, but the impact of abrupt occlusion of the ICA is unpredictable, especially on postoperative cognitive function. The present study evaluated the clinical results as well as cognitive performances after high-flow bypass using radial artery graft (RAG) with supportive superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass, followed by ICA ligation. Ten consecutive patients underwent high-flow bypass surgery for large or giant ICA aneurysms of cavernous or cervical portion. Demographics, clinical information, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials, neuropsychological examinations including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R), and follow-up data were analyzed. The aneurysm was located on the cavernous segment in eight cases and cervical segment in two cases, and mean aneurysm size was 27.9 mm. Postoperative DSA demonstrated robust bypass flow from the external carotid artery to MCA via the RAG, and no anterograde flow into the aneurysm. No patient showed new symptoms after the operation. Follow-up clinical study and MR imaging were performed in nine patients and showed no additional ischemic lesion compared with preoperative imaging. Seven patients completed neuropsychological examinations before and after surgery. All postoperative scores except WMS-R composite memory score slightly improved. High-flow bypass followed by ICA ligation can achieve good clinical outcomes. Successful high-flow bypass using RAG with supportive STA-MCA bypass and ICA ligation does not adversely affect postoperative cognitive function.

  2. Runoff- and erosion-driven transport of cattle slurry: linking molecular tracers to hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, C. E. M.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D. R.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    The addition of cattle slurry to agricultural land is a widespread practise, but if not correctly managed it can pose a contamination risk to aquatic ecosystems. The transport of inorganic and organic components of cattle slurry to watercourses is a major concern, yet little is known about the physical transport mechanisms and associated fluxes and timings of contamination threats. Therefore, the aim of the study was to ascertain the importance of flow pathway partitioning in the transport (fluxes and timing) of dissolved and particulate slurry-derived compounds with implications for off-site contamination. A series of rainfall-runoff and erosion experiments were carried out using the TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) experimental hillslope facility. The experiments allowed the quantification of the impact of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on nutrient transport from cattle slurry applied to the hillslope, via surface, subsurface, and vertical percolated flow pathways, as well as particulate transport from erosion. The dissolved components were traced using a combination of ammonium (NH4+) and fluorescence analysis, while the particulate fraction was traced using organic biomarkers, 5β-stanols. Results showed that rainfall events which produced flashy hydrological responses, resulting in large quantities of surface runoff, were likely to move sediment and also flush dissolved components of slurry-derived material from the slope, increasing the contamination risk. Rainfall events which produced slower hydrological responses were dominated by vertical percolated flows removing less sediment-associated material, but produced leachate which could contaminate deeper soil layers, and potentially groundwater, over a more prolonged period. Overall, this research provides new insights into the partitioning of slurry-derived material when applied to an unvegetated slope and the transport mechanisms by which contamination risks are

  3. Runoff- and erosion-driven transport of cattle slurry: linking molecular tracers to hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, C. E. M.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D. R.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    The addition of cattle slurry to agricultural land is a widespread practise, but if not correctly managed it can pose a contamination risk to aquatic ecosystems. The transport of inorganic and organic components of cattle slurry to watercourses is a major concern, yet little is known about the physical transport mechanisms and associated fluxes and timings of contamination threats. Therefore, the aim of the study was to ascertain the importance of flow pathway partitioning in the transport (fluxes and timing) of dissolved and particulate slurry-derived compounds with implications for off-site contamination. A series of rainfall-runoff and erosion experiments were carried out using the TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) experimental hillslope facility. The experiments allowed the quantification of the impact of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on nutrient transport from cattle slurry applied to the hillslope, via surface, subsurface and vertical percolated flow pathways, as well as particulate transport from erosion. The dissolved components were traced using a combination of ammonium (NH4+) and fluorescence analysis, while the particulate fraction was traced using organic biomarkers, 5β-stanols. Results showed that rainfall events which produced flashy hydrological responses, resulting in large quantities of surface runoff, were likely to move sediment and also flush dissolved components of slurry-derived material from the slope, increasing the contamination risk. Rainfall events which produced slower hydrological responses were dominated by vertical percolated flows removing less sediment-associated material, but produced leachate which could contaminate deeper soil layers, and potentially groundwater, over a more prolonged period. Overall, this research provides new insights into the partitioning of slurry-derived material when applied to an unvegetated slope and the transport mechanisms by which contamination risks are created.

  4. Concentration and Velocity Measurements of Both Phases in Liquid-Solid Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altobelli, Stephen; Hill, Kimberly; Caprihan, Arvind

    2007-03-01

    Natural and industrial slurry flows abound. They are difficult to calculate and to measure. We demonstrate a simple technique for studying steady slurries. We previously used time-of-flight techniques to study pressure driven slurry flow in pipes. Only the continuous phase velocity and concentration fields were measured. The discrete phase concentration was inferred. In slurries composed of spherical, oil-filled pills and poly-methyl-siloxane oils, we were able to use inversion nulling to measure the concentration and velocity fields of both phases. Pills are available in 1-5mm diameter and silicone oils are available in a wide range of viscosities, so a range of flows can be studied. We demonstrated the technique in horizontal, rotating cylinder flows. We combined two tried and true methods to do these experiments. The first used the difference in T1 to select between phases. The second used gradient waveforms with controlled first moments to produce velocity dependent phase shifts. One novel processing method was developed that allows us to use static continuous phase measurements to reference both the continuous and discrete phase velocity images. ?

  5. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A [West Palm Beach, FL; Carella, John A [Jupiter, FL

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  6. Searching for Radial Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Ben J; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. Numerous investigations, dating back over one hundred years, have explored the visual processing of symmetry. However, these studies have been concerned with mirror symmetry, overlooking radial (or rotational) symmetry, which is also prevalent in nature. Using a visual search paradigm, which approximates the everyday task of searching for an object embedded in background clutter, we have measured how quickly and how accurately human observers detect radially symmetric dot patterns. Performance was compared with mirror symmetry. We found that with orders of radial symmetry greater than 5, radial symmetry can be detected more easily than mirror symmetry, revealing for the first time that radial symmetry is a salient property of objects for human vision.

  7. Searching for Radial Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry is ubiquitous in the natural world. Numerous investigations, dating back over one hundred years, have explored the visual processing of symmetry. However, these studies have been concerned with mirror symmetry, overlooking radial (or rotational) symmetry, which is also prevalent in nature. Using a visual search paradigm, which approximates the everyday task of searching for an object embedded in background clutter, we have measured how quickly and how accurately human observers detect radially symmetric dot patterns. Performance was compared with mirror symmetry. We found that with orders of radial symmetry greater than 5, radial symmetry can be detected more easily than mirror symmetry, revealing for the first time that radial symmetry is a salient property of objects for human vision. PMID:28855979

  8. The rheology of cryovolcanic slurries: Motivation and phenomenology of methanol-water slurries with implications for Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Fang; Mitchell, Karl L.; Hays, Charles C.; Choukroun, Mathieu; Barmatz, Martin; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2009-08-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has revealed landforms on the surface of Titan suggested to be viscous cryovolcanic flows and possibly eruptive domes. In order to relate those surface features to the processes and chemistries that produced them, it is necessary to construct flow models, which rely on characterization of the rheological properties of the eruptants. This paper describes our initial exploratory attempts to understand the rheological characteristics of cryogenic slurries, using a 40% methanol-water mixture, as a precursor to more detailed experiments. We have devised a new automated cryogenic rotational viscometer system to more fully characterize cryovolcanic slurry rheologies. A series of measurements were performed, varying first temperature, and then strain rate, which revealed development of yield stress-like behaviors, shear-rate dependence, and thixotropic behavior, even at relatively low crystal fractions, not previously reported. At fixed shear rate our data are fit well by the Andrade equation, with the activation energy modified by a solid volume fraction. At fixed temperature, depending on shearing history, a Cross model could describe our data over a wide shear rate range. A Bingham plastic model appears to be a good constitutive model for the data measured at high shear rates when the shear was global. The yield stress like behavior implies that levee formation on cryolava flows is more likely than would be inferred from the previous studies, and may provide a partial explanation for features interpreted as steep-sided volcanic constructs on Titan.

  9. Fluid dynamic studies for a simulated Melton Valley Storage Tank slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), are used for the collection and storage of remote-handled radioactive liquid wastes. These wastes, which were typically acidic when generated, were neutralized with the addition of sodium hydroxide to protect the storage tanks from corrosion, but this caused the transuranic and heavy metals to precipitate. These wastes will eventually need to be removed from the tanks for ultimate disposal. The objective of the research activities discussed in this report is to support the design of a pipeline transport system between the MVSTs and a treatment facility. Since the wastes in the MVSTs are highly radioactive, a surrogate slurry was developed for this study. Rheological properties of the simulated slurry were determined in a test loop in which the slurry was circulated through three pipeline viscometers of different diameters. Pressure drop data at varying flow rates were used to obtain shear stress and shear rate data. The data were analyzed, and the slurry rheological properties were analyzed by the Power Law model and the Bingham plastic model. The plastic viscosity and yield stress data obtained from the rheological tests were used as inputs for a piping design software package, and the pressure drops predicted by the software compared well with the pressure drop data obtained from the test loop. The minimum transport velocity was determine for the slurry by adding known nominal sizes of glass spheres to the slurry. However, it was shown that the surrogate slurry exhibited hindered settling, which may substantially decrease the minimum transport velocity. Therefore, it may be desired to perform additional tests with a surrogate with a lower concentration of suspended solids to determine the minimum transport velocity.

  10. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry.

    PubMed

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita; Veith, Tamie L; Laegdsmand, Mette

    2016-12-15

    Animal manure application to agricultural land provides beneficial organic matter and nutrients but can spread harmful contaminants to the environment. Contamination of fresh produce, surface water and shallow groundwater with the manure-borne pollutants can be a critical concern. Leaching and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns at a rate of 50 t ha(-1) and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h(-1) after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils. In contrast, NO3-N leaching from the intact soil was higher for all events except the first event, probably due to a lower nitrification rate in the disturbed soil. A week after the last irrigation event, the redistribution of all slurry constituents except NO3-N in most of the sections of the soil column was higher for the disturbed soil. Total recovery of E. coli was significantly higher from the disturbed soil and total leaching of mineral nitrogen was significantly lower

  11. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    SciTech Connect

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  12. New technique for treatment of postcatheterization radial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Pancholy, Samir B.; Kartashov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new technique for treatment of radial artery pseudoaneurysm (RAP) caused by transradial access (TRA) for coronary angiography. Traditional extrinsic compression with radial flow cessation leads to a local milieu likely associated with an increase in probability of radial artery occlusion (RAO). Our technique involves obtaining ipsilateral radial artery access distal to the neck of the RAP followed by a prolonged sheath dwell time covering the neck of the RAP which allows the RAP sac to thrombose and maintains radial artery lumen patency. © 2016 The Authors. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27527608

  13. Conductivity and electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 slurry in the lithium slurry battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Caimei; Chen, Yongchong; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Ping

    2017-06-01

    Lithium slurry battery is a new type of energy storage technique which uses the slurry of solid active materials, conductive additions and liquid electrolyte as the electrode. The proportion of conductive addition and the active material has significant influence on the conductivity and electrochemical performance of the slurry electrode. In the present work, slurries with different volume ratios of LiFePO4 (LFP) and Ketjenblack (KB) were investigated by the electrochemical workstation and charge-discharge testing system (vs. Li/Li+). Results show that the conductivity of the slurry increases linearly with the addition of KB, and the measured specific capacity of the slurry reaches its theoretical value when the volume ratio of KB to LFP is around 0.2. Based on this ratio, a slurry battery with higher loading of LFP (19.1 wt.% in the slurry) was tested, and a specific capacity of 165 mAh/g at 0.2 mA/cm2 and 102 mAh/g at 5 mA/cm2 was obtained for LFP.

  14. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Fifteenth quarterly report, 14 February 1994--13 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-08-10

    During this quarter of the DOE project, ``Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation``, the x-ray CT measurements were correlated with the results from the flotation experiments reported in the 13th quarterly report. In this regard the axial view of the flow regimes in the ASH during steady state operation were constructed from the radial density profiles as revealed by x-ray CT measurements. Construction of the axial view of the flow regimes was explained in the last quarterly report. By studying the characteristics of the flow regimes from these axial views and relating them with flotation recovery data, a phenomenological description of ASH flotation was possible. The effect of two operating variables, inlet pressure and dimensionless flow rate ratio (A* = air flow rate/slurry flow rate), are reported in this quarterly report.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Heat-Mass Transfer in Radial Flow Plasma-Chemical Reactor with Multicomponent Kinetics CF4/02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-23

    that the effect of CF3 adsorption on etching rate does not exceed 5%. In CF4/O2 plasma the oxygen reacts with CFx radicals preventing their...realized at the small gas flow rates (Table 1, gas flow rate 100 cm3/min). Here it is possible the effective control of etching rate by changing the...rates (100 cm3/min) where fluorine transfer is determined by a concentration diffusion to the wafer. Here it is possible the effective control of

  16. Characterization and Delivery of Hanford High-Level Radioactive Waste Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Michael G.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Lee, K. P.

    2014-11-15

    Two primary challenges to characterizing Hanford’s high-level radioactive waste slurry prior to transfer to a treatment facility are the ability to representatively sample million-gallon tanks and to estimate the critical velocity of the complex slurry. Washington River Protection Solutions has successfully demonstrated a sampling concept that minimizes sample errors by collecting multiple sample increments from a sample loop where the mixed tank contents are recirculated. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed and demonstrated an ultrasonic-based Pulse-Echo detection device that is capable of detecting a stationary settled bed of solids in a pipe with flowing slurry. These two concepts are essential elements of a feed delivery strategy that drives the Hanford clean-up mission.

  17. Combustion behavior of single coal-water slurry droplets, Part 1: Experimental techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Metghalchi, M.; Wise, D.

    1991-12-31

    Techniques to produce single droplets of coal-water slurries have been developed in order to study the combustion behavior of the slurries. All stages of slurry combustion are of interest to the present study, however, emphasis will be given to the combustion of the solid agglomerate char which remains upon the termination of the water evaporation and the devolatilization periods. An experimental facility is under construction where combustion of coal-water slurries will be monitored in a variety of furnace temperatures and oxidizing atmospheres. The effect of the initial size of the slurry droplet and the solids loading (coal to water ratio) will be investigated. A drop tube, laminar flow furnace coupled to a near-infrared, ratio pyrometer win be used to monitor temperature-time histories of single particles from ignition to extinction. This paper describes the experimental built-up to this date and presents results obtained by numerical analysis that help understanding the convective and radiating environment in the furnace.

  18. Measuring fluid and slurry density and solids concentration non-invasively

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2004-04-01

    Staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a highly sensitive, non-invasive, self calibrating, on-line sensor to measure the density, speed of sound, and attenuation of ultrasound for a liquid or slurry flowing through a pipeline; the approach can also be applied for measurements made in vessels. The sensor transducers are mounted directly upon the stainless steel wall and the pipeline wall becomes part of the measurement system. Multiple reflections within the stainless steel wall are used to determine the acoustic impedance of the liquid, where the acoustic impedance is defined as the product of the density and the speed of sound. The probe becomes self-calibrating because variations in the pulser voltage do not affect the measurements. This feature leads to the stability of the measurements and the instrument requires much less time and effort to calibrate. Further, the calibration remains constant in time, because it does not depend upon the pulser voltage remaining at a given value. By basing the measurement upon multiple reflections, the sensitivity of the measurement is significantly increased. For slurries with wt% solids concentration of 1% or less, high sensitivity is gained by analyzing attenuation measurements obtained from multiple paths through the slurry. For slurries with higher concentrations of solids, sufficient sensitivity is obtained by analyzing data from a simple transmission. Data are presented that show probe performance for each of these cases: very dilute and highly concentrated kaolin clay slurries.

  19. The rheology and stability of concentrated coal water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Slaczka, A.; Piszczynski, Z.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the rheological properties of coal-water slurries (CWS). Slurries were prepared from coal of different rank, different particle size distribution, additives and solid content. Viscosity at different shear rate were measured using a capillary viscometer specially constructed by the authors for this purpose. The stability of investigated CWS was performed too. The study has revealed a correlation between the rank of coal used for slurry preparation and its viscosity in all ranges of slurry concentration. The addition of some reagents causes a considerable decrease in the slurry viscosity. The stability of the slurry was improved too.

  20. Determination of chromium, manganese and vanadium in sediments and soils by modifier—free slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwa, J.; Sun, Yuh-Chang; Yang, Mo-Hsiung

    1998-01-01

    Slurried sediment and soil samples of the certified reference materials with a highly elevated level of the metals of interest (Mn, Cr and V) were analysed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with Zeeman effect background correction. The method of slurry preparation and time-temperature programmes were optimized and, finally, the use of chemical modifiers was not necessary. The effect of alternate spectral lines and gas mini-flows on characteristic masses of analytes was studied. The homogeneity of samples and the influence of short sample grinding were also discussed. The simple, aqueous standard based calibration graphs (except Mn at the concentration > 1000 mg kg -1) were applied for the quantification of results. The results of determinations obtained by slurry sampling agreed well with the cetified values, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the over-all analytical procedure repeatability (at slurries concentration level about 2 mg/2 ml) were less than 9.5%, except manganese (10.4%).

  1. Determination of impurities in titanium nitride by slurry introduction axial viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Ni, Zheming; Qiu, Deren; Tao, Guangyi; Yang, Pengyuan

    2005-03-01

    A method of slurry nebulization for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) applied to the analysis of titanium niride(TiN) was reported. The TiN slurry sample was prepared with adding dispersant polyacrylate amine or polyethylene imine for the stabilization and homogenization of suspension, and the amount of additives was optimized. A Babington type cross-flow nebulizer with V-groove was used for nebulization of the slurry for avoidance of blockage from the particles. The stability of slurry was characterized via zeta potential measurement, scanning electron microscope observation, particle size distrbution measurement and signal stability testing. For nm size TiN, calibration curves could be established by aqueous standards and the analytical results were in good accordance with the alkaline fusion method. For μm size TiN, a negative deviation was observed for most of elements and this deviation can be corrected by using Ti intrinsic internal standard method.

  2. Effects of Radial Variability in Sap Flow on up-Scaling of in Situ Evapotranspiration Measurements from the Scale of Individual Trees to the Grove Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, P. T.; Weinberger, J. L.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Sap flow sensors are routinely used to obtain in situ measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) by individual trees. Flow rates within a single tree of some species, e.g., Quercus englemanii trees, exhibit high spatial variability. The latter impedes one's ability to extrapolate single-tree ET estimates to their grove- and/or watershed-scale counterparts. A simplistic approach of using the highest observed sap flow rate might introduce a systemic bias into up-scaled estimates. We propose an approach to obtain a representative sap flow rate from all observed data; this rate is then applied to multiple trees in order to extrapolate ET rates from individual trees to the grove-scale. Eight thermal dissipation probe (TDP) pairs were deployed in individual Quercus englemanii trees, which had previously been monitored with only two TDP pairs. Analysis of the variability observed among the probes in the eight-probe arrays yields both a representative composite ET rate for the tree and quantification of the uncertainty associated with that rate. The probability distribution from the eight probe arrays can be applied to trees with one or two probes to estimate the probable range of representative ET rates for those trees and the composite rates for all measured trees is then applied to the grove as a whole.

  3. A novel method of atomizing coal-water slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, P.E.; Lefebvre, A.H.

    1990-05-01

    Despite the body of work describing the performance of effervescent atomizers, its potential for use with coal water slurries (CWS) had not been evaluated prior to this study. This program was therefore undertaken: to demonstrate that effervescent atomization can produce CWS sprays with mean drop sizes below 50{mu}m; to determine a lower size limit for effervescent atomizer produced CWS sprays; to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for the formation of effervescent atomizer produced sprays. An analysis of the effects of slurry rheological properties (as indicated by the consistency index and the flow behavior index) and formulation (in terms of loading and coal particle top size) on the spray formation process was performed. The experimental data reported were then analyzed to explain the physical processes responsible for spray formation. The analysis began by considering an energy balance across a control volume that extended from the nozzle exit plant to the line of spray measurement. The inlet conditions were calculated using two-phase flow techniques and the outlet conditions were calculated by using conservation of momentum and assuming that the final velocities of the air and liquid were equal. Entrainment was considered negligible and losses were accounted for by realizing that only a small fraction of the atomizing air participated in the spray formation process with the remainder passing through the control volume unperturbed. Results are discussed. 41 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. The granular mixing in a slurry rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. C.; Hsiau, S. S.

    2010-03-01

    The mixing dynamics of granular materials immersed in a liquid was experimentally studied in a quasi-2D rotating drum. A DV (SONY DCR-TRV900 NTSC) motion corder analyzer was used to record the motions of granular materials. The effects of interstitial fluid viscosity and filling degree on the mixing index, mixing rate constant, and dynamic repose angle in the rotating drum were investigated and discussed in this paper. The experimental results show that the interstitial fluid viscosity has almost not influence on the final stable mixing index but has significantly effects on the mixing rate constant and dynamic repose angle in slurry granular flows. The results show that the mixing rate and dynamic repose angle increase with increasing the interstitial fluid viscosity. The results also indicate that the filling degree plays an important role in mixing dynamics in slurry granular flows. The mixing rate constant is demonstrated to be decreased with increasing the filling degree. The dynamic repose angle is not altered by the filling degree. Finally, we find that the dynamic repose angle and the mixing rate constant increase slightly at high Stokes number and increase dramatically at low Stokes number with decreasing Stokes number.

  5. Radial gate evaluation: Olympus Dam, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The report presents a structural analysis of the radial gates of Olympus Dam in eastern Colorado. Five 20-foot wide by 17-foot high radial gates are used to control flow through the spillway at Olympus Dam. The spillway gates were designed in 1947. The gate arm assemblies consist of two separate wide flange beams, with a single brace between the arms. The arms pivot about a 4.0-inch diameter pin and bronze graphite-insert bushing. The pin is cantilevered from the pier anchor girder. The radial gates are supported by a pin bearing on a pier anchor birder bolted to the end of the concrete pier. The gates are operated by two-part wire rope 15,000-pound capacity hoise. Stoplog slots upstream of the radial gates are provided in the concrete piers. Selected drawings of the gates and hoists are located in appendix A.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  7. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Taularides, L. L.; Sangani, A.

    2001-06-01

    The principal objective of the project is to develop an acoustic probe for determining the volume fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. This will include testing the theory of acoustic wave propagation in suspensions and demonstrating the application of the probe by installing it on a flow loop through which a suspension is flowing and determining the particle volume fraction. The signal from the probe must be processed such that the noise arising from the presence of the gas bubbles, if present in the system, is removed to yield an accurate estimate of the particle volume fraction. Once the probe is developed and tested successfully at Syracuse University, it is to be installed and tested in the flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratories for surrogate slurries for the Hanford Nuclear site. Particular attention is to be given to testing suspensions with low particle volume fractions since slurries to be transported in nuclear waste processing will have low particle volume fractions.

  8. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design.

  9. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  10. SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE PROCESSING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 205E

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Slurries of inorganic solids, containing both stable and radioactive elements, were produced during the cold war as by-products of the production of plutonium and enriched uranium and stored in large tanks at the Savannah River Site. Some of this high level waste is being processed into a stable glass waste form today. Waste processing involves various large scale operations such as tank mixing, inter-tank transfers, washing, gravity settling and decanting, chemical adjustment, and vitrification. The rheological properties of waste slurries are of particular interest. Methods for modeling flow curve data and predicting the properties of slurry blends are particularly important during certain operational phases. Several methods have been evaluated to predict the rheological properties of sludge slurry blends from the data on the individual slurries. These have been relatively successful.

  11. CFD simulation and experimental analysis of erosion in a slurry tank test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimian, Mehdi; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Erosion occurring in equipment dealing with liquid-solid mixtures such as pipeline parts, slurry pumps, liquid-solid stirred reactors and slurry mixers in various industrial applications results in operational failure and economic costs. A slurry erosion tank test rig is designed and was built to investigate the erosion rates of materials and the influencing parameters such as flow velocity and turbulence, flow angle, solid particle concentration, particles size distribution, hardness and target material properties on the material loss and erosion profiles. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool is used to simulate the erosion rate of sample plates in the liquid-solid slurry mixture in a cylindrical tank. The predictions were made in a steady state and also transient manner, applying the flow at the room temperature and using water and sand as liquid and solid phases, respectively. The multiple reference frame method (MRF) is applied to simulate the flow behavior and liquid-solid interactions in the slurry tank test rig. The MRF method is used since it is less demanding than sliding mesh method (SM) and gives satisfactory results. The computational domain is divided into three regions: a rotational or MRF zone containing the mixer, a rotational zone (MRF) containing the erosion plates and a static zone (outer liquid zone). It is observed that changing the MRF zone diameter and height causes a very low impact on the results. The simulated results were obtained for two kinds of hard metals namely stainless steel and ST-50 under some various operating conditions and are found in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  13. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  14. Fifth international technical conference on slurry transportation. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Linderman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    The fifth international technical conference on slurry transportation was held March 26-28, 1980, at the Sahara Tahoe, Lake Tahoe, Nevada. The papers deal with the transport of slurries (mostly coal and iron ores) in slurry pipelines. Planned slurry pipelines in the USA are described and the legal problems in getting rights-of-way and water rights. The economics of slurry pipelines and railways are considered in some detail. Finally, technical aspects of such pipelines are considered: design, engineering, pumps, maintenance, etc. Other topics discussed are: marine transport (moorings, terminal facilities and tanker ship design, other slurry media than water (fuel oils, methanol, CO/sub 2/), coarse slurry transport, slurry preparation, water removal and pumps (pulsations and dampering). Thirty-two papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  15. Hall and radial magnetic field effects on radiative peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a channel with convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of present investigation is to study the Hall and MHD effects on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a convectively curved configuration. Thermal radiation, Soret and Dufour effects are also accounted. The channel walls comprised the no slip and compliant properties. Constitutive equations for mass, momentum, energy and concentration are first modeled in view of considered assumptions and then simplified under long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Solution of the resulting system of equations is carried out via a regular perturbation technique. Physical behaviors of velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are discussed with the help of graphical representation.

  16. Prospects for coal slurry pipelines in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The coal slurry pipeline segment of the transport industry is emerging in the United States. If accepted it will play a vital role in meeting America's urgent energy requirements without public subsidy, tax relief, or federal grants. It is proven technology, ideally suited for transport of an abundant energy resource over thousands of miles to energy short industrial centers and at more than competitive costs. Briefly discussed are the following: (1) history of pipelines; (2) California market potential; (3) slurry technology; (4) environmental benefits; (5) market competition; and (6) a proposed pipeline.

  17. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  18. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G.

    1986-01-01

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  19. Study on the degradation of chitosan slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Benjamin; Dimida, Simona; De Benedetto, Egidio; Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian

    In the present work, we measured the degradation rate of different chitosan slurries. Several parameters were monitored such as temperature (25 °C, 37 °C, 50 °C); chitosan concentration (1% and 2% (w/V)); and polymer molecular weight. The samples were tested in dynamic sweep test mode. This test is able to provide a reliable estimation of viscosity variations of the slurries; in turn, these variations could be related to degradation rate of the system in the considered conditions. The resulting information is particularly important especially in applications in which there is a close relationship between physical properties and molecular structure.

  20. A new physical model based on cascading column experiments to reproduce the radial flow and transport of micro-iron particles.

    PubMed

    Comba, Silvia; Braun, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    In the field of aquifer restoration and civil engineering, fluids and suspensions are delivered in porous media via well injection. The flow field resulting around the well is three-dimensional. Since two and three-dimensional experiments which can be used to reproduce such flow fields are, although accurate, extremely elaborate and time consuming, the authors suggest to substitute them by a cascade of interdependent, one-dimensional (column) experiments. The new method is used to simulate the injection in aquifers of micro-iron particles dispersed in a shear thinning gel of guar gum and allows the prediction of iron particle distribution around the well and of injection pressure. The method respects the mass balance at the field scale and its predictions are in good agreement with those of a mathematical model proposed in the literature. The method is consistent with the Triad Approach, a way to improve remediation efficiency proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The representativeness of the proposed tests combined with their simplicity and relative inexpensiveness make this new method applicable and useful in the planning and design of real remediation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. SEPARATING LIQUID MODERATOR FROM A SLURRY TYPE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1961-07-01

    A system for evaporating moderator such as D/sub 2/O from an irradiated slurry or sloution characterized by two successive evaproators is described. In the first of these the most troublesome radioactivity dissipates before the slurry becomes too thick to be pumped out; in the second the slurry, now easier to handle, can be safely reduced to a sludge.

  2. Process for producing high-concentration slurry of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaoji, K.; Itoh, H.; Kamao, M.; Takao, Sh.; Tatsumi, Sh.

    1985-02-19

    High concentrated coal-water slurry is produced by coarsely crushing coal, thereafter pulverizing the coarsely crushed coal, together with water and a slurry dispersant, according to necessity, in a wet-type ball mill, and feeding back one portion of the finely pulverized coal slurry thus obtained into the inlet of the wet-type ball mill.

  3. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Dooher, J.P.

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  4. CATALYTIC RECOMBINATION OF RADIOLYTIC GASES IN THORIUM OXIDE SLURRIES

    DOEpatents

    Morse, L.E.

    1962-08-01

    A method for the coinbination of hydrogen and oxygen in aqueous thorium oxide-uranium oxide slurries is described. A small amount of molybdenum oxide catalyst is provided in the slurry. This catalyst is applicable to the recombination of hydrogen and/or deuterium and oxygen produced by irradiation of the slurries in nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  5. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J.

    2009-08-15

    Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

  7. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  8. Comparison of raw dairy manure slurry and anaerobically digested slurry as N sources for grass forage production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our study was conducted to determine how raw dairy slurry and anaerobically digested slurry (dairy slurry and food waste) applied via broadcast and subsurface deposition to reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) affected forage biomass, N uptake, apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR), and soil nitrate...

  9. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  10. Freeforming objects with low-binder slurry

    DOEpatents

    Cesarano, III, Joseph; Calvert, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    In a rapid prototyping system, a part is formed by depositing a bead of slurry that has a sufficient high concentration of particles to be pseudoplastic and almost no organic binders. After deposition the bead is heated to drive off sufficient liquid to cause the bead to become dilatant.

  11. Aerated atomization of coal water slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, H.N.; Sojka, P.E.; Lefebvre, A.H.

    1989-01-05

    In order to better understand the process of slurry atomization, it is important to observe the influence of fluid non-Newtonian rheological behavior on the spray formation process. As a first step, glycerin-water solutions have been atomized. This report describes findings of photographs taken during atomization. 19 figs.

  12. Low Cost Dewatering of Waste Slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. B.; Sharma, S. K.; Church, R. H.; Scheiner, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed a technique for dewatering mineral waste slurries which utilizes polymer and a static screen. A variety of waste slurries from placer gold mines and crushed stone operations have been successfully treated using the system. Depending on the waste, a number of polymers have been used successfully with polymer costs ranging from $0.05 to $0.15 per 1,000 gal treated. The dewatering is accomplished using screens made from either ordinary window screen or wedge wire. The screens used are 8 ft wide and 8 ft long. The capacity of the screens varies from 3 to 7 gpm/sq. ft. The water produced is acceptable for recycling to the plant or for discharge to the environment. For example, a fine grain dolomite waste slurry produced from a crushed stone operation was dewatered from a nominal 2.5 pct solids to greater than 50 pct solids using $0.10 to $0.15 worth of polymer per 1,000 gal of slurry. The resulting waste water had a turbidity of less than 50 NTU and could be discharged or recycled. The paper describes field tests conducted using the polymer-screen dewatering system.

  13. Dispersant for aqueous slurry of coal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, N.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamura, M.

    1982-05-18

    A dispersant for forming an aqueous slurry of coal powder having a good flowability, which comprises as the active ingredient at least one member selected from sulfonation products of polycyclic aromatic compounds which may have a hydrocarbon group as a substituent, salts thereof and formaldehyde condensates thereof.

  14. Fluid loss control in well cement slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, D.N.; Nugent, A.; Bandlish, B.K.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a fluid-loss-control additive adapted for use in cementing subterranean well formations with an aqueous well cement slurry. The additive comprises in combination, an anydrous mixture of (i) a lignosulfonate polymer or a condensed naphthalene sulfonate polymer or a sulfonated vinylaromatic polymer or any combination thereof and (ii) an unmodified or a chemically modified polymer of monoallylamine.

  15. Radial plant growth.

    PubMed

    Tonn, Nina; Greb, Thomas

    2017-09-11

    One of the extraordinary features of plants is their growth capacity. Depending on the species and the environment, body forms are manifold and, at the same time, constantly reshaped. An important basis of this plastic variation and life-long accumulation of biomass is radial growth. Here, we use this term to describe the ability to grow in girth by the formation of wood, bast and cork. The more technical term for radial growth is secondary growth, which distinguishes the process from primary growth taking place at the tips of stems and roots during plant elongation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  17. Radially uniform electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D.; Bame, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A thermionic electron source capable of producing uniform count rates in a number of channel electron multipliers simultaneously was required for conditioning multipliers for an extended space mission. It was found that a straight tungsten filament in the center of a cylindrically symmetric geometry surrounded by an array of multipliers emits a radially asymmetric distribution of electrons that changes with time. A source was developed which successfully produces a time-independent radially uniform distribution of electrons by moving the filament out of the direct line of sight and replacing it with a centrally located electron 'cloud.'

  18. EOS for critical slurry and solution systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiPeso, G; Peterson, P

    1998-10-27

    In a fire involving fissile material, the mixture of the fissile material ash with fire fighting water may lead to a criticality excursion if there are nearby sumps that permit a critical geometry. The severity of the resulting energy release and pressure pulse is dependent on the rate at which the mixing occurs. To calculate these excursions, a non-equilibrium equation of state for the water ash mixture or slurry is needed that accounts for the thermal non-equilibrium that occurs due to finite heat transfer rates. We are developing the slurry EOS as well as a lumped neutronic and hydrodynamic model to serve as a testing ground for the non-equilibrium EOS before its incorporation into more sophisticated neutronic-hydrodynamics codes. Though the model lacks spatial dependence, it provides estimates of energy release and pressure pulses for various mixture assembly rates. We are also developing a non-equilibrium EOS for critical solution systems in which the fissile material is dissolved in water, which accounts for chemical non-equilibrium due to finite mass transfer rates. In contrast to previously published solution EOS, our solution EOS specifically accounts for mass diffusion of dissolved radiolytic gas to bubble nucleation sites. This EOS was developed to check our overall modeling against published solution excursion experiments and to compare solution excursions with slurry excursions initiated under the same conditions. Preliminary results indicate a good match between solution EOS calculations and experiments involving premixed 60-80 g U/l solutions for both low rate and high rate reactivity insertions. Comparison between slurry and solution calculations for the same composition show comparable energy release and pressure peaks for both low and high rate reactivity insertions with the slurry releasing less energy but generating more pressure than the solution for the amount of energy released. Calculations more appropriate to actual fire fighting scenarios

  19. Efficiency gain limits of the parallel segmented inlet and outlet flow concept in analytical liquid chromatography columns suffering from radial transcolumn packing density gradients.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2012-10-05

    The maximal gain in efficiency that can be expected from the use of the segmented column end fittings that were recently introduced to alleviate the effect of transcolumn packing density gradients has been quantified and generalized using numerical computations of the band broadening process. It was found that, for an unretained compound in a column with a parabolic packing density gradient, the use of a segmented inlet or a segmented outlet allows to eliminate about 60-100% of the plate height contribution (H(tc)) originating from a parabolic transcolumn velocity gradient in a d(c)=4.6 mm column. In a d(c)=2.1 mm column, these percentages change from 10 to 100%. Using a combined segmented in- and outlet, H(tc) can be reduced by about 90-100% (d(c)=4.6 mm column) or 20-100% (d(c)=2.1 mm column). The strong variation of these gain percentages is due to fact that they depend very strongly on the column length and the flow rate. Dimensionless graphs have been established that allow to directly quantify the effect for each specific case. It was also found that, in agreement with one's physical intuition, trans-column velocity profiles that are more flat in the central region benefit more from the concept than sharp, parabolic-like profiles. The gain margins furthermore tend to become smaller with increasing retention and increasing diffusion coefficient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of slurry characteristics for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Ki Yeon; Kwon, Young Il; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lithium-ion battery slurries are prepared for rechargeable batteries. • The dispersion state of slurry constituents is identified. • Thermal, morphological, rheological, and electrical properties of slurries are analyzed. - Abstract: A multi-component slurry for rechargeable batteries is prepared by dispersing LiCoO{sub 2}, conductive additives, and polymeric binders in a solvent. The physical properties, including rheological, morphological, electrical, and spectroscopic features of battery slurries are investigated. The relationship between the measured physical properties and the internal structure of the slurry is analyzed. It is found that the rheological behavior of the slurry is determined by the interaction of active materials and binding materials (e.g., network structure) and that the dispersion state of conductive additives (e.g., agglomeration) also depends on the binder–carbon interaction.

  1. Elemental analysis of slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eseller, Kemal E.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2010-05-01

    Direct analysis of wet slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is challenging due to problems of sedimentation, splashing, and surface turbulence. Also, water can quench the laser plasma and suppress the LIBS signal, resulting in poor sensitivity. The effect of water on LIBS spectra from slurries was investigated. As the water content decreased, the LIBS signal was enhanced and the standard deviation was reduced. To improve LIBS slurry analysis, dried slurry samples prepared by applying slurry on PVC coated slides were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on the LIBS spectra of the dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si, and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give a good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  2. RHEOLOGICAL AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSES OF SIMULANT SB5 SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR-MELTER FEED TANK SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.

    2010-02-08

    (OH){sub 2} and Mn(OH){sub 2} caused the increase in yield stress. The low pH run exhibited as much as an order of magnitude greater B and Li (frit components) leachate concentrations in the supernate. At high pH a decrease of B leaching was found and this was attributed to adsorption onto Mg(OH){sub 2}. A second leaching experiment was performed without any sludge to deconvolute the leach rate behavior of Frit 418 from those of the SB5 sludge-Frit 418 system. At high pH, the sludgeless system demonstrated very fast leaching of all the frit components, primarily due to fast dissolution of the main component, silica, by hydroxide anion; various semiconductor studies have established this reactivity. Overall, the frit-water system exhibited greater leaching from a factor two to almost three orders of magnitude (varying by conditions and species). The slower leaching of the sludge system is possibly due to a greater ionic strength or smaller driving force. Another possible reason is a physical effect, coating of the frit particles with sludge; this would increase the mass transfer resistance to leaching. Based on this study, the cause of clogs in the melter feed loop is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the SME product, like the simulant, is too thin and could contribute to a loss of two-phase flow which could cause plugging of a restricted and poorly mixed zone like the melter feed loop. This is feasible since a previous study of a slurry showed an increase in resistance to flow at lower flow rates. Testing with a radioactive SME sample is underway and should help understand this potential mechanism.

  3. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report

  4. Planar radial weakly dissipative diffeomorphisms.

    PubMed

    Simó, C; Vieiro, A

    2010-12-01

    We study the effect of a small dissipative radial perturbation acting on a one parameter family of area preserving diffeomorphisms. This is a specific type of dissipative perturbation. The interest is on the global effect of the dissipation on a fixed domain around an elliptic fixed/periodic point of the family, rather than on the effects around a single resonance. We describe the local/global bifurcations observed in the transition from the conservative to a weakly dissipative case: the location of the resonant islands, the changes in the domains of attraction of the foci inside these islands, how the resonances disappear, etc. The possible ω-limits are determined in each case. This topological description gives rise to three different dynamical regimes according to the size of dissipative perturbation. Moreover, we determine the conservative limit of the probability of capture in a generic resonance from the interpolating flow approximation, hence assuming no homoclinics in the resonance. As a paradigm of weakly dissipative radial maps, we use a dissipative version of the Hénon map. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  6. Physical Characterization of Solid-Liquid Slurries at High Weight Fractions Using Optical and Ultrasonic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.W.; Brodsky, A.M.; Panetta P.D.

    2005-12-22

    Remediation of highly radioactive waste is a major technical and programmatic challenge for the DOE. Rapid, on-line physical characterization of highly concentrated slurries is required for the safe and efficient remediation of 90 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (HLW), sodium bearing waste, and mixed waste. The research presented here, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) to directly address the need for rapid on-line characterization of the physical properties of HLW slurries during all phases of the remediation process, from in-tank characterization of sediments to monitoring of the concentration, particle size, and degree of agglomeration and gelation of slurries during transport. Near-surface characterization of the slurry flow in the particle size range from nanometer to micrometer is examined using optical low coherence reflectometry. Volumetric characterization at depths in the slurry flow, up to several centimeters in the particle size range from the micrometer to millimeter, is realized by utilizing ultrasonic backscatter and diffuses fields. One of the strengths, the teaming up of significant talents in both experimental and theoretical optics and in ultrasonics, provides a synergistic approach to integrate these complimentary techniques. One of the benefits of this combined approach is the physical characterization of HLW over a concentration and particle size range that is broader than can be achieved with today's technology. This will avoid a costly increase in waste stream volume due to excess dilution, and will lessen chance of plugging pipes that could shut down expensive processing lines.

  7. Effect of radial flow on two particle correlations with identified triggers at intermediate pT in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debojit; Choudhury, Subikash; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-09-01

    Results from two-particle correlation between identified triggers (pions (π±), protons (p / p bar)) and un-identified charged particles at intermediate transverse momentum (pT) in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV have been presented. The events generated from a hybrid Monte-Carlo event generator, EPOS 3.107 that implements a flux-tube initial conditions followed by event by event 3+1D viscous hydrodynamical evolution, have been analyzed to calculate two-dimensional correlation functions in Δη- Δϕ. The strength of angular correlations at small relative angles (jet-like correlations), quantified in terms of near-side jet-like per-trigger yield has been calculated as a function of the event multiplicity. The yield associated with pion triggers exhibit negligible multiplicity dependence, while the proton-triggered yield shows a gradual suppression from low to high multiplicity events. In small collision systems like p-Pb where jet modification is expected to be less dominant, the observed suppression may be associated with the hydrodynamical evolution of the bulk system that generates an outward radial flow. Analogous measurements in Au-Au collisions at RHIC energy have shown a hint of dilution in proton-triggered correlation at its highest multiplicity suggesting that the soft physics processes in p-Pb and heavy ion collisions may have qualitative similarity.

  8. Enhanced photocatalysis in a pilot laminar falling film slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Puma, G.L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-09-01

    Laminar falling film slurry (LFFS) photocatalytic reactors are one of the most efficient reactor configurations for conducting heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions, particularly for wastewater treatment. This paper presents a study on the oxidation of an aqueous salicylic acid waste in a pilot continuous flow LFFS photocatalytic reactor which has an optimum design for light absorption. In conducting the oxidation reaction, heterogeneous photocatalysis was supplemented with other photon-assisted processes. The effect of light intensity, radiation wavelength, oxidizing-enhancing agents, substrate and photocatalyst concentration, and exposure time were studied. A comparison of six different photon-based processes showed that higher oxidation rates of salicylic acid were obtained when there was concomitant photocatalysis, photolysis, and UV peroxidation. The oxidation rates of salicylic acid with this combined process were at least 1 order of magnitude higher in comparison with those for UVA photocatalysis and 3-fold higher in comparison with homogeneous UVC photolysis/UVC peroxidation.

  9. Well completion and stimulation: good slurry blending enhances frac

    SciTech Connect

    Arribau, J.O.; Dorn, R.J.; Deleon, C.

    1982-02-01

    Successful fracturing is dependent in large part upon surface equipment. One critical factor is effective blending of the fracturing slurry before it is pumped into the formation. In hydraulic fracturing, a blender draws water from storage tanks to mix with sand, polymers, or other chemical additives. Solids and liquids generally are mixed by a paddle in a large open tub monitored visually for mixture level. The mixture then advances through the impeller zone of the blender. Conventional blending apparatus often requires multistage blending to mix large quantities of liquid and solids or additives and to maintain them in suspension when pumped the extended distances required in fracturing. Geo Condor, Inc. has developed a closed blending system, which provides a single-stage blending apparatus which achieves intimate mixing of liquid-solid or liquid-liquid constituents without altering the course or direction of liquid flow in established high-capacity mixing. The advantages and disadvantages of this system are discussed.

  10. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  11. Ultrasonic Method for Concentration and Particle Size Analysis in Dense Coal-water Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Minghua; Su, Mingxu; Dong, Lili; Shang, Zhitao; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2007-06-01

    The concentration and particle size distribution in particulate two-phase flow are the important parameters in a wide variety of industrial areas. For the purpose of on-line characterizing dense coal-water slurry, ultrasonic methods have many advantages, such as no-dilution, real-time and no-invasion, while light-based techniques are not capable of providing information because optical methods normally require the sample to be diluted. In this paper, the modified Urick equation including temperature modification, which can be used to determine concentration from the measurement of velocity in the coal-water slurry, is evaluated on the basis of model analysis and experiments. Combined with the optimum regulation technique inverse algorithm, the particle size distribution of the coal-water slurry is obtained according to the attenuation prediction of Coupled-phase model plus Bouguer-Lambert-Beer-Law scattering model and experimental attenuation at frequencies ranges from 3MHz to 12MHz. This technique brings the possibility of using ultrasound for on-line measurement of dense slurry.

  12. Numerical modeling of three-phase slurry bubble column: Study of particle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Abd Alhamid R.; Karim, M. R. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a numerical investigation has been conducted to describe the pulp zone properties by predicting the local gas holdup and bubble size distribution accounting for the effect of bubble-particle aggregate on the flow dynamic of slurry bubble column. Modelling calculations have been conducted using Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase approach with k-ɛ turbulence for the liquid phase. This work is carried out considering a finite volume method (FVM) tool using AVL FIRE, v.2014 coupled with the user defined subroutines especially for the change in the concentration number of different bubble sizes due to bubble break-up and coalescence. This code is validated comparing the experimental gas holdup with the numerically predicted data and a reasonable agreement has been found. In the current model, the effect of attachment and detachment process was included into the kinetic equation.by transferring the mass of attached particles to the gas bubble-particle aggregate. The results of this study show that the gas holdup linearly decreases with increasing slurry concentration for different gas velocities which has been attributed to the fact that the increase of slurry concentration promotes bubble coalescence and thus increases the rising velocity of bubbles. Overall, the results of simulations are represented a useful addition for a deep understanding of the dynamics of slurry bubble columns in the presence of solid particles.

  13. Rheology measurements of a biomass slurry: an inter-laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Stickel, Jonathan J.; Knutsen, Jeffrey S.; Liberatore, Matthew W.; Luu, Wing; Bousfield, Douglas W.; Klingenberg, Daniel J.; Scott, C. Tim; Root, Thatcher W.; Ehrhardt, Max R.; Monz, Thomas O.

    2009-09-02

    The conversion of biomass, specifically lignocellulosic biomass, into fuels and chemicals has recently gained national attention as an alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Increasing the concentration of the biomass solids during biochemical conversion has a large potential to reduce production costs. These concentrated biomass slurries have highly viscous, non-Newtonian behavior that poses several technical challenges to the conversion process. A collaborative effort to measure the rheology of a biomass slurry at four separate laboratories has been undertaken. A comprehensive set of rheological properties were measured using several different rheometers, flow geometries, and experimental methods. The tendency for settling, water evaporation, and wall slip required special care when performing the experiments. The rheological properties were measured at different concentrations up to 30% insoluble solids by mass. The slurry was found to be strongly shear-thinning, to be viscoelastic, and to have a significant concentration-dependent yield stress. The elastic modulus was found to be almost an order of magnitude larger than the loss modulus and weakly dependent on frequency. The techniques and results of this work will be useful to characterize other biomass slurries and in the design of biochemical conversion processing steps that operate at high solids concentrations.

  14. Multiphase hydrodynamic modeling and analysis of non-Newtonian coal/water slurry rheology

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.S.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Berry, G.F.

    1988-03-01

    A multiphase non-Newtonian hydrodynamic model has been developed to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of pressure, relative motion between solids and liquid, solids concentration, and slurry shear rate and viscosity. This model includes separate continuity and momentum equations for each phase and extends the well accepted power-law, non-Newtonian constitutive relationship for shear stress calculations. The model has been partially validated by comparison with single-phase power-law non-Newtonian flow theory and the literature data. The present model has also been used to analyze the pure water, No. 2 diesel fuel and coal/water slurry data measured by using high pressure and high shear rate capillary tube systems. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the calculated and measured values on mixture shear rates and viscosity, mass flow rates, and pressure. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

    2013-09-30

    electricity computed for the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry cases is greater for both PRB and ND Lignite coals. It does not appear that there is any benefit to using liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries for feeding low rank coals to the E-Gas™ gasifier. Any incidental benefits in improved cold gas efficiency are more than compensated for in higher overall plant costs, increased complexity, and reduced power output and efficiency. The results of the study are compared with previous published analyses, and the differences in model assumptions, approach and basis are summarized. It has been concluded that the use of liquid CO{sub 2} may still prove to have a significant advantage in a different type of gasifier, i.e., single-stage entrained flow with radiant quench section, but some key questions remain unanswered that can validate the potential improvement of gasifier performance using liquid CO{sub 2} slurries. In order to provide a path to answering these questions, a technology development roadmap has been developed to resolve fundamental issues and to better define the operation aspects of using liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries. The fundamental issues could be resolved by conducting additional laboratory analyses consisting of: • A rheological test program to quantitatively evaluate slurry preparation and handling for liquid CO{sub 2} including experiments to evaluate preparation systems. • An experimental program on CO{sub 2}-assisted gasification in order to obtain the most relevant experimental data from drop tube furnace studies to aid in verifying the potential advantages of direct feed of liquid CO{sub 2}/coal as gasifier feedstocks. Quantifying the operational aspects of liquid CO{sub 2} slurries can best be achieved with: • An experimental program using a flow test loop to evaluate equipment performance and handling properties of liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries for gasifier feedstocks on a scale sufficient to predict full scale operating parameters. • Spray

  16. In-line ultrasonic monitoring of waste slurry suspended solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, H.-T.; Sheen, S.-H.; Raptis, A. C.

    2000-05-25

    During the transport of tank waste, it is very important to quantitatively measure the percent solids concentration (PSC) of the waste, which indicates the flow conditions and the extent of solids settling. At Argonne National Laboratory, an in-line, real-time, a nonintrusive ultrasonic monitoring system has been developed to measure the PSC and flow density of tank waste by measuring sound velocity and attenuation in the flow. This system consists of a pair of longitudinal transducers bonded to waveguides on the opposite sides of the pipe and operating at IMHz simultaneously in pulse-and-echo and pitch-and-catch modes. The PSC measurement is provided by attenuation, while the density measurement is calculated by impedance and sound velocity. A thermocouple is attached to one of the waveguides for automatic temperature correction of the measurements. This system was one of four evaluated for in-line measurement of slurry at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1998. The results indicate that the measurements are in good agreement with a Coriolis meter and that the system can be used to monitor PSC up to 40 wt.%. However, the system is greatly affected by entrained air bubbles within the solid flow during Puisair mixing. A different mixing mechanism will solve this problem.

  17. Augmenting groundwater monitoring networks near landfills with slurry cutoff walls.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of slurry cutoff walls in conjunction with monitoring wells to detect contaminant releases from a solid waste landfill. The 50 m wide by 75 m long landfill was oriented oblique to regional groundwater flow in a shallow sand aquifer. Computer models calculated flow fields and the detection capability of six monitoring networks, four including a 1 m wide by 50 m long cutoff wall at various positions along the landfill's downgradient boundaries and upgradient of the landfill. Wells were positioned to take advantage of convergent flow induced downgradient of the cutoff walls. A five-well network with no cutoff wall detected 81% of contaminant plumes originating within the landfill's footprint before they reached a buffer zone boundary located 50 m from the landfill's downgradient corner. By comparison, detection efficiencies of networks augmented with cutoff walls ranged from 81 to 100%. The most efficient network detected 100% of contaminant releases with four wells, with a centrally located, downgradient cutoff wall. In general, cutoff walls increased detection efficiency by delaying transport of contaminant plumes to the buffer zone boundary, thereby allowing them to increase in size, and by inducing convergent flow at downgradient areas, thereby funneling contaminant plumes toward monitoring wells. However, increases in detection efficiency were too small to offset construction costs for cutoff walls. A 100% detection efficiency was also attained by an eight-well network with no cutoff wall, at approximately one-third the cost of the most efficient wall-augmented network.

  18. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  19. Balanced radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Goldowsky, M.P.

    1991-04-02

    This patent describes an internal combustion radial engine composed of an even number of identical and fully functional single cylinder slider crank 2-cycle or 4-cycle engines. It comprises a piston, linkage means, carburetor means, and shaft, the engines being positioned in pairs in a common plane, the pistons are in line and diametrally opposed, the engine shafts are parallel to one another and to a central output shaft and having synchronized means positioned on the engine shafts for coupling the engine shafts to the output shaft whereby diametrally opposite pistons and linkage means inertial forces, the output shaft projections from the synchronizing means past a front of the radial engine and the engine shafts project from the engines to the synchronizing means opposite in direction to the output shaft.

  20. Experimental study of the atomizing performance of a new type of nozzle for coal water slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hai-long; Zhang Chao; Liu Jian-zhong; Cen Ke-fa

    2008-03-15

    In this paper, a new type of coal water slurry nozzle for gasification has been developed by us, and its atomizing performance has been studied experimentally. The influences of the nozzle work load and gas flow on the atomizing particle distribution, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), and nozzle atomizing angle are discussed. The results show that there is a double-peak distribution of the atomizing particle in the flow field of atomization. In addition, the SMD will decrease, and the uniformity of the atomizing particle becomes better as the nozzle work load decreases and the gas flow increases. Also, the atomizing quality is clearly improved. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.