Science.gov

Sample records for radiating leg pain

  1. Radiating leg pain and positive straight leg raising in spondylolysis in children.

    PubMed

    Halperin, N; Copeliovitch, L; Schachner, E

    1983-09-01

    Three children presented with low back pain radiating to the leg and with spasm of the hamstring and paravertebral muscles. Since the pain could not be ascribed to trauma, it was necessary to exclude the presence of infection or tumors. All the signs--localization of the pain, tenderness on one side of the back, X-ray film findings of unilateral or bilateral spondylolysis, and localized positive bone scan--pointed to spondylolysis as the cause of pain. All three children exhibited symptoms resembling those found in the facet syndrome described by Mooney and Robertson.

  2. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  3. [Low back pain vs. leg dominant pain].

    PubMed

    Kovac, Ida

    2011-01-01

    There are two patterns of back pain: 1) back-dominant pain and 2) leg pain dominant, greater than back pain. The causes of back pain are very different and numerous, but mostly are due to vertebral, mechanical etiology, and rarely because of non vertebral, visceral etiology. Leg pain greater than back pain is mostly disease of spinal nerve root, generally presented by radicular pain in a dermatomal distribution. Mechanical compression of spinal roots, caused by disc herniation or by spinal stenosis, results in radicular symptoms. Rarely, in about 1% of patients, there are some other reasons except vertebral mechanical cause, like infection, tumor or fracture. There are several causes of pseudoradicular pain like periferal neuropathy, myifascial syndromes, vascular diseases, osteoarthritis. Spondylarthropathies should be taken in cosideration as well. A complete history and physical examination is important to determine further diagnostic evaluation and to provide eficient therapy.

  4. Chronic Lower Leg Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Results: Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Conclusion: Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. PMID:23016078

  5. Leg symptoms associated with sacroiliac joint disorder and related pain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Eiichi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Kurosawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Kyoko

    2017-06-01

    The symptoms of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) disorders are usually detected in the buttock and groin, and occasionally referred to the thigh and leg. However, lumbar disorders also cause symptoms in these same body regions. The presence of a characteristic, symptomatic pattern in the legs would be useful for diagnosing SIJ disorders. This study aimed to identify specific leg symptoms in patients with SIJ pain originating from the posterior sacroiliac ligament and determine the rate of occurrence of these symptoms. The source population consisted of 365 consecutive patients from February 2005 to December 2007. One hundred patients were diagnosed with SIJ pain by a periarticular SIJ injection (42 males and 58 females, average age 46 years, age range, 18-75 years). A leg symptom map was made by subtracting the symptoms after a periarticular SIJ injection from the initial symptoms, and evaluating the rate of each individual symptom by area. Ninety-four patients reported pain at or around the posterior-superior iliac spine (PSIS). Leg symptoms comprised pain and a numbness/tingling sensation; ≥60% of the patients had these symptoms. Pain was mainly detected in the back, buttock, groin, and thigh areas, while numbness/tingling was mainly detected in the lateral to posterior thigh and back of the calf. Leg symptoms associated with SIJ pain originating from the posterior sacroiliac ligament include both pain and numbness, which do not usually correspond to the dermatome. These leg symptoms in addition to pain around the PSIS may indicate SIJ disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  7. Are differences in leg length predictive of lateral patello-femoral pain?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Mary; Wilkerson, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    Lateral patello-femoral pain can shorten an athletic career and generally decrease an individual's physical activity and functional level, such as preventing stair climbing and reducing the ability to rise from a chair. Leg length inequality is associated with patello-femoral pain. A leg length test that best distinguishes the difference between people who have lateral patello-femoral pain and those who do not would have clinical utility. The purpose of the present study was, first, to determine if unilateral, lateral patello-femoral pain was associated with the longer leg when inequality of leg lengths existed and, second, to determine if leg length direct measurement, indirect measurement or quadriceps angle (Q angle) could correctly classify participants according to the presence or absence of patello-femoral pain. The study used an ex post facto, two-group quasi-experimental design. A volunteer sample of 52 participants (14 males, 38 females), ranged in age from 18 to 52 years. Three methods were used to measure leg lengths: palpation meter (PALM) on anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) while participants maintained centred weight-bearing position on a high resolution pressure mat; tape measurement from ASIS to medial malleolus (supine); tape measurement from ASIS to lateral malleolus (supine). Additionally, Q angle was measured in supine position. Patellar grind test, medial retinacular and lateral patellar palpation screened for patello-femoral pain. Logistic regression analysis determined correctness of membership in painful and non-painful patello-femoral groups. The PALM method of indirect measurement of leg length differences overall correctly classified approximately 83 % of the participants. Tape measure to medial and lateral malleoli as well as Q angle did not yield significant results. The results suggested that the PALM method of measuring leg length differences may have clinical utility in differentiating between patients who are likely to sustain

  8. Back pain was less explained than leg pain: a cross-sectional study using magnetic resonance imaging in low back pain patients with and without radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole Kudsk; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2015-12-03

    Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between lumbar degenerative manifestations on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and low back pain (LBP). Disc herniations and other degenerative manifestations, however, frequently occur in asymptomatic individuals. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to analyze for associations between pain intensity and degenerative manifestations and other pain variables in patients for whom prognostic factors have been published previously. Included were 141 consecutive patients with and without radiculopathy, all sick-listed 1-4 months due to low back pain and subsequently examined by MRI of the lumbar spine. Using different methods of grouping the degenerative manifestations, linear regression analyses were performed with the intensity of back + leg pain, back pain and leg pain as dependent variables covering actual pain and pain the preceding 2 weeks. The clinical classification into +/- radiculopathy was established before and independently of the standardised description of MRI findings. Radiculopathy was present in 43 % of the patients. Pain was best explained using rank-ordered degenerative manifestations on MRI. Back pain and leg pain were differently associated, and back pain was less explained than leg pain in the multivariate analyses (15 % vs. 31 % of the variation). Back pain intensity was higher in patients with type 1 Modic changes and in some patients with nerve root touch, but was not associated with disc herniations. Leg pain intensity was well explained by disc herniations causing MRI nerve root compromise and radiculopathy. In patients with radiculopathy, nerve root touch caused as much leg pain as nerve root displacement or compression. High intensity zones and osteophytes were not associated with back pain, but only associated with leg pain in patients with radiculopathy. Tender points explained some of the back pain, and widespread pain explained leg pain in some of the patients without

  9. [Pseudo-radicular referred leg pain].

    PubMed

    von Heymann, W

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-radicular leg pain as initially described by Bruegger more than 55 years ago was at that time a genius explanation for so many non-radicular pain syndromes that needed not any kind of surgical intervention but in first line a manual treatment or a treatment by therapeutic local anesthetics. Today we describe this pain as a "referred pain" originating from other anatomic structures that may occur during the development of chronic pain. Nevertheless this pain is found in many patients and it still seems to be a big problem for many physicians and surgeons. Imaging does not help either. The history and the clinical symptoms, the examinations, the chain reactions in the motor system as well as the treatment options from the point of view of manual medicine are described.

  10. Agreement and correlation between the straight leg raise and slump tests in subjects with leg pain.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    The straight leg raise (SLR) and slump tests have traditionally been used to identify nerve root compression arising from disk herniation. However, they may be more appropriate as tests of lumbosacral neural tissue mechanosensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine agreement and correlation between the SLR and slump tests in a population presenting with back and leg pain. This was an observational, cross-sectional study design. Forty-five subjects with unilateral leg pain were recruited from an outpatient Back Pain Screening Clinic at a large teaching hospital in Ireland. The SLR and slump tests were performed on each side. In the event of symptom reproduction, the ankle was dorsiflexed. Reproduction of presenting symptoms, which were intensified by ankle dorsiflexion, was interpreted as a positive test. An inclinometer was used to measure range of motion (ROM). There was substantial agreement between SLR and slump test interpretation (kappa = 0.69) with good correlation in ROM between the 2 tests (r = 0.64) on the symptomatic side. In subjects who had positive results, ROM for both tests was significantly reduced compared to ROM on the contralateral side and ROM in subjects who had negative results. When the SLR and slump tests are interpreted as positive in the event of reproduction of presenting leg pain that are intensified by ankle dorsiflexion, these tests show substantial agreement and good correlation in the leg pain population. When interpreted in this way, these tests may be appropriate tests of neural tissue mechanosensitivity, but further criteria must be met before a definitive conclusion in relation to neural tissue mechanosensitivity may be drawn.

  11. Reliability among clinicians diagnosing low back-related leg pain.

    PubMed

    Stynes, Siobhán; Konstantinou, Kika; Dunn, Kate M; Lewis, Martyn; Hay, Elaine M

    2016-09-01

    To investigate agreement and reliability among clinicians when diagnosing low back-related leg pain (LBLP) in primary care consulters. Thirty-six patients were assessed by one of six physiotherapists and diagnosed as having either leg pain due to nerve root involvement (sciatica) or referred leg pain. Assessments were video recorded. In part one, the physiotherapists each viewed videos of six patients they had not assessed. In part two, videos were viewed by another six health professionals. All clinicians made an independent differential diagnosis and rated their confidence with diagnosis (range 50-100 %). In part one agreement was 72 % with fair inter-rater reliability (K = 0.35, 95 % CI 0.07, 0.63). Results for part two were almost identical (K = 0.34, 95 % CI 0.02, 0.69). Agreement and reliability indices improved as diagnostic confidence increased. Reliability was fair among clinicians from different backgrounds when diagnosing LBLP but improved substantially with high confidence in clinical diagnosis.

  12. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients' self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica.

  13. Classification of patients with low back-related leg pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stynes, Siobhán; Konstantinou, Kika; Dunn, Kate M

    2016-05-23

    The identification of clinically relevant subgroups of low back pain (LBP) is considered the number one LBP research priority in primary care. One subgroup of LBP patients are those with back related leg pain. Leg pain frequently accompanies LBP and is associated with increased levels of disability and higher health costs than simple low back pain. Distinguishing between different types of low back-related leg pain (LBLP) is important for clinical management and research applications, but there is currently no clear agreement on how to define and identify LBLP due to nerve root involvement. The aim of this systematic review was to identify, describe and appraise papers that classify or subgroup populations with LBLP, and summarise how leg pain due to nerve root involvement is described and diagnosed in the various systems. The search strategy involved nine electronic databases including Medline and Embase, reference lists of eligible studies and relevant reviews. Selected papers were appraised independently by two reviewers using a standardised scoring tool. Of 13,358 initial potential eligible citations, 50 relevant papers were identified that reported on 22 classification systems. Papers were grouped according to purpose and criteria of the classification systems. Five themes emerged: (i) clinical features (ii) pathoanatomy (iii) treatment-based approach (iv) screening tools and prediction rules and (v) pain mechanisms. Three of the twenty two systems focused specifically on LBLP populations. Systems that scored highest following quality appraisal were ones where authors generally included statistical methods to develop their classifications, and supporting work had been published on the systems' validity, reliability and generalisability. There was lack of consistency in how LBLP due to nerve root involvement was described and diagnosed within the systems. Numerous classification systems exist that include patients with leg pain, a minority of them focus

  14. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients’ self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  15. Simvastatin-lnduced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution.

    PubMed

    Stojaković, Natasa; Igić, Rajko

    2013-01-01

    Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the'desirable' range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day). The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day). At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways.l It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  16. Acute experimental hip muscle pain alters single-leg squat balance in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Anna L; Crossley, Kay M; Hug, François; Bouma, James; Ha, Bonnie; Spaulding, Kara L; Tucker, Kylie

    2015-05-01

    Clinical musculoskeletal pain commonly accompanies hip pathology and can impact balance performance. Due to the cross-sectional designs of previous studies, and the multifactorial nature of musculoskeletal pain conditions, it is difficult to determine whether pain is a driver of balance impairments in this population. This study explored the effects of experimentally induced hip muscle pain on static and dynamic balance. Twelve healthy adults (4 women, mean[SD]: 27.1[3] years) performed three balance tasks on each leg, separately: single-leg standing (eyes closed), single-leg squat (eyes open), forward step (eyes open); before and after hypertonic saline injection (1ml, 5% NaCl) into the right gluteus medius. Range, standard deviation (SD), and velocity of the centre of pressure (CoP) in medio-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were considered. During the single-leg squat task, experimental hip pain was associated with significantly reduced ML range (-4[13]%, P=0.028), AP range (-14[21]%, P=0.005), APSD (-15[28]%, P=0.009), and AP velocity (-6[13]%, P=0.032), relative to the control condition, in both legs. No effect of pain was observed during single-leg standing and forward stepping. Significant between-leg differences in ML velocity were observed during the forward stepping task (P=0.034). Pain is a potentially modifiable patient-reported outcome in individuals with hip problems. This study demonstrates that acute hip muscle pain alone, without interference of musculoskeletal pathology, does not lead to the same impairments in balance as exhibited in clinical populations with hip pathologies. This is the first step in understanding how and why balance is altered in painful hip pathologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease who have different types of exertional leg pain.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Montgomery, Polly S; Afaq, Azhar

    2007-07-01

    This study compared the exercise performance of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who have different types of exertional leg pain. Patients with PAD were classified into one of four groups according to the San Diego Claudication Questionnaire: intermittent claudication (n = 406), atypical exertional leg pain causing patients to stop (n = 125), atypical exertional leg pain in which patients were able to continue walking (n = 81), and leg pain on exertion and rest (n = 103). Patients were assessed on the primary outcome measures of ankle-brachial index (ABI), treadmill exercise measures, and ischemic window. All patients experienced leg pain consistent with intermittent claudication during a standardized treadmill test. The mean (+/- SD) initial claudication distance (ICD) was similar (P = .642) among patients with intermittent claudication (168 +/- 160 meters), atypical exertional leg pain causing patients to stop (157 +/- 130 meters), atypical exertional leg pain in which patients were able to continue walking (180 +/- 149 meters), and leg pain on exertion and rest (151 +/- 136 meters). The absolute claudication distance (ACD) was similar (P = .648) in the four respective groups (382 +/- 232, 378 +/- 237, 400 +/- 245, and 369 +/- 236 meters). Similarly, the ischemic window, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) after treadmill exercise, was similar (P = .863) in these groups (189 +/- 137, 208 +/- 183, 193 +/- 143, and 199 +/- 119 AUC). PAD patients with different types of exertional leg pain, all limited by intermittent claudication during a standardized treadmill test, were remarkably similar in ICD, ACD, and ischemic window. Thus, the presence of ambulatory symptoms should be of primary clinical concern in evaluating PAD patients regardless of whether they are consistent with classic intermittent claudication.

  18. Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. The ATLAS study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-back related leg pain with or without nerve root involvement is associated with a poor prognosis compared to low back pain (LBP) alone. Compared to the literature investigating prognostic indicators of outcome for LBP, there is limited evidence on prognostic factors for low back-related leg pain including the group with nerve root pain. This 1 year prospective consultation-based observational cohort study will describe the clinical, imaging, demographic characteristics and health economic outcomes for the whole cohort, will investigate differences and identify prognostic indicators of outcome (i.e. change in disability at 12 months), for the whole cohort and, separately, for those classified with and without nerve root pain. In addition, nested qualitative studies will provide insights on the clinical consultation and the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients' symptom management and illness trajectory. Methods Adults aged 18 years and over consulting their General Practitioner (GP) with LBP and radiating leg pain of any duration at (n = 500) GP practices in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, UK will be invited to participate. All participants will receive a standardised assessment at the clinic by a study physiotherapist and will be classified according to the clinically determined presence or absence of nerve root pain/involvement. All will undergo a lumbar spine MRI scan. All participants will be managed according to their clinical need. The study outcomes will be measured at 4 and 12 months using postal self-complete questionnaires. Data will also be collected each month using brief postal questionnaires to enable detailed description of the course of low back and leg pain over time. Clinical observations and patient interviews will be used for the qualitative aspects of the study. Discussion This prospective clinical observational cohort will combine self-reported data, comprehensive clinical and MRI assessment, together with

  19. Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Allan D; Tyni-Lenné, Raija; Hedlund, Rune

    2011-10-01

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  20. Prognostic Factors for Persistent Leg-Pain in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Sciatica.

    PubMed

    Fjeld, Olaf; Grotle, Margreth; Siewers, Vibeke; Pedersen, Linda M; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-03-01

    Prospective cohort study. To identify potential prognostic factors for persistent leg-pain at 12 months among patients hospitalized with acute severe sciatica. The long-term outcome for patients admitted to hospital with sciatica is generally unfavorable. Results concerning prognostic factors for persistent sciatica are limited and conflicting. A total of 210 patients acutely admitted to hospital for either surgical or nonsurgical treatment of sciatica were consecutively recruited and received a thorough clinical and radiographic examination in addition to responding to a comprehensive questionnaire. Follow-up assessments were done at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Potential prognostic factors were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. The impact of these factors on leg-pain was analyzed by multiple linear regression modeling. A total of 151 patients completed the entire study, 93 receiving nonrandomized surgical treatment. The final multivariate models showed that the following factors were significantly associated with leg-pain at 12 months: high psychosocial risk according to the Örebro Musculosceletal Pain Questionnaire (unstandardized beta coefficient 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-2.38, P < 0.001), not receiving surgical treatment (1.11, 95% CI 0.29-1.93, P = 0.01), not actively employed upon admission (1.47, 95% CI 0.63-2.31, P < 0.01), and self-reported leg-pain recorded 6 weeks posthospital admission (0.49, 95% CI 0.34-0.63, P < 0.001). Interaction analysis showed that the Örebro Musculosceletal Pain Questionnaire had significant prognostic value only on the nonsurgically treated patients (3.26, 95% CI 1.89-4.63, P < 0.001). The results suggest that a psychosocial screening tool and the implementation of a 6-week postadmission follow-up has prognostic value in the hospital management of severe sciatica. 2.

  1. Limb symmetry during double-leg squats and single-leg squats on land and in water in adults with long-standing unilateral anterior knee pain; a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Severin, Anna C; Burkett, Brendan J; McKean, Mark R; Wiegand, Aaron N; Sayers, Mark G L

    2017-01-01

    The presence of pain during movement typically results in changes in technique. However, the physical properties of water, such as flotation, means that water-based exercise may not only reduce compensatory movement patterns but also allow pain sufferers to complete exercises that they are unable to perform on land. The purpose of this study was to assess bilateral kinematics during double-leg squats and single-leg squats on land and in water in individuals with unilateral anterior knee pain. A secondary aim was to quantify bilateral asymmetry in both environments in affected and unaffected individuals using a symmetry index. Twenty individuals with unilateral knee pain and twenty healthy, matched controls performed body weight double- and single-leg squats in both environments while inertial sensors (100 Hz) recorded trunk and lower body kinematics. Repeated-measures statistics tested for environmental effects on movement depths and peak angles within the anterior knee pain group. Differences in their inter-limb symmetry in each environments was compared to the control group using analysis of variance tests. Water immersion allowed for greater movement depths during both exercises (double-leg squat: +7 cm, p  = 0.032, single-leg squat: +9 cm, p  = 0.002) for the knee pain group. The double-leg squat was symmetrical on land but water immersion revealed asymmetries in the lower body frontal plane movements. The single-leg squat revealed decreased hip flexion and frontal plane shank motions on the affected limb in both environments. Water immersion also affected the degree of lower limb asymmetry in both groups, with differences also showing between groups. Individuals with anterior knee pain achieved increased squat depth during both exercises whilst in water. Kinematic differences between the affected and unaffected limbs were often increased in water. Individuals with unilateral anterior knee pain appear to utilise different kinematics in the affected

  2. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Chiang, Pei-Tzu; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP) and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above) with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis) during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT) and relative standstill time (RST), and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test). The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests. PMID:26024534

  3. Neuroleptic-induced "painful legs and moving toes" syndrome: successful treatment with clonazepam and baclofen.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1990-12-01

    The syndrome of "painful legs and moving toes" is characterised by spontaneous causalgic pain in the lower extremities associated with peculiar involuntary movements of the toes and feet. It has been observed after a variety of lesions affecting the posterior nerve roots, the spinal ganglia and the peripheral nerves. The pathophysiology of the syndrome is unknown. I report a patient who developed the syndrome during treatment for schizophrenia with the antipsychotic agent molindone hydrochloride. The patient's response to the combination of clonazepam and baclofen suggests that the pathophysiology of the "painful legs and moving toes" may be linked to impairment of spinal serotonergic and GABA functions.

  4. Exercise Related Leg Pain (ERLP): a Review of The Literature

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Exercise related leg pain (ERLP) is a regional pain syndrome described as pain between the knee and ankle which occurs with exercise. Indiscriminant use of terminology such as “shin splints” has resulted in ongoing confusion regarding the pathoanatomic entities associated with this pain syndrome. Each of the pathoanatomic entities – medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial and fibular stress fractures, tendinopathy, nerve entrapment, and vascular pathology – which manifest as ERLP are each described in terms of relevant anatomy, epidemiology, clinical presentation, associated pathomechanics, and intervention strategies. Evidence regarding risk factors for ERLP general and specific pathoanatomic entities are presented in the context of models of sports injury prevention. PMID:21522213

  5. Back pain and leg complaints that revealed non–small cell carcinoma: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Casey A.; Pierce, Angela N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical presentation of a patient with a chief complaint of low back and leg pain with no prior diagnosis of lung cancer. Clinical Features A 48-year-old man with a history of back pain presented to a chiropractic office with a complaint of low back and left leg pain. Intervention and Outcome Abnormal examination and radiographic findings were discovered. The patient was immediately referred to the pulmonologist for co-management. Through the use of advanced imaging and biopsy, stage 4 lung cancer was diagnosed. Conclusion Low back pain recurrence in an established patient should constitute a reevaluation of the problem. The cause cannot be assumed to be musculoskeletal in origin even though this may have been the case with the initial complaint. Metastatic disease should be considered with any type of recurrent low back pain. PMID:22014908

  6. Predominant Leg Pain Is Associated With Better Surgical Outcomes in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis: Results from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Adam; Blood, Emily; Lurie, Jon; Abdu, William; Sengupta, Dilip; Frymoyer, John W.; Weinstein, James

    2010-01-01

    Study Design As-treated analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and surgical and nonoperative outcomes in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients stratified by predominant pain location (i.e. leg vs. back). Summary of Background Data Evidence suggests that degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients with predominant leg pain may have better surgical outcomes than patients with predominant low back pain (LBP). Methods The DS cohort included 591 patients (62% underwent surgery), and the SpS cohort included 615 patients (62% underwent surgery). Patients were classified as leg pain predominant, LBP predominant or having equal pain according to baseline pain scores. Baseline characteristics were compared between the three predominant pain location groups within each diagnostic category, and changes in surgical and nonoperative outcome scores were compared through two years. Longitudinal regression models including baseline covariates were used to control for confounders. Results Among DS patients at baseline, 34% had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 40% had equal pain. Similarly, 32% of SpS patients had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 42% had equal pain. DS and SpS patients with predominant leg pain had baseline scores indicative of less severe symptoms. Leg pain predominant DS and SpS patients treated surgically improved significantly more than LBP predominant patients on all primary outcome measures at one and two years. Surgical outcomes for the equal pain groups were intermediate to those of the predominant leg pain and LBP groups. The differences in nonoperative outcomes were less consistent. Conclusions Predominant leg pain patients improved significantly more with surgery than predominant LBP patients. However, predominant LBP patients still improved significantly more with surgery than with

  7. Back pain and leg complaints that revealed non-small cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Casey A; Pierce, Angela N

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical presentation of a patient with a chief complaint of low back and leg pain with no prior diagnosis of lung cancer. A 48-year-old man with a history of back pain presented to a chiropractic office with a complaint of low back and left leg pain. Abnormal examination and radiographic findings were discovered. The patient was immediately referred to the pulmonologist for co-management. Through the use of advanced imaging and biopsy, stage 4 lung cancer was diagnosed. Low back pain recurrence in an established patient should constitute a reevaluation of the problem. The cause cannot be assumed to be musculoskeletal in origin even though this may have been the case with the initial complaint. Metastatic disease should be considered with any type of recurrent low back pain. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prior leg massage decreases pain responses to heel stick in preterm babies.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sunil; Kumar, Praveen; McMillan, Douglas D

    2006-09-01

    Leg massage could inhibit the transmission of pain by 'closing the gate' or by activating the endogenous opioid pathway to decrease nociceptive transmission of pain associated with heel stick. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of massage therapy prior to heel stick on responses assessed by the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) (primary outcome), heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation (secondary outcomes) in infants who required a heel stick for blood sampling. This randomised, double-blind, crossover trial with infants from 1 to 7 days post birth excluded those with prior surgery, septicaemia, current assisted ventilation or an analgesic within 48 h. After informed consent, 13 infants received a 2-min massage of the ipsilateral leg prior to heel stick on the first study sampling and no massage on the next sampling 2-7 days later and 10 infants had the reverse order. The bedside nurse, blinded to the intervention, measured NIPS, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation prior to massage, after massage, and 5 min after heel stick. Serum cortisol was measured with the blood sampling. In 23 infants (birthweight 795-2507 g), there were no adverse physiologic effects of massage. After heel stick, NIPS (P < 0.001) and heart rate (P = 0.03) were increased in the no-massage group compared with the massage group. Respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and serum cortisol were not significantly different. Gentle massage of the leg prior to heel stick is safe and decreases pain responses in preterm infants.

  9. Management of nerves during leg amputation--a neglected area in our understanding of the pathogenesis of phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, S; Kehlet, H

    2007-09-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after leg amputation is a significant problem, with a reported incidence during the first year as high as 70%. Intra-operative handling of the nerves during amputation has not been discussed in the literature on post-amputation pain and, in major textbooks, it is recommended that the ischial nerve be ligated, despite the fact that the experimental literature uses nerve ligations to produce neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical practice of nerve handling during leg amputation. Trainees with at least 2 years of practice received a questionnaire regarding handling of the nerves during leg amputation; 128 of 149 questionnaires sent (86%) were returned. Ligation of the nerves was used by 31% of surgeons. There is no consistency in the management of the large nerves during lower leg amputation. The recommendations in major textbooks may not be appropriate when compared with the experimental literature on nerve ligature models to produce neuropathic pain. Future studies on post-amputation pain should consider intra-operative nerve management.

  10. Movement of the sacroiliac joint during the Active Straight Leg Raise test in patients with long-lasting severe sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Kibsgård, Thomas J; Röhrl, Stephan M; Røise, Olav; Sturesson, Bengt; Stuge, Britt

    2017-08-01

    The Active Straight Leg Raise is a functional test used in the assessment of pelvic girdle pain, and has shown to have good validity, reliability and responsiveness. The Active Straight Leg Raise is considered to examine the patients' ability to transfer load through the pelvis. It has been hypothesized that patients with pelvic girdle pain lack the ability to stabilize the pelvic girdle, probably due to instability or increased movement of the sacroiliac joint. This study examines the movement of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise in patients with pelvic girdle pain. Tantalum markers were inserted in the dorsal sacrum and ilium of 12 patients with long-lasting pelvic girdle pain scheduled for sacroiliac joint fusion surgery. Two to three weeks later movement of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise was measured with radiostereometric analysis. Small movements were detected. There was larger movement of the sacroiliac joint of the rested leg's sacroiliac joint compared to the lifted leg's side. A mean backward rotation of 0.8° and inward tilt of 0.3° were seen in the rested leg's sacroiliac joint. The movements of the sacroiliac joints during the Active Straight Leg Raise are small. There was a small backward rotation of the innominate bone relative to sacrum on the rested leg's side. Our findings contradict an earlier understanding that a forward rotation of the lifted leg's innominate occur while performing the Active Straight Leg Raise. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Incidence of foot rotation, pelvic crest unleveling, and supine leg length alignment asymmetry and their relationship to self-reported back pain.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Gary A

    2002-02-01

    To determine the incidence of pelvic unleveling, foot rotation, and supine leg length alignment asymmetry in a nonclinical population and to examine the validity (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values) of these visual tests and their relationship to self-reported back pain. Volunteers answered a questionnaire regarding back pain and were then examined by a chiropractor who was unaware of the status of their back pain. Seventy-four unscreened volunteers answered the questionnaire. The association of visual tests with back pain and their validity indices; Visual Analogue Scale ratings. Fifty-one percent (n = 74) of volunteers examined had supine leg length alignment asymmetry (LLA). Pain intensity on a Visual Analogue Scale was significantly higher (P <.001) for those demonstrating supine LLA than for those without LLA. Those with back pain and recurrent back pain were significantly (P <.001) more likely to have supine LLA. The validity indices of the supine leg check showed acceptable levels for sensitivity (74%), specificity (78%), and positive predictive value (82%) [corrected] in recurrent back pain. Findings also indicated a high incidence of supine LLA in volunteers with chronic back pain (85%). The results indicated that, in this group of volunteers, the supine leg length alignment check had clinical validity as a stand-alone test for recurring back pain. Further testing on a larger, statistically defined cross-section of the population is recommended.

  12. Older Age and Leg Pain Are Good Predictors of Pain and Disability Outcomes in 2710 Patients Who Receive Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad E; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony K; Radcliff, Kristen; Karikari, Isaac; Isaacs, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Identifying appropriate candidates for lumbar spine fusion is a challenging and controversial topic. The purpose of this study was to identify baseline characteristics related to poor/favorable outcomes at 1 year for a patient who received lumbar spine fusion. The aims of this study were to describe baseline characteristics of those who received lumbar surgery and to identify baseline characteristics from a spine repository that were related to poor and favorable pain and disability outcomes for patient who received lumbar fusion (with or without decompression), who were followed up for 1 full year and discriminate predictor variables that were either or in contrast to prognostic variables reported in the literature. This study analyzed data from 2710 patients who underwent lumbar spine fusion. All patient data was part of a multicenter, multi-national spine repository. Ten relatively commonly captured data variables were used as predictors for the study. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression analyses were run against outcome variables of pain/disability. Multiple univariate findings were associated with pain/disability outcomes at 1 year including age, previous surgical history, baseline disability, baseline pain, baseline quality of life scores, and leg pain greater than back pain. Notably significant multivariate findings for both pain and disability include older age, previous surgical history, and baseline mental summary scores, disability, and pain. Leg pain greater than back pain and older age may yield promising value when predicting positive outcomes. Other significant findings may yield less value since these findings are similar to those that are considered to be prognostic regardless of intervention type.

  13. Tactile allodynia in patients with lumbar radicular pain (sciatica).

    PubMed

    Defrin, Ruth; Devor, Marshall; Brill, Silviu

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel symptom in many patients with low back pain (LBP) that sheds new light on the underlying pain mechanism. By means of quantitative sensory testing, we compared patients with radicular LBP (sciatica), axial LBP (LBP without radiation into the leg), and healthy controls, searching for cutaneous allodynia in response to weak tactile and cooling stimuli on the leg and low back. Most patients with radicular pain (~60%) reported static and dynamic tactile allodynia, as well as cooling allodynia, on the leg, often extending into the foot. Some also reported allodynia on the low back. In axial LBP, allodynia was almost exclusively on the back. The degree of dynamic tactile allodynia correlated with the degree of background pain. The presence of allodynia suggests that the peripheral nerve generators of background leg and back pain have also induced central sensitization. The distal (foot) location of the allodynia in patients who have it indicates that the nociceptive drive that maintains the central sensitization arises paraspinally (ectopically) in injured ventral ramus afferents; this is not an instance of somatic referred pain. The presence of central sensitization also provides the first cogent account of shooting pain in sciatica as a wave of activity sweeping vectorially across the width of the sensitized dorsal horn. Finally, the results endorse leg allodynia as a pain biomarker in animal research on LBP, which is commonly used but has not been previously validated. In addition to informing the underlying mechanism of LBP, bedside mapping of allodynia might have practical implications for prognosis and treatment. How can you tell whether pain radiating into the leg in a patient with sciatica is neuropathic, ie, due to nerve injury? Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome: a 76-patient case series.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Anhar; Mateen, Farrah J; Coon, Elizabeth A; Ahlskog, J Eric

    2012-08-01

    To better characterize the clinical features, electrophysiologic features, and treatment outcomes of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome. Large case series. Neurology outpatient clinic at a tertiary referral center, 1983-2011. All cases of PLMT seen at our institution during an 18-year period were identified using our medical record linkage system. Key demographic, clinical, imaging, and electrophysiologic features of PLMT. Treatment outcomes and long-term follow-up are also reported. Of 76 cases identified (including 50 women [66%]), the mean age at onset was 58 years (range, 24-86 years) and at neurologic evaluation was 63 years (range, 26-88 years). Pure lower limb involvement was most common (69 patients [91%]), and 44 cases (58%) were bilateral. The most frequently diagnosed causes were peripheral neuropathy (21 cases [28%]), previous trauma (8 [11%]), and radiculopathy (7 [9%]); 32 cases (42%) were cryptogenic. Electromyography consistently showed irregular 50-millisecond to 1-second bursts of normal motor unit potential firing at 2 to 200 Hz accompanying the movements. Pain occurred first in nearly all cases and was more distressing to patients than the movements. Both components were difficult to treat, with no consistent benefit from a variety of drugs and therapeutic modalities. The syndrome persisted in most patients (83%) during the mean follow-up of 4.6 years, suggesting low likelihood of spontaneous resolution. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome is a debilitating clinical syndrome, not because of the movements but rather because of the pain, which often is refractory to treatment. Segmental lower limb involvement is most common, and neurophysiologic findings support a pathophysiologic process localizing to a central generator at the spinal cord or brainstem level.

  15. Subcutaneous Stimulation as an Additional Therapy to Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Low Back Pain and Leg Pain in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: Four-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Hamm-Faber, Tanja E; Aukes, Hans; van Gorp, Eric-Jan; Gültuna, Ismail

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of long-term follow-up of subcutaneous stimulation (SubQ) as an additional therapy for patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) with chronic refractory pain, for whom spinal cord stimulation (SCS) alone was unsuccessful in treating low back pain. Prospective case series. FBSS patients with leg and/or low back pain whose conventional therapies had failed, received a combination of SCS (8-contact Octad lead, 3877-45 cm, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and/or SubQ (4-contact Quad Plus lead (s), 2888-28 cm, Medtronic). Initially, an Octad lead was placed in the epidural space for SCS for a trial stimulation to assess the suppression of leg and/or low back pain. Where SCS alone was insufficient in treating low back pain, lead(s) were placed superficially in the subcutaneous tissue of the lower back, exactly in the middle of the pain area. A pulse generator (Prime Advanced, 37702, Medtronic) was implanted if the patient reported more than 50% pain relief during the trial period. We investigated the long-term effect of neuromodulation on pain with the visual analog scale (VAS), and disability using the Quebec Pain Disability Scale. The results after 46 months are presented. Eleven patients, five men and six women (age 51 ± 8 years, mean ± SD) were included in the pilot study. In nine cases, SCS was used in combination with SubQ leads. Two patients received only SubQ leads. In one patient, the SCS + SubQ system was removed after nine months and these results were not taken into account for the analysis. Baseline scores for leg (N = 8) and low back pain (N = 10) were VASbl: 59 ± 15 and VASbl: 63 ± 14, respectively. The long-term follow-up period was 46 ± 4 months. SCS significantly reduced leg pain after 12 months (VAS12: 20 ± 11, p12 = 0.001) and 46 months (VAS46: 37 ± 17, p46 = 0.027). Similarly, SubQ significantly reduced back pain after 12 months(VAS12: 33 ± 16, p12 = 0.001) and 46 months

  16. Low back related leg pain: an investigation of construct validity of a new classification system.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Axel G M; Hall, Toby M; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Lüdtke, Kerstin; Mallwitz, Joachim; Briffa, Kathryn N

    2014-01-01

    Leg pain is associated with back pain in 25-65% of all cases and classified as somatic referred pain or radicular pain. However, distinction between the two may be difficult as different pathomechanisms may cause similar patterns of pain. Therefore a pathomechanism based classification system was proposed, with four distinct hierarchical and mutually exclusive categories: Neuropathic Sensitization (NS) comprising major features of neuropathic pain with sensory sensitization; Denervation (D) arising from significant axonal compromise; Peripheral Nerve Sensitization (PNS) with marked nerve trunk mechanosensitivity; and Musculoskeletal (M) with pain referred from musculoskeletal structures. To investigate construct validity of the classification system. Construct validity was investigated by determining the relationship of nerve functioning with subgroups of patients and asymptomatic controls. Thus somatosensory profiles of subgroups of patients with low back related leg pain (LBRLP) and healthy controls were determined by a comprehensive quantitative sensory test (QST) protocol. It was hypothesized that subgroups of patients and healthy controls would show differences in QST profiles relating to underlying pathomechanisms. 77 subjects with LBRLP were recruited and classified in one of the four groups. Additionally, 18 age and gender matched asymptomatic controls were measured. QST revealed signs of pain hypersensitivity in group NS and sensory deficits in group D whereas Groups PNS and M showed no significant differences when compared to the asymptomatic group. These findings support construct validity for two of the categories of the new classification system, however further research is warranted to achieve construct validation of the classification system as a whole.

  17. Chiropractic and self-care for back-related leg pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Back-related leg pain (BRLP) is a common variation of low back pain (LBP), with lifetime prevalence estimates as high as 40%. Often disabling, BRLP accounts for greater work loss, recurrences, and higher costs than uncomplicated LBP and more often leads to surgery with a lifetime incidence of 10% for those with severe BRLP, compared to 1-2% for those with LBP. In the US, half of those with back-related conditions seek CAM treatments, the most common of which is chiropractic care. While there is preliminary evidence suggesting chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy is beneficial for patients with BRLP, there is insufficient evidence currently available to assess the effectiveness of this care. Methods/Design This study is a two-site, prospective, parallel group, observer-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT). A total of 192 study patients will be recruited from the Twin Cities, MN (n = 122) and Quad Cities area in Iowa and Illinois (n = 70) to the research clinics at WHCCS and PCCR, respectively. It compares two interventions: chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) plus home exercise program (HEP) to HEP alone (minimal intervention comparison) for patients with subacute or chronic back-related leg pain. Discussion Back-related leg pain (BRLP) is a costly and often disabling variation of the ubiquitous back pain conditions. As health care costs continue to climb, the search for effective treatments with few side-effects is critical. While SMT is the most commonly sought CAM treatment for LBP sufferers, there is only a small, albeit promising, body of research to support its use for patients with BRLP. This study seeks to fill a critical gap in the LBP literature by performing the first full scale RCT assessing chiropractic SMT for patients with sub-acute or chronic BRLP using important patient-oriented and objective biomechanical outcome measures. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00494065 PMID:21426558

  18. Clinical diagnostic model for sciatica developed in primary care patients with low back-related leg pain

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Kika; Ogollah, Reuben; Hay, Elaine M.; Dunn, Kate M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Identification of sciatica may assist timely management but can be challenging in clinical practice. Diagnostic models to identify sciatica have mainly been developed in secondary care settings with conflicting reference standard selection. This study explores the challenges of reference standard selection and aims to ascertain which combination of clinical assessment items best identify sciatica in people seeking primary healthcare. Methods Data on 394 low back-related leg pain consulters were analysed. Potential sciatica indicators were seven clinical assessment items. Two reference standards were used: (i) high confidence sciatica clinical diagnosis; (ii) high confidence sciatica clinical diagnosis with confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging findings. Multivariable logistic regression models were produced for both reference standards. A tool predicting sciatica diagnosis in low back-related leg pain was derived. Latent class modelling explored the validity of the reference standard. Results Model (i) retained five items; model (ii) retained six items. Four items remained in both models: below knee pain, leg pain worse than back pain, positive neural tension tests and neurological deficit. Model (i) was well calibrated (p = 0.18), discrimination was area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) 0.95 (95% CI 0.93, 0.98). Model (ii) showed good discrimination (AUC 0.82; 0.78, 0.86) but poor calibration (p = 0.004). Bootstrapping revealed minimal overfitting in both models. Agreement between the two latent classes and clinical diagnosis groups defined by model (i) was substantial, and fair for model (ii). Conclusion Four clinical assessment items were common in both reference standard definitions of sciatica. A simple scoring tool for identifying sciatica was developed. These criteria could be used clinically and in research to improve accuracy of identification of this subgroup of back pain patients. PMID:29621243

  19. Novel approach to characterising individuals with low back-related leg pain: cluster identification with latent class analysis and 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Stynes, Siobhán; Konstantinou, Kika; Ogollah, Reuben; Hay, Elaine M; Dunn, Kate M

    2018-04-01

    Traditionally, low back-related leg pain (LBLP) is diagnosed clinically as referred leg pain or sciatica (nerve root involvement). However, within the spectrum of LBLP, we hypothesised that there may be other unrecognised patient subgroups. This study aimed to identify clusters of patients with LBLP using latent class analysis and describe their clinical course. The study population was 609 LBLP primary care consulters. Variables from clinical assessment were included in the latent class analysis. Characteristics of the statistically identified clusters were compared, and their clinical course over 1 year was described. A 5 cluster solution was optimal. Cluster 1 (n = 104) had mild leg pain severity and was considered to represent a referred leg pain group with no clinical signs, suggesting nerve root involvement (sciatica). Cluster 2 (n = 122), cluster 3 (n = 188), and cluster 4 (n = 69) had mild, moderate, and severe pain and disability, respectively, and response to clinical assessment items suggested categories of mild, moderate, and severe sciatica. Cluster 5 (n = 126) had high pain and disability, longer pain duration, and more comorbidities and was difficult to map to a clinical diagnosis. Most improvement for pain and disability was seen in the first 4 months for all clusters. At 12 months, the proportion of patients reporting recovery ranged from 27% for cluster 5 to 45% for cluster 2 (mild sciatica). This is the first study that empirically shows the variability in profile and clinical course of patients with LBLP including sciatica. More homogenous groups were identified, which could be considered in future clinical and research settings.

  20. Efficacy of Hip Strengthening Exercises Compared With Leg Strengthening Exercises on Knee Pain, Function, and Quality of Life in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lun, Victor; Marsh, Andrew; Bray, Robert; Lindsay, David; Wiley, Preston

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of hip and leg strengthening exercise programs on knee pain, function, and quality of life (QOL) of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial. Patients with KOA. Male and female subjects were recruited from patients referred to the University of Calgary Sport Medicine Center and from newspaper advertisements. Thirty-seven and 35 patients with KOA were randomly assigned to either a 12-week hip or leg strengthening exercise program, respectively. Both exercise programs consisted of strengthening and flexibility exercises, which were completed 3 to 5 days a week. The first 3 weeks of exercise were supervised and the remaining 9 weeks consisted of at-home exercise. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS) and Western Ontario McMaster Arthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaires, 6-minute walk test, hip and knee range of motion (ROM), and hip and leg muscle strength. Statistically and clinically significant improvements in the KOOS and WOMAC pain subscale scores were observed in both the hip and leg strengthening programs. There was no statistical difference in the change in scores observed between the 2 groups. Equal improvements in the KOOS and WOMAC function and QOL subscales were observed for both programs. There was no change in hip and knee ROM or hip and leg strength in either group. Isolated hip and leg strengthening exercise programs seem to similarly improve knee pain, function, and QOL in patients with KOA. The results of this study show that both hip and leg strengthening exercises improve pain and QOL in patients with KOA and should be incorporated into the exercise prescription of patients with KOA.

  1. A prospective study of gait related risk factors for exercise-related lower leg pain.

    PubMed

    Willems, T M; De Clercq, D; Delbaere, K; Vanderstraeten, G; De Cock, A; Witvrouw, E

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prospectively gait related risk factors for exercise-related lower leg pain (ERLLP) in 400 physical education students. Static lower leg alignment was determined, and 3D gait kinematics combined with plantar pressure profiles were collected. After this evaluation, all sports injuries were registered by the same sports physician during the duration of the study. Forty six subjects developed ERLLP and 29 of them developed bilateral symptoms thus giving 75 symptomatic lower legs. Bilateral lower legs of 167 subjects who developed no injuries in the lower extremities served as controls. Cox regression analysis revealed that subjects who developed ERLLP had an altered running pattern before the injury compared to the controls and included (1) a significantly more central heel-strike, (2) a significantly increased pronation, accompanied with more pressure underneath the medial side of the foot, and (3) a significantly more lateral roll-off. These findings suggest that altered biomechanics play a role in the genesis of ERLLP and thus should be considered in prevention and rehabilitation.

  2. Radiosteriometric analysis of movement in the sacroiliac joint during a single-leg stance in patients with long-lasting pelvic girdle pain.

    PubMed

    Kibsgård, Thomas J; Røise, Olav; Sturesson, Bengt; Röhrl, Stephan M; Stuge, Britt

    2014-04-01

    Chamberlain's projections (anterior-posterior X-ray of the pubic symphysis) have been used to diagnose sacroiliac joint mobility during the single-leg stance test. This study examined the movement in the sacroiliac joint during the single-leg stance test with precise radiostereometric analysis. Under general anesthesia, tantalum markers were inserted into the dorsal sacrum and the ilium of 11 patients with long-lasting and severe pelvic girdle pain. After two to three weeks, a radiostereometric analysis was conducted while the subjects performed a single-leg stance. Small movements were detected in the sacroiliac joint during the single-leg stance. In both the standing- and hanging-leg sacroiliac join, a total of 0.5 degree rotation was observed; however, no translations were detected. There were no differences in total movement between the standing- and hanging-leg sacroiliac joint. The movement in the sacroiliac joint during the single-leg stance is small and almost undetectable by the precise radiostereometric analysis. A complex movement pattern was seen during the test, with a combination of movements in the two joints. The interpretation of the results of this study is that, the Chamberlain examination likely is inadequate in the examination of sacroiliac joint movement in patients with pelvic girdle pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of pain relief following spinal cord stimulation in chronic back and leg pain and failed back surgery syndrome: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-07-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P < 0.0001) in level of pain relief following SCS was noted. The mean level of pain relief across studies was 58% (95% CI: 53% to 64%, random effects) at an average follow-up of 24 months. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  4. Pain, opioids, and sleep: implications for restless legs syndrome treatment.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Högl, Birgit

    2017-03-01

    Opioid receptor agonists are known to relieve restless legs syndrome (RLS) symptoms, including both sensory and motor events, as well as improving sleep. The mechanisms of action of opioids in RLS are still a matter of speculation. The mechanisms by which endogenous opioids contribute to the pathophysiology of this polygenetic disorder, in which there are a number of variants, including developmental factors, remains unknown. A summary of the cellular mode of action of morphine and its (partial) antagonist naloxone via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and the involvement of dendritic spine activation is described. By targeting pain and its consequences, opioids are the first-line treatment in many diseases and conditions with both acute and chronic pain and have thus been used in both acute and chronic pain conditions over the last 40 years. Addiction, dependence, and tolerability of opioids show a wide variability interindividually, as the response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular, and phenotypic factors. Although several trials have now addressed opioid treatment in RLS, hyperalgesia as a complication of long-term opioid treatment, or opioid-opioid interaction have not received much attention so far. Therapeutic opioids may act not only on opioid receptors but also via histamine or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In patients with RLS, one of the few studies investigating opioid bindings found that possible brain regions involved in the severity of RLS symptoms are similar to those known to be involved in chronic pain, such as the medial pain system (medial thalamus, amygdala, caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex). The results of this diprenorphine positron emission tomography study suggested that the more severe the RLS, the greater the release of endogenous opioids. Since 1993, when the first small controlled study was performed with

  5. Development and validation of a questionnaire to measure the severity of functional limitations and reduction of sports ability in German-speaking patients with exercise-induced leg pain.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Padhiar, Nat; King, John B

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no generally agreed measure available to quantify a subject's perceived severity of exercise-induced leg pain symptoms. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire that measures the severity of symptoms that impact on function and sports ability in patients with exercise-induced leg pain. The exercise-induced leg pain questionnaire for German-speaking patients (EILP-G) was developed in five steps: (1) initial item generation, (2) item reduction, (3) pretesting, (4) expert meeting and (5) validation. The resulting EILP-G was tested for reliability, validity and internal consistency in 20 patients with exercise-induced leg pain, 20 asymptomatic track and field athletes serving as a population at risk and 33 asymptomatic sport students. The patient group scored the EILP-G questionnaire significantly lower than both control groups (each p<0.001). Test-retest demonstrates an excellent reliability in all tested groups (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, ICC=0.861-0.987). Concurrent validity of the EILP-G questionnaire showed a substantial agreement when correlated with the chronic exertional compartment syndrome classification system of Schepsis (r=-0.743; p<0.001). Internal consistency for the EILP-G questionnaire was 0.924. EILP-G questionnaire is a valid and reliable self-administered and disease-related outcome tool to measure the severity of symptoms that impact on function and sports ability in patients with exercise-induced leg pain. It can be recommended as a robust tool for measuring the subjectively perceived severity in German-speaking patients with exercise-induced leg pain. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Prevention and treatment of exercise related leg pain in young soldiers; a review of the literature and current practice in the Dutch Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Wes O; Helmhout, P H; Beutler, A

    2017-04-01

    Overuse injuries of the leg are a common problem for young soldiers. This article reviews the literature concerning the prevention and treatment of exercise related leg pain in military settings and presents the latest developments in proposed mechanisms and treatments. Current practice and treatment protocols from the Dutch Armed Forces are reviewed, with an emphasis on the most prevalent conditions of medial tibial stress syndrome and chronic exertional compartment syndrome. The conclusion is that exercise related leg pain in the military is an occupational problem that deserves further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. A 27-Year-Old Man With Acute Severe Low Back Pain and Bilateral Leg Swelling That Prompted Renting a Wheelchair for Mobility.

    PubMed

    Williams, John G; Phan, Huy; Winston, Helena R; Fugit, Randolph V; Graney, Bridget; Jamroz, Brant; English, Benjamin; Chan, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    A 27-year-old man with OSA, posttraumatic stress disorder, and chronic mechanical back pain presented with a 3-day history of acute atraumatic worsening of his low back pain as well as right groin numbness that was exacerbated by walking. He also complained of bilateral leg "heaviness," pain, and swelling, all becoming so severe that he rented a wheelchair for mobility. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Leg stiffness, valgus knee motion, and Q-angle are associated with hypertrophic soft patella tendon and idiopathic knee pain in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Satkunskiene, Danguole; Mickevicius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2017-01-01

    Knee pain without knee degenerative symptoms is a common phenomenon among young basketball players. The aim of this study was to identify factors predisposing young basketball players to suffer from knee pain. The study involved 20 male adolescent (14-15 years) basketball players who were divided into two equal groups based on knee pain symptoms. Legs torque was tested on an isokinetic dynamometer. The length, elongation and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the patellar tendon were measured with ultrasonography. Quadriceps angle (Q-angle), knee valgus motion, and joint angular displacement in the sagittal plane were analyzed using video recording during countermovement jump. Ground reaction force was measured using a force platform. Knee pain (KP) participants had a significantly lower Q-angle (P=0.045) and lower maximum varus knee angle (P=0.035), and a greater knee inside displacement (P=0.039) during squat phase. In the KP group, the CSA at the top of the tendon was significantly greater than in the middle (P=0.006) and at the bottom (P=0.039). Absolute tendon stiffness (P=0.013) and Young's modulus (P=0.034) were significantly lower in the KP group compared with controls. Leg stiffness during landing was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.015). Leg stiffness, valgus knee motion, and Q-angle are associated with hypertrophic soft patella tendon and idiopathic knee pain in adolescent basketball players.

  9. Patients' Attitudes Toward Nonphysician Screening of Low Back and Low Back Related Leg Pain Complaints Referred for Surgical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Joshua; Busse, Jason W; Drew, Brian; Reddy, Kesava; Cenic, Aleksa; Kachur, Edward; Murty, Naresh; Candelaria, Henry; Moore, Ainsley E; Riva, John J

    2017-03-01

    A questionnaire survey. The aim of this study was to explore patient attitudes toward screening to assess suitability for low back surgery by nonphysician health care providers. Canadian spine surgeons have shown support for nonphysician screening to assess and triage patients with low back pain and low back related leg pain. However, patients' attitudes toward this proposed model are largely unknown. We administered a 19-item cross-sectional survey to adults with low back and/or low back related leg pain who were referred for elective surgical assessment at one of five spine surgeons' clinics in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The survey inquired about demographics, expectations regarding wait time for surgical consultation, as well as willingness to pay, travel, and be screened by nonphysician health care providers. Eighty low back patients completed our survey, for a response rate of 86.0% (80 of 93). Most respondents (72.5%; 58 of 80) expected to be seen by a surgeon within 3 months of referral, and 88.8% (71 of 80) indicated willingness to undergo screening with a nonphysician health care provider to establish whether they were potentially a surgical candidate. Half of respondents (40 of 80) were willing to travel >50 km for assessment by a nonphysician health care provider, and 46.2% were willing to pay out-of-pocket (25.6% were unsure). However, most respondents (70.0%; 56 of 80) would still want to see a surgeon if they were ruled out as a surgical candidate, and written comments from respondents revealed concern regarding agreement between surgeons' and nonphysicians' determination of surgical candidates. Patients referred for surgical consultation for low back or low back related leg pain are largely willing to accept screening by nonphysician health care providers. Future research should explore the concordance of screening results between surgeon and nonphysician health care providers. 3.

  10. Night Leg Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet or thighs might cramp as well. Forcefully stretching the contracted muscle relieves the pain. Most of ... include Drinking plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration Stretching your leg muscles or riding a stationary bicycle ...

  11. [Acute leg compartment syndrome after exertion].

    PubMed

    Misović, Sidor; Kronja, Goran; Ignjatović, Dragan; Tomić, Aleksandar

    2005-03-01

    A case of a 22-year old soldier, with a history of pain in the leg during heavy exercise, which desisted at rest, was presented. One day before admission, the patient had felt an extreme exertion-induced pain in his right leg which had not lessenned at rest. At the same time, the patient noticed persistent severe leg edema. On physical examination, the intracompartmental pressure was 62 mmHg (> 30 mmHg). The patient was urgently operated on, and fasciotomy according to Mubarak was used. At second surgery, the debridement of the muscles of the posterior group of the leg, and the evacuation of hemathoma from the anterior and lateral group of the right leg muscles were perfomed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Fasciotomy wounds were closed within 14 days of the surgery. The complete physical treatment was done. Follow-up examinations 1, 3, and 6 months afterwards were satisfactory. The soldier completed his compulsory military service without any sequelae. Laboratory results were normal. Overlooked, unrecognized or surgically untreated compartment syndrome can cause severe damage, including even the loss of the extremity.

  12. A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Regiane S.; UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program; Proctor, Julian W., E-mail: proctorj@upmc.ed

    Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Dailymore » pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.« less

  13. A randomised clinical trial of the efficacy of drop squats or leg extension/leg curl exercises to treat clinically diagnosed jumper's knee in athletes: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, L; Taunton, J; Clement, D; Smith, C; Khan, K

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To compare the therapeutic effect of two different exercise protocols in athletes with jumper's knee. Methods—Randomised clinical trial comparing a 12 week programme of either drop squat exercises or leg extension/leg curl exercises. Measurement was performed at baseline and after six and 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain (visual analogue scale 1–10) and return to sport. Secondary outcome measures included quadriceps and hamstring moment of force using a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/second. Differences in pain response between the drop squat and leg extension/curl treatment groups were assessed by 2 (group) x 3 (time) analysis of variance. Two by two contingency tables were used to test differences in rates of return to sport. Analysis of variance (2 (injured versus non-injured leg) x 2 (group) x 3 (time)) was also used to determine differences for secondary outcome measures. Results—Over the 12 week intervention, pain diminished by 2.3 points (36%) in the leg extension/curl group and 3.2 points (57%) in the squat group. There was a significant main effect of both exercise protocols on pain (p<0.01) with no interaction effect. Nine of 10 subjects in the drop squat group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks, but five of those subjects still had low level pain. Six of nine of the leg extension/curl group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks and four patients had low level pain. There was no significant difference between groups in numbers returning to sporting activity. There were no differences in the change in quadriceps or hamstring muscle moment of force between groups. Conclusions—Progressive drop squats and leg extension/curl exercises can reduce the pain of jumper's knee in a 12 week period and permit a high proportion of patients to return to sport. Not all patients, however, return to sport by that time. Key Words: knee; patellar tendon; tendinopathy; tendinosis; eccentric strengthening; strength training

  14. [Observation on the transient analgesic effect of abdominal acupuncture TENS on pain of neck, shoulder, loin and legs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang-lian; Chen, Li-fang; Zhu, Wei-ming

    2007-09-01

    To observe on the transient analgesic effect of abdominal points transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) combined with abdominal acupuncture according to the holographic theory on pain of neck, shoulder, loin and legs. One hundred and twenty cases of pain of neck, shoulder, loin and legs were randomly divided into 4 groups: abdominal acupuncture TENS group, acupoints TENS group, electroacupuneture (EA) group, non-abdominal acupuncture TENS group, 30 cases in each group. All the cases were treated by the same stimulation parameters, but different stimulation points. The VAS scores were recorded before and after treatment. The VAS scores were significantly different before and after treatment in abdominal acupuncture TENS group (P < 0.01); the total effective rate of the transient analgesic effec t was 96.7% in the abdominal acupuncture TENS group, 93.3% in the acupoints TENS group, 96.7% in the EA group with no significant difference among the 3 groups, but with a very significant difference between the abdominal acupuncture TENS group and the non-abdominal acupunctureTENS group (10.0%), P < 0.01. Abdominal acupuncture TENS has a better transient analgesic effect and can use less stimulation points to increase the analgesic effect.

  15. Cultural adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr) scale of pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Bussotti, Edna Aparecida; Guinsburg, Ruth; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    to perform the translation into Brazilian Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr) scale, with children under 18 years old, affected by cerebral palsy, presenting or not cognitive impairment and unable to report their pain. methodological development study of translation into Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. After approval by the ethics committee, the process aimed at translation and back-translation, evaluation of translation and back-translation using the Delphi technique and assessment of cultural equivalence. The process included the five categories of the scale and the four application instructions, considering levels of agreement equal to or greater than 80%. it was necessary three rounds of the Delphi technique to achieve consensus among experts. The agreement achieved for the five categories was: Face 95.5%, Legs 90%, Activity 94.4%, Cry 94.4% and Consolability 99.4%. The four instructions achieved the following consensus levels: 1st 99.1%, 2nd 99.2%, 3rd 99.1% and 4th 98.3%. the method enabled the translation and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. This is a study able to expand the knowledge of Brazilian professionals on pain assessment in children with CP.

  16. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Paulien G., E-mail: p.g.westhoff@umcutrecht.nl; Graeff, Alexander de; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study were used. These patients, irradiated for painful bone metastases, rated pain, QoL, and overall health at baseline and weekly afterward for 12 weeks. Using generalized estimating equations analysis, the course of QoL was studied, adjusted for primary tumor. To identify predictive variables, proportional hazard analyses were performed, taking into account death asmore » a competing risk, and C-statistics were calculated for discriminative value. Results: In total, 722 patients (76%) responded to radiation therapy. During follow-up, responders had a better QoL in all domains compared with nonresponders. Patients with breast or prostate cancer had a better QoL than patients with lung cancer. In multivariate analysis, baseline predictors for a pain response were breast or prostate cancer as primary tumor, younger age, good performance status, absence of visceral metastases, and using opioids. The discriminative ability of the model was low (C-statistic: 0.56). Conclusions: Responding patients show a better QoL after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases than nonresponders. Our model did not have enough discriminative power to predict which patients are likely to respond to radiation therapy. Therefore, radiation therapy should be offered to all patients with painful bone metastases, aiming to decrease pain and improve QoL.« less

  17. Effect of leg dominance, gender and age on sensory responses to structural differentiation of straight leg raise test in asymptomatic subjects: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Torres Lacomba, María; de la Villa Polo, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Study design Cross-sectional study. Objectives To assess the effect of structural differentiation on sensory responses of asymptomatic individuals to standard neurodynamic tests of straight leg raise (SLR) and to evaluate the relevance of leg dominance, gender, and age. Background SLR test is a well-known neurodynamic test among physical therapists; no studies to date have investigated the influence of gender, age, and leg dominance to the sensory responses of this neurodynamic test and its structured differentiating maneuver. Methods Thirty (16 women) asymptomatic individuals enrolled in this study. Dominancy test was performed for each participant. Pain intensity using visual analogue scale (VAS), symptoms location in a body chart, nature of symptoms evoked, and hip range of motion (ROM) were recorded and compared at ankle neutral position (N-SLR) and dorsiflexion (DF-SLR) in both legs at the point of pain tolerance during SLR (P2). In addition, hip ROM was recorded at the onset of pain (P1). Results There was a statistically significant sex main effect for P1 and P2 between N-SLR and DF-SLR (p < 0.05). Mean hip ROM during the SLR was more than 10° greater in women than men. There was no statistically significant interaction between leg dominance and age group in N-SLR, DF-SLR, and VAS. Pain intensity was moderate for each SLR test. Symptoms most often described were stretch (96.7%), followed by tightness (70%) in the posterior thigh and leg. Conclusions SLR hip ROM is influenced by sex in asymptomatic individuals, leading to a greater hip ROM in SLR in women. Age and limb dominance are not relevant to SLR hip ROM or pain intensity. PMID:28559668

  18. Validity of the Korean Version of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale for Assessment of Pain in Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yeonsil; Kim, Yoon Sook; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol Heui

    2017-11-01

    Pain is often associated with a more rapid progression of cognitive and functional decline, and behavioral disturbance in dementia. Therefore, it is essential to accurately assesses pain for proper intervention in patients with dementia. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) scale is an excellent behaviour scale which includes most of the domains that are recommended by the American Geriatrics Society to evaluate when assessing pain in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to develop the Korean version of the FLACC (K-FLACC) and to verify its reliability and validity in assessing pain of elderly patients with dementia. We developed the K-FLACC to consist of the five domains (face, legs, activity, cry, and consolability) with scores of 0, 1, and 2 for each domain and a total score ranging from 0 to 10 as in the original FLACC. Eighty-eight patients with dementia who visited Konkuk University Medical Center were evaluated. The K-FLACC revealed good validity as compared to the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS; r = 0.617, P < 0.001) and the Face Pain Scale (FPS; r = 0.350, P = 0.001). All of the five domains of the K-FLACC were related to the NRS and FPS, in which the activity domain showed the highest correlation. Test-retest reliability was excellent, as the intra-class correlation coefficient comparing the retest to test was 0.73 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.82). Our results show that the K-FLACC is a suitable and valuable scale to assess pain in patients with dementia in Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  19. Alterations in Pain Responses in Treated and Untreated Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome: Associations with Sleep Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J.; Allen, Richard P; Greenbaum, Seth; Earley, Christopher J; Smith, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Objective There has been recent interest in characterizing potential abnormalities of pain processing in patients with sleep disorders such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). The aim of this study was to evaluate psychophysical responses to noxious heat and pressure stimuli in both treated and untreated RLS patients, compared to matched controls. Methods This study is a cross-sectional group comparison of RLS patients with matched controls. A total of 31 patients (15 treated, 16 untreated) with a confirmed diagnosis of RLS were compared to 18 controls with no history of RLS or related sleep disorders. Results RLS patients (both treated and untreated) demonstrated reduced pain thresholds and reported greater clinical pain relative to controls. Moreover, RLS patients demonstrated enhanced temporal summation of heat pain (p< .05), which may reflect aberrant central nervous system facilitation of pain transmission. Both treated and untreated RLS patients reported disrupted sleep relative to controls, and mediation analyses suggested that the reduced pain thresholds in RLS were attributable to sleep disturbance. However, the effect of RLS on the magnitude of temporal summation of heat pain was independent of sleep disturbance. Conclusions These findings suggest that central nervous system pain processing may be amplified in RLS, perhaps partially as a consequence of sleep disruption. RLS patients, even those whose symptoms are managed pharmacologically, may be at elevated long-term risk for the development or maintenance of persistent pain conditions. Further studies in larger samples could help to improve the prospects for pain management in RLS patients. PMID:21570347

  20. Kinematic Differences During Single-Leg Step-Down Between Individuals With Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome and Individuals Without Hip Pain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Loverro, Kari L; Khuu, Anne

    2018-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Background Despite recognition that femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) is a movement-related disorder, few studies have examined dynamic unilateral tasks in individuals with FAIS. Objectives To determine whether movements of the pelvis and lower extremities in individuals with FAIS differ from those in individuals without hip pain during a single-leg step-down, and to analyze kinematic differences between male and female participants within groups. Methods Individuals with FAIS and individuals without hip pain performed a single-leg step-down while kinematic data were collected. Kinematics were evaluated at 60° of knee flexion. A linear regression analysis assessed the main effects of group, sex, and side, and the interaction of sex by group. Results Twenty individuals with FAIS and 40 individuals without hip pain participated. Individuals with FAIS performed the step-down with greater hip flexion (4.9°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5°, 9.2°) and anterior pelvic tilt (4.1°; 95% CI: 0.9°, 7.3°) than individuals without hip pain. Across groups, female participants performed the task with more hip flexion (6.1°; 95% CI: 1.7°, 10.4°), hip adduction (4.8°; 95% CI: 2.2°, 7.4°), anterior pelvic tilt (5.8°; 95% CI: 2.6°, 9.0°), pelvic drop (1.4°; 95% CI: 0.3°, 2.5°), and thigh adduction (2.7°; 95% CI: 1.3°, 4.2°) than male participants. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that individuals with FAIS have alterations in pelvic motion during a dynamic unilateral task. The noted altered movement patterns in the FAIS group may contribute to the development of hip pain and may be due to impairments that are modifiable through rehabilitation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(4):270-279. Epub 6 Mar 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7794.

  1. Trigger point-related sympathetic nerve activity in chronic sciatic leg pain: a case study.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica has classically been associated with irritation of the sciatic nerve by the vertebral disc and consequent inflammation. Some authors suggest that active trigger points in the gluteus minimus muscle can refer pain in similar way to sciatica. Trigger point diagnosis is based on Travel and Simons criteria, but referred pain and twitch response are significant confirmatory signs of the diagnostic criteria. Although vasoconstriction in the area of a latent trigger point has been demonstrated, the vasomotor reaction of active trigger points has not been examined. We report the case of a 22-year-old Caucasian European man who presented with a 3-year history of chronic sciatic-type leg pain. In the third year of symptoms, coexistent myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed. Acupuncture needle stimulation of active trigger points under infrared thermovisual camera showed a sudden short-term vasodilatation (an autonomic phenomenon) in the area of referred pain. The vasodilatation spread from 0.2 to 171.9 cm(2) and then gradually decreased. After needling, increases in average and maximum skin temperature were seen as follows: for the thigh, changes were +2.6°C (average) and +3.6°C (maximum); for the calf, changes were +0.9°C (average) and +1.4°C (maximum). It is not yet known whether the vasodilatation observed was evoked exclusively by dry needling of active trigger points. The complex condition of the patient suggests that other variables might have influenced the infrared thermovision camera results. We suggest that it is important to check if vasodilatation in the area of referred pain occurs in all patients with active trigger points. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Associations between disc space narrowing, anterior osteophytes and disability in chronic mechanical low back pain: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Perera, Romain Shanil; Dissanayake, Poruwalage Harsha; Senarath, Upul; Wijayaratne, Lalith Sirimevan; Karunanayake, Aranjan Lional; Dissanayake, Vajira Harshadeva Weerabaddana

    2017-05-15

    Radiographic features of lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) are common findings in patients with chronic mechanical low back pain; however, its role in disability and intensity of pain is debatable. This study aims to investigate the associations of the x-ray features of LDD and lumbar spondylolisthesis with severity of disability and intensity of pain. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 439 patients with chronic mechanical low back pain who attended the rheumatology clinic, National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, from May 2012 to May 2014. Severity of disability was measured using Modified Oswestry Disability Index and intensity of pain was assessed using numeric rating scale (0-100). X-ray features of LDD (disc space narrowing, anterior osteophytes and overall LDD) and spondylolisthesis were assessed in lateral recumbent lumbar x-rays (L1/L2 to L5/S1) and graded by a consultant radiologist blinded to clinical data. Generalised linear model with linear response was used to assess the associations of x-ray features of LDD with severity of disability and intensity of pain adjusting for age, gender, body mass index and pain radiating into legs. Mean age was 48.99 ± 11.21 and 323 (73.58%) were females. 87 (19.82%) were obese. Mean severity of disability was 30.95 ± 13.67 and mean intensity of pain was 45.50 ± 20.37. 69 (15.72%), 26 (5.92%) and 85 (19.36%) patients had grade 2 disc space narrowing, anterior osteophytes and overall LDD, respectively. 51 (11.62%) patients had lumbar spondylolisthesis. Grade of disc space narrowing and overall LDD were not associated with severity of disability or intensity of pain. The presence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was associated with severity of disability. Female gender and pain radiating into legs were associated with severity of disability and intensity of pain. Advancing age was associated with x-ray features of LDD and lumbar spondylolisthesis. Lumbar spondylolisthesis is associated with severity of

  3. Lower Leg Anterior and Lateral Intracompartmental Pressure Changes Before and After Classic Versus Skate Nordic Rollerskiing.

    PubMed

    Woods, Katherine M; Petron, David J; Shultz, Barry B; Hicks-Little, Charlie A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a debilitating condition resulting in loss of function and a decrease in athletic performance. Cases of CECS are increasing among Nordic skiers; therefore, analysis of intracompartmental pressures (ICPs) before and after Nordic skiing is warranted. To determine if lower leg anterior and lateral ICPs and subjective lower leg pain levels increased after a 20-minute Nordic rollerskiing time trial and to examine if differences existed between postexercise ICPs for the 2 Nordic rollerskiing techniques, classic and skate. Crossover study. Outdoor paved loop. Seven healthy Division I Nordic skiers (3 men, 4 women; age = 22.71 ± 1.38 y, height = 175.36 ± 6.33 cm, mass = 70.71 ± 6.58 kg). Participants completed two 20-minute rollerskiing time trials using the classic and skate technique in random order. The time trials were completed 7 days apart. Anterior and lateral ICPs and lower leg pain scores were obtained at baseline and at minutes 1 and 5 after rollerskiing. Anterior and lateral ICPs (mm Hg) were measured using a Stryker Quic STIC handheld monitor. Subjective measures of lower leg pain were recorded using the 11-point Numeric Rating Scale. Increases in both anterior (P = .000) and lateral compartment (P = .002) ICPs were observed, regardless of rollerskiing technique used. Subjective lower leg pain increased after the classic technique for the men from baseline to 1 minute postexercise and after the skate technique for the women. Significant 3-way interactions (technique × time × sex) were observed for the anterior (P = .002) and lateral (P = .009) compartment ICPs and lower leg pain (P = .005). Postexercise anterior and lateral ICPs increased compared with preexercise ICPs after both classic and skate rollerskiing techniques. Lower leg pain is a primary symptom of CECS. The subjective lower leg pain 11-point Numeric Rating Scale results indicate that increases in lower leg ICPs sustained during Nordic

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Mixed Arteriovenous Leg Ulcers: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Joseph A; Woo, Kevin Y

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers (MLU) that differentiated them from venous leg ulcers (VLU). Secondary analysis of data from larger electronic database. The sample comprised 1007 persons with lower extremity ulcers. Two hundred sixty three individuals with MLU were compared to 744 individuals with VLU; their ankle brachial indices were 0.51-0.90 and 0.91-.30 respectively. Subjects were drawn from community care settings from across Canada. Data concerning baseline demographic and pertinent clinical characteristics including ulcer history were collected using multiple validated instruments. The Leg Ulcer Assessment Tool was used to collect demographic and pertinent medical history, The Short Form Health Survey 12 and the Euro Wuol 5D (EQ-5D) were used to measure health related quality of life, the numeric pain scales was used to measure character and intensity of pain. Groups were compared using χ or Mann-Whitney U. Individuals with MLU were significantly older, has lower body mass index, a history of smoking, and more comorbid conditions than subjects with VLU. In many cases, clinical presentation was indicative of significant arterial insufficiency including cool extremities, shiny, cracked and inelastic skin, impaired capillary refill, and weak pedal pulses. Ulcer pain was highly prevalent, but overall pain rating was similar between groups. Mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers were associated with lower health related quality of life, greater mobility impairments, and more deficits in self-care and usual activities. Greater knowledge and understanding of the distinct characteristics of MLU is critical for appropriate screening, prevention, assessment and management of persons with this form of leg ulcer. Pain and health related quality of life factors are important considerations when evaluating and managing these patients.

  5. [Replantation at lower leg level].

    PubMed

    Daigeler, A; Fansa, H; Westphal, T; Schneider, W

    2003-11-01

    Replantation in reconstructive surgery is an established procedure due to microsurgical techniques. It can be routinely performed in unilateral lower leg amputation. In some cases of bilateral amputation, in which orthotopic replantation is not possible due to the complex trauma, heterotopic replantation is a therapeutic option. This avoids prosthetic fitting. We report five cases of orthotopic and two of heterotopic lower limb replantations. Functional outcome concerning sensibility, mobility, pain, and aesthetic result were assessed clinically and using a questionnaire. Functional outcome and patient satisfaction were good. The psychological situation of the patients as well as mobility and stability of the replanted limbs were satisfying. Heterotopically replanted patients found the replanted legs superior to the prostheses. We conclude that, in lower leg amputation, attempts should be made to replant the extremity. In bilateral lower leg amputations, at least one limb should be reconstructed, even if "only" a heterotopic replantation can be performed.

  6. Effects of functional training on pain, leg strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Santos E Campos, María Aparecida; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of 18-week functional training (FT) program consisting in two sessions a week of in-water exercise and one of on-land exercise on pain, strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia. A sample consisting of 36 fibromyalgia patients was included in the study. The patients were allocated randomly into the experimental group (EG, n = 20), and control group (CG, n = 16). Standardized field-based fitness tests were used to assess muscle strength (30-s chair stand and handgrip strength) and agility/dynamic balance and static balance. Fibromyalgia impact and pain were analyzed by Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), tender points (TPs), visual analog scale (VAS). We observed a significant reduction in the FIQ (p = 0.042), the algometer scale of TP (p = 0.008), TP (p < 0.001), and VAS (p < 0.001) in the EG. The EG shows better results in leg strength (p < 0.001), handgrip strength (p = 0.025), agility/dynamic balance (p = 0.032) and balance (p = 0.006). An 18-week intervention consisting in two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise of FT reduces pain and improves functional capacity in FM patients. These results suggested that FT could play an important role in maintaining an independent lifestyle in patients with FM.

  7. Lower Leg Anterior and Lateral Intracompartmental Pressure Changes Before and After Classic Versus Skate Nordic Rollerskiing

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Katherine M.; Petron, David J.; Shultz, Barry B.; Hicks-Little, Charlie A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a debilitating condition resulting in loss of function and a decrease in athletic performance. Cases of CECS are increasing among Nordic skiers; therefore, analysis of intracompartmental pressures (ICPs) before and after Nordic skiing is warranted. Objective To determine if lower leg anterior and lateral ICPs and subjective lower leg pain levels increased after a 20-minute Nordic rollerskiing time trial and to examine if differences existed between postexercise ICPs for the 2 Nordic rollerskiing techniques, classic and skate. Design Crossover study. Setting Outdoor paved loop. Patients or Other Participants Seven healthy Division I Nordic skiers (3 men, 4 women; age = 22.71 ± 1.38 y, height = 175.36 ± 6.33 cm, mass = 70.71 ± 6.58 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed two 20-minute rollerskiing time trials using the classic and skate technique in random order. The time trials were completed 7 days apart. Anterior and lateral ICPs and lower leg pain scores were obtained at baseline and at minutes 1 and 5 after rollerskiing. Main Outcome Measure(s) Anterior and lateral ICPs (mm Hg) were measured using a Stryker Quic STIC handheld monitor. Subjective measures of lower leg pain were recorded using the 11-point Numeric Rating Scale. Results Increases in both anterior (P = .000) and lateral compartment (P = .002) ICPs were observed, regardless of rollerskiing technique used. Subjective lower leg pain increased after the classic technique for the men from baseline to 1 minute postexercise and after the skate technique for the women. Significant 3-way interactions (technique × time × sex) were observed for the anterior (P = .002) and lateral (P = .009) compartment ICPs and lower leg pain (P = .005). Conclusions Postexercise anterior and lateral ICPs increased compared with preexercise ICPs after both classic and skate rollerskiing techniques. Lower leg pain is a primary symptom of CECS. The subjective

  8. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. Case Report A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst–induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Intervention and Outcomes Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Conclusion Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis–generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation. PMID:22942836

  9. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  10. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B.; Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Vapiwala, Neha

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lungmore » (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.« less

  11. Pain and pain management in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Beiteke, Ulrike; Bigge, Stefan; Reichenberger, Christina; Gralow, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that 23 million Germans suffer from chronic pain. A recent survey has revealed that 30 % of chronic pain patients are dissatisfied with their pain management. Furthermore, five million Germans suffer from neuropathic pain, 20 % of whom are inadequately treated. Pain is also a symptom of many dermatologic diseases, which is mostly somatic and may be classified as mild in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, research on the quality of life (QoL) has increasingly shown a marked impairment of QoL by moderate pain such as in psoriatic arthritis. -Severe pain is associated with herpes zoster (shingles), leg ulcers, and pyoderma gangrenosum. This article addresses the basics of pain classification and, in a short excerpt, pain transduction/transmission and modulation. The use of standardized diagnostic -scales is recommended for the purpose of recording and monitoring pain intensity, which allows for the optimization of therapy and consistent interdisciplinary -communication. Any dermatology residency program includes the acquisition of knowledge and skills in pain management. This review therefore aims to present fundamental therapeutic concepts based on the expanded WHO analgesic ladder, and describes a step-wise therapeutic approach and combination therapies. The article focuses on the pain management of the above-mentioned severely painful, conservatively treated dermatoses. Besides well-established therapeutic agents and current -therapeutic standards, it discusses specific options based on guidelines (where available). Current knowledge on peri- and postoperative pain management is briefly outlined. This article addresses: ▸ The fundamentals of the classification and neurophysiology of pain; ▸ Standards for pain documentation in children and adults; ▸ General standards for pharmaceutical pain management; ▸ Current specific treatment options for postherpetic neuralgia, leg ulcers, and -pyoderma gangrenosum in conjunction with the expanded WHO

  12. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance.

  13. Influence of educational attainment on pain intensity and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: mediation effect of pain catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kim, Sung-Chan; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2014-05-01

    Level IV, prospective case series. To investigate the influence of educational attainment on the level of pain intensity and disability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and determine how coping behavior, such as catastrophizing, may mediate the association between educational attainment and clinical impairments. Educational attainment has been thought to influence disability caused by chronic painful disease, mediated by pain behavior or a coping strategy such as catastrophizing. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of educational attainment on pain intensity or disability related with LSS. A total of 155 patients who were diagnosed as degenerative LSS participated in the study. Data on detailed medical history, physical examination, and series of questionnaires were collected, including pain catastrophizing scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and visual analogue pain scale for back and leg pain. For measures of socioeconomic status, educational attainment and occupation were assessed. Radiological analysis was performed using magnetic resonance images and computed tomographic scans. After adjustment of covariates, multivariate regression analysis was used to assess each component of the proposed mediation models among visual analogue pain scale for back/leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, the level of education, occupation and pain catastrophizing scale. Mediation was also assessed by the bootstrapping technique. Educational attainment was negatively correlated with pain intensity, disability, and catastrophizing. Pain catastrophizing were also significantly correlated with disability and pain intensity for back/leg pain in the patients with LSS. In the relationship among variables, the mediation analysis with bootstrapping clearly showed the role of catastrophizing in the mediation between visual analogue pain scale for back pain/leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the level of education. This study demonstrated that lower educational

  14. Dynamic leg length asymmetry during gait is not a valid method for estimating mild anatomic leg length discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Leporace, Gustavo; Batista, Luiz Alberto; Serra Cruz, Raphael; Zeitoune, Gabriel; Cavalin, Gabriel Armondi; Metsavaht, Leonardo

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the validity of dynamic leg length discrepancy (DLLD) during gait as a radiation-free screening method for measuring anatomic leg length discrepancy (ALLD). Thirty-three subjects with mild leg length discrepancy walked along a walkway and the dynamic leg length discrepancy (DLLD) was calculated using a motion analysis system. Pearson correlation and paired Student t -tests were applied to calculate the correlation and compare the differences between DLLD and ALLD (α = 0.05). The results of our study showed DLLD is not a valid method to predict ALLD in subjects with mild limb discrepancy.

  15. The risk of radiation exposure to the eyes of the interventional pain physician.

    PubMed

    Fish, David E; Kim, Andrew; Ornelas, Christopher; Song, Sungchan; Pangarkar, Sanjog

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the use of medical imaging continues to grow across the globe as does the concern for radiation safety. The danger of lens opacities and cataract formation related to radiation exposure is well documented in the medical literature. However, there continues to be controversy regarding actual dose thresholds of radiation exposure and whether these thresholds are still relevant to cataract formation. Eye safety and the risk involved for the interventional pain physician is not entirely clear. Given the available literature on measured radiation exposure to the interventionist, and the controversy regarding dose thresholds, it is our current recommendation that the interventional pain physician use shielded eyewear. As the breadth of interventional procedures continues to grow, so does the radiation risk to the interventional pain physician. In this paper, we attempt to outline the risk of cataract formation in the scope of practice of an interventional pain physician and describe techniques that may help reduce them.

  16. The Risk of Radiation Exposure to the Eyes of the Interventional Pain Physician

    PubMed Central

    Fish, David E.; Kim, Andrew; Ornelas, Christopher; Song, Sungchan; Pangarkar, Sanjog

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the use of medical imaging continues to grow across the globe as does the concern for radiation safety. The danger of lens opacities and cataract formation related to radiation exposure is well documented in the medical literature. However, there continues to be controversy regarding actual dose thresholds of radiation exposure and whether these thresholds are still relevant to cataract formation. Eye safety and the risk involved for the interventional pain physician is not entirely clear. Given the available literature on measured radiation exposure to the interventionist, and the controversy regarding dose thresholds, it is our current recommendation that the interventional pain physician use shielded eyewear. As the breadth of interventional procedures continues to grow, so does the radiation risk to the interventional pain physician. In this paper, we attempt to outline the risk of cataract formation in the scope of practice of an interventional pain physician and describe techniques that may help reduce them. PMID:22091381

  17. Long-term quality of life improvement for chronic intractable back and leg pain patients using spinal cord stimulation: 12-month results from the SENZA-RCT.

    PubMed

    Amirdelfan, Kasra; Yu, Cong; Doust, Matthew W; Gliner, Bradford E; Morgan, Donna M; Kapural, Leonardo; Vallejo, Ricardo; Sitzman, B Todd; Yearwood, Thomas L; Bundschu, Richard; Yang, Thomas; Benyamin, Ramsin; Burgher, Abram H; Brooks, Elizabeth S; Powell, Ashley A; Subbaroyan, Jeyakumar

    2018-06-01

    Chronic axial low-back pain is a debilitating disorder that impacts all aspects of an afflicted individual's life. Effective, durable treatments have historically been elusive. Interventional therapies, such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS), have shown limited efficacy at best. Recently, a novel treatment, 10 kHz SCS, has demonstrated superior pain relief compared with traditional SCS in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In this manuscript, we report on the long-term improvements in quality of life (QoL) outcomes for subjects enrolled in this study. A prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial (SENZA-RCT) was conducted. Patients with both chronic back and leg pain were enrolled and randomized (1:1) into 10 kHz SCS or traditional SCS treatment groups. A total of 171 subjects received a permanent SCS device implant. QoL and functionality measures were collected up to 12 months. The device remote control utilization, which is an indication of patient interaction with the device for adjustments, was collected at 24-month post-implantation. At 12 months, a higher proportion of 10 kHz SCS subjects had marked improvement of their disability (Oswestry Disability Index) to a "moderate" or "minimal" impact on their daily function versus the control group. The subjects also reported better improvement in the Global Assessment of Functioning, Clinician Global Impression of Change, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, compared to traditional SCS subjects. The 10 kHz SCS subjects also reported far higher rates of both driving and sleeping with their device turned on, as well as reduced reliance on their programmers to adjust therapy settings. In addition to superior pain relief, 10 kHz SCS provides long-term improvements in quality of life and functionality for subjects with chronic low-back and leg pain. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01609972).

  18. The effect of topical arnica on muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Adkison, Julie D; Bauer, David W; Chang, Terence

    2010-10-01

    The herb Arnica montana, in topical formulations, has been reputed to decrease bruising and muscle pain. This claim has been inadequately and incompletely addressed. To determine whether topical A. montana cream could decrease subjective leg pain following calf raises. Secondary outcomes were effects on ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 53 subjects. Active range of motion was measured in both ankles, and then a series of calf-raises were completed according to a standardized protocol. Each participant received 2 tubes of cream, 1 with active arnica and 1 with placebo. The creams were applied to the lower legs immediately after the exercise, and again at 24 and 48 hours postexercise according to the "RIGHT" or "LEFT" labels. At 48 hours postexercise, subjects had their ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness measured. Subjects used the analog scale to rate pain in each leg at baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. No significant differences in pain scores were seen before exercise (arnica: 0.07 vs placebo: 0.09, p = 0.32). Pain scores on legs treated with arnica were higher than scores on those receiving placebo 24 hours after exercise (3.04 vs 2.36, respectively; p < 0.005). Pain scores on day 3 (arnica: 3.44 vs placebo: 3.20, p = 0.66) and day 4 (arnica: 2.36 vs placebo: 2.31, p = 0.62) were not significantly different. There was no difference in muscle tenderness (arnica: 1.05 vs placebo: 1.05, p = 1.0). Ankle range of motion did not differ significantly on either day 1 (arnica: 64.70 degrees vs placebo: 66.15, p = 0.352 or day 3 (arnica: 63.32 degrees vs placebo: 65.94, p = 0.058). Rather than decreasing leg pain, arnica was found to increase leg pain 24 hours after eccentric calf exercises. This effect did not extend to the 48-hour measurement.

  19. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... are visible just under the surface of the skin Spinal stenosis —narrowing in the spine, causing pressure on the nerves and spine, with resulting numbness and pain Lumbar disease Osteoarthritis QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER Does my medical history raise my risk for P.A.D.? Do ...

  20. Patients with chronic pain after abdominal surgery show less preoperative endogenous pain inhibition and more postoperative hyperalgesia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Oliver Hamilton; Schreyer, Tobias; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain is common and undesirable after surgery. Progression from acute to chronic pain involves altered pain processing. The authors studied relationships between presence of chronic pain versus preoperative descending pain control (diffuse noxious inhibitory controls; DNICs) and postoperative persistence and spread of skin and deep tissue hyperalgesia (change in electric/pressure pain tolerance thresholds; ePTT/pPTT) up to 6 months postoperatively. In 20 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery under standardized anesthesia, we determined ePTT/pPTT (close to [abdomen] and distant from [leg] incision), eDNIC/pDNIC (change in ePTT/pPTT with cold pressor pain task; only preoperatively), and a 100 mm long pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst pain imaginable), both at rest and on movement preoperatively, and 1 day and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Patients reporting chronic pain 6 months postoperatively had more abdominal and leg skin hyperalgesia over the postoperative period. More inhibitory preoperative eDNIC was associated with less late postoperative pain, without affecting skin hyperalgesia. More inhibitory pDNIC was linked to less postoperative leg deep tissue hyperalgesia, without affecting pain VAS. This pilot study for the first time links chronic pain after surgery, poorer preoperative inhibitory pain modulation (DNIC), and greater postoperative degree, persistence, and spread of hyperalgesia. If confirmed, these results support the potential clinical utility of perioperative pain processing testing.

  1. Chronic pulmonary disease is associated with pain spreading and restless legs syndrome in middle-aged women-a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zou; Stehlik, Romana; Hedner, Jan; Ulfberg, Jan; Grote, Ludger

    2018-06-04

    Recent studies suggest an increased prevalence of chronic pain conditions and restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with chronic pulmonary disease (CPD). We analyzed the prevalence and risk factors for pain and RLS in a population-based sample of females with comorbid CPD. Questionnaire-based data from 2745 women aged 18-64 years were analyzed regarding comorbid CPD status (severe bronchitis, emphysema, asthma). Pain status was assessed according to symptoms reflecting severity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS rating 0-10) and duration and spreading (limited spread or widespread) of pain. A diagnosis of RLS was defined by four validated diagnostic criteria. Anthropometrics and co-morbidities were assessed as covariates in univariate and multivariate analyses. Widespread pain was overrepresented in women with CPD (44.6 vs. 24.6%, p < 0.001). The odds ratio for widespread pain in women with CPD was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-2.2, p < 0.001) in the fully adjusted model. Severe pain (VAS rating ≥ 7) was more prevalent in females with known CPD (28.8 vs. 15.4%, p < 0.001, odd ratio 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9, p = 0.029)). The prevalence of RLS was 37.4 and 23.8% in subjects with or without CPD, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, CPD was associated with a 30% risk increase for RLS (odds ratio 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.7, p = 0.04)). This population-based study identified CPD as an independent risk factor for severe and widespread pain as well as for RLS. Further research addressing pathophysiological mechanisms linking CPD and chronic pain conditions/RLS is warranted.

  2. Kinematic and Kinetic Analysis of the Single-Leg Triple Hop Test in Women With and Without Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Bley, André Serra; Rabelo, Nayra Deise dos Anjos; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2015-10-01

    Cross-sectional study. To compare the biomechanical strategies of the trunk and lower extremity during the transition period between the first and second hop of a single-leg triple hop test in women with and without patellofemoral pain (PFP). Recent literature has shown that PFP is associated with biomechanical impairments of the lower extremities. A number of studies have analyzed the position of the trunk and lower extremities for functional activities such as walking, squatting, jumping, and the step-down test. However, studies on more challenging activities, such as the single-leg triple hop test, may be more representative of sports requiring jumping movements. Women between 18 and 35 years of age (control group, n = 20; PFP group, n = 20) participated in the study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected during the transition period between the first and second hops while participants performed the single-leg triple hop test. Compared to the control group, women with PFP exhibited greater (P<.05) anterior and ipsilateral trunk lean, contralateral pelvic drop, hip internal rotation and adduction, and ankle eversion, while exhibiting less hip and knee flexion. A significant difference (P<.05) in time to peak joint angle was also found between groups for all the variables analyzed, except anterior pelvic tilt and hip flexion. In addition, women with PFP exhibited greater (P<.05) hip and knee abductor internal moments. Compared to the control group, women with PFP exhibited altered trunk, pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  3. Prospective Evaluation of Severe Skin Toxicity and Pain During Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: j.p.pignol@erasmusmc.nl; Vu, Thi Trinh Thuc; Mitera, Gunita

    Purpose: To prospectively capture acute toxicities and pain associated with postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), to analyze patient and treatment risk factors for severe side effects. Methods and Materials: Women referred for PMRT were prospectively enrolled and assessed weekly during and after radiation therapy. The endpoint included severe National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects grade 3 moist desquamation, other skin symptoms, and pain. Results: Of 257 patients, 73 (28.4%) experienced extensive moist desquamation, 84 (32.7%) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects skin toxicity grade 3, and 57 (22.2%) a pain impacting on daily life activities. Among symptoms only grademore » 3 moist desquamation was significantly associated with severe pain (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, smoking, high-energy photons, and skin bolus were significantly associated with severe moist desquamation. Skin toxicity doubled for smokers, with 40% severe pain, 48% grade 3 moist desquamation, and 64% grade 3 skin toxicity. Without skin bolus 4.2% had severe pain, none moist desquamation, and 2.1% grade 3 skin toxicity. When skin bolus was used on alternate days, the frequency increased to 15% for pain, 22% for moist desquamation, and 26% for grade 3 skin toxicity. When bolus was used daily, 32% had pain, 41% moist desquamation, and 47% grade 3 skin toxicity. Symptoms peaked 1 to 2 weeks after the end of PMRT. Conclusions: The present cohort study suggests excessive radiation toxicity after PMRT. Among factors associated with an increase of toxicity are smoking habits and the use of skin bolus.« less

  4. Referred leg pain originating from the sacroiliac joint: 6-month outcomes from the prospective randomized controlled iMIA trial.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Julius; Sturesson, Bengt; Kools, Djaya; Prestamburgo, Domenico; Cher, Daniel; van Eeckhoven, Eddie; Erk, Emanuel; Pflugmacher, Robert; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The first results from the randomized, controlled iFuse Implant System Minimally Invasive Arthrodesis (iMIA) trial showed that minimally invasive surgical management (MISM) of low back pain originating from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) by placing transarticular triangular titanium implants reduced pain more effectively than conservative management (CM). We now conducted a separate analysis of the iMIA data to assess whether the referred leg pain (RLP) component of SIJ-associated pain may also be affected by MISM or CM. Data from 101 patients, recruited between June 2013 and May 2015 at nine European spine care centers, were included. Forty-nine patients were randomized to CM and 51 patients to MISM. RLP was defined as pain below the gluteal fold and assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Changes in RLP over 6 months were the primary endpoint. The prevalence of clinically significant RLP was 76.2 %. Over 6 months of follow-up, CM produced no significant change in RLP, which was 51.0 VAS points (interquartile range (IQR) 17.0-75.0) at baseline. In contrast, in the MISM cohort, we found a significant decrease in RLP from VAS 58.0 (IQR 24.5-80.0) at baseline to VAS 13.5 (IQR 0.0-39.3) after 6 months (p < 0.01). Improvement of RLP was associated only with the type of treatment (OR 5.04, p < 0.01), but not with patient age, sex, or different patterns of pain referral. Our analysis shows that RLP is a frequent phenomenon in patients with SIJ-associated pain. At 6 months of follow-up, MISM helped relieve RLP more effectively than CM. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01741025.

  5. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pain biomarkers are warranted for individualized pain management. Based on different pain modulatory phenotypes, the objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups within patients with nonmalignant chronic pain and to investigate differences in clinical pain and pain hypersensitivity between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 patients with chronic pain to assess pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to 10 repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in cuff pressure pain threshold during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection and heat pain thresholds at clinical painful and nonpainful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM, 4 distinct groups were formed: group 1 (n = 85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP; group 2 (n = 148) had impaired CPM and normal TSP; group 3 (n = 45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP; and group 4 (n = 122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions than the other 3 groups (P < 0.001), indicating that impaired CPM and facilitated TSP play an important role in widespread pain. Groups 1 and 2 compared with group 4 had lower heat pain threshold at nonpainful areas and lower cuff pressure pain tolerance (P < 0.02), indicating that CPM plays a role for widespread hyperalgesia. Moreover, group 1 demonstrated higher clinical pain scores than group 4 (P < 0.05). Although not different between subgroups, patients were profiled on demographics, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. Future research should investigate interventions tailored towards these subgroups.

  6. The Role of Complex Treatment in Mixed Leg Ulcers - A Case Report of Vascular, Surgical and Physical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Stelzner, Christian; Hansel, Gesina; Schönlebe, Jacqueline; Tchernev, Georgi; Lotti, Torello

    2018-01-25

    Leg ulcers are a burden to patients, their families and society. The second most common cause of chronic leg ulcers is the mixed arterio-venous type. An 80-year-old female patient presented to our department due to painful enlarging chronic leg ulcer of mixed arteriovenous origin on her left lower leg. She suffered from peripheral arterial occlusive disease stage I and chronic venous insufficiency Widmer grade IIIa, and a number of comorbidities. The aim of our ulcer treatment was a complete and stable wound closure that was hampered by arterial occlusion, exposed tendon, and renal insiffuciency. To improve the prognosis for ulcer surgery, we performed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, transcutaneous CO 2 and deep ulcer shaving. The wound was closed by sandwich transplantation using elastin-collagen dermal template and meshed split skin graft. She had a 100% graft take with rapid reduction of severe wound pain. Complex approaches are necessary, to gain optimum results in leg ulcer therapy in mixed leg ulcers. Therapeutic nihilism should be abandonend.

  7. Intradermal capsaicin as a neuropathic pain model in patients with unilateral sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Aykanat, Verna; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond; Yap, Sharon; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    AIM This study compared the responses between patients with unilateral sciatica and pain-free volunteers following administration of intradermal capsaicin. METHODS Fourteen patients with unilateral sciatica and 12 pain-free volunteers received one injection per hour over 4 h of 1 µg and 10 µg capsaicin, into each calf. For each dose, spontaneous pain (10 cm VAS), area of flare (cm2) and the sum of allodynia and hyperalgesia radii across eight axes (cm) were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post injection. RESULTS Sciatica subjects experienced higher spontaneous pain and hyperalgesia responses in both legs compared with pain-free volunteers. The largest mean difference in spontaneous pain was 2.8 cm (95% CI 1.6, 3.9) at 5 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. The largest mean difference in hyperalgesia was 19.7 cm (95% CI 12.4, 27.0) at 60 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. Allodynia was greater in patients than in controls with the largest mean difference of 2.9 cm (95% CI 1, 4.8) at 5 min following 10 µg in the affected leg. Allodynia was also higher in the affected leg compared with the unaffected leg in sciatica patients with the highest mean difference of 3.0 cm (95% CI 1.2, 4.7) at 5 min following 10 µg. CONCLUSIONS The responses to intradermal capsaicin are quantitatively and qualitatively different in unilateral sciatica patients compared with pain-free controls. PMID:21740458

  8. Improvement of wound healing by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs including evaluation using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, James B.; Nielsen, Stig Pors; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue-penetration and with a low thermal burden to the surface of the skin. wIRA is able to improve essential and energetically meaningful factors of wound healing by thermal and non-thermal effects. Aim of the study: prospective study (primarily planned randomised, controlled, blinded, de facto with one exception only one cohort possible) using wIRA in the treatment of patients with recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs with thermographic follow-up. Methods: 10 patients (5 males, 5 females, median age 62 years) with 11 recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs were treated with water-filtered infrared-A and visible light irradiation (wIRA(+VIS), Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, water-filtered spectrum 550–1400 nm) or visible light irradiation (VIS; only possible in one patient). The uncovered wounds of the patients were irradiated two to five times per week for 30 minutes at a standard distance of 25 cm (approximately 140 mW/cm2 wIRA and approximately 45 mW/cm2 VIS). Treatment continued for a period of up to 2 months (typically until closure or nearly closure of the ulcer). The main variable of interest was “percent change of ulcer size over time” including complete wound closure. Additional variables of interest were thermographic image analysis, patient’s feeling of pain in the wound, amount of pain medication, assessment of the effect of the irradiation (by patient and by clinical investigator), assessment of feeling of the wound area (by patient), assessment of wound healing (by clinical investigator) and assessment of the cosmetic state (by patient and by clinical investigator). For these assessments visual analogue scales (VAS) were used. Results: The study showed a complete or nearly complete healing of lower leg ulcers in 7 patients and a clear reduction of ulcer size in another 2 of 10 patients, a

  9. Improvement of wound healing by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs including evaluation using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Mercer, James B; Nielsen, Stig Pors; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-10-21

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue-penetration and with a low thermal burden to the surface of the skin. wIRA is able to improve essential and energetically meaningful factors of wound healing by thermal and non-thermal effects. prospective study (primarily planned randomised, controlled, blinded, de facto with one exception only one cohort possible) using wIRA in the treatment of patients with recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs with thermographic follow-up. 10 patients (5 males, 5 females, median age 62 years) with 11 recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs were treated with water-filtered infrared-A and visible light irradiation (wIRA(+VIS), Hydrosun radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, water-filtered spectrum 550-1400 nm) or visible light irradiation (VIS; only possible in one patient). The uncovered wounds of the patients were irradiated two to five times per week for 30 minutes at a standard distance of 25 cm (approximately 140 mW/cm(2) wIRA and approximately 45 mW/cm(2) VIS). Treatment continued for a period of up to 2 months (typically until closure or nearly closure of the ulcer). The main variable of interest was "percent change of ulcer size over time" including complete wound closure. Additional variables of interest were thermographic image analysis, patient's feeling of pain in the wound, amount of pain medication, assessment of the effect of the irradiation (by patient and by clinical investigator), assessment of feeling of the wound area (by patient), assessment of wound healing (by clinical investigator) and assessment of the cosmetic state (by patient and by clinical investigator). For these assessments visual analogue scales (VAS) were used. The study showed a complete or nearly complete healing of lower leg ulcers in 7 patients and a clear reduction of ulcer size in another 2 of 10 patients, a clear reduction of pain and pain medication

  10. Brain Areas Involved in Anticipation of Clinically Relevant Pain in Low Back Pain Populations With High Levels of Pain Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Donna M; Helbig, Torben; Findlay, Gordon; Roberts, Neil; Nurmikko, Turo

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify neural correlates of pain anticipation in people with nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) that correlated with pain-related distress and disability, thus providing evidence for mechanisms underlying pain behavior in this population. Thirty NSLBP sufferers, with either high levels of pain behavior or low levels on the basis of Waddell signs, were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while a straight-leg raise (of the side deemed to cause moderate pain in the lower back) was performed. On each trial colored stimuli were presented and used to indicate when the leg definitely would be raised (green; 100% certainty), might be raised (yellow; 50% certainty), or would definitely not be raised (red; 100% certainty). In response to expected versus unexpected pain the group difference in activation between patients with high levels of pain behavior and low levels of pain behavior covaried as a function of anxiety scores in the right insula and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and as a function of catastrophizing in prefrontal and parietal cortex and hippocampus. The results suggest NSLBP populations with the highest levels of pain-related distress are more likely to attend to and infer threat from innocuous cues, which may contribute to the maintenance of pain behavior associated with some chronic pain states. This article shows a likely neural network for exacerbating pain anticipation in NSLBP contributing to high levels of pain behavior in some people. This information could potentially help clinicians and patients to understand how anticipation of pain may contribute to patient pain and disability. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  12. Pain as social glue: shared pain increases cooperation.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Brock; Jetten, Jolanda; Ferris, Laura J

    2014-11-01

    Even though painful experiences are employed within social rituals across the world, little is known about the social effects of pain. We examined the possibility that painful experiences can promote cooperation within social groups. In Experiments 1 and 2, we induced pain by asking some participants to insert their hands in ice water and to perform leg squats. In Experiment 3, we induced pain by asking some participants to eat a hot chili pepper. Participants performed these tasks in small groups. We found evidence for a causal link: Sharing painful experiences with other people, compared with a no-pain control treatment, promoted trusting interpersonal relationships by increasing perceived bonding among strangers (Experiment 1) and increased cooperation in an economic game (Experiments 2 and 3). Our findings shed light on the social effects of pain, demonstrating that shared pain may be an important trigger for group formation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Kinematic and electromyographic analysis in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome during single leg triple hop test.

    PubMed

    Kalytczak, Marcelo Martins; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Bley, André Serra; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Politti, Fabiano

    2016-09-01

    Possible delays in pre-activation or deficiencies in the activity of the dynamic muscle stabilizers of the knee and hip joints are the most common causes of the patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The aim of the study was to compare kinematic variables and electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles between patients with PFPS and health subjects during the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT). This study included 14 female with PFPS (PFPS group) and 14 female healthy with no history of knee pain (Healthy group). Kinematic and EMG data ware collected through participants performed a single session of the SLTHT. The PFPS group exhibited a significant increase (p<0.05) in the EMG activity of the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles, when compared with the healthy group in pre-activity and during the stance phase. This same result was also found for the vastus lateralis muscle (p<0.05) when analyzing the EMG activity during the eccentric phase of the stance phase. In kinematic analysis, no significant differences were found between the groups. These results indicate that biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles mainly during the pre-activation phase and stance phases of the SLTHT are more active in PFPS group among healthy group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined electric and pressure cuff pain stimuli for assessing conditioning pain modulation (CPM).

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, M; Petersen, K K; Mørch, C D; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2017-12-29

    Aims Traditionally, conditioning pain modulation (CPM) can be assessed by applying a test stimulus (TS) before and after application of a conditioning stimulus (CS), which is normally applied extra-segmental. Currently, no studies have attempted to apply the TS and CS to the same site using different stimuli modalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate electrical TS and cuff pressure CS applied to the same experimental site for studying CPM. Methods 20 male volunteers participated in this study, which consisted of stimulations applied by a cuff-algometer (NociTech and Aalborg University, Denmark) and current stimulator (Digitimer DS5, UK), through two Ag/AgCl electrodes (Ambu® Neuroline 700, Denmark). The cuff was wrapped around the lower leg and stimulation electrodes were placed under the cuff and to the same location on the contralateral leg. Electrical TS were applied to the non-dominant leg with or without cuff pressure CS on the dominant (CS1) or the same (non-dominant) leg (CS2, electrode under cuff). The subjects were instructed to rate the electrical evoked pain intensity on a 10-cm continuous visual analog scale (VAS, "0" represented "no pain", and "10" represented "maximal pain"). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as "1" on the VAS scale. Results There was no significant deference in PDT for neither CS1 nor CS2. A median split subanalysis on CPM-responders versus CPM-nonresponders to the TS + CS1 combination. Using this grouping, there was significant increase in PDT when comparing TS to TS + CS1 or TS + CS2 (4.0 mA vs 5.6 mA; P < 0.05, 4.0 mA vs 5.1 mA; P < 0.05). Conclusions The study indicates that CPM can be evoked in a subgroup of subjects by applying the electrical test stimulus and cuff pressure conditioning stimuli to the same experimental site.

  15. An unusual case of calcineurine inhibitor pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nickavar, Azar; Mehrazma, Mitra; Hallaji, Farideh

    2014-09-01

    Cyclosporine induced pain syndrome (CIPS) is a newly diagnosed complication of calcineurine inhibitors, mainly observed in solid organ and hematopoetic transplantations. The present case is a male child with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome on low therapeutic level cyclosporine treatment. He presented with intractable and debilitating leg pain, with no reported history of previous injury or trauma. The pain was reluctant to antimicrobial and sedative treatment. MRI revealed bone marrow and soft tissue edema in the mid shaft of patient's right leg. Inspite of unusual manifestations, CIPS was suggested and cyclosporine discontinued. However, the pain did not improve and was resistant to calcium blocker. Subsequently, core decompression was performed as an unusual treatment of CIPS, revealing normal bone morphology. The pain improved rapidly and the patient was discharged a few days later.

  16. Making Better Lives: Patient-Focused Care for Low Back Pain (LBP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-26

    Chronic Low Back Pain; Hip Ostearthritis; Myofascial Pain Syndrome; Fibromyalgia; Depression; Maladaptive Coping; Lumbar Spinal Stenosis; Insomnia; Sacroiliac Joint Pain; Lateral Hip and Thigh Pain; Anxiety; Dementia; Recent Leg Length Discrepancy

  17. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T; Christensen, Henrik W; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. To describe pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with clinical and radiographic confirmed hip OA. Primary care patients with unilateral clinical and radiographic hip OA living on the island of Funen, Denmark were recruited from primary care to participate in a randomized clinical trial. At baseline, patients recorded pain intensity using an 11-box numeric rating scale and the distribution of hip pain using a manikin displaying three separate views: front, back and lateral. Pain drawings were analysed using a template to determine the most frequent pain locations and distribution of pain. Pain drawings were completed by 109 patients of which 108 (99%) were valid. The mean age of patients was 65 (SD 9) years and 44% were females. The mean pain intensity was 5.4 (SD 2.0). A total of 77% had marked the greater trochanter area, 53% the groin area, 42% the anterior/lateral thigh area, 38% the buttock area, 17% the knee and 15% the lower leg area. No patients marked pain exclusively in the areas of the knee, posterior thigh or lower leg. The most common pain locations of patients with hip OA presenting to primary care are the greater trochanter, groin, thigh and buttock areas. No patients recorded pain exclusively in the knee or lower leg. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine in elite horseback riders: correlations with back pain, body mass index, trunk/leg-length coefficient, and riding discipline.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Clayton N; Pennekamp, Peter H; Becker, Ute; Young, Mei; Diedrich, Oliver; Lüring, Christian; von Falkenhausen, Makus

    2009-11-01

    Most orthopaedic problems experienced by competitive horseback riders are related to pain in the lower back, hip joint, and hamstring muscles. Riders-especially, show jumpers-are frequently hampered in their performance because of lumbar pain. To date, there has been no research into lumbar disk degeneration in elite competitive riders. Competitive horseback riding accelerates lumbar disk degeneration. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty-eight elite riders (18 men, 40 women; mean age, 32.4 years) and a control group of 30 nonriding volunteers (17 men, 13 women; mean age, 28.7 years) were evaluated for lumbar disk degeneration, cross-sectional area of paraspinal muscles, spondylolysis, and spondylolisthesis, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of disk degeneration between the 2 groups was compared, and the relationship was investigated between low back pain (LBP), riding discipline, body mass index (BMI), trunk/leg-length coefficient, and MRI results. Eighty-eight percent of elite riders (n = 51) had a history of LBP, versus 33% of the controls (P < .05). There was no statistical difference for the prevalence of LBP among the different riding disciplines. However, there was a high rate of pathologic T2 signal intensity of the lumbar intervertebral disk among riders-specifically, dressage riders-yet no significant increase when compared with controls. History of LBP symptoms, riding discipline, BMI, and trunk/leg-length ratio had no significant effect on the development of lumbar disk degeneration. Occult fractures of the pars interarticularis and manifest spondylolysis were not seen for any rider. Two controls had spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade 1 not associated with back pain. Although riders have a high prevalence of LBP, there is no conclusive MRI evidence to suggest that the cause lies in undue disk degeneration, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, or pathologic changes of the paraspinal muscles of the lumbar spine.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis associated low-back and leg pain over two years.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Adogwa, Owoicho; Bydon, Ali; Cheng, Joseph; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for lumbar spondylolisthesis allows for surgical treatment of back and leg pain while theoretically minimizing tissue injury and accelerating overall recovery. Although the authors of previous studies have demonstrated shorter length of hospital stay and reduced blood loss with MIS versus open-TLIF, short- and long-term outcomes have been similar. No studies to date have evaluated the comprehensive health care costs associated with TLIF procedures or assessed the cost-utility of MIS- versus open-TLIF. As such, we set out to assess previously unstudied end points of health care cost and cost-utility associated with MIS- versus open-TLIF. Thirty patients undergoing MIS-TLIF (n=15) or open-TLIF (n=15) for grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis associated back and leg pain were prospectively studied. Total back-related medical resource use, missed work, and health-state values (quality-adjusted life years [QALYs], calculated from EQ-5D with U.S. valuation) were assessed after two-year follow-up. Two-year resource use was multiplied by unit costs on the basis of Medicare national allowable payment amounts (direct cost) and work-day losses were multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate (indirect cost). Difference in mean total cost per QALY gained for MIS- versus open-TLIF was assessed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: COSTmis-COSTopen/QALYmis-QALYopen). MIS versus open-TLIF cohorts were similar at baseline. By two years postoperatively, patients undergoing MIS- versus open-TLIF reported similar mean QALYs gained (0.50 vs. 0.41, P=0.17). Mean total two-year cost of MIS- and open-TLIF was $35,996 and $44,727, respectively. The $8,731 two-year cost savings of MIS- versus open-TLIF did not reach statistical significance (P=0.18) for this sample size. Although our limited sample size prevented statistical significance, MIS- versus open-TLIF was associated with reduced costs over

  20. Quality of nursing care from the perspective of patients with leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Törnvall, E; Wilhelmsson, S

    2010-09-01

    To investigate and analyse the quality of nursing care in a primary care setting from the perspective of patients with leg ulcers and determine the subjective importance that patients attach to various aspects of quality of care. All of the patients with leg ulcers at 15 primary care centres in the south east of Sweden were invited to participate. They were given the short version of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire (QPP) to fill in. This included a number of closed and open questions relating to their perceptions of the quality of their nursing care and the importance of this care to them. Overall, the patients in this study perceived that the quality of nursing care was high. However, important areas for improvement were revealed, including the need for an increase in patient-focused care, continuity of care and better pain relief. To address the weak points highlighted by the study, we recommend that nurses explore patient perceptions of pain in greater detail and invite patients take a more active role in the management of their leg ulcers.

  1. Distal Lower-Extremity Pain and Work Postures in the Quebec Population

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Stock, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Standing at work has been associated with discomfort and cardiovascular symptoms. Because standing postures vary in duration, mobility, and constraint, we explored associations between specific postures and pain in the lower extremities. Methods. We used multiple logistic regression to analyze associations between work factors and pain in the lower extremities during the previous 12 months that interfered with usual activities. We used data from among 7757 workers who were interviewed in the 1998 Quebec Health and Social Survey. Results. Among all respondents, 9.4% reported significant ankle or foot pain, and 6.4% had lower-leg or calf pain. Significantly more women than men had pain at both sites. Both leg or calf and ankle or foot pain were strongly associated with standing postures, whole-body vibration, psychological distress, female gender, and being aged 50 years or older. Constrained standing postures were associated with increased ankle or foot pain for both men and women and with leg or calf pain for women, compared with standing with freedom to sit at will. Conclusions. Freedom to sit at work may prevent lower-extremity pain. The effects of specific sitting and standing postures on cartilage, muscle, and the cardiovascular system may help explain discomfort in the lower extremities. PMID:17761561

  2. Evaluating the influence of massage on leg strength, swelling, and pain following a half-marathon.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Lance G; Dawson, Kimberley A; Tiidus, Peter M

    2004-11-01

    Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female) completed a half marathon (21.1 km) road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control) leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline) and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), and soreness and leg circumference significantly elevated (p < 0.05) relative to pre-race values with no difference between legs. This suggested that exercise-induced muscle disruption did occur. Comparing the rate of return to baseline measures between the massaged and control legs, revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12

  3. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population.

    PubMed

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O'Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-03-27

    Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20-45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an "upright standing" reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may provide important insights into injury

  4. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, J. Hampton; Slater, Mark A.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Patel, Shetal M.; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S.; Wallace, Mark S.; Funk, Stephen D.; Rutledge, Thomas R.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Matthews, Scott C.; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, two-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) to inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized chronic back pain patients (daily pain for ≥ 6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (p < .0001) with subjects on gabapentin or placebo reporting reductions of about 30% from baseline, but did not differ significantly between groups (p = .423). The same results pertained for disability scores. In responder analyses of those who completed 12 weeks (N=72), the proportion reporting at least 30% or 50% reduction in pain intensity, or at least “Minimal Improvement” on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and non-radiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component. PMID:26963844

  5. Common Leg Injuries of Long-Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Robert A.; Plakke, Michael; Silvis, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Context Long-distance running (greater than 3000 m) is often recommended to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Running injury rates increase significantly when weekly mileage extends beyond 40 miles cumulatively. With the development of running analysis and other diagnostic tests, injuries to the leg secondary to bone, musculotendinous, and vascular causes can be diagnosed and successfully managed. Evidence Acquisition Searches used the terms running, injuries, lower extremity, leg, medial tibial stress syndrome, compartment syndrome, stress fractures, popliteal artery entrapment, gastrocnemius soleus tears, and Achilles tendinopathy. Sources included Medline, Google Scholar, and Ovid from 1970 through January 2012. Results Tibial stress fractures and medial tibial stress syndrome can sometimes be prevented and/or treated by correcting biomechanical abnormalities. Exertional compartment syndrome and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are caused by anatomic abnormalities and are difficult to treat without surgical correction. Conclusion Leg pain due to bone, musculotendinous, and vascular causes is common among long-distance runners. Knowledge of the underlying biomechanical and/or anatomic abnormality is necessary to successfully treat these conditions. PMID:24179587

  6. Fear of movement, passive coping, manual handling, and severe or radiating pain increase the likelihood of sick leave due to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Anna P; Schluter, Philip J; Hodges, Paul W; Stewart, Simon; Turner, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Sick leave due to low back pain (LBP-SL) is costly and compromises workforce productivity. The fear-avoidance model asserts that maladaptive pain-related cognitions lead to avoidance and disuse, which can perpetuate ongoing pain. Staying home from work is an avoidant behavior, and hence pain-related psychological features may help explain LBP-SL. We examined the relative contribution of pain catastrophizing, fear of movement, and pain coping (active and passive) in LBP-SL in addition to pain characteristics and other psychosocial, occupational, general health, and demographic factors. Two-way interactions between age and gender and candidate exposures were also considered. Our sample comprised 2164 working nurses and midwives with low back pain in the preceding year. Binary logistic regression was performed on cross-sectional data by manual backward stepwise elimination of nonsignificant terms to generate a parsimonious multivariable model. From an extensive array of exposures assessed, fear of movement (women, odds ratio [OR]=1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.08; men, OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.29), passive coping (OR=1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11), pain severity (OR=1.61, 95% CI 1.50-1.72), pain radiation (women, OR=1.45, 95% CI 1.10-1.92; men, OR=4.13, 95% CI 2.15-7.95), and manual handling frequency (OR=1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05) increased the likelihood of LBP-SL in the preceding 12 months. Administrators and managers were less likely to report LBP-SL (OR=0.44, 95% CI 0.27-0.71), and age had a protective effect in individuals in a married or de facto relationship (OR=0.97, 95% CI 0.95-0.98). In summary, fear of movement, passive coping, frequent manual handling, and severe or radiating pain increase the likelihood of LBP-SL. Gender-specific responses to pain radiation and fear of movement are evident. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidural steroid injections are useful for the treatment of low back pain and radicular symptoms: pro.

    PubMed

    Sethee, Jai; Rathmell, James P

    2009-02-01

    Epidural steroid injection has been used to treat low back pain for many decades. Numerous randomized trials have examined the efficacy of this approach. This review details the findings of older systematic reviews, newer randomized controlled trials, and two recent systematic reviews that examine the effectiveness of this treatment. Collectively, studies in acute radicular pain due to herniated nucleus pulposus have failed to show that epidural steroid injection reduces long-term pain or obviates the need for surgery. Similarly, there is scant evidence that epidural steroids have any beneficial effect in those with acute low back pain without leg pain or in those with chronic low back or leg pain. However, most studies have demonstrated more rapid resolution of leg pain in those who received epidural steroid injections versus those who did not. The role of epidural steroid injections in the management of acute radicular pain due to herniated nucleus pulposus is simply to provide earlier pain relief.

  8. Spider leg autotomy induced by prey venom injection: An adaptive response to “pain”?*

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Thomas; Camazine, Scott

    1983-01-01

    Field observations showed orb-weaving spiders (Argiope spp.) to undergo leg autotomy if they are stung in a leg by venomous insect prey (Phymata fasciata). The response occurs within seconds, before the venom can take lethal action by spread to the body of the spiders. Autotomy is induced also by honeybee venom and wasp venom, as well as by several venom components (serotonin, histamine, phospholipase A2, melittin) known to be responsible for the pain characteristically elicited by venom injection in humans. The sensing mechanism by which spiders detect injected harmful chemicals such as venoms therefore may be fundamentally similar to the one in humans that is coupled with the perception of pain. Images PMID:16593325

  9. Shin-splints: common exercise-related syndromes affecting the lower leg.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B L; Arthur, C H C

    2014-01-01

    Lower leg pain is a common complaint of athletically active individuals, often limiting physical activities. As such, the group of lower leg conditions related to athletic pursuits and physical exercise confer considerable operational implications for the military. Whilst acute injuries to the lower limb are commonly encountered and are clearly of significance, this article focuses instead on chronic conditions related to physical activity. These include insults to bone such as stress fractures and medial tibial stress syndrome, and those related to the soft tissues such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome. In this article we will examine the presentation and management of these conditions.

  10. Development Of A Multivariate Prognostic Model For Pain And Activity Limitation In People With Low Back Disorders Receiving Physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jon J; Richards BPhysio, Matt C; Surkitt BPhysio, Luke D; Chan BPhysio, Alexander Yp; Slater, Sarah L; Taylor, Nicholas F; Hahne, Andrew J

    2018-05-28

    To identify predictors for back pain, leg pain and activity limitation in patients with early persistent low back disorders. Prospective inception cohort study; Setting: primary care private physiotherapy clinics in Melbourne, Australia. 300 adults aged 18-65 years with low back and/or referred leg pain of ≥6-weeks and ≤6-months duration. Not applicable. Numerical rating scales for back pain and leg pain as well as the Oswestry Disability Scale. Prognostic factors included sociodemographics, treatment related factors, subjective/physical examination, subgrouping factors and standardized questionnaires. Univariate analysis followed by generalized estimating equations were used to develop a multivariate prognostic model for back pain, leg pain and activity limitation. Fifty-eight prognostic factors progressed to the multivariate stage where 15 showed significant (p<0.05) associations with at least one of the three outcomes. There were five indicators of positive outcome (two types of low back disorder subgroups, paresthesia below waist, walking as an easing factor and low transversus abdominis tone) and 10 indicators of negative outcome (both parents born overseas, deep leg symptoms, longer sick leave duration, high multifidus tone, clinically determined inflammation, higher back and leg pain severity, lower lifting capacity, lower work capacity and higher pain drawing percentage coverage). The preliminary model identifying predictors of low back disorders explained up to 37% of the variance in outcome. This study evaluated a comprehensive range of prognostic factors reflective of both the biomedical and psychosocial domains of low back disorders. The preliminary multivariate model requires further validation before being considered for clinical use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Experimental muscle pain challenges the postural stability during quiet stance and unexpected posture perturbation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Rogério Pessoto; Ervilha, Ulysses Fernandes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Musculoskeletal pain impairs postural control and stability. Nine subjects stood as quietly as possible on a moveable force platform before, during, and after experimental pain in the right leg muscles. A moveable force platform was used to measure the center of pressure and provided unexpected perturbations. Lower limb muscle activity, joint angles, and foot pressure distributions were measured. Hypertonic saline was used to induce pain in the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, or biceps femoris muscle of the right leg. Compared to baseline and control sessions, pain in the knee extensor muscles during quiet standing evoked: 1) larger sway area, greater medial-lateral center of pressure displacement and higher speed (P < .05); 2) increased sway displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (P < .05); and 3) increased electromyography (EMG) activity for left tibialis anterior and left erector spinae muscles (P < .05). Pain provoked longer time to return to an equilibrium posture after forward EMG activity for, and pain in vastus medialis muscle decreased the time for the maximum hip flexion during this perturbation (P < .05). These results show that muscle pain impairs postural stability during quiet standing and after unexpected perturbation, which suggest that people suffering from leg muscle pain are more vulnerable to falls. This article presents the acute responses to leg muscle pain on the postural control. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how pain responses may contribute to patient's postural control and stability during quiet standing and after recovering from unexpected perturbations. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hamstring Elongation Quantified Using Ultrasonography During the Straight Leg Raise Test in Individuals With Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Ellinoudis, Athanasios; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Although the straight leg raise (SLR) test frequently is used to assess hamstring extensibility in individuals with low back pain (LBP), evidence relating LBP, SLR, and hamstring extensibility remains unclear. The SLR measures the angle between the lifted leg and the horizontal, however, and, as such, it is not a direct measure of the elongation capacity of the hamstrings. To examine the differences in hamstring elongation (quantified via ultrasonography) and SLR score between individuals with LBP and asymptomatic controls and to determine the relationship between hamstring elongation, SLR, and functional disability scores. Cross-sectional study. University laboratory. Forty men and women with chronic LBP (mean ± SD, age 43.51 ± 3.71 years and 40 control subjects (age 45.11 ± 4.01 years) participated in this study. Passive SLR, elongation assessed via ultrasonography, and functional disability. SLR score, elongation of tendinous tissue within the semitendinosus muscle, and Oswestry Disability Index. Two-way analysis of variance tests indicated a significantly lower SLR score and a greater Oswestry score in LBP group compared with control subjects (P < .05). In contrast, there were no significant group differences in hamstring elongation (P > .05). Gender did not have an effect on all dependent measures (P > .05). Hamstring elongation showed a low correlation with SLR score and a minimal correlation with Oswestry score. These results indicate that the SLR score is not determined by hamstring elongation (quantified via ultrasonography). Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The psychosocial impact of leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell disease: I don't want them to know my little secret.

    PubMed

    Umeh, Nkeiruka I; Ajegba, Brittany; Buscetta, Ashley J; Abdallah, Khadijah E; Minniti, Caterina P; Bonham, Vence L

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) impacts millions of individuals worldwide and more than 100,000 people in the United States. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of SCD. The health status of individuals living with chronic leg ulcers is not only influenced by clinical manifestations such as pain duration and intensity, but also by psychosocial factors. Garnering insights into the psychosocial impact can provide a more holistic view of their influence on quality of life. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants living with active SCD-associated leg ulcers or with a history of ulcers. Subjects were recruited from an ongoing study (INSIGHTS, Clin Trial.Gov NCT02156102) and consented to this qualitative phase of the study. Five areas were explored: leg ulcer pain, physical function, social-isolation, social relationships and religious support. Data was collected from 20 individuals during these interviews and a thematic analysis was performed and reported. Twenty participants with a mean age of 42.4 (SD ± 11.1years) were included in the study. Major themes identified included:1) pain (acute and chronic); 2) compromised physical function as demonstrated by decreased ability to walk, run, and play sports; 3) social isolation from activities either by others or self-induced as a means of avoiding certain emotions, such as embarrassment; 4) social relationships (family support and social network); 5) support and comfort through their religion or spirituality. SCD patients with leg ulcers expressed that they experience social isolation, intense and frequent ulcer pain, and difficulty in physical function. SCD-associated leg ulcers have been studied from a clinical approach, but the psychosocial factors investigated in this study informs how quality of life is impacted by the leg ulcers.

  14. [Study on the area of pain and numbness in cases with lumbosacral radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Keita; Hanakita, Junya; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Manabu; Watanabe, Mizuki; Uesaka, Toshio; Honda, Fumiaki

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral radicular symptoms, dermatome maps are commonly used, by which the segmental location of the affected nerve can be determined. However, the diagnosis is often difficult because the pattern of sensory disturbance does not necessarily match the patterns of classical dermatomes, and there are many dermatome maps made by different methods. The author examined the area of pain and numbness in cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Clinical features of pain and numbness in consecutive seventy three cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy were investigated (L3: n=13, L4-S1: n=20). Patients of L3 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the upper buttock and ventral surface of the thighs, knees and upper ventral surface of the legs. Patients of L4 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the ventro-lateral surfaces of the thigh and leg. The distinctive region, defined as the region having 100% superimposition, of L4 radiculopathy was the lateral part of the shin. Patients of L5 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the lateral surfaces of the thigh and leg. The distinctive region was the upper buttock. Patients of S1 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the lower buttock, dorso-lateral part of the leg and lateral part of the foot. The distinctive region was the lateral part of the calf. It was found that the regions of pain and numbness formed a continuous band-like zone from thigh to leg in 8% of L3, 45% of L4 and L5, and 35% of S1 radiculopathy. Using a visual analogue scale, the degree of leg pain was more severe than low back pain in 68% of the patients, but in 5% of patients, low back pain was more severe.

  15. Back pain: a real target for spinal cord stimulation?

    PubMed

    Rigoard, Philippe; Delmotte, Alexandre; D'Houtaud, Samuel; Misbert, Lorraine; Diallo, Bakari; Roy-Moreau, Aline; Durand, Sylvain; Royoux, Solène; Giot, Jean-Philippe; Bataille, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome represents one of the most frequent etiologies of chronic back pain and is a major public health issue. Neurostimulation has currently not been validated in the treatment of back pain because of technological limitations in implantable spinal cord stimulation (SCS) systems. New-generation leads using several columns of stimulation can generate longitudinal and/or transverse stimulation fields into the spinal cord. To investigate, through extensive stimulation testing, the capacity of multicolumn tripolar leads to achieve back territory paresthesia coverage in refractory failed back surgery syndrome patients. Eleven patients implanted with a 16-contact spinal cord stimulation lead (Specify 5-6-5, Medtronic Inc) were assessed with a systematic exploration of 43 selected stimulation configurations to generate bilateral back paresthesia in addition to leg territory coverage. The tripolar lead successfully generated paresthesia in both bilateral back and leg territories in 9 patients (81.8%). Success rates of multicolumn stimulation patterns were significantly higher than for longitudinal configurations for lombodorsal paresthesia coverage. Six months after implantation, significant pain relief was obtained compared with preoperative evaluation for global pain (Visual Analog Scale, 2.25 vs 8.2 preoperatively; P < .05), leg pain (Visual Analog Scale, 0.5 vs 7.6 preoperatively; P < .05), and back pain (Visual Analog Scale, 1.5 vs 7.8 preoperatively; P < .05). These results suggest that multicolumn leads can reliably generate back pain coverage and favor pain relief outcomes. This may lead physicians to reconsider new indications for spinal cord stimulation. Expanding neurostimulation perspectives to intractable back pain syndromes could become realistic in the near future.

  16. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model.

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris; Krasner, Diane L; Osterbrink, Jürgen; Sibbald, R Gary

    2007-04-01

    Chronic wound pain is not well understood and the literature is limited. Six of 10 patients venous leg ulcer experience pain with their ulcer, and similar trends are observed for other chronic wounds. Chronic wound pain can lead to depression and the feeling of constant tiredness. Pain related to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase.

  17. Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Dag; Börsbo, Björn; Sjörs, Anna; Lind, Eva-Britt; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Gerdle, Björn

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pressure pain sensitivity on leg and arm in 98 healthy persons (50 women) using cuff algometry. Furthermore, associations with sex and physical activity level were investigated. Normal physical activity level was defined as Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) score ≤ 45 and high activity level as GLTEQ > 45. A pneumatic double-chamber cuff was placed around the arm or leg where a single chamber was inflated. The cuff inflation rate (1 kPa/s) was constant, and pain intensity was registered continuously on a 10 cm electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as when the pressure was perceived as painful, and pain tolerance (PTT) was when the subject terminated the cuff inflation. For PTT, the corresponding VAS score was recorded (VAS-PTT). The protocol was repeated with two chambers inflated. Only single cuff results are given. For women compared with men, the PDT was lower when assessed in the arm ( P = 0.002), PTTs were lower in the arm and leg ( P < 0.001), and the VAS-PTT was higher in the arm and leg ( P < 0.033). Highly active participants compared with less active had higher PDT ( P = 0.027) in the leg. Women showed facilitated spatial summation ( P < 0.014) in the arm and leg and a steeper VAS slope (i.e., the slope of the VAS pressure curve between PDT and PPT) in the arm and leg ( P < 0.003). This study indicates that reduced pressure pain sensitivity is associated both with male sex and physical activity level. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. [Physical treatment modalities for chronic leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J

    2010-05-01

    An increasing numbers of physical treatment options are available for chronic leg ulcer. In this review article, compression therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, negative pressure therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrostimulation therapy, electromagnetic therapy, photodynamic therapy, water-filtered infrared-A-radiation and hydrotherapy are discussed in terms of their practical applications and the underlying evidence. With the exception of compression therapy for most of these treatments, good scientific data are not available. However this is a widespread problem in the treatment of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, several of the described methods such as negative pressure therapy represent one of the gold standards in practical treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. Although the use of physical treatment modalities may improve healing in patients with chronic leg ulcers, the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying causes are essential for long-lasting success.

  19. Delayed onset of transversus abdominus in long-standing groin pain.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Sallie M; Schache, Anthony G; Brukner, Peter; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W; Coburn, Paul; Crossley, Kay M

    2004-12-01

    Long-standing groin pain is a persistent problem that is commonly difficult to rehabilitate. Theoretical rationale indicates a relationship between the motor control of the pelvis and long-standing groin pain; however, this link has not been investigated. The current experiment aimed to evaluate motor control of the abdominal muscles in a group of Australian football players with and without long-standing groin pain. Ten participants with long-standing groin pain and 12 asymptomatic controls were recruited for the study. Participants were elite or subelite Australian football players. Fine-wire and surface electromyography electrodes were used to record the activity of the selected abdominal and leg muscles during a visual choice reaction-time task (active straight leg raising). When the asymptomatic controls completed the active straight leg raise (ASLR) task, the transversus abdominus contracted in a feed-forward manner. However, when individuals with long-standing groin pain completed the ASLR task, the onset of transversus abdominus was delayed (P < 0.05) compared with the control group. There were no differences between groups for the onset of activity of internal oblique, external oblique, and rectus abdominus (all P > 0.05). The finding that the onset of transversus abdominus is delayed in individuals with long-standing groin pain is important, as it demonstrates an association between long-standing groin pain and transversus abdominus activation.

  20. The effect of Vitamin D and calcium plus Vitamin D on leg cramps in pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Ameneh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad Alizadeh; Najafi, Moslem

    2017-01-01

    This study intended to determine the effects of Vitamin D and calcium-Vitamin D in treating leg cramps in pregnant women. This study was conducted as a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial on 126 participants, 18-35-year-old pregnant women with a minimum of two leg cramps per week who were referred to health-care centers in Tabriz-Iran in 2013. The participants were allocated to three 42 member groups using a randomized block design. For 42 days, the intervention groups took a 1000 unit Vitamin D pill or 300 mg calcium carbonate plus a 1000 unit Vitamin D pill, and the control group received a placebo pill every day. The participants were evaluated with regard to the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps during the week before and during the 3 rd and 6 th week of the intervention. The ANCOVA and repeated measurement test were used to analyze the data. Results showed that controlling for the effects before the intervention, calcium-Vitamin D, and Vitamin D supplements had no effect on the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps. The results of this study showed that the calcium-Vitamin D and the Vitamin D supplements have no effect on the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps during the 6 weeks of the study.

  1. User-independent assessment of conditioning pain modulation by cuff pressure algometry.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Izumi, M; Petersen, K K; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2017-03-01

    The use of conditioning pain modulation (CPM) is hampered by poor reproducibility and lack of user-independent paradigms. This study refined the CPM paradigm by applying user-independent cuff algometry. In 20 subjects, the CPM effect of conditioning with cuff stimulation on the arm was investigated by pain test stimuli on the contralateral leg before and in parallel with different cuff conditionings (10, 30, 60 kPa/60 s; 30, 60 kPa/10 s). As test stimulus, another cuff was inflated (1 kPa/s) until the subjects detected the pain tolerance threshold (PTT) during which the pain detection threshold (PDT) and the pressure at a pain intensity of 6 cm on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (PVAS6) were extracted. For comparison, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) as test stimuli were recorded by the user-dependent handheld pressure algometry. Combinations of cuff locations for conditioning (pain intensity standardized) and contralateral test stimuli were additionally evaluated (leg-arm, leg-leg, arm-thigh). The test-retest reliability in two sessions 1 month apart was assessed in five CPM protocols. In all protocols, the PDT, PVAS6 and PTT increased during conditioning compared with baseline (p < 0.05). The CPM effect (i.e. conditioning minus baseline) for PVAS6, PTT and PPT increased for increasing conditioning intensities (p < 0.05). The CPM effects were not significantly different for changes in conditioning durations or conditioning/test stimulus locations. In two sessions, the CPM effects for PVAS6 and PTT assessed after 60 s of conditioning on the leg/thigh showed the highest intra-class correlations (0.47-0.73), where they were 0.04-0.6 for PPTs. The user-independent cuff algometry is reliable for CPM assessment and for supra-pain threshold test stimuli better than the user-dependent technology. A user-independent CPM technique where the conditioning is controlled by one cuff stimulation, and the test-stimulus is provided by another cuff stimulation. This study

  2. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe theirmore » pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal

  3. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  4. Propulsion Phase of the Single Leg Triple Hop Test in Women with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Reis, Amir Curcio Dos; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress. PMID:24830289

  5. People with chronic low back pain have poorer balance than controls in challenging tasks.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rubens A; Vieira, Edgar R; Fernandes, Karen B P; Andraus, Rodrigo A; Oliveira, Marcio R; Sturion, Leandro A; Calderon, Mariane G

    2018-06-01

    To compare the balance of individuals with and without chronic low back pain during five tasks. The participants were 20 volunteers, 10 with and 10 without nonspecific chronic low back pain, mean age 34 years, 50% females. The participants completed the following balance tasks on a force platform in random order: (1) two-legged stance with eyes open, (2) two-legged stance with eyes closed, (3) semi-tandem with eyes open, (4) semi-tandem with eyes closed and (5) one-legged stance with eyes open. The participants completed three 60-s trials of tasks 1-4, and three 30-s trials of task 5 with 30-s rests between trials. The center of pressure area, velocity and frequency in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions were computed during each task, and compared between groups and tasks. Participants with chronic low back pain presented significantly larger center of pressure area and higher velocity than the healthy controls (p < 0.001). There were significant differences among tasks for all center of pressure variables (p < 0.001). Semi-tandem (tasks 3 and 4) and one-leg stance (task 5) were more sensitive to identify balance impairments in the chronic low back pain group than two-legged stance tasks 1 and 2 (effect size >1.37 vs. effect size <0.64). There were no significant interactions between groups and tasks. Individuals with chronic low back pain presented poorer postural control using center of pressure measurements than the healthy controls, mainly during more challenging balance tasks such as semi-tandem and one-legged stance conditions. Implications for Rehabilitation People with chronic low back had poorer balance than those without it. Balance tasks need to be sensitive to capture impairments. Balance assessments during semi-tandem and one-legged stance were the most sensitive tasks to determine postural control deficit in people with chronic low back. Balance assessment should be included during rehabilitation programs for individuals with

  6. Active and Inactive Leg Hemodynamics during Sequential Single-Leg Interval Cycling.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nicole; Abbiss, Chris R; Ihsan, Mohammed; Maiorana, Andrew J; Peiffer, Jeremiah J

    2018-06-01

    Leg order during sequential single-leg cycling (i.e., exercising both legs independently within a single session) may affect local muscular responses potentially influencing adaptations. This study examined the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle hemodynamic responses during double-leg and sequential single-leg cycling. Ten young healthy adults (28 ± 6 yr) completed six 1-min double-leg intervals interspersed with 1 min of passive recovery and, on a separate occasion, 12 (six with one leg followed by six with the other leg) 1-min single-leg intervals interspersed with 1 min of passive recovery. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, blood pressure, muscle oxygenation, muscle blood volume, and power output were measured throughout each session. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, and power output were not different between sets of single-leg intervals, but the average of both sets was lower than the double-leg intervals. Mean arterial pressure was higher during double-leg compared with sequential single-leg intervals (115 ± 9 vs 104 ± 9 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and higher during the initial compared with second set of single-leg intervals (108 ± 10 vs 101 ± 10 mm Hg, P < 0.05). The increase in muscle blood volume from baseline was similar between the active single leg and the double leg (267 ± 150 vs 214 ± 169 μM·cm, P = 0.26). The pattern of change in muscle blood volume from the initial to second set of intervals was significantly different (P < 0.05) when the leg was active in the initial (-52.3% ± 111.6%) compared with second set (65.1% ± 152.9%). These data indicate that the order in which each leg performs sequential single-leg cycling influences the local hemodynamic responses, with the inactive muscle influencing the stimulus experienced by the contralateral leg.

  7. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... But do this slowly, increasing the amount of time you do the sports activity a little at a time. Talk to ... 20 seconds. Do the exercise 6 to 10 times and then switch legs. Citations Management of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome by S Dixit, M.D., ...

  8. The role of obesity and physical activity in non-specific and radiating low back pain: the Young Finns study.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Solovieva, Svetlana; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Telama, Risto; Yang, Xiaolin; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli T; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2013-06-01

    To study the effects of obesity, physical activity, and change in physical activity on the incidence of low back pain and explore whether obesity modifies the effects of physical activity. As part of the ongoing Young Finns Study, 1224 subjects aged 24-39 years free from low back pain during the preceding 12 months at baseline in 2001 were included. Obesity was defined based on the body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, and physical activity was assessed by the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) index in 2001 and 2007. Abdominal obesity, defined by an increased waist circumference, was associated with an increased incidence of radiating low back pain (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.7 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.7), while it had no effect on non-specific low back pain. BMI was associated neither with the incidence of radiating low back pain nor with non-specific low back pain. Compared with subjects who stayed active during follow-up, those with a low level of physical activity (adjusted OR = 2.0 and 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and active subjects who further increased their physical activity during follow-up (OR = 3.1 and 95% CI 1.5-6.7) had a higher incidence of radiating low back pain. Low level of physical activity was associated with an increased incidence of radiating low back pain in obese (OR = 3.3 and 95% 1.1-10.4), but not in non-overweight subjects (OR = 1.1 and 95% CI 0.6-1.9). Physical activity was not associated with non-specific low back pain. Our findings indicate that both obesity and low level of physical activity are independent risk factors of radiating low back pain. The current findings propose a U-shaped relation between physical activity and radiating low back pain. Moderate level of physical activity is recommended for the prevention of low back pain, especially in obese individuals. In all, our findings imply that obese individuals should stay physically active, even if they may not lose weight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Effects of cardiopulmonary baroreceptor activation on pain may be moderated by risk for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Blaine; Lewkowski, Maxim D; Rainville, Pierre; Duncan, Gary H

    2009-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulation may modulate pain, though the literature is much smaller than research showing that sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation can buffer pain. To examine the possibility that risk for established high blood pressure may moderate the effects of cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulation on pain, 22 borderline hypertensive and 18 normotensive men participated in a laboratory experiment. Group differences in blood pressure were documented by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure recording. Ratings of the intensity of acute heat pain were influenced by both group membership and leg position. Passive elevation of the legs, a technique that stimulates cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, reduced ratings of heat pain though only among borderline hypertensives. Alteration of pain sensitivity may reflect the development of the hypertensive process.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Slater, Mark A; Capparelli, Edmund V; Patel, Shetal M; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S; Wallace, Mark S; Funk, Stephen D; Rutledge, Thomas R; Wetherell, Julie L; Matthews, Scott C; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, 2-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) with inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized patients with chronic back pain (daily pain for ≥6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (P < 0.0001) with subjects on gabapentin or placebo, reporting reductions of about 30% from baseline, but did not differ significantly between groups (P = 0.423). The same results pertained for disability scores. In responder analyses of those who completed 12 weeks (N = 72), the proportion reporting at least 30% or 50% reduction in pain intensity, or at least "Minimal Improvement" on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and nonradiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component.

  11. The relationship between isotonic plantar flexor endurance, navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain in a cohort of collegiate cross-country runners.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jason E; Reinking, Mark F; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle plantar flexor endurance (PFE), foot pronation as measured by navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain (ERLP). Exercise-related leg pain is a common occurrence in competitive and recreational runners. The identification of factors contributing to the development of ERLP may help guide methods for the prevention and management of overuse injuries. Seventy-seven (44 males, 33 females) competitive runners from five collegiate cross-country (XC) teams consented to participate in the study. Isotonic ankle PFE and foot pronation were measured using the standing heel-rise and navicular drop (ND) tests, respectively. Demographic information, anthropometric measurements, and ERLP history were also recorded. Subjects were then prospectively tracked for occurrence of ERLP during the 2009 intercollegiate cross-country season. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle joint PFE and ND and the occurrence of ERLP. While no significant differences were identified for isotonic ankle PFE between groups of collegiate XC runners with and without ERLP, runners with a ND >10 mm were almost 7 times (OR=6.6, 95% CI=1.2-38.0) more likely to incur medial ERLP than runners with ND <10 mm. Runners with a history of ERLP in the month previous to the start of the XC season were 12 times (OR=12.3, 95% CI=3.1-48.9) more likely to develop an in-season occurrence of ERLP. While PFE did not appear to be a risk factor in the development of ERLP in this group of collegiate XC runners, those with a ND greater than 10 mm may be at greater odds of incurring medial ERLP. 2b.

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOTONIC PLANTAR FLEXOR ENDURANCE, NAVICULAR DROP, AND EXERCISE-RELATED LEG PAIN IN A COHORT OF COLLEGIATE CROSS-COUNTRY RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Reinking, Mark F.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle plantar flexor endurance (PFE), foot pronation as measured by navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain (ERLP). Background: Exercise-related leg pain is a common occurrence in competitive and recreational runners. The identification of factors contributing to the development of ERLP may help guide methods for the prevention and management of overuse injuries. Methods: Seventy-seven (44 males, 33 females) competitive runners from five collegiate cross-country (XC) teams consented to participate in the study. Isotonic ankle PFE and foot pronation were measured using the standing heel-rise and navicular drop (ND) tests, respectively. Demographic information, anthropometric measurements, and ERLP history were also recorded. Subjects were then prospectively tracked for occurrence of ERLP during the 2009 intercollegiate cross-country season. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle joint PFE and ND and the occurrence of ERLP. Results: While no significant differences were identified for isotonic ankle PFE between groups of collegiate XC runners with and without ERLP, runners with a ND >10 mm were almost 7 times (OR=6.6, 95% CI=1.2–38.0) more likely to incur medial ERLP than runners with ND <10 mm. Runners with a history of ERLP in the month previous to the start of the XC season were 12 times (OR=12.3, 95% CI=3.1–48.9) more likely to develop an in-season occurrence of ERLP. Conclusion: While PFE did not appear to be a risk factor in the development of ERLP in this group of collegiate XC runners, those with a ND greater than 10 mm may be at greater odds of incurring medial ERLP. Level of Evidence: 2b. PMID:22666641

  13. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Squat Depth and the Perception of Pain in People with Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Amanda M.; Harrington, Elaine

    Patellar taping is a treatment adjunct commonly used in the management of anterior knee pain. The aim of this cross sectional study was to investigate the effects of medial glide patellar taping on sagittal plane lower-limb joint kinematics and knee pain during a unilateral squat in a symptomatic population complaining of anterior knee pain. Ten participants with a history of unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain were included in the study. Subjects were required to squat on the symptomatic leg under three conditions: placebo tape, patellar tape and no tape. Kinematic data was recorded using the CODA mpx64 motion analysis system and subjects’ pain was assessed using the Numerical Rating Scale. Patellar taping resulted in a significantly greater single-legged squat depth compared to placebo tape (p=0.008) and no tape (p=0.001) and a statistically significant reduction in pain during a squat compared to placebo tape (p=0.001) or no tape (p=0.001). Significant differences were not identified for maximum knee flexion in the patella taping compared to the no tape condition. This study may have significant clinical implications as participants reported less pain and alterations in sagittal plane movement following the application of patellar tape. PMID:24146711

  14. Aches and pains during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between 18 and 24 weeks. When you feel stretching or pain, move slowly or change positions. Mild ... common in the last months of pregnancy. Sometimes stretching your legs before bed will reduce the cramps. ...

  15. The association between Modic changes and pain during 1-year follow-up in patients with lumbar radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Schistad, Elina Iordanova; Espeland, Ansgar; Rygh, Lars Jørgen; Røe, Cecilie; Gjerstad, Johannes

    2014-09-01

    To examine whether Modic changes influence pain during a 1-year follow-up in patients with lumbar radicular pain. A total of 243 patients with lumbar radicular pain due to disc herniation were recruited from two hospitals in Norway and followed up at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. On baseline lumbar magnetic resonance images, two observers independently evaluated Modic changes (types I-III; craniocaudal size 0-3). Outcomes were sensory pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), back and leg pain (visual analogue scale, VAS). Association between Modic type and outcomes was explored with a mixed model and then by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at each time point with Modic and treatment groups (surgical, n = 126; nonsurgical, n = 117) as fixed factors, adjusted for disc degeneration, age, sex, smoking, and duration of radicular pain. Modic size was also analyzed using ANOVA. Pain scores had decreased significantly at 1-year follow-up. Modic type was significantly related to McGill sensory scores (mixed model: p = 0.014-0.026; ANOVA: p = 0.007 at 6 weeks), but not to VAS back pain or VAS leg pain scores. At 6 weeks, the mean McGill sensory score was higher in Modic I than in Modic II-III patients (p = 0.003) and in patients without Modic changes (p = 0.018). Modic size L1-S1 was not associated with pain outcomes. Patients with lumbar radicular pain have a substantial pain reduction during 1-year follow-up, but Modic type I changes may imply a slower initial decrease in sensory pain.

  16. Low back pain and its treatment by spinal manipulation: measures of flexibility and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Hoehler, F K; Tobis, J S

    1982-02-01

    Nineteen low back pain patients and eight patients not suffering from low back pain were given several tests of flexibility and asymmetry by two different examiners. Three criteria of reliability and validity were used: (1) significant agreement between independent observers, (2) significantly different scores in the groups with and without low back pain, and (3) significant improvement following a successful spinal manipulation. Tests of anterior flexion and asymmetry of foot eversion met only the first and second criteria while tests of hamstring tightness and asymmetry of voluntary straight leg raising met only the first and third criteria. Passive and voluntary straight leg raising tests were the only measures that met all three criteria. Therefore, of the objective tests investigated here, only passive or voluntary straight leg raising can be strongly recommended for use in the evaluation of spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain.

  17. Measurement and simulation of thermoelectric efficiency for single leg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaokai; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ohta, Michihiro; Nishiate, Hirotaka

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency measurements were carried out on n-type bismuth telluride legs with the hot-side temperature at 100 and 150 °C. The electric power and heat flow were measured individually. Water coolant was utilized to maintain the cold-side temperature and to measure heat flow out of the cold side. Leg length and vacuum pressure were studied in terms of temperature difference across the leg, open-circuit voltage, internal resistance, and heat flow. Finite-element simulation on thermoelectric generation was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics, by inputting two-side temperatures and thermoelectric material properties. The open-circuit voltage and resistance were in good agreement between the measurement and simulation. Much larger heat flows were found in measurements, since they were comprised of conductive, convective, and radiative contributions. Parasitic heat flow was measured in the absence of bismuth telluride leg, and the conductive heat flow was then available. Finally, the maximum thermoelectric efficiency was derived in accordance with the electric power and the conductive heat flow.

  18. Transitional Vertebra and Spina Bifida Occulta Related with Chronic Low Back Pain in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Maham; Babar, Sumbal; Kundi, Asif K; Assad, Salman; Sheikh, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Bertolotti’s syndrome (BS) must be considered as a differential diagnosis in a young patient presenting with low back pain (LBP). We present a case of a 26-year-old male complaining of mild chronic LBP for six years, radiating to his left thigh for the past six months. He has been taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with skeletal muscle relaxants for pain relief. The X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imagings showed congenital enlargement of the left transverse process of the fifth lumbar (L5) vertebra forming pseudo-articulation with the sacrum and unilateral pars interarticularis defect at the L4 level on the left side, respectively. He has managed with gabapentin 100 mg three times a day for his neuropathic left leg pain. On follow-up, the patient reported that his pain has improved with gabapentin and it decreased from 8/10 to 4/10 on the visual analogue scale. PMID:27904817

  19. Transitional Vertebra and Spina Bifida Occulta Related with Chronic Low Back Pain in a Young Patient.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Maryam; Habib, Maham; Babar, Sumbal; Kundi, Asif K; Assad, Salman; Sheikh, Amjad

    2016-10-19

    Bertolotti's syndrome (BS) must be considered as a differential diagnosis in a young patient presenting with low back pain (LBP). We present a case of a 26-year-old male complaining of mild chronic LBP for six years, radiating to his left thigh for the past six months. He has been taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with skeletal muscle relaxants for pain relief. The X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imagings showed congenital enlargement of the left transverse process of the fifth lumbar (L5) vertebra forming pseudo-articulation with the sacrum and unilateral pars interarticularis defect at the L4 level on the left side, respectively. He has managed with gabapentin 100 mg three times a day for his neuropathic left leg pain. On follow-up, the patient reported that his pain has improved with gabapentin and it decreased from 8/10 to 4/10 on the visual analogue scale.

  20. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  1. Quantitative Sensory Testing and Current Perception Threshold Testing in Patients With Chronic Pain Following Lower Extremity Fracture.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Mari A; Greenspan, Joel D; Johantgen, Meg; Von Rueden, Kathryn; O'Toole, Robert V; Dorsey, Susan G; Renn, Cynthia L

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pain is a significant problem for patients with lower extremity injuries. While pain hypersensitivity has been identified in many chronic pain conditions, it is not known whether patients with chronic pain following lower extremity fracture report pain hypersensitivity in the injured leg. To quantify and compare peripheral somatosensory function and sensory nerve activation thresholds in persons with chronic pain following lower extremity fractures with a cohort of persons with no history of lower extremity fractures. This was a cross-sectional study where quantitative sensory testing and current perception threshold testing were conducted on the injured and noninjured legs of cases and both legs of controls. A total of 14 cases and 28 controls participated in the study. Mean time since injury at the time of testing for cases was 22.3 (standard deviation = 12.1) months. The warmth detection threshold ( p = .024) and nerve activation thresholds at 2,000 Hz ( p < .001) and 250 Hz ( p = .002), respectively, were significantly higher in cases compared to controls. This study suggests that patients with chronic pain following lower extremity fractures may experience hypoesthesia in the injured leg, which contrasts with the finding of hyperesthesia previously observed in other chronic pain conditions but is in accord with patients with nerve injuries and surgeries. This is the first study to examine peripheral sensory nerve function at the site of injury in patients with chronic pain following lower extremity fractures using quantitative sensory testing and current perception threshold testing.

  2. The photonic device for integrated evaluation of collateral circulation of lower extremities in patients with local hypertensive-ischemic pain syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Volodymyr S.; Bezsmernyi, Yurii O.; Zlepko, Sergey M.; Bezsmertna, Halyna V.

    2017-08-01

    The given paper analyzes principles of interaction and analysis of the reflected optical radiation from biotissue in the process of assessment of regional hemodynamics state in patients with local hypertensive- ischemic pain syndrome of amputation stumps of lower extremities, applying the method of photoplethysmography. The purpose is the evaluation of Laser photoplethysmography (LPPG) diagnostic value in examination of patients with chronic ischemia of lower extremities. Photonic device is developed to determine the level of the peripheral blood circulation, which determines the basic parameters of peripheral blood circulation and saturation level. Device consists of two sensors: infrared sensor, which contains the infrared laser radiation source and photodetector, and red sensor, which contains the red radiation source and photodetector. LPPG method allows to determined pulsatility of blood flow in different areas of the foot and lower leg, the degree of compensation and conservation perspectives limb. Surgical treatment of local hypertensive -ischemic pain syndrome of amputation stumps of lower extremities by means of semiclosed fasciotomy in combination with revasculating osteotrepanation enabled to improve considerably regional hemodynamics in the tissues of the stump and decrease pain and hypostatic disorders.

  3. Pediatric restless legs syndrome: analysis of symptom descriptions and drawings.

    PubMed

    Picchietti, Daniel L; Arbuckle, Robert A; Abetz, Linda; Durmer, Jeffrey S; Ivanenko, Anna; Owens, Judith A; Croenlein, Jens; Allen, Richard P; Walters, Arthur S

    2011-11-01

    The specific aims of this study were to collect and analyze detailed symptom descriptions from patients with pediatric restless legs syndrome, ages 6 to 17 years, as well as assess symptom impact and the usefulness of drawings. Trained qualitative interviewers conducted face-to-face audio-recorded interviews of children and adolescents who met criteria for definite restless legs syndrome. Thirty-three patients in 3 age groups used 16 different categories of descriptors for restless legs sensations, with a mean of 3 or more categories used per patient in each age group. "Need to move/kick," "pain/hurts," "uncomfortable/cannot get comfortable," and "like bugs or ants/crawling" were the most common descriptors. Two-thirds reported daytime sensations, and nearly half had arm involvement. They described impact on sleep, cognitive function, and affect. Drawings provided useful diagnostic information. These detailed empirical data will be useful in clinical practice, as well as in the development of formal diagnostic tools and severity measures.

  4. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer - brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  5. Inequality in leg length is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Kanat, Ayhan; Erkut, Adem; Ozdemir, Bulent; Batcik, Osman Ersagun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inequality in leg length may lead to to abnormal transmission of load across the endplates and degeneration lumbar spine and the disc space. There has been no study focusing on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and leg length discrepancy. This subject was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients with leg length discrepancy and low back pain (LBP) admitted to our department were respectivelly studied. Results: A total number of 39 subjects (31 women and eight men) with leg length discrepancy and LBP and 43 (25 females and 18 males) patients with LBP as a control group were tested. Occurrence of disc herniation is statistically different between patients with hip dysplasia and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a statistically significant association between leg length discrepancy and occurrence of LDH. The changes of spine anatomy with leg length discrepancy in hip dysplastic patients are of importance in understanding the nature of LDH. PMID:27217654

  6. Determining the activation of gluteus medius and the validity of the single leg stance test in chronic, nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Penney, Tracy; Ploughman, Michelle; Austin, Mark W; Behm, David G; Byrne, Jeannette M

    2014-10-01

    To determine the activation of the gluteus medius in persons with chronic, nonspecific low back pain compared with that in control subjects, and to determine the association of the clinical rating of the single leg stance (SLS) with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and gluteus medius weakness. Cohort-control comparison. Academic research laboratory. Convenience sample of people (n=21) with CLBP (>12wk) recruited by local physiotherapists, and age- and sex-matched controls (n=22). Subjects who received specific pain diagnoses were excluded. Not applicable. Back pain using the visual analog scale (mm); back-related disability using the Oswestry Back Disability Index (%); strength of gluteus medius measured using a hand dynamometer (N/kg); SLS test; gluteus medius onset and activation using electromyography during unipedal stance on a forceplate. Individuals in the CLBP group exhibited significant weakness in the gluteus medius compared with controls (right, P=.04; left, P=.002). They also had more pain (CLBP: mean, 20.50mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], 13.11-27.9mm; control subjects: mean, 1.77mm; 95% CI, -.21 to 3.75mm) and back-related disability (CLBP: mean, 18.52%; 95% CI, 14.46%-22.59%; control subjects: mean, .68%; 95% CI, -.41% to 1.77%), and reported being less physically active. Weakness was accompanied by increased gluteus medius activation during unipedal stance (R=.50, P=.001) but by no difference in muscle onset times. Although greater gluteus medius weakness was associated with greater pain and disability, there was no difference in muscle strength between those scoring positive and negative on the SLS test (right: F=.002, P=.96; left: F=.1.75, P=.19). Individuals with CLBP had weaker gluteus medius muscles than control subjects without back pain. Even though there was no significant difference in onset time of the gluteus medius when moving to unipedal stance between the groups, the CLBP group had greater gluteus medius activation. A key finding was that

  7. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... CT scan makes detailed pictures of the body very quickly. The test may help look for: An abscess ...

  8. Lower Extremity Limb Salvage with Cross Leg Pedicle Flap, Cross Leg Free Flap, and Cross Leg Vascular Cable Bridge Flap.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Oscar J; Bishop, Sarah N; Ciudad, Pedro; Adabi, Kian; Martinez-Jorge, Jorys; Moran, Steven L; Huang, Tony; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2018-05-16

     Lower extremity salvage following significant soft tissue loss can be complicated by lack of recipient vessel for free tissue transfer. We describe our experience in lower limb salvage for patients with no recipient vessels with the use of pedicle, free and cable bridge flaps.  A retrospective review from 1985 to 2017 of patients undergoing lower limb salvage using a contralateral pedicle cross leg (PCL) flaps, free cross leg (FCL) flaps, or free cable bridge (FCB) flaps was conducted. Demographics, etiology of the reconstruction, type of flap used, donor-site vessels, defect size, operating time, time of pedicle division, length of hospital stay, time to ambulation, and complications were analyzed.  A total of 53 patients (48 males and 5 females) with an average age of 35 years (range, 29-38 years) were identified. The etiology for the reconstruction was trauma in 52 patients and oncological resection in 1 patient. There were 18 PCL, 25 FCL, and 10 FCB completed. The recipient vessels for all flaps were the posterior tibial artery and vein. The average operating room times for PCL, FCL, and FCB flaps were 4, 9, and 10 hours, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 5 weeks and average time to ambulation was 4 weeks. The average follow-up time was 7.5 years (range, 3-12 years). Complications encountered were hematoma (six), prolonged pain (six), total flap loss (two), reoperation (five), and infection (four). Limb salvage rates were 96.2%.  When ipsilateral limb vessels are not available, and other reconstructive options have been exhausted, cross leg flaps can be a viable option for limb salvage in the setting of extensive defects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Leg kinematics and kinetics in landing from a single-leg hop for distance. A comparison between dominant and non-dominant leg.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, J J; Gokeler, A; Hof, A L

    2007-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency can be a major problem for athletes and subsequent reconstruction of the ACL may be indicated if a conservative regimen has failed. After ACL reconstruction signs of abnormality in the use of the leg remain for a long time. It is expected that the landing after a single-leg hop for distance (horizontal hop) might give insight in the differences in kinematics and kinetics between uninjured legs and ACL-reconstructed legs. Before the ACL-reconstructed leg can be compared with the contralateral leg, knowledge of differences between legs of uninjured subjects is needed. Kinematic and kinetic variables of both legs were measured with an optoelectronic system and a force plate and calculated by inverse dynamics. The dominant leg (the leg with biggest horizontal hop distance) and the contralateral leg of nine uninjured subjects were compared. No significant differences were found in most of the kinematic and kinetic variables between dominant leg and contralateral leg of uninjured subjects. Only hop distance and hip extension angles differed significantly. This study suggests that there are no important differences between dominant leg and contralateral leg in healthy subjects. As a consequence, the uninvolved leg of ACL-reconstructed patients can be used as a reference. The observed variables of this study can be used as a reference of normal values and normal differences between legs in healthy subjects.

  10. Effect of squatting velocity on hip muscle latency in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Chavez, Ignacio; Mendez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2018-03-01

    [Purpose] Neuromuscular activity has been evaluated in patellofemoral pain syndrome but movement velocity has not been considered. The aim was to determine differences in onset latency of hip and knee muscles between individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome during a single leg squat, and whether any differences are dependent on movement velocity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four females with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 24 healthy females participated. Onset latency of gluteus maximus, anterior and posterior gluteus medius, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris during a single leg squat at high and low velocity were evaluated. [Results] There was an interaction between velocity and diagnosis for posterior gluteus medius. Healthy subjects showed a later posterior gluteus medius onset latency at low velocity than high velocity; and also later than patellofemoral pain syndrome subjects at low velocity and high velocity. [Conclusion] Patellofemoral pain syndrome subjects presented an altered latency of posterior gluteus medius during a single leg squat and did not generate adaptations to velocity variation, while healthy subjects presented an earlier onset latency in response to velocity increase.

  11. A systematic review of the passive straight leg raising test as a diagnostic aid for low back pain (1989 to 2000).

    PubMed

    Rebain, Richard; Baxter, G David; McDonough, Suzanne

    2002-09-01

    A systematic review. This systematic review sought papers (January 1989-January 2000) on the passive straight leg raising test (PSLR) as a diagnostic component for low back pain (LBP) to identify, summarize, and assess developments in the test procedure, the factors influencing PSLR outcome, and the clinical significance of that outcome. Previous studies suggested that the PSLR tractioned the sciatic nerve and that diminished leg elevation with reproduced pain indicated low lumbar intervertebral disc pathology. Searches on six computerized bibliographic databases identified publications written about the PSLR. Papers were excluded if they were published before January 1989, were non-English language papers, or employed either an active SLR or a PSLR for purposes other than LBP diagnosis. The references of qualifying papers (and the references of references) were searched. Contact with primary authors, and others known to be active in this field, was attempted. The PSLR procedure remains unchanged. The influence of hip rotation during the PSLR was discussed without consensus. Biomechanical devices improved intra- and interobserver reliability and so increased test reproducibility. Hamstrings were found to have a defensive role in protecting nerve roots by limiting PSLR range in cases of nerve root inflammation. A small diurnal variation in the PSLR may imply a poorer prognosis. A positive PSLR at 4 months after lumbar intervertebral disc surgery predicted poor reoperative outcome, and a negative 4-month PSLR predicted excellent outcome. The influence of psychosocial factors was not discussed, neither was the diagnostic significance of a negative PSLR outcome. There remains no standard PSLR procedure, no consensus on interpretation of results, and little recognition that a negative PSLR test outcome may be of greater diagnostic value than a positive one. The causal link between LBP pathology and hamstring action remains unclear. There is a need for research into the

  12. Predicting SF-6D utility scores from the Oswestry disability index and numeric rating scales for back and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; McDonough, Christine M; Rampersaud, Raja; Berven, Sigurd; Shainline, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Cross-sectional cohort. The purpose of this study is to provide a model to allow estimation of utility from the Short Form (SF)-6D using data from the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Back Pain Numeric Rating Scale (BPNRS), and the Leg Pain Numeric Rating Scale (LPNRS). Cost-utility analysis provides important information about the relative value of interventions and requires a measure of utility not often available from clinical trial data. The ODI and numeric rating scales for back (BPNRS) and leg pain (LPNRS), are widely used disease-specific measures for health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study is to provide a model to allow estimation of utility from the SF-6D using data from the ODI, BPNRS, and the LPNRS. SF-36, ODI, BPNRS, and LPNRS were prospectively collected before surgery, at 12 and 24 months after surgery in 2640 patients undergoing lumbar fusion for degenerative disorders. Spearman correlation coefficients for paired observations from multiple time points between ODI, BPNRS, and LPNRS, and SF-6D utility scores were determined. Regression modeling was done to compute the SF-6D score from the ODI, BPNRS, and LPNRS. Using a separate, independent dataset of 2174 patients in which actual SF-6D and ODI scores were available, the SF-6D was estimated for each subject and compared to their actual SF-6D. In the development sample, the mean age was 52.5 +/- 15 years and 34% were male. In the validation sample, the mean age was 52.9 +/- 14.2 years and 44% were male. Correlations between the SF-6D and the ODI, BPNRS, and LPNRS were statistically significant (P < 0.0001) with correlation coefficients of 0.82, 0.78, and 0.72, respectively. The regression equation using ODI, BPNRS,and LPNRS to predict SF-6D had an R of 0.69 and a root mean square error of 0.076. The model using ODI alone had an R of 0.67 and a root mean square error of 0.078. The correlation coefficient between the observed and estimated

  13. Painful acute radiation thyroiditis induced by 131I treatment of Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kinjal K; Tarasova, Valentina; Davidian, Michael; Anderson, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman, chronic smoker with Graves’ disease was treated with radioactive iodine ablation (RAI). One week after the treatment, she presented with severe pain in the anterior neck with radiation to the angle of the jaw associated with fatigue, tremor and odynophagia. Physical examination demonstrated an asymmetric and exquisitely tender thyroid gland. There was no laboratory evidence of thyrotoxicosis. Acute radiation thyroiditis was diagnosed. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hydrocodone-acetaminophen started initially were ineffective for pain control. Prednisone provided relief and was continued for 1 month with a tapering dose. Symptoms completely resolved after 1 month at which time the thyroid remained diffusely enlarged and non-tender. Three months following RAI ablation she developed hypothyroid symptoms. Levothyroxine was initiated. The patient has remained asymptomatic on continued follow-up care. PMID:25576511

  14. Painful acute radiation thyroiditis induced by 131I treatment of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kinjal K; Tarasova, Valentina; Davidian, Michael; Anderson, Robert J

    2015-01-09

    A 44-year-old woman, chronic smoker with Graves' disease was treated with radioactive iodine ablation (RAI). One week after the treatment, she presented with severe pain in the anterior neck with radiation to the angle of the jaw associated with fatigue, tremor and odynophagia. Physical examination demonstrated an asymmetric and exquisitely tender thyroid gland. There was no laboratory evidence of thyrotoxicosis. Acute radiation thyroiditis was diagnosed. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hydrocodone-acetaminophen started initially were ineffective for pain control. Prednisone provided relief and was continued for 1 month with a tapering dose. Symptoms completely resolved after 1 month at which time the thyroid remained diffusely enlarged and non-tender. Three months following RAI ablation she developed hypothyroid symptoms. Levothyroxine was initiated. The patient has remained asymptomatic on continued follow-up care. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. The immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barton, C J; Menz, H B; Crossley, K M

    2011-03-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) often results in reduced functional performance. There is growing evidence for the use of foot orthoses to treat this multifactorial condition. In this study, the immediate effects of foot orthoses on functional performance and the association of foot posture and footwear with improvements in function were evaluated. Fifty-two individuals with PFPS (18-35 years) were prescribed prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Pro; Vasyli International, Labrador, Australia). Functional outcome measures evaluated included the change in (1) pain and (2) ease of a single-leg squat on a five-point Likert scale, and change in the number of (3) pain-free step downs and (4) single-leg rises from sitting. The association of foot posture using the Foot Posture Index, navicular drop and calcaneal angle relative to subtalar joint neutral; and the footwear motion control properties scale score with improved function were evaluated using Spearman's ρ statistics. Prefabricated foot orthoses produced significant improvements (p<0.05) for all functional outcome measures. A more pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties were found to be associated with reduced pain during the single-leg squat and improvements in the number of pain-free single-leg rises from sitting when wearing foot orthoses. In addition, a more pronated foot type was also found to be associated with improved ease of completing a single-leg squat when wearing foot orthoses. Prefabricated foot orthoses provide immediate improvements in functional performance, and these improvements are associated with a more pronated foot type and poorer footwear motion control properties.

  16. [A case of nonclostridial gas gangrene of the leg complicated by severe pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Seiko; Baba, Kenji; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Etsuro

    2005-10-01

    A 73-year-old man admitted for febrile left leg pain with dyspnea, who had poorly controlled diabetes was found on admission to have severe hypoxia and chest X-ray showed infiltrates in the middle to lower left lung. X-rays of the left leg showed gas around the knee joint. These findings suggested severe pneumonia with gas gangrene, necessitating immediate debridement of the gas gangrene lesion and hyperbaric oxygenation. Antibiotics were also administered intravenously (panipenem/betamipron 0.5 g x 3/day, clindamycin 600 mg x 2/day, and erythromycin 500 mg x 3/day). We conducted fiberoptic bronchoscope daily because consolidation of the whole left lung developed with purulent sputum expectoration. Both pneumonia and gas gangrene gradually ameliorated avoiding amputation of theleg. Gas gangrene was cured without leaving sequelae such as motor dysfunction. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in both pus from the leg and sputum collected by bronchoscopy. Microorganisms showed the same pattern of sensitivity to antibiotics, suggesting a causal relationship between pneumonia and gas gangrene through the blood stream. Gas gangrene was considered the primary infection followed by pneumonia, since pain and swelling of the left leg preceded the airway symptoms. The present case illustrates in compromised hosts including diabetics, gas gangrene may develop taking an opportunity of airway infection, and that in some cases, early debridement of the lesion and optimal use of antibiotics may help cure this disease without aggressive surgery. Hyperbaric oxygenation may also be useful, although its validity must be investigated further.

  17. Management of venous leg ulcers in general practice - a practical guideline.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sankar; Sreedharan, Sadhishaan

    2014-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers are the most common wounds seen in general practice. Their management can be both challenging and time-consuming. To produce a short practical guideline incorporating the TIME concept and A2BC2D approach to help general practitioners and their practice nurses in delivering evidence-based initial care to patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. Most chronic venous leg ulcers can be managed effectively in the general practice setting by following the simple, evidence-based approach described in this article. Figure 1 provides a flow chart to aid in this process. Figure 2 illustrates the principles of management in general practice. Effective management of chronic ulcers involves the assessment of both the ulcer and the patient. The essential requirements of management are to debride the ulcer with appropriate precautions, choose dressings that maintain adequate moisture balance, apply graduated compression bandage after evaluation of the arterial circulation and address the patient's concerns, such as pain and offensive wound discharge.

  18. [Paraesthesia in the legs].

    PubMed

    Eisensehr, Ilonka

    2007-10-18

    Paraesthesia in the legs can have numerous causes. In addition to the restless legs syndrome, other primary causes include venous insufficiency in the leg, propriospinal myoclonus, nocturnal leg cramps, peripheral polyneuropathy that affects mostly the legs or neuroleptic drug-induced akathisia. Through detailed questioning of the patient, restless legs syndrome can be specifically distinguished from the other named differential diagnoses.

  19. The Accuracy of the VISA-P Questionnaire, Single-Leg Decline Squat, and Tendon Pain History to Identify Patellar Tendon Abnormalities in Adult Athletes.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Luciana de Michelis; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; Bittencourt, Natália Franco Netto; Fernandes, Ludmila Maria Oliveira; Verhagen, Evert; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional clinical assessment. Background Patellar tendinopathy is not always accompanied by patellar tendon abnormalities (PTAs). Thus, clinical screening tools to help identify patients with patellar tendon pain who have PTAs could enhance clinical decision making and patient prognosis. Objectives To test the diagnostic accuracy of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) questionnaire, a single-leg decline squat (SLDS), tendon pain history, age, and years of sports participation to identify athletes with symptomatic patellar tendons who have PTAs confirmed on imaging. Methods Data provided by ultrasound examination, the VISA-P questionnaire, the SLDS, tendon pain history, age, and years of sport participation were collected in 43 athletes. A classification and regression tree (CART) model was developed to verify variables associated with PTA occurrence. Likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for positive and negative tests. Results The SLDS, VISA-P questionnaire, and tendon pain history were associated with PTA occurrence. Athletes with negative results on all 3 tests (CART model) had a lower likelihood of having PTAs (negative LR = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 0.5). The isolated use of the SLDS or tendon pain history (positive LR = 4.2; 95% CI: 2.3, 7.14 and 4.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1, respectively) had similar influence on probability of PTA presence compared to the CART model (positive LR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.5, 6.3). Conclusion Although the objective was to investigate a clinical test to identify PTAs, the combined use of the tests had greater accuracy to identify individuals without PTAs. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):673-680. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6192.

  20. Role of Gabapentin in Managing Mucositis Pain in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy to the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Milazzo-Kiedaisch, Carol Ann; Itano, Joanne; Dutta, Pinaki R

    2016-12-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a painful and debilitating side effect that affects 80%-100% of patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. This dose-limiting side effect may potentially lead to pain, dehydration, malnutrition, infection, and treatment breaks. Treatment breaks can lead to decreased disease control and suboptimal patient outcomes. No primary prevention exists for OM, and management is focused on pain control. Compelling evidence exists that OM pain has somatic and neuropathic components. This article reviews the existing literature on the use of gabapentin (Neurontin®) as a co-analgesic in treating the neuropathic pain in OM. A literature search was performed using CINAHL® and PubMed with the search terms gabapentin and oral mucositis. The selected articles were briefly screened for relevance, and three were included in this review. No systematic reviews exist on the role of gabapentin for neuropathic pain in radiation-induced OM. Two retrospective studies concluded that gabapentin reduced escalation of opioid doses and unplanned treatment breaks. One retrospective study demonstrated favorable swallowing outcomes. Pain and OM are nursing-sensitive outcomes that can be significantly affected by evidence-based nursing interventions.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of the urinary symptoms on quality of life of patients with painful bladder syndrome/chronic pelvic pain and radiation cystitis: EURCIS study.

    PubMed

    Rapariz-González, M; Castro-Díaz, D; Mejía-Rendón, D

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary symptoms of Painful Bladder/Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis (PBCPPS) on the Quality of Life, and self-esteem of the patient. An observational, multicenter, epidemiological and cross-sectional study was performed on patients with Painful Bladder/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis. Data was recorded on severity of urinary symptoms and QoL impairment using the PUF Score. The patients evaluated the QoL deterioration grade through the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and the level of their anxiety and self-esteem with the Goldberg's Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. Post-hoc comparisons were performed between the results of the KHQ of this study and a sample of patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Results on RSES were analyzed with data from the general population and from patients with erectile dysfunction. A total of 530 cases, mostly female patients, who had been diagnosed with PBCPPS, were analyzed. High levels of deterioration in QoL were described: KHQ scores were significantly higher when compared with patients with UI (P<.01). Involvement of self-esteem was higher in patients with RC and men, who obtained scores similar to those of patients with erectile dysfunction. Patients with Painful Bladder Syndrome/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis present high levels of anxiety, and significant reductions in both quality of life and self-esteem. Especially for men, this affectation is similar to that caused by erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Severe pain as a possible cause of dropped head syndrome that was attenuated after amputation of an ischemic lower limb.

    PubMed

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-03-02

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is defined as weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing a correctable chin-on-the-chest deformity. Here we report the case of a patient with severe pain from lower leg ischemia showing DHS whose symptoms were attenuated by pain relief after amputation of the severely ischemic lower leg. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating that severe pain can cause DHS. A 64-year-old Asian woman was referred to our department with a 1-month history of DHS. She also suffered from severe right foot pain because of limb ischemia. She began to complain of DHS as her gangrenous foot pain worsened. She had neck pain and difficulty with forward gaze. We found no clinical or laboratory findings of neuromuscular disorder or isolated neck extensor myopathy. We amputated her leg below the knee because of progressive foot gangrene. Her severe foot pain resolved after the surgery and her DHS was attenuated. Severe pain can cause DHS. If a patient with DHS has severe pain in another part of the body, we recommend considering aggressive pain relief as a treatment option.

  3. Urethral Pain Among Prostate Cancer Survivors 1 to 14 Years After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, Niclas, E-mail: niclas.pettersson@vgregion.se; Olsson, Caroline; Tucker, Susan L.

    Purpose: To investigate how treatment-related and non-treatment-related factors impact urethral pain among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Men treated for prostate cancer with radiation therapy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Goeteborg, Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were approached with a study-specific postal questionnaire addressing symptoms after treatment, including urethral burning pain during urination (n=985). The men had received primary or salvage external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (BT). Prescribed doses were commonly 70 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions for primary and salvage EBRT and 50 Gy plus 2 Multiplication-Sign 10.0 Gy for EBRT +more » BT. Prostatic urethral doses were assessed from treatment records. We also recruited 350 non-pelvic-irradiated, population-based controls matched for age and residency to provide symptom background rates. Results: Of the treated men, 16% (137 of 863) reported urethral pain, compared with 11% (27 of 242) of the controls. The median time to follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-14.3 years). Prostatic urethral doses were similar to prescription doses for EBRT and 100% to 115% for BT. Fractionation-corrected dose and time to follow-up affected the occurrence of the symptom. For a follow-up {>=}3 years, 19% of men (52 of 268) within the 70-Gy EBRT + BT group reported pain, compared with 10% of men (23 of 222) treated with 70 Gy primary EBRT (prevalence ratio 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.0). Of the men treated with salvage EBRT, 10% (20 of 197) reported urethral pain. Conclusions: Survivors treated with EBRT + BT had a higher risk for urethral pain compared with those treated with EBRT. The symptom prevalence decreased with longer time to follow-up. We found a relationship between fractionation-corrected urethral dose and pain. Among long-term prostate cancer survivors, the occurrence of pain was not increased above the background rate for prostatic

  4. Extensibility and stiffness of the hamstrings in patients with nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Halbertsma, J P; Göeken, L N; Hof, A L; Groothoff, J W; Eisma, W H

    2001-02-01

    To investigate the extensibility and stiffness of the hamstrings in patients with nonspecific low back pain (LBP). An experimental design. A university laboratory for human movement analysis in a department of rehabilitation medicine. Forty subjects, a patient group (20) and a healthy control group (20). Subjects laid supine on an examination table with a lift frame, with left leg placed in a sling at the ankle. Straight leg raising, pulling force, and activity of hamstring and back muscles were recorded with electrodes. Patients indicated when they experienced tension or pain. The lift force, leg excursion, pelvic-femoral angle, first sensation of pain, and the electromyogram of the hamstrings and back muscles measured in an experimental straight-leg raising set-up. The patient group showed a significant restriction in range of motion (ROM) and extensibility of the hamstrings compared with the control group. No significant difference in hamstring muscle stiffness can be assessed between both groups. The restricted ROM and the decreased extensibility of the hamstrings in patients with nonspecific LBP is not caused by increased muscle stiffness of the hamstrings, but determined by the stretch tolerance of the patients.

  5. The relationship with restless legs syndrome, fibromyalgia, and depressive symptoms in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Akdag Uzun, Zehra; Kurt, Semiha; Karaer Unaldi, Hatice

    2018-05-18

    In this study, we aimed to investigate restless legs syndrome, depression, frequency of fibromyalgia and possible causes of its frequencies, and the relationships among these synergies and migraine's prodrome, aura, pain, and postdrome symptoms in patients with migraine. The study group included 200 patients previously or recently diagnosed with definite migraine and according to International Headache Society criteria and 200 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent a medical interview to confirm restless legs syndrome and fibromyalgia, and they were asked to complete Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventory and "severity of restless legs syndrome inventory." The frequencies of depressive symptoms and fibromyalgia in the patients with migraine were higher than those of the control group. The mean age of the migraine patients with restless legs syndrome was also higher, and this group had migraine headache for a longer time. There was a statistically significant difference with regard to only generalized anxiety and traveler's distress, which were features of the migraine, between migraine patients with and without restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome was more common in migraine patients with and without aura and in those with nonspecific white matter lesions in the cranial MRI. In our study, the greater frequency of restless legs syndrome, depressive symptoms, and fibromyalgia in the patients with migraine supports the role of dopamine, which is common to all three disorders. Interviews focused on these problems among migraine patients may help to decide on the best available treatment modality.

  6. Task driven optimal leg trajectories in insect-scale legged microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Neel; Goldberg, Benjamin; Jayaram, Kaushik; Wood, Robert

    Origami inspired layered manufacturing techniques and 3D-printing have enabled the development of highly articulated legged robots at the insect-scale, including the 1.43g Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR). Research on these platforms has expanded its focus from manufacturing aspects to include design optimization and control for application-driven tasks. Consequently, the choice of gait selection, body morphology, leg trajectory, foot design, etc. have become areas of active research. HAMR has two controlled degrees-of-freedom per leg, making it an ideal candidate for exploring leg trajectory. We will discuss our work towards optimizing HAMR's leg trajectories for two different tasks: climbing using electroadhesives and level ground running (5-10 BL/s). These tasks demonstrate the ability of single platform to adapt to vastly different locomotive scenarios: quasi-static climbing with controlled ground contact, and dynamic running with un-controlled ground contact. We will utilize trajectory optimization methods informed by existing models and experimental studies to determine leg trajectories for each task. We also plan to discuss how task specifications and choice of objective function have contributed to the shape of these optimal leg trajectories.

  7. Benzydamine hydrochloride in prevention and management of pain in oral mucositis associated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Stevenson-Moore, P.

    1986-08-01

    Benzydamine hydrochloride rinse reduced pain associated with radiation mucositis when it was used during the course of radiation therapy. Fewer patients using benzydamine rinse required systemic analgesics. All patients using benzydamine tolerated the rinse well and continued with regular rinsing throughout the course of radiation therapy. Benzydamine hydrochloride is currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States for application for approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

  8. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Knoop, J; Steultjens, M P M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Twisk, J W R; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van der Leeden, M; Dekker, J

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Rehabilitation centre. One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Exercise therapy. Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (-8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P>0.05). Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence and Predictive Factors of Pain Flare After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of Phase 1/2 Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hubert Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin S.

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a secondary analysis of institutional prospective spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) trials to investigate posttreatment acute pain flare. Methods and Materials: Medical records for enrolled patients were reviewed. Study protocol included baseline and follow-up surveys with pain assessment by Brief Pain Inventory and documentation of pain medications. Patients were considered evaluable for pain flare if clinical note or follow-up survey was completed within 2 weeks of SBRT. Pain flare was defined as a clinical note indicating increased pain at the treated site or survey showing a 2-point increase in worst pain score, a 25% increase in analgesicmore » intake, or the initiation of steroids. Binary logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors for pain flare occurrence. Results: Of the 210 enrolled patients, 195 (93%) were evaluable for pain flare, including 172 (88%) clinically, 135 (69%) by survey, and 112 (57%) by both methods. Of evaluable patients, 61 (31%) had undergone prior surgery, 57 (29%) had received prior radiation, and 34 (17%) took steroids during treatment, mostly for prior conditions. Pain flare was observed in 44 patients (23%). Median time to pain flare was 5 days (range, 0-20 days) after the start of treatment. On multivariate analysis, the only independent factor associated with pain flare was the number of treatment fractions (odds ratio = 0.66, P=.004). Age, sex, performance status, spine location, number of treated vertebrae, prior radiation, prior surgery, primary tumor histology, baseline pain score, and steroid use were not significant. Conclusions: Acute pain flare after spine SBRT is a relatively common event, for which patients should be counseled. Additional study is needed to determine whether prophylactic or symptomatic intervention is preferred.« less

  10. Disaggregating pain and its effect on physical functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, M J; Dhanda, R; Cornell, J E; Escalante, A; Hazuda, H P

    1998-09-01

    Pain is a common impairment that limits the abilities of older persons. The purposes of this article are to: (i) describe the distribution of pain location using the McGill Pain Map (MPM) in a community-based cohort of aged subjects; (ii) investigate whether individual areas of pain could be sensibly grouped into regions of pain; (iii) determine whether intensity, frequency, and location constitute independent dimensions of pain; and (iv) determine whether these three pain dimensions make differential contributions to the presence of self-reported physical functional limitations. A total of 833 Mexican American and European American subjects, aged 65-79 years, were enrolled in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging and were interviewed in their homes between 1992 and 1996. A total of 373 (46%) of the subjects reported having pain in the past week. Physical functional limitations were ascertained using the nine items from the Nagi scale. Three composite scales were created: upper extremity, lower extremity, and total. Pain intensity and frequency were ascertained using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain location was ascertained by using the MPM. Pain was reported in every area of the MPM. Using multiple groups confirmatory factor analysis, the 36 areas were grouped into 7 regions of pain: head, arms, hands and wrists, trunk, back, upper leg, and lower leg. Among persons with pain, pain frequency, intensity, and location were weakly associated with each other. Pain regions were primarily independent of each other, yet weak associations existed between 6 of the 21 pair-wise correlations between regions. Pain regions were differentially associated with individual physical functional limitations. Pain in the upper leg was associated with 8 of the 9 physical tasks. In multivariate analyses, age, gender, and ethnic group accounted for only 2-3% of the variance in physical tasks. In multivariate analyses, age, gender, and ethnic group accounted for only 2-3% of the

  11. Monocoque structure for the SKITTER three-legged walker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansek, Robert N.; Booth, Andrew J.; Daneman, Steven A.; Dresser, James A.; Haney, Todd G.; Johnson, Gregory R.; Lindzen, Eric C.; Montgomery, Robert C.; Warren, Andrew L.

    1988-06-01

    The SKITTER 2 design is a monocoque version of the proposed lunar three-legged walker. By the definition of monocoque, the body and legs are a shell with no internal ribbing or supports added for absorbing stresses. The purpose of the monocoque is to encase the elements used for power transmission, power supply, and control of the motion. The material for the structure is a vinyl ester resin, Derakane 8084. This material is easily formable and locally obtainable. The body consists of a hexagonally shaped cylinder with truncated hexagonal pyramids on the top and botton. The legs are eight inch diameter cylinders. The legs are comprised of a tibia section and a femur section. The SKITTER 2 is powered by six actuators which provide linear forces that are transformed into rotary torques by a series of chains and sprockets. The joints connect the femur to the body and the tibia to the femur. Surrounding the joints are flexible rubber hoses that fully encase the chains and sprockets. The SKITTER 2 is capable of walking upside down, righting itself after being overturned, and has the ability to perform in many environments. Applications for this walker include lunar transport or drilling, undersea exploration, and operation in severe surroundings such as arctic temperatures or high radiation.

  12. Monocoque structure for the SKITTER three-legged walker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansek, Robert N.; Booth, Andrew J.; Daneman, Steven A.; Dresser, James A.; Haney, Todd G.; Johnson, Gregory R.; Lindzen, Eric C.; Montgomery, Robert C.; Warren, Andrew L.

    1988-01-01

    The SKITTER 2 design is a monocoque version of the proposed lunar three-legged walker. By the definition of monocoque, the body and legs are a shell with no internal ribbing or supports added for absorbing stresses. The purpose of the monocoque is to encase the elements used for power transmission, power supply, and control of the motion. The material for the structure is a vinyl ester resin, Derakane 8084. This material is easily formable and locally obtainable. The body consists of a hexagonally shaped cylinder with truncated hexagonal pyramids on the top and botton. The legs are eight inch diameter cylinders. The legs are comprised of a tibia section and a femur section. The SKITTER 2 is powered by six actuators which provide linear forces that are transformed into rotary torques by a series of chains and sprockets. The joints connect the femur to the body and the tibia to the femur. Surrounding the joints are flexible rubber hoses that fully encase the chains and sprockets. The SKITTER 2 is capable of walking upside down, righting itself after being overturned, and has the ability to perform in many environments. Applications for this walker include lunar transport or drilling, undersea exploration, and operation in severe surroundings such as arctic temperatures or high radiation.

  13. Effects of functional stabilization training on pain, function, and lower extremity biomechanics in women with patellofemoral pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Baldon, Rodrigo de Marche; Serrão, Fábio Viadanna; Scattone Silva, Rodrigo; Piva, Sara Regina

    2014-04-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the effects of functional stabilization training (FST) versus standard training on knee pain and function, lower-limb and trunk kinematics, trunk muscle endurance, and eccentric hip and knee muscle strength in women with patellofemoral pain. A combination of hip- and knee-strengthening exercise may be more beneficial than quadriceps strengthening alone to improve pain and function in individuals with patellofemoral pain. However, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of these exercise programs on the biomechanics of the lower extremity. Thirty-one women were randomized to either the FST group or standard-training group. Patients attended a baseline assessment session, followed by an 8-week intervention, and were reassessed at the end of the intervention and at 3 months after the intervention. Assessment measures were a 10-cm visual analog scale for pain, the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and the single-leg triple-hop test. A global rating of change scale was used to measure perceived improvement. Kinematics were assessed during the single-leg squat. Outcome measures also included trunk endurance and eccentric hip and knee muscle strength assessment. The patients in the FST group had less pain at the 3-month follow-up and greater global improvement and physical function at the end of the intervention compared to those in the standard-training group. Lesser ipsilateral trunk inclination, pelvis contralateral depression, hip adduction, and knee abduction, along with greater pelvis anteversion and hip flexion movement excursions during the single-leg squat, were only observed in the FST group after the intervention. Only those in the FST group had greater eccentric hip abductor and knee flexor strength, as well as greater endurance of the anterior, posterior, and lateral trunk muscles, after training. An intervention program consisting of hip muscle strengthening and lower-limb and trunk movement control exercises was

  14. The Lindsay Leg Club: supporting the NHS to provide leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Morag

    2013-06-01

    Public health services will need to cope with additional demands due to an ageing society and the increasing prevalence of chronic conditions. Lower-limb ulceration is a long-term, life-changing condition and leg ulcer management can be challenging for nursing staff. The Lindsay Leg Club model is a unique partnership between community nurses, members and the local community, which provides quality of care and empowerment for patients with leg ulcers, while also supporting and educating nursing staff. The Leg Club model works in accord with core themes of Government and NHS policy. Patient feedback on the Leg Club model is positive and the Leg Clubs provide a service to members which is well accepted by patients, yet is more economically efficient than the traditional district nursing practice of home visits. Lindsay Leg Clubs provide a valuable support service to the NHS in delivering improved quality of care while improving efficiency.

  15. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  16. Movement coordination of the lumbar spine and hip during a picking up activity in low back pain subjects.

    PubMed

    Shum, Gary L K; Crosbie, Jack; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2007-06-01

    The effect of low back pain, with or without nerve root signs, on the joint coordination and kinematics of the lumbar spine and hips during everyday activities, such as picking up an object from the floor, are largely unknown. An experimental study was designed to compare lumbar spine and hip joint kinematics and coordination in subjects with and without sub-acute low back pain, while picking up an object in a sitting position. A three-dimensional real-time electromagnetic tracking device was used to measure movements of the lumbar spine and hips. Sixty participants with subacute low back pain, with or without straight leg raise signs, and twenty healthy asymptomatic participants were recruited. The ranges of motions of lumbar spine and hips were determined. Movement coordination between the two regions was examined by cross-correlation. Results showed that mobility was significantly reduced in subjects with back pain, who compensated for limited motion through various strategies. The contribution of the lumbar spine relative to that of the hip was, however, found to be similar in all groups. The lumbar spine-hip joint coordination was substantially altered in subjects with back pain, in particular, those with a positive straight leg raise sign. We conclude that changes in the lumbar and hip kinematics were related to back pain and limitation in straight leg raise. Lumbar-hip coordination was mainly affected by the presence of positive straight leg raise sign when picking up an object in a sitting position.

  17. Adaptability to pain is associated with potency of local pain inhibition, but not conditioned pain modulation: a healthy human study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Kelun; Yao, Dongyuan; Xue, Charlie C L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pain sensitivity, adaptability, and potency of endogenous pain inhibition, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local pain inhibition. Forty-one healthy volunteers (20 male, 21 female) received conditioning stimulation (CS) over 2 sessions in a random order: tonic heat pain (46 °C) on the right leg for 7 minutes and cold pressor pain (1 °C to 4 °C) on the left hand for 5 minutes. Participants rated the intensity of pain continuously using a 0 to 10 electronic visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPT) measured at the heterotopic and homotopic location to the CS sites before, during, and 20 minutes after CS. Two groups of participants, pain adaptive and pain nonadaptive, were identified based on their response to pain in the cold pressor test. Pain-adaptive participants showed a pain reduction between peak pain and pain at end of the test by at least 2 of 10 (n=16); whereas the pain-nonadaptive participants reported unchanged peak pain during 5-minute CS (n=25). Heterotopic PPTs during the CS did not differ between the 2 groups. However, increased homotopic PPTs measured 20 minutes after CS correlated with the amount of pain reduction during CS. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to pain does not correlate with the potency of CPM. Adaptability to pain is associated with longer-lasting local pain inhibition. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tramadol infusion for the pain management in sickle cell disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Elvan; Inal, Mehmet T; Aydinok, Yesim; Balkan, Can; Yegul, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    We present the analgesic management of a 4-year-old child who suffered from severe abdominal and leg pain during his first vaso-occlusive crisis with sickle cell disease, diagnosed as beta/S disease when he was 1 year old. His mother and father were carriers of beta-thalassemia and hemoglobin S, respectively. He had an upper respiratory tract infection in which a vaso-occlusive crisis was precipitated. On admission to hospital, fever, severe abdominal and leg pain were noted. Hemoglobin was 4 g x dl(-1) with accompanying prominent reticulocytosis and acute spleen enlargement. These findings indicated a sequestration crisis as well as vaso-occlusive disease. He was transfused with packed red cells. Paracetamol (40-60 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) and ibuprofen (20 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) were administered to relieve pain. The child experienced moderate to severe pain (Oucher score 60-80) despite nonopioid analgesics, so a tramadol infusion (0.25 mg x kg(-1) x h(-1)) was started. During the tramadol infusion no morphine was required, the intensity of pain gradually decreased (Oucher score 20) and the child was able to move his legs. At the end of 3 days splenomegaly regressed, no fever and pain were observed and the infusion was stopped. In conclusion, tramadol infusion i.v. (0.25 mg x kg(-1) x h(-1)) combined with nonopioids was effective to relieve moderate to severe pain due to vaso-occlusive crisis and can be recommended before using morphine in a pediatric sickle cell crisis.

  19. Objective correlate of subjective pain perception by contact heat-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Granovsky, Yelena; Granot, Michal; Nir, Rony-Reuven; Yarnitsky, David

    2008-01-01

    The method of pain-evoked potentials has gained considerable acceptance over the last 3 decades regarding its objectivity, repeatability, and quantifiability. The present study explored whether the relationship between pain-evoked potentials and pain psychophysics obtained by contact heat stimuli is similar to those observed for the conventionally used laser stimulation. Evoked potentials (EPs) were recorded in response to contact heat stimuli at different body sites in 24 healthy volunteers. Stimuli at various temperatures were applied to the forearm (43 degrees C, 46 degrees C, 49 degrees C, and 52 degrees C) and leg (46 degrees C and 49 degrees C). The amplitudes of both components (N2 and P2) were strongly associated with the intensity of the applied stimuli and with subjective pain perception. Yet, regression analysis revealed pain perception and not stimulus intensity as the major contributing factor. A significant correlation was found between the forearm and the leg for both psychophysics and EPs amplitude. Contact heat can generate readily distinguishable evoked potentials on the scalp, consistent between upper and lower limbs. Although these potentials bear positive correlation with both stimulus intensity and pain magnitude, the latter is the main contributor to the evoked brain response.

  20. Kinematic analyses during stair descent in young women with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Grenholm, Anton; Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Häger-Ross, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Compensatory movement strategies may develop in response to pain to avoid stress on the affected area. Patellofemoral pain is characterised by intermittent periods of pain and the present study addresses whether long-term pain leads to compensatory movement strategies that remain even when the pain is absent. Lower extremity kinematics in three dimensions was studied in stair descent in 17 women with patellofemoral and in 17 matched controls. A two-dimensional geometric model was constructed to normalise kinematic data for subjects with varying anthropometrics when negotiating stairs of fixed proportions. There were minor differences in movement patterns between groups. Knee joint angular velocity in the stance leg at foot contact was lower and the movement trajectory tended to be jerkier in the patellofemoral group. The two-dimensional model showed greater plantar flexion in the swing leg in preparation for foot placement in the patellofemoral group. The results indicate that an altered stair descent strategy in the patellofemoral group may remain also in the absence of pain. The biomechanical interpretation presumes that the strategy is aimed to reduce knee joint loading by less knee joint moment and lower impact force.

  1. The effect of foot orthotic use on exercise related leg pain in cross country athletes.

    PubMed

    Reinking, Mark F; Hayes, Ann M; Austin, Tricia M

    2012-11-01

    The purposes of this research were to (1) investigate the effect of foot orthotic use on exercise related leg pain (ERLP) in cross-country (XC) athletes, and (2) determine if an association between foot type and foot orthotic use exists. Prospective cohort design. High schools and colleges in a Midwestern metropolitan region. 213 high school and college XC athletes (107 male, 106 female). Participants were seen before the fall XC season for classification of foot type, visual orthotic inspection, and questionnaire completion regarding foot orthotic use and ERLP. Statistical analysis of relationships (chi-square) was conducted. 37 of the 213 XC athletes (17.4%) used foot orthotics; 31 of the 37 athletes using foot orthotics (83.8%) reported a history of ERLP. Of these 31 athletes, 17 (54.8%) were using orthotics for ERLP and 15 reported a decrease in ERLP with orthotic use. Fourteen athletes were using orthotics for a reason other than ERLP and only 2 reported a decrease in ERLP with orthotic use. Athletes using orthotics included all three foot types (pronated, neutral, supinated) with no relationship between orthotic use and foot type. One-sixth of the XC athletes used foot orthotics and most using orthotics for ERLP reported a decrease in ERLP symptoms. The majority of athletes using orthotics for reasons other than ERLP reported no change in ERLP symptoms. There was no association between foot type and orthotic use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of manual therapy and neuroplasticity education on chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Farrell, Kevin; Landers, Merrill; Barclay, Martin; Goodman, Elise; Gillund, Jordan; McCaffrey, Sara; Timmerman, Laura

    2017-12-01

    To determine if a neuroplasticity educational explanation for a manual therapy technique will produce a different outcome compared to a traditional mechanical explanation. Sixty-two patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) were recruited for the study. Following consent, demographic data were obtained as well as pain ratings for low back pain (LBP) and leg pain (Numeric Pain Rating Scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), fear-avoidance (Fear-Avoidance-Beliefs Questionnaire), forward flexion (fingertips-to-floor), and straight leg raise (SLR) (inclinometer). Patients were then randomly allocated to receive one of two explanations (neuroplasticity or mechanical), a manual therapy technique to their lumbar spine, followed by post-intervention measurements of LBP, leg pain, forward flexion, and SLR. Sixty-two patients (female 35 [56.5%]), with a mean age of 60.1 years and mean duration of 9.26 years of CLBP participated in the study. There were no statistically significant interactions for LBP ( p  = .325), leg pain ( p  = .172), and trunk flexion ( p  = .818) between the groups, but SLR showed a significant difference in favor of the neuroplasticity explanation ( p  = .041). Additionally, the neuroplasticity group were 7.2 times (95% confidence interval = 1.8-28.6) more likely to improve beyond the MDC on the SLR than participants in the mechanical group. The results of this study show that a neuroplasticity explanation, compared to a traditional biomechanical explanation, resulted in a measureable difference in SLR in patients with CLBP when receiving manual therapy. Future studies need to explore if the increase in SLR correlated to changes in cortical maps of the low back.

  3. Does pain score in response to a standardized subcutaneous local anesthetic injection predict epidural steroid injection outcomes in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy? A prospective correlational study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven P; Mao, Jianren; Vu, To-Nhu; Strassels, Scott A; Gupta, Anita; Erdek, Michael A; Christo, Paul J; Kurihara, Connie; Griffith, Scott R; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Chen, Lucy

    2013-03-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are the most commonly performed pain procedures. Despite numerous studies, controversy continues to surround their effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a standard, clinical local anesthetic injection can predict outcomes for ESI. In this multicenter study, 103 patients received two ESI 2 weeks apart. Prior to their first injection, subjects rated the pain intensity of a standardized subcutaneous (SQ) injection of lidocaine prior to the full dose. Numerical rating scale pain scores were correlated with leg and back pain relief, and functional improvement, through 3-month follow-up. A composite successful outcome was predetermined to be a ≥2-point decrease in leg pain score, coupled with a positive global perceived effect. A small but significant relationship was found between SQ pain score and reduction in leg (r = -0.21, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.04; P = 0.03) and back pain (r = -0.22, 95% CI -0.36 to -0.07; P = 0.03). Subjects with a positive outcome at 1 month had a mean SQ pain score of 2.5 (SD 1.9) vs 4.1 (SD 2.7) in those with a negative outcome (P = 0.04). Subjects with SQ pain scores <4/10 had lower leg and back pain scores than those with pain scores ≥4 at 1-month (mean 3.2, SD 2.6 vs 5.1, SD 2.7 for leg, P < 0.01; mean 3.7, SD 2.6 vs 5.0, SD 3.0 for back, P = 0.02) and 3-month (mean 3.8, SD 2.7 vs 5.2, SD 3.1 for leg, P = 0.01; mean 4.0, SD 2.6 vs 4.9, SD 3.1 for back; P = 0.14) follow-up. The results of this study found a weak positive correlation between SQ pain scores and treatment results. Further research should consider whether pain perception in conjunction with other variables might prove to be a reliable predictor for ESI and other procedural outcomes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparative functional analyses of ultrabithorax reveal multiple steps and paths to diversification of legs in the adaptive radiation of semi-aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Khila, Abderrahman; Abouheif, Ehab; Rowe, Locke

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of new ecological habitats is often associated with lineage diversification, yet the genetic changes underlying invasions and radiations are poorly understood. Over 200 million years ago, the semi-aquatic insects invaded water surface from a common terrestrial ancestor and diversified to exploit a wide array of niches. Here, we uncover the changes in regulation and function of the gene Ultrabithorax associated with both the invasion of water surface and the subsequent diversification of the group. In the common ancestor of the semi-aquatic insects, a novel deployment of Ubx protein in the mid-legs increased their length, thereby enhancing their role in water surface walking. In derived lineages that specialize in rowing on the open water, additional changes in the timing of Ubx expression further elongated the mid-legs thereby facilitating their function as oars. In addition, Ubx protein function was selectively reversed to shorten specific rear-leg segments, thereby enabling their function as rudders. These changes in Ubx have generated distinct niche-specialized morphologies that account for the remarkable diversification of the semi-aquatic insects. Therefore, changes in the regulation and function of a key developmental gene may facilitate both the morphological change necessary to transition to novel habitats and fuel subsequent morphological diversification. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Involvement of neutrophils and interleukin-18 in nociception in a mouse model of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinichirou; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Shinoda, Masamichi; Koide, Masashi; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Chaweewannakorn, Chayanit; Yano, Toshihisa; Sogi, Yasuhito; Itaya, Nobuyuki; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Yabe, Yutaka; Sasaki, Keiichi; Kanzaki, Makoto; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    Muscle pain is a common condition that relates to various pathologies. Muscle overuse induces muscle pain, and neutrophils are key players in pain production. Neutrophils also play a central role in chronic pain by secreting interleukin (IL)-18. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of neutrophils and IL-18 in a mouse model of muscle pain. The right hind leg muscles of BALB/c mice were stimulated electrically to induce excessive muscle contraction. The left hind leg muscles were not stimulated. The pressure pain threshold, number of neutrophils, and IL-18 levels were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the IL-18-binding protein and Brilliant Blue G on pain were investigated. In stimulated muscles, pressure pain thresholds decreased, and neutrophil and IL-18 levels increased compared with that in non-stimulated muscles. The administration of IL-18-binding protein and Brilliant Blue G attenuated hyperalgesia caused by excessive muscle contraction. These results suggest that increased IL-18 secretion from larger numbers of neutrophils elicits mechanical hyperalgesia.

  6. [Treatment Results of Low Back and Leg Pain Considering Para-Lumbar Spine Disease and Peripheral Nerve Neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Naotaka; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Morimoto, Daijiro; Matsumoto, Juntaro; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Isobe, Masanori

    2018-06-01

    Here we report our treatment results of low back and leg pain(LBLP)considering para-lumbar spine disease(PLSD)and peripheral nerve neuropathy(PNN). We enrolled 103 patients who were admitted to our institute for LBLP treatment between January and December in 2014. For the treatment, we preferentially performed intensive block therapy for PLSD. Among 103 patients, 89 patients had PLSD. In 85 patients, we performed intensive block therapy and 82 patients experienced short-term improvement of symptoms. In 35 of these 82 patients, lumbar spine and/or PNN surgical treatment was required as the effect of block therapy was transient. Intensive block therapy was effective in 47 of 103 patients(45.6%), and the remaining patients required surgical treatment(PLSD and/or PNN:31 cases, lumbar spine:13 cases, both:8 cases). Among 103 patients with LBLP, intensive block therapy for PLSD and PNN was useful for short-term symptom improvement in 82 patients(79.6%), and for long-term symptom improvement in 47 patients(45.6%)as evaluated at the final follow-up. Surgical treatment of PLSD and/or PNN was required in 39 patients(37.9%). These results suggested that treatment of PLSD and PNN might yield good results for patients with LBLP.

  7. Interventions for varicose veins and leg oedema in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rebecca M D; Aflaifel, Nasreen; Bamigboye, Anthony A

    2015-10-19

    Pregnancy is presumed to be a major contributory factor in the increased incidence of varicose veins in women, which can in turn lead to venous insufficiency and leg oedema. The most common symptom of varicose veins and oedema is the substantial pain experienced, as well as night cramps, numbness, tingling, the legs may feel heavy, achy, and possibly be unsightly. Treatments for varicose veins are usually divided into three main groups: surgery, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. Treatments of leg oedema comprise mostly symptom reduction rather than cure and use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. To assess any form of intervention used to relieve the symptoms associated with varicose veins and leg oedema in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials of treatments for varicose veins or leg oedema, or both, in pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We included seven trials (involving 326 women). The trials were largely unclear for selection bias and high risk for performance and detection bias.Two studies were placebo-controlled trials. The first one compared a phlebotonic (rutoside) with placebo for the reduction in symptoms of varicose veins; the second study evaluated the efficacy of troxerutin in comparison to placebo among 30 pregnant women in their second trimester with symptomatic vulvar varicosities and venous insufficiency in their lower extremities. Data from this study were not in useable format, so were not included in the analysis. Two trials compared either compression stockings with resting in left lateral position or reflexology with rest for 15 minutes for the reduction of leg oedema. One trial compared standing water immersion for 20 minutes with sitting upright in a chair with legs elevated for 20

  8. Eccentric and Isometric Hip Adduction Strength in Male Soccer Players With and Without Adductor-Related Groin Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thorborg, Kristian; Branci, Sonia; Nielsen, Martin Peter; Tang, Lars; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Hölmich, Per

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adductor-related pain is the most common clinical finding in soccer players with groin pain and can be a long-standing problem affecting physical function and performance. Hip adductor weakness has been suggested to be associated with this clinical entity, although it has never been investigated. Purpose: To investigate whether isometric and eccentric hip strength are decreased in soccer players with adductor-related groin pain compared with asymptomatic soccer controls. The hypothesis was that players with adductor-related groin pain would have lower isometric and eccentric hip adduction strength than players without adductor-related groin pain. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Male elite and subelite players from 40 teams were contacted. In total, 28 soccer players with adductor-related groin pain and 16 soccer players without adductor-related groin pain (asymptomatic controls) were included in the study. In primary analysis, the dominant legs of 21 soccer players with adductor-related groin pain (≥4 weeks duration) were compared with the dominant legs of 16 asymptomatic controls using a cross-sectional design. The mean age of the symptomatic players was 24.5 ± 2.5 years, and the mean age of the asymptomatic controls was 22.9 ± 2.4 years. Isometric hip strength (adduction, abduction, and flexion) and eccentric hip strength (adduction) were assessed with a handheld dynamometer using reliable test procedures and a blinded assessor. Results: Eccentric hip adduction strength was lower in soccer players with adductor-related groin pain in the dominant leg (n = 21) compared with asymptomatic controls (n = 16), namely 2.47 ± 0.49 versus 3.12 ± 0.43 N·m/kg, respectively (P < .001). No other hip strength differences were observed between symptomatic players and asymptomatic controls for the dominant leg (P = .35-.84). Conclusion: Large eccentric hip adduction strength deficits were found in soccer players with adductor

  9. Does a 'tight' hamstring predict low back pain reporting during prolonged standing?

    PubMed

    Raftry, Sean M; Marshall, Paul W M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hamstring passive stiffness and extensibility in asymptomatic individuals with the reporting of low back pain during 2-h prolonged standing. Twenty healthy participants with no history of low back pain (mean±SD, age 22.6±2.7 years, height 1.74±0.09 m, weight 76.2±14.8 kg). Low back pain (VAS score; mm) was continuously monitored during 2-h prolonged standing. Hamstring extensibility, passive stiffness, and stretch tolerance were measured before and after prolonged standing using an instrumented straight leg raise (iSLR). Ten participants reported a clinically relevant increase (Δ VAS>10mm) in low back pain during prolonged standing. Hamstring extensiblity (leg°(max)), passive stiffness (Nm.°(-1)), and stretch tolerance (VAS; mm) were no different between pain developers and non-pain developers. No changes in hamstring measures were observed following 2-h prolonged standing. No relationship was observed in this study between measures of hamstring extensibility and the reporting of low back pain during prolonged standing. There is no evidence to recommend hamstring extensibility interventions (i.e. passive stretching) as a means of reducing pain reporting in occupations requiring prolonged standing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Relationship among Leg Strength, Leg Power and Alpine Skiing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettman, Larry R.; Huckel, Jack R.

    The purpose of this study was to relate leg strength and power to alpine skiing success as measured by FIS points. Isometric leg strength was represented by the knee extension test described by Clarke. Leg power was measured by the vertical jump test and the Margaria-Kalamen stair run. Results in the strength and power tests were correlated with…

  11. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  12. Morphine, Nortriptyline and their Combination vs. Placebo in Patients with Chronic Lumbar Root Pain

    PubMed Central

    Khoromi, Suzan; Cui, Lihong; Nackers, Lisa; Max, Mitchell B.

    2007-01-01

    Although lumbar radicular pain is the most common chronic neuropathic pain syndrome, there have been few randomized studies of drug treatments. We compared the efficacy of morphine (15–90 mg), nortriptyline (25 –100 mg), their combination, and a benztropine “active placebo” (0.25-1 mg) in patients with chronic sciatica. Each period consisted of 5 weeks of dose escalation, 2 weeks of maintenance at the highest tolerated doses, and 2 weeks of dose tapering. The primary outcome was the mean daily leg pain score on a 0–10 scale during the maintenance period. Secondary outcomes included a 6-point ordinal global pain relief scale, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index (ODI) and the SF-36. In the 28 out of 61 patients who completed the study, none of the treatments produced significant reductions in average leg pain or other leg or back pain scores. Pain reduction, relative to placebo treatment was 14% for nortriptyline (95% CI= [−2%, 30%]), 7% for morphine (95% CI= [−8%, 22%]), and 7% for the combination treatment (95% CI= [−4%, 18%]). Mean doses were: nortriptyline alone, 84 +/− 24.44 (SD)mg/day; morphine alone, 62 +/−29mg/day; and combination, morphine, 49 +/−27 mg/day plus nortriptyline, 55 mg+/− 33.18 mg/day. Over half of the study completers reported some adverse effect with morphine, nortriptyline or their combination. Within the limitations of the modest sample size and high dropout rate, these results suggest that nortriptyline, morphine and their combination may have limited effectiveness in the treatment of chronic sciatica. PMID:17182183

  13. Risk factors for pain in children with severe cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Breau, Lynn M; Camfield, Carol S; McGrath, Patrick J; Finley, G Allen

    2004-06-01

    Diagnosing cause of pain in children with severe cognitive impairments is difficult due to their problems with communication. Identification of risk factors for specific pain etiologies might help professionals in this task. The aim of this study was to determine whether child-related characteristics increase risk for specific types of pain. Participants were the caregivers of 41 females and 53 males with moderate to profound mental retardation, who were aged 3 to 18 years 8 months (mean 10:1, SD 4:4) but who communicated at the level of a typical child of 13.8 months (SD 10 months): 44 of the children had cerebral palsy (CP) and 59 a seizure disorder. Caregivers reported the cause of children's episodes of pain for four 1-week periods over 1 year. Logistic regression analyses were used to predict occurrence of specific types of pain using children's demographic, medical, and physical characteristics. Children had 406 episodes of pain due to accident, gastrointestinal conditions, musculoskeletal problems, infection, recurrent conditions, and common childhood causes. Results indicated that a unique set of risk factors predicted each pain type in this sample. Significant risk factors for pain included: lack of visual impairment and leg impairment (accidental pain); seizures, leg impairment, and greater number of medications (non-accidental pain); being male and tube fed (musculoskeletal pain); age <7 years, absence of CP, visual impairment, and less frequent medical monitoring (infection pain); being female and with arm impairment (gastrointestinal pain); and being tube fed and taking fewer medications (common childhood pains). In most cases, models were more specific than sensitive, indicating that the significant predictors are more useful for eliminating potential pain causes. These results suggest that population risk factors may be helpful in structuring diagnostic investigations for individual children with severe cognitive impairments.

  14. Managing a Female Patient with Left Low Back Pain and Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Therapeutic Exercise: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry. Client Description: The client was 65-year-old woman with a 10-month history of constant left LBP/SIJP and leg pain. Intervention: The patient was seen six times to correct pelvic position/posture and left hip posterior capsule restriction via (1) muscle activation (left hamstrings, adductor magnus, and anterior gluteus medius) and (2) left hip adduction to lengthen the left posterior capsule/ischiofemoral ligament. Stabilization exercises included bilateral hamstrings, gluteus maximus, adductors, and abdominals to maintain pelvic position/posture. Measures and Outcome: Left Ober's test (initially positive) was negative at discharge. Pain as measured on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (initially 1/10 at best and 8/10 at worst) was 0/10–0/10 at discharge. Oswestry Disability Index score (initially 20%) was 0% at discharge. The patient no longer had numbness in her left leg, and sexual intercourse had become pain free. Implications: Interventions to restore and maintain the optimal position of pelvis and hip (femoral head in the acetabulum) may be beneficial for treating patients with chronic LBP/SIJP. The patient's pain was eliminated 13 days after she first performed three exercises to reposition the pelvis and restore left posterior hip capsule extensibility and internal rotation. PMID:22379254

  15. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in "turnout".

    PubMed

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in "turned out" postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat.

  16. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-27

    sweeps the leg during stance, and the third places the foot during flight and controls body attitude during stance. Each of the three methods elucidates...secondary strategy has been to examine systems with springy legs, so that the role of resonant oscillatory leg behavior might be better understood. ’ The ...body attitude : I lopping _leit: ’ The control system rcgulate:; hopping height by manlil)Lulating hopping energy. The leg is springy, so hopping is a

  17. Wings versus legs in the avian bauplan: development and evolution of alternative locomotor strategies.

    PubMed

    Heers, Ashley M; Dial, Kenneth P

    2015-02-01

    Wings have long been regarded as a hallmark of evolutionary innovation, allowing insects, birds, and bats to radiate into aerial environments. For many groups, our intuitive and colloquial perspective is that wings function for aerial activities, and legs for terrestrial, in a relatively independent manner. However, insects and birds often engage their wings and legs cooperatively. In addition, the degree of autonomy between wings and legs may be constrained by tradeoffs, between allocating resources to wings versus legs during development, or between wing versus leg investment and performance (because legs must be carried as baggage by wings during flight and vice versa). Such tradeoffs would profoundly affect the development and evolution of locomotor strategies, and many related aspects of animal ecology. Here, we provide the first evaluation of wing versus leg investment, performance and relative use, in birds-both across species, and during ontogeny in three precocial species with different ecologies. Our results suggest that tradeoffs between wing and leg modules help shape ontogenetic and evolutionary trajectories, but can be offset by recruiting modules cooperatively. These findings offer a new paradigm for exploring locomotor strategies of flying organisms and their extinct precursors, and thereby elucidating some of the most spectacular diversity in animal history. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee kinematics, hip strength, and gluteal muscle activation during a single-leg squat in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Theresa H; Moriya, Erika T U; Maciel, Carlos D; Serrão, Fábio V

    2012-06-01

    Controlled laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. To determine whether there are any differences between the sexes in trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee kinematics, hip strength, and gluteal muscle activation during the performance of a single-leg squat in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and control participants. Though there is a greater incidence of PFPS in females, PFPS is also quite common in males. Trunk kinematics may affect hip and knee function; however, there is a lack of studies of the influence of the trunk in individuals with PFPS. Eighty subjects were distributed into 4 groups: females with PFPS, female controls, males with PFPS, and male controls. Trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee kinematics and gluteal muscle activation were evaluated during a single-leg squat. Hip abduction and external rotation eccentric strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Group differences were assessed using a 2-way multivariate analysis of variance (sex by PFPS status). Compared to controls, subjects with PFPS had greater ipsilateral trunk lean (mean ± SD, 9.3° ± 5.3° versus 6.7° ± 3.0°; P = .012), contralateral pelvic drop (10.3° ± 4.7° versus 7.4° ± 3.8°; P = .003), hip adduction (14.8° ± 7.8° versus 10.8° ± 5.6°; P<.0001), and knee abduction (9.2° ± 5.0° versus 5.8° ± 3.4°; P<.0001) when performing a single-leg squat. Subjects with PFPS also had 18% less hip abduction and 17% less hip external rotation strength. Compared to female controls, females with PFPS had more hip internal rotation (P<.05) and less muscle activation of the gluteus medius (P = .017) during the single-leg squat. Despite many similarities in findings for males and females with PFPS, there may be specific sex differences that warrant consideration in future studies and when clinically evaluating and treating females with PFPS.

  19. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  20. The differential role of pain, work characteristics and pain-related fear in explaining back pain and sick leave in occupational settings.

    PubMed

    Gheldof, Els L M; Vinck, Jan; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Hidding, Alita; Crombez, Geert

    2005-01-01

    This cross-sectional questionnaire study investigated the role of pain (pain severity, radiating pain), work characteristics (physical workload, job stressors, job satisfaction), negative affect and pain-related fear in accounting for low back pain (LBP) and sick leave (SL) in 1294 employees from 10 companies in Belgium and the Netherlands. An increased risk for short-term LBP (1-30 days during the last year) was observed for workers reporting high physical workload (OR=2.39), high task exertion (OR=1.63) and high negative affect (OR=1.03). For prolonged LBP (>30 days during the last year) severe pain (OR=13.03), radiating pain (OR=2.37) and fear of work-related activities (OR=3.17) were significant risk factors. A lack of decision latitude decreased the risk of long-term LBP (OR=0.39). Short-term SL (1-30 days during the last year) was associated with severe pain (OR=2.83), high physical workload (OR=2.99) and high fear of movement/(re)injury (OR=1.88). A lack of decision latitude increased the risk of short-term SL (OR=1.92). Long-term SL (>30 days during the last year) was associated with radiating pain (OR=3.80) and high fear of movement/(re)injury (OR=6.35). A lack of co-worker support reduced the risk of long-term SL (OR=0.27). These results suggest that physical load factors are relatively more important in the process leading to short-term LBP and short-term SL, whereas job stressors, severe pain, radiation, and pain-related fear are more important in determining the further course and maintenance of the inability to work. The potential implications of these findings for primary and secondary prevention, and occupational rehabilitation are discussed.

  1. The effect of preoperative dexamethasone on pain 1 year after lumbar disc surgery: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-11-16

    It has been hypothesized that dexamethasone can inhibit persistent postoperative pain, but data on humans is lacking and results from animal studies are conflicting. We explored the effect of 16 mg dexamethasone IV administered preoperatively on persistent pain 1 year after lumbar discectomy. This is a prospective 1-year follow-up on a single-centre, randomized, and blinded trial exploring the analgesic effect of 16 mg IV dexamethasone or placebo after lumbar discectomy. One year follow-up was a written questionnaire including back and leg pain (VAS 0-100 mm), Short Form 36 survey (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), OSWESTRY Low Back Pain Questionnaire, duration of sick leave, working capability, contentment with surgical result. Response rate was 71% (55 patients) in the dexamethasone group, 58% (44 patients) in the placebo group. Leg pain (VAS) was significantly lower in the placebo group compared to the dexamethasone group: 17 (95% CI 10-26) vs 26 (95% CI 19-33) mm, respectively (mean difference 9 mm (95% CI -1 to 0), (P = 0.03). No difference regarding back pain. The placebo group reported significantly more improvement of leg pain and were significantly more satisfied with the surgical result. Patients in the dexamethasone group reported significantly higher pain levels in EQ-5D- and Oswestry questionnaires. No difference in the SF-36 survey or daily analgesic consumption. We found significantly higher pain levels in the dexamethasone group compared to placebo 1 year after lumbar disc surgery. Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT01953978 ). Registered 26 Sep 2013.

  2. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  3. Idiopathic epidural lipomatosis as a cause of pain and neurological symptoms attributed initially to radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Millwater, C J; Jacobson, I; Howard, G C

    1992-09-01

    Epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition in which overgrowth of extradural fat can lead to back pain, spinal cord compression and radiculopathy. A 51-year-old man developed back pain and reduced mobility following a standard course of radiotherapy for a Stage I seminoma. His symptoms and radiological appearances were initially attributed to radiation fibrosis. Further investigations and operative intervention revealed epidural lipomatosis. The excess lipomatous tissue was removed with complete resolution of his symptoms.

  4. De-educate to re-educate: aging and low back pain.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Zimney, Kory; Johnson, Eldon A; Kraemer, Chris; Fesler, Justin; Burcham, Tyler

    2017-12-01

    Patients' beliefs about their condition have been shown to play a significant role in their pain experience and response to treatment, especially when a patient sees their tissue health as vulnerable or aged. Educational can alter these beliefs. Prior to new information, patients often have to be de-educated regarding common misbeliefs to undergo re-education. To determine if a brief de-education session regarding aging and low back pain (LBP) can shift pain ratings, fear-avoidance beliefs, beliefs regarding aging and LBP, and limited active trunk flexion. Fifty adults ranging from 50 to 93 years of age (SD = 10.73) with a 15.1 years of LBP were education on the poor correlation between aging and LBP. Prior to and immediately after the education pain ratings for LBP and leg pain (numeric pain rating scale-NPRS), fear-avoidance (fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire-FABQ), beliefs regarding aging and LBP (Likert scale) and active trunk flexion were measured. Significant changes were found in positive shifts with LBP (p = 0.002), leg pain (p = 0.042), FABQ-physical activity subscale (p = 0.004) and active trunk forward flexion (p < 0.001). The results show that education aimed at altering beliefs regarding LBP and aging result in a positive shift in pain, fear avoidance related to physical activity and active trunk flexion. Prior to providing patients with new healthcare information, de-educating them regarding poor beliefs may be helpful in shifting them towards new, healthier paradigms associated with their condition.

  5. Predictors of pain and disability outcomes in one thousand, one hundred and eight patients who underwent lumbar discectomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad E; Arnold, Paul M; Passias, Peter G; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony K; Radcliff, Kristen; Isaacs, Robert

    2015-11-01

    A key component toward improving surgical outcomes is proper patient selection. Improved selection can occur through exploration of prognostic studies that identify variables which are associated with good or poorer outcomes with a specific intervention, such as lumbar discectomy. To date there are no guidelines identifying key prognostic variables that assist surgeons in proper patient selection for lumbar discectomy. The purpose of this study was to identify baseline characteristics that were related to poor or favourable outcomes for patients who undergo lumbar discectomy. In particular, we were interested in prognostic factors that were unique to those commonly reported in the musculoskeletal literature, regardless of intervention type. This retrospective study analysed data from 1,108 patients who underwent lumbar discectomy and had one year outcomes for pain and disability. All patient data was part of a multicentre, multi-national spine repository. Ten relatively commonly captured data variables were used as predictors for the study: (1) age, (2) body mass index, (3) gender, (4) previous back surgery history, (5) baseline disability, unique baseline scores for pain for both (6) low back and (7) leg pain, (8) baseline SF-12 Physical Component Summary (PCS) scores, (9) baseline SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores, and (10) leg pain greater than back pain. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were run against one year outcome variables of pain and disability. For the multivariate analyses associated with the outcome of pain, older patients, those with higher baseline back pain, those with lesser reported disability and higher SF-12 MCS quality of life scores were associated with improved outcomes. For the multivariate analyses associated with the outcome of disability, presence of leg pain greater than back pain and no previous surgery suggested a better outcome. For this study, several predictive variables were either unique or

  6. Painful bone metastasis in elderly treated with radiation therapy: Single- or multiple-fraction regimen? A multicentre retrospective observational analysis.

    PubMed

    Falivene, S; Pezzulla, D; Di Franco, R; Giugliano, F M; Esposito, E; Scoglio, C; Amato, B; Borzillo, V; D'Aiuto, M; Muto, P

    2017-02-01

    Bone metastases are a frequent complication of advanced oncologic disease. Pain associated to bone metastasis is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients, especially in elderly. The aim of this multicentric retrospective observational study is to evaluate the efficacy of different schedules of radiation therapy in elderly patients in terms of pain relief. 206 patients over the age of 60 were enrolled in 1 year time for a multicentre retrospective observational study. Patients were treated with palliative purposes for painful bone metastases. Pain intensity difference (PID) was found in 72% of patients. Reported PID was statistically significant for p < 0.01. Pain intensity measured by a point numeric rating scale was statistically significant reduced for p < 0.05 by one-fraction regimen compared to other two regimens. In recent years, numerous studies have evaluated the most appropriate regimen of fractionation in individual cases, despite this, a consensus about the best schedule is still debated. On our analysis, single-fractionation scheme (8 Gy) confirmed to be statistical significant effective in providing pain reduction due to bone metastases. Radiation therapy provides significant pain relief of symptomatic bone metastases, but appropriate radiotherapy scheduled is needed in order to get significant response to treatment. Multidisciplinary approach is warranted to value the balance between the therapeutic objectives and the patient quality of life.

  7. Financial compensation and vocational recovery: a prospective study of secondary care neck and back patients.

    PubMed

    Hestbaek, L; Rasmussen, C; Leboeuf-Yde, C

    2009-01-01

    Financial compensation has been shown to be a negative prognostic factor for pain and disability in patients with neck or low back pain. It is unclear whether this association is causal and to what extent it hampers return to work. The objective of this study was to assess the direct influence of a financial compensation process on the ability to remain in regular employment in patients with suspected disc herniation. A prospective cohort study with a register-based follow-up at 1, 3, and 5 years after baseline was carried out at two multidisciplinary, non-surgical spine clinics in two public hospitals in Denmark. The study population comprised consecutive patients in regular employment with neck pain radiating to the arm or low back pain radiating to the leg. The exposure variable was any type of claim for financial compensation for the actual low back/leg or neck/arm pain. The outcome measure was receiving income compensation benefits. This information was obtained through national registers. Follow-up points were 1, 3, and 5 years after inclusion. The study included 1243 low back pain patients and 202 neck pain patients. The odds ratio, adjusted for relevant confounders, of receiving income compensation benefits in case of baseline financial claim was approximately 2 for low back/leg pain patients and about 4 for neck/arm pain patients at 1, 3, and 5 years. In employed patients, a claim for financial compensation for low back or neck pain with radiating pain was found to be independently associated with receipt of income compensation benefits after 1, 3, and 5 years.

  8. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Legs Syndrome Condition Restless Legs Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Treatment5. Questions Overview ... twitch when you try and sleep (also called periodic limb movements of sleep or PLMS). Diagnosis How ...

  9. Leg ulcer plastic surgery descent by laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfer, Jacqui; Filonenko, Natalia; Salansky, Norman M.

    1994-02-01

    Low energy laser therapy (LELT) was used to treat chronic leg ulcers. Seven patients, aged 59 to 96 years, with 11 leg ulcers were referred for laser therapy by plastic surgeons. They had a history of ulceration of 3 - 50 years and five of the patients had breakdown of previous skin grafts. Laser treatments were administered with a microprocessor-controlled device. A 22 red ((lambda) equals 660 nm) laser head was utilized to provide a dose of (4 - 6) J/cm2 and 7 infrared ((lambda) equals 880 nm) head to provide a dose of (4 - 8) J/cm2. The patients were treated three to five times per week, 25 - 30 treatments per course. Three patients underwent two courses of laser therapy with three weeks interval between them. All patients, after 5 - 10 laser treatments, have gotten relief of pain and decreased the amount of analgesics used. All ulcers in six patients were completely healed and two ulcers in the seventh patient decreased in size by 75%. One may conclude the developed laser methodology might be used as a preventative measure to avoid plastic surgery or improve its success.

  10. [Effect of medicinal-cake-separated moxibustion on functional activity of back-leg and plasma substance P level in patients with lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Yang, Xiao-fang; Jiang, Yu; Xiang, Kai-wei; Li, Hai-yu

    2014-12-01

    To observe the effect of medicinal-cake-separated moxibustion combined with acupuncture on back-leg activities and plasma substance P (SP) levels in patients with lumbar disc herniation, so as to reveal its mechanism underlying pain relief. A total of 114 patients with lumbar disc herniation were randomly divided into control group (n=56) and treatment group (n=58) according to a random digits table. Patients of the control group were treated by manual acupuncture stimulation of main acupoints Jiaji (EX-B 2), Huantiao (GB 30, affected side), Chengshan (BL 57, affected side), Kunlun (BL 60, affected side), and supplemented acupoints Yanglingquan (GB 34), Weizhong (BL 40) and Zusanli (ST 36) in combination with wheat-flour-cake separated moxibustion at the main acupoints, and patients of the treatment group were treated by medicinal-cake [Chuanwu (Radix Aconiti), Caowu (Radix Aconiti Kusnezoffii), Ruxiang (Olibanum), etc. ]-separated moxibustion in combination with manual acupuncture stimulation of the same acupoints mentioned above. Acupuncture treatment was conducted for 30 min, followed by moxibustion for 15 min. The treatment was given once daily for 10 days. The patients' back-leg functional activity ability was assessed using straight-leg raising test, and the pain state assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, respectively. The therapeutic effect was evaluated by using "Crite- ria for Diagnosis and Outcome Evaluation of Clinical Disorders or Syndromes of Chinese Medicine" issued in 1994 and plasma SP content was detected by radioimmunoassay. After the therapy, the back-leg activity score and JOA score of both groups were significantly higher than those of pre-treatment in the same one group (P<0. 05, P<0. 01), and those of the treatment group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). The VAS score of the treatment group was re- markably lower than that of the control group (P<0. 01

  11. Postural control in subclinical neck pain: a comparative study on the effect of pain and measurement procedures.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Gabriela; Martins, Helena; Silva, Anabela G

    2018-04-25

    This study investigated whether young university students with neck pain (NP) have postural control deficits when compared to sex and age-matched asymptomatic subjects. Centre of pressure (COP) sway area, velocity, anterior-posterior and mediolateral distances were measured in participants with (n=27) and without (n=27) neck pain for different combinations of static standing (narrow stance, tandem stance and single leg stance) and measurement time (90, 60, 30 and 15 s) with eyes closed using a force plate. Additionally, static and dynamic clinical tests of postural control were used. No significant between group differences were found for the COP measurements (p>0.05). However, individuals with subclinical NP were more likely to fail the 90 s tandem test (p<0.05) in the force plate and univariate comparisons revealed significant between group differences in the tandem and single leg stance clinical test measurements. Taken together, the inconsistent results might suggest an emerging postural control deficit in university students with low disability and low intensity chronic idiopathic NP.

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Slump Test for Identifying Neuropathic Pain in the Lower Limb.

    PubMed

    Urban, Lawrence M; MacNeil, Brian J

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic accuracy study with nonconsecutive enrollment. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the slump test for neuropathic pain (NeP) in those with low to moderate levels of chronic low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether accuracy of the slump test improves by adding anatomical or qualitative pain descriptors. Neuropathic pain has been linked with poor outcomes, likely due to inadequate diagnosis, which precludes treatment specific for NeP. Current diagnostic approaches are time consuming or lack accuracy. A convenience sample of 21 individuals with LBP, with or without radiating leg pain, was recruited. A standardized neurosensory examination was used to determine the reference diagnosis for NeP. Afterward, the slump test was administered to all participants. Reports of pain location and quality produced during the slump test were recorded. The neurosensory examination designated 11 of the 21 participants with LBP/sciatica as having NeP. The slump test displayed high sensitivity (0.91), moderate specificity (0.70), a positive likelihood ratio of 3.03, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.13. Adding the criterion of pain below the knee significantly increased specificity to 1.00 (positive likelihood ratio = 11.9). Pain-quality descriptors did not improve diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was highly sensitive in identifying NeP within the study sample. Adding a pain-location criterion improved specificity. Combining the diagnostic outcomes was very effective in identifying all those without NeP and half of those with NeP. Limitations arising from the small and narrow spectrum of participants with LBP/sciatica sampled within the study prevent application of the findings to a wider population. Diagnosis, level 4-.

  13. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri

  14. Treatment of reticular and telangiectatic leg veins: double-blind, prospective comparative trial of polidocanol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer D; Goldman, Mitchel P; Weiss, Robert A; Duffy, David M; Fabi, Sabrina G; Weiss, Margaret A; Guiha, Isabella

    2012-08-01

    Sixty-three subjects' legs were randomized to receive treatment with polidocanol (POL) or hypertonic saline (HS) for telangiectasias and reticular leg veins. To compare the safety and efficacy of two sclerosing agents in three dermatologic surgery practices. After exclusion of saphenofemoral junction incompetence, each subject's veins were categorized (telangiectasias <1 mm and reticular veins 1-3 mm) and randomized. Telangiectasias were treated with POL 0.5% or 11.7% HS and reticular veins with POL 1% or 23.4% HS. An independent, blinded physician determined efficacy and adverse events. Subject satisfaction questionnaires were administered and global clinical improvement assessments performed. All patients completed four visits at 0, 1, 4, and 12 weeks. Patients reported significantly greater pain during treatment with HS (2.42) than POL (1.03) (p < .001). There were no significant differences in physician-assessed improvement of reticular leg veins or telangiectasias; subject- or physician-assessed overall improvement; or physician-assessed phlebitis, pigmentation, edema, or matting in either of the three practices or the entire cohort. Two subjects developed ulcerations with HS. No ulcerations or allergic reactions developed after POL injections. Both agents provided effective treatment, but HS caused 2.35 times as much pain during injections and resulted in two episodes of tissue necrosis. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Eccentric and Isometric Hip Adduction Strength in Male Soccer Players With and Without Adductor-Related Groin Pain: An Assessor-Blinded Comparison.

    PubMed

    Thorborg, Kristian; Branci, Sonia; Nielsen, Martin Peter; Tang, Lars; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Hölmich, Per

    2014-02-01

    Adductor-related pain is the most common clinical finding in soccer players with groin pain and can be a long-standing problem affecting physical function and performance. Hip adductor weakness has been suggested to be associated with this clinical entity, although it has never been investigated. To investigate whether isometric and eccentric hip strength are decreased in soccer players with adductor-related groin pain compared with asymptomatic soccer controls. The hypothesis was that players with adductor-related groin pain would have lower isometric and eccentric hip adduction strength than players without adductor-related groin pain. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Male elite and subelite players from 40 teams were contacted. In total, 28 soccer players with adductor-related groin pain and 16 soccer players without adductor-related groin pain (asymptomatic controls) were included in the study. In primary analysis, the dominant legs of 21 soccer players with adductor-related groin pain (≥4 weeks duration) were compared with the dominant legs of 16 asymptomatic controls using a cross-sectional design. The mean age of the symptomatic players was 24.5 ± 2.5 years, and the mean age of the asymptomatic controls was 22.9 ± 2.4 years. Isometric hip strength (adduction, abduction, and flexion) and eccentric hip strength (adduction) were assessed with a handheld dynamometer using reliable test procedures and a blinded assessor. Eccentric hip adduction strength was lower in soccer players with adductor-related groin pain in the dominant leg (n = 21) compared with asymptomatic controls (n = 16), namely 2.47 ± 0.49 versus 3.12 ± 0.43 N·m/kg, respectively (P < .001). No other hip strength differences were observed between symptomatic players and asymptomatic controls for the dominant leg (P = .35-.84). Large eccentric hip adduction strength deficits were found in soccer players with adductor-related groin pain compared with asymptomatic soccer players

  16. Pain, not structural impairments may explain activity limitations in people with gluteal tendinopathy or hip osteoarthritis: A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Angela; Neeman, Teresa; Smith, Paul; Scarvell, Jennie; Cook, Jill

    2017-02-01

    What are the functional differences between people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GT), hip osteoarthritis (OA) or an asymptomatic population as measured by walking, Time Up and Go, single leg standing and strength? Cross sectional study with blinded measurers. 38 participants with GT, 20 with end stage hip OA and 21 asymptomatic healthy control (AS) participants. All participants were women. Pain (numeric rating scale), Walking speed (m/s), cadence (steps/min) and step length (m) measured via the 10m walk test and the Timed Up and Go; balance via single leg stance (s) duration; and hip abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation strength, standardized to body mass (BM) via the body mass average index (BMavg), measured via a wall mounted dynamometer. The two symptomatic groups reported similar pain levels (p=0.226), more pain then the AS group (p<0.000). Compared to the AS participants, participants with GT or hip OA demonstrated lower walking speed (10mwt and TUG, p<0.001), lower cadence and shorter duration single leg stance on the affected leg (p<0.05). Participants with GT or hip OA also demonstrated bilaterally weaker hip abduction than the AS group (p≤0.005). Compared to AS and GT participants, participants with hip OA demonstrated adduction weakness on the affected side (p=0.008 and p=0.002 respectively). There is a significant level of dysfunction and impairments associated with GT and hip OA. As activity limitations do not appear to be differentiated by structural impairments, we suggest that pain, rather than the underlying pathology may be the driving impairment that leads to walking and single leg standing dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic low back pain in older adults: prevalence, reliability, and validity of physical examination findings.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Debra K; Sakamoto, Sara; Perera, Subashan; Breuer, Paula

    2006-01-01

    To develop a structured physical examination protocol that identifies common biomechanical and soft-tissue abnormalities for older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) that can be used as a triage tool for healthcare providers and to test the interobserver reliability and discriminant validity of this protocol. Cross-sectional survey and examination. Older adult pain clinic. One hundred eleven community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older with CLBP and 20 who were pain-free. Clinical history for demographics, pain duration, previous lumbar surgery or advanced imaging, neurogenic claudication, and imaging clinically serious symptoms. Physical examination for scoliosis, functional leg length discrepancy, pain with lumbar movement, myofascial pain (paralumbar, piriformis, tensor fasciae latae (TFL)), regional bone pain (sacroiliac joint (SIJ), hip, vertebral body), and fibromyalgia. Scoliosis was prevalent in those with (77.5%) and without pain (60.0%), but prevalence of SIJ pain (84% vs 5%), fibromyalgia tender points (19% vs 0%), myofascial pain (96% vs 10%), and hip pain (48% vs 0%) was significantly different between groups (P < .001). Interrater reliability was excellent for SIJ pain (0.81), number of fibromyalgia tender points (0.84), and TFL pain (0.81); good for scoliosis (0.43), kyphosis (0.66), lumbar movement pain (0.75), piriformis pain (0.71), and hip disease by internal rotation (0.56); and marginal for leg length (0.00) and paravertebral pain (0.39). Biomechanical and soft tissue pathologies are common in older adults with CLBP, and many can be assessed reliably using a brief physical examination. Their recognition may save unnecessary healthcare expenditure and patient suffering.

  18. Correlates of low back pain in a general population sample: a multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, A; McMullen, W

    1988-06-01

    This study identifies correlates of low back pain in a general population sample and defines a profile of subjects with low back pain. A multidisciplinary approach was employed that required surveying and physically assessing 674 subjects on 105 variables in biographical, anatomical, strength and flexibility measurement categories. No attempt was made to select subjects from specific occupational, age, athletic, psychological and anatomical groups or subjects with specific biographical features, which may have resulted in a sample that was atypical of the general population. The results of this study based on a causal comparative ex post facto research design corroborated selected findings of previous research conducted on nongeneral population samples. These findings include relationships between low back pain and age, body type, sex, stress, smoking, selected types of physical activity, occupation and previous injuries to the neck, shoulders, back and upper legs, as well as previous episodes of low back pain. Additional correlates of low back pain that were identified and have little or controversial review in the back literature include: delayed low back pain syndrome caused by abrupt changes in running frequency, Q angle, pes cavus, leg length (right and left), trunk length, genu recurvatum and multiplane strength and flexibility limitations in the hip joints.

  19. Effective Relief of Pain and Associated Symptoms With Closed-Loop Spinal Cord Stimulation System: Preliminary Results of the Avalon Study.

    PubMed

    Russo, Marc; Cousins, Michael J; Brooker, Charles; Taylor, Nathan; Boesel, Tillman; Sullivan, Richard; Poree, Lawrence; Shariati, Nastaran Hesam; Hanson, Erin; Parker, John

    2018-01-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a fixed-input of energy into the dorsal column. Physiologic effects such as heartbeat, respiration, spinal cord movement, and history of stimulation can cause both the perceived intensity and recruitment of stimulation to increase or decrease, with clinical consequences. A new SCS system controls stimulation dose by measuring the recruitment of fibers in the dorsal column and by using the amplitude of the evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) to maintain stimulation within an individualized therapeutic range. Safety and efficacy of this closed-loop system was evaluated through six-month postimplantation. Chronic pain subjects with back and/or leg pain who were successfully trialed received a permanent system (Evoke; Saluda Medical, Sydney, Australia). Ratings of pain (100-mm visual analogue scale [VAS] and Brief Pain Instrument [BPI]), quality of life (EuroQol instrument [EQ-5D-5L]), function (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), and sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) were collected at baseline and repeated three and six months after implantation. Fifty-one subjects underwent a trial procedure; permanent implants were placed in 36 subjects. The proportion of subjects with ≥50% relief was 92.6% (back) and 91.3% (leg) at three months, and 85.7% (back) and 82.6% (leg) at six months. The proportion with ≥80% pain relief was 70.4% (back) and 56.5% (leg) at three months, and 64.3% (back) and 60.9% (leg) at six months. Statistically significant improvements in mean BPI, EQ-5D-5L, ODI, and PSQI were also observed at both time points. The majority of subjects experienced profound pain relief at three and six months, providing preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of the closed-loop SCS system. The exact mechanism of action for these outcomes is still being explored, although one likely hypothesis holds that ECAP feedback control may minimize recruitment of Aβ nociceptors and Aδ fibers during daily

  20. Surgery-Induced Changes and Early Recovery of Hip-Muscle Strength, Leg-Press Power, and Functional Performance after Fast-Track Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Bente; Thorborg, Kristian; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik; Bandholm, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background By measuring very early changes in muscle strength and functional performance after fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA), post-operative rehabilitation, introduced soon after surgery, can be designed to specifically target identified deficits. Objective(s) Firstly, to quantify changes (compared to pre-operative values) in hip muscle strength, leg-press power, and functional performance in the first week after THA, and secondly, to explore relationships between the muscle strength changes, and changes in hip pain, systemic inflammation, and thigh swelling. Design Prospective, cohort study. Setting Convenience sample of patients receiving a THA at Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark, between March and December 2011. Participants Thirty-five patients (65.9±7.2 years) undergoing THA. Main outcome measures Hip muscle strength, leg-press power, performance-based function, and self-reported disability were determined prior to, and 2 and 8 days after, THA (Day 2 and 8, respectively). Hip pain, thigh swelling, and C-Reactive Protein were also determined. Results Five patients were lost to follow-up. Hip muscle strength and leg press power were substantially reduced at Day 2 (range of reductions: 41–58%, P<0.001), but less pronounced at Day 8 (range of reductions: 23–31%, P<0.017). Self-reported symptoms and function (HOOS: Pain, Symptoms, and ADL) improved at Day 8 (P<0.014). Changes in hip pain, C-Reactive Protein, and thigh swelling were not related to the muscle strength and power losses. Conclusion(s) Hip muscle strength and leg-press power decreased substantially in the first week after THA – especially at Day 2 – with some recovery at Day 8. The muscle strength loss and power loss were not related to changes in hip pain, systemic inflammation, or thigh swelling. In contrast, self-reported symptoms and function improved. These data on surgery-induced changes in muscle strength may help design impairment-directed, post

  1. Increasing trunk flexion transforms human leg function into that of birds despite different leg morphology.

    PubMed

    Aminiaghdam, Soran; Rode, Christian; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    Pronograde trunk orientation in small birds causes prominent intra-limb asymmetries in the leg function. As yet, it is not clear whether these asymmetries induced by the trunk reflect general constraints on the leg function regardless of the specific leg architecture or size of the species. To address this, we instructed 12 human volunteers to walk at a self-selected velocity with four postures: regular erect, or with 30 deg, 50 deg and maximal trunk flexion. In addition, we simulated the axial leg force (along the line connecting hip and centre of pressure) using two simple models: spring and damper in series, and parallel spring and damper. As trunk flexion increases, lower limb joints become more flexed during stance. Similar to birds, the associated posterior shift of the hip relative to the centre of mass leads to a shorter leg at toe-off than at touchdown, and to a flatter angle of attack and a steeper leg angle at toe-off. Furthermore, walking with maximal trunk flexion induces right-skewed vertical and horizontal ground reaction force profiles comparable to those in birds. Interestingly, the spring and damper in series model provides a superior prediction of the axial leg force across trunk-flexed gaits compared with the parallel spring and damper model; in regular erect gait, the damper does not substantially improve the reproduction of the human axial leg force. In conclusion, mimicking the pronograde locomotion of birds by bending the trunk forward in humans causes a leg function similar to that of birds despite the different morphology of the segmented legs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  3. Position Sense in Chronic Pain: Separating Peripheral and Central Mechanisms in Proprioception in Unilateral Limb Pain.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Anthony J; Giummarra, Melita J

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of limb position is derived primarily from muscle spindles and higher-order body representations. Although chronic pain appears to be associated with motor and proprioceptive disturbances, it is not clear if this is due to disturbances in position sense, muscle spindle function, or central representations of the body. This study examined position sense errors, as an indicator of spindle function, in participants with unilateral chronic limb pain. The sample included 15 individuals with upper limb pain, 15 with lower limb pain, and 15 sex- and age-matched pain-free control participants. A 2-limb forearm matching task in blindfolded participants, and a single-limb pointer task, with the reference limb hidden from view, was used to assess forearm position sense. Position sense was determined after muscle contraction or stretch, intended to induce a high or low spindle activity in the painful and nonpainful limbs, respectively. Unilateral upper and lower limb chronic pain groups produced position errors comparable with healthy control participants for position matching and pointer tasks. The results indicate that the painful and nonpainful limb are involved in limb-matching. Lateralized pain, whether in the arm or leg, does not influence forearm position sense. Painful and nonpainful limbs are involved in bilateral limb-matching. Muscle spindle function appears to be preserved in the presence of chronic pain. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Reflexology on the Pain-Insomnia-Fatigue Disturbance Cluster of Breast Cancer Patients During Adjuvant Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarrasch, Ricardo; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin N; Ben-Ami, Sarah; Kaufman, Bella; Pfeffer, Raphi; Ben-David, Merav; Gamus, Dorit

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of reflexology treatment on quality of life, sleep disturbances, and fatigue in breast cancer patients during radiation therapy. A total of 72 women with breast cancer (stages 1-3) scheduled for radiation therapy were recruited. Women were allocated upon their preference either to the group receiving reflexology treatments once a week concurrently with radiotherapy and continued for 10 weeks or to the control group (usual care). The Lee Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, and Multidimensional Quality of Life Scale Cancer were completed by each patient in both arms at the beginning of the radiation treatment, after 5 weeks, and after 10 weeks of reflexology treatment. The final analysis included 58 women. The reflexology treated group demonstrated statistically significant lower levels of fatigue after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (p < 0.001), compared to the control group. It was also detected that although the quality of life in the control group deteriorated after 5 and 10 weeks of radiation therapy (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), it was preserved in the reflexology group, which also demonstrated a significant improvement in the quality of sleep after 10 weeks of radiation treatment (p < 0.05). Similar patterns were obtained in the assessment of the pain levels experienced by the patients. The results of the present study indicate that reflexology may have a positive effect on fatigue, quality of sleep, pain, and quality of life in breast cancer patients during radiation therapy. Reflexology prevented the decline in quality of life and significantly ameliorated the fatigue and quality of sleep of these patients. An encouraging trend was also noted in amelioration of pain levels.

  5. Gynecological Surgery and Low Back Pain in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Jeffery; Pidcoe, Peter E.; Ketchum-McKinney, Jessica M.; Burnet, Evie N.; Huang, Emily; Wilson, James C.; Hoogstad, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine sacroiliac joint compliance characteristics and pelvic floor movements in older women relative to gynecological surgery history and back pain complaints. Design: Single-visit laboratory measurement. Setting: University clinical research center. Participants: Twenty-five women aged 65 years or older. Outcome Measures: Sacroiliac joint compliance measured by Doppler imaging of vibrations and ultrasound measures of pelvic floor motion during the active straight leg raise test. Results: Doppler imaging of vibrations demonstrated test reliability ranging from 0.701 to 0.898 for detecting vibration on the ilium and sacrum sides of the sacroiliac joint. The presence of low-back pain or prior gynecological surgery was not significantly associated with a difference in the compliance or laxity symmetry of the sacroiliac joints. No significant difference in pelvic floor movement was found during the active straight leg raise test between subject groups. All P values were ≥.4159. Conclusions: Prior gynecological surgery and low-back pain were not significantly associated with side-to-side differences in the compliance of the sacroiliac joints or in significant changes in pelvic floor movement during a loading maneuver in a group of older women. PMID:23569659

  6. Chronic pain experience and pain management in persons with spinal cord injury in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Sagun; Kitrungrote, Luppana; Damkliang, Jintana

    2018-04-25

    Chronic pain is the frequent and significantly challenging complications in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Socio-cultural background may lead people perceive and manage pain differently. The study aims to describe the chronic pain experience and pain management of SCI persons in Nepal. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among purposively selected sample of 120 SCI persons with chronic pain living in the eight districts of Bagmati Zone of Nepal. The data were collected using the International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set Version 2 (ISCIPBDS-2) and Open-ended Pain Management Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis method. The back (n=84), lower legs/feet (n=63) and buttocks/hips (n=51) was found as the common pain locations. In common, the onset of pain was found within the first 6 month of the injury. Overall pain intensity and pain interference were found to be at the moderate level. The SCI persons used pain medications and non-pharmacological pain management. Ibuprofen was the commonly used pain medication and commonly used non-pharmacological pain management methods included physical support (e.g. massage, exercise), relaxation (e.g. distraction, substance abuse), coping (e.g. acceptance, praying), and traditional herbs. SCI persons had chronic pain experience which interfered with their daily living. They used pain medications and non-pharmacological pain management methods based on their beliefs, knowledge, and community resources in Nepal. This study provides some evidence to help the team of rehabilitation professional to plan and help SCI persons with chronic pain. Based on these findings, chronic pain management intervention for SCI persons should be developed and supported continuously from hospital to home based community context of Nepal.

  7. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. ...

  8. Central Sensitization and Perceived Indoor Climate among Workers with Chronic Upper-Limb Pain: Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Persson, Roger; Andersen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of indoor climate is an essential part of occupational health and safety. While questionnaires are commonly used for surveillance, not all workers may perceive an identical indoor climate similarly. The aim of this study was to evaluate perceived indoor climate among workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free colleagues and to determine the influence of central sensitization on this perception. Eighty-two male slaughterhouse workers, 49 with upper-limb chronic pain and 33 pain-free controls, replied to a questionnaire with 13 items of indoor climate complaints. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in muscles of the arm, shoulder, and lower leg. Cross-sectional associations were determined using general linear models controlled for age, smoking, and job position. The number of indoor climate complaints was twice as high among workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free controls (1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.3] versus 0.9 [0.4–1.5], resp.). PPT of the nonpainful leg muscle was negatively associated with the number of complaints. Workers with chronic pain reported more indoor climate complaints than pain-free controls despite similar actual indoor climate. Previous studies that did not account for musculoskeletal pain in questionnaire assessment of indoor climate may be biased. Central sensitization likely explains the present findings. PMID:26425368

  9. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of PIMAL: Mathematical Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2007-05-01

    The computational model of the human anatomy (phantom) has gone through many revisions since its initial development in the 1970s. The computational phantom model currently used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is based on a model published in 1974. Hence, the phantom model used by the NRC staff was missing some organs (e.g., neck, esophagus) and tissues. Further, locations of some organs were inappropriate (e.g., thyroid).Moreover, all the computational phantoms were assumed to be in the vertical-upright position. However, many occupational radiation exposures occur with the worker in other positions. In the first phase of this work, updates onmore » the computational phantom models were reviewed and a revised phantom model, which includes the updates for the relevant organs and compositions, was identified. This revised model was adopted as the starting point for this development work, and hence a series of radiation transport computations, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, was performed. The computational results were compared against values reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) in Publication 74. For some of the organs (e.g., thyroid), there were discrepancies between the computed values and the results reported in ICRP-74. The reasons behind these discrepancies have been investigated and are discussed in this report.Additionally, sensitivity computations were performed to determine the sensitivity of the organ doses for certain parameters, including composition and cross sections used in the simulations. To assess the dose for more realistic exposure configurations, the phantom model was revised to enable flexible positioning of the arms and legs. Furthermore, to reduce the user time for analyses, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed. The GUI can be used to visualize the positioning of the arms and legs as desired posture is achieved to generate the input file, invoke the computations, and extract the

  11. Transcutaneous laser treatment of leg veins.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; Pitassi, Luiza H U; Campos, Valeria; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Dierickx, Christine C

    2014-03-01

    Leg telangiectasias and reticular veins are a common complaint affecting more than 80% of the population to some extent. To date, the gold standard remains sclerotherapy for most patients. However, there may be some specific situations, where sclerotherapy is contraindicated such as needle phobia, allergy to certain sclerosing agents, and the presence of vessels smaller than the diameter of a 30-gauge needle (including telangiectatic matting). In these cases, transcutaneous laser therapy is a valuable alternative. Currently, different laser modalities have been proposed for the management of leg veins. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the basic principles of transcutaneous laser therapy of leg veins and to review the existing literature on this subject, including the most recent developments. The 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser, the 585-600-nm pulsed dye laser, the 755-nm alexandrite laser, various 800-983-nm diode lasers, and the 1,064-nm neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and various intense pulsed light sources have been investigated for this indication. The KTP and pulsed dye laser are an effective treatment option for small vessels (<1 mm). The side effect profile is usually favorable to that of longer wavelength modalities. For larger veins, the use of a longer wavelength is required. According to the scarce evidence available, the Nd:YAG laser produces better clinical results than the alexandrite and diode laser. Penetration depth is high, whereas absorption by melanin is low, making the Nd:YAG laser suitable for the treatment of larger and deeply located veins and for the treatment of patients with dark skin types. Clinical outcome of Nd:YAG laser therapy approximates that of sclerotherapy, although the latter is associated with less pain. New developments include (1) the use of a nonuniform pulse sequence or a dual-wavelength modality, inducing methemoglobin formation and enhancing the optical absorption

  12. Patellar taping, patellofemoral pain syndrome, lower extremity kinematics, and dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Aminaka, Naoko; Gribble, Phillip A

    2008-01-01

    Patellar taping has been a part of intervention for treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). However, research on the efficacy of patellar taping on lower extremity kinematics and dynamic postural control is limited. To evaluate the effects of patellar taping on sagittal-plane hip and knee kinematics, reach distance, and perceived pain level during the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) in individuals with and without PFPS. Repeated-measures design with 2 within-subjects factors and 1 between-subjects factor. The University of Toledo Athletic Training Research Laboratory. Twenty participants with PFPS and 20 healthy participants between the ages of 18 and 29 years. The participants performed 3 reaches of the SEBT in the anterior direction under tape and no-tape conditions on both legs. The participants' hip and knee sagittal-plane kinematics were measured using the electromagnetic tracking system. Reach distance was recorded by hand and was normalized by dividing the distance by the participants' leg length (%MAXD). After each taping condition on each leg, the participants rated the perceived pain level using the 10-cm visual analog scale. The participants with PFPS had a reduction in pain level with patellar tape application compared with the no-tape condition (P = .005). Additionally, participants with PFPS demonstrated increased %MAXD under the tape condition compared with the no-tape condition, whereas the healthy participants demonstrated decreased %MAXD with tape versus no tape (P = .028). No statistically significant differences were noted in hip flexion and knee flexion angles. Although patellar taping seemed to reduce pain and improve SEBT performance of participants with PFPS, the exact mechanisms of these phenomena cannot be explained in this study. Further research is warranted to investigate the effect of patellar taping on neuromuscular control during dynamic postural control.

  13. Mirror gait retraining for the treatment of patellofemoral pain in female runners

    PubMed Central

    Willy, Richard W.; Scholz, John P.; Davis, Irene S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal hip mechanics are often implicated in female runners with patellofemoral pain. We sought to evaluate a simple gait retraining technique, using a full-length mirror, in female runners with patellofemoral pain and abnormal hip mechanics. Transfer of the new motor skill to the untrained tasks of single leg squat and step descent was also evaluated. Methods Ten female runners with patellofemoral pain completed 8 sessions of mirror and verbal feedback on their lower extremity alignment during treadmill running. During the last 4 sessions, mirror and verbal feedback were progressively removed. Hip mechanics were assessed during running gait, a single leg squat and a step descent, both pre- and post-retraining. Subjects returned to their normal running routines and analyses were repeated at 1-month and 3-month post-retraining. Data were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance. Findings Subjects reduced peaks of hip adduction, contralateral pelvic drop, and hip abduction moment during running (P<0.05, effect size=0.69–2.91). Skill transfer to single leg squatting and step descent was noted (P<0.05, effect size=0.91–1.35). At 1 and 3 months post retraining, most mechanics were maintained in the absence of continued feedback. Subjects reported improvements in pain and function (P<0.05, effect size=3.81–7.61) and maintained through 3 months post retraining. Interpretation Mirror gait retraining was effective in improving mechanics and measures of pain and function. Skill transfer to the untrained tasks of squatting and step descent indicated that a higher level of motor learning had occurred. Extended follow-up is needed to determine the long term efficacy of this treatment. PMID:22917625

  14. Aspirin in venous leg ulcer study (ASPiVLU): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Weller, Carolina D; Barker, Anna; Darby, Ian; Haines, Terrence; Underwood, Martin; Ward, Stephanie; Aldons, Pat; Dapiran, Elizabeth; Madan, Jason J; Loveland, Paula; Sinha, Sankar; Vicaretti, Mauro; Wolfe, Rory; Woodward, Michael; McNeil, John

    2016-04-11

    Venous leg ulceration is a common and costly problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages. Current treatment is compression therapy; however, up to 50 % of ulcers remain unhealed after 2 years, and ulcer recurrence is common. New treatments are needed to address those wounds that are more challenging to heal. Targeting the inflammatory processes present in venous ulcers is a possible strategy. Limited evidence suggests that a daily dose of aspirin may be an effective adjunct to aid ulcer healing and reduce recurrence. The Aspirin in Venous Leg Ulcer study (ASPiVLU) will investigate whether 300-mg oral doses of aspirin improve time to healing. This randomised, double-blinded, multicentre, placebo-controlled, clinical trial will recruit participants with venous leg ulcers from community settings and hospital outpatient wound clinics across Australia. Two hundred sixty-eight participants with venous leg ulcers will be randomised to receive either aspirin or placebo, in addition to compression therapy, for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is time to healing within 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes are ulcer recurrence, wound pain, quality of life and wellbeing, adherence to study medication, adherence to compression therapy, serum inflammatory markers, hospitalisations, and adverse events at 24 weeks. The ASPiVLU trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of aspirin as an adjunct to compression therapy to treat venous leg ulcers. Study completion is anticipated to occur in December 2018. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12614000293662.

  15. Infection in Venous Leg Ulcers: Considerations for Optimal Management in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Douglas J

    2016-02-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most common cause of chronic leg wounds, accounting for up to 70 % of all chronic leg ulcers and carrying with them a significant morbidity, especially for elderly patients. Among people aged 65 years and older, the annual prevalence is 1.7 %. Billions of dollars per year are spent caring for patients with these often difficult-to-heal and sometimes recurrent chronic wounds. Chronic non-healing wounds of the lower extremities are susceptible to microbial invasion and can lead to serious complications, such as delayed healing, cellulitis, enlargement of wound size, debilitating pain, and deeper wound infections causing systemic illness. Recognition and treatment of the infected venous leg ulcer is an essential skill set for any physician caring for geriatric patients. Most physicians rely on subjective clinical signs and patient-reported symptoms in the evaluation of infected chronic wounds. The conventional bacterial culture is a widely available tool for the diagnosis of bacterial infection but can have limitations. Systemic antibiotics, as well as topical antiseptics and antibiotics, can be employed to treat and control infection and critical colonization. Better understanding of microbial biofilms in the wound environment have caused them to emerge as an important reason for non-healing and infection due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial, immunological, and chemical attack. A sound understanding of the microbial-host environment and its complexities, as well as the pathophysiology of venous hypertension, must be appreciated to understand the need for a multimodality approach to treating an infected venous leg ulcer. Other treatment measures are often required, in addition to systemic and topical antibiotics, such as the application of wound bandages, compression therapy, and wound debridement, which can hasten clearance of the infection and help to promote healing.

  16. Using near infrared light to manage symptoms associated with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guffey, J Stephen; Motts, Susan; Barymon, Deanna; Wooten, Amber; Clough, Tim; Payne, Emily; Henderson, McCall; Tice, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of near infrared (NIR) light could positively modulate symptoms associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Twenty-one subjects with RLS were treated with NIR three times weekly for four weeks. Baseline measures of: (1) international restless legs syndrome rating scale (IRLSRS) score; (2) Semmes Weinstein monofilament (SWM) test; (3) visual analog pain scale (VAS); (4) ankle-brachial index (ABI); and (5) sonographic imaging of the popliteal and posterior tibial arteries were compared to post-treatment values. NIR (850 nm) was delivered transcutaneously at 8 J/cm(2) to four locations on each leg and the plantar surface of each foot. A pre-test-post-test one group design was employed. Baseline and post-treatment measures were compared using either a dependent t-test when data were normal or the Wilcoxon signed rank test in the absence of normality. A significant improvement in IRLSRS scores was observed. Sensation improved from less than protective in 16.6% of sites tested at the baseline to 13.4% post-intervention. There was a significant improvement in ABI scores. VAS and sonographic imaging measures other than ABI remained unchanged. The use of NIR to modulate symptoms associated with RLS was supported by the data.

  17. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    PubMed

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p < 0.05) when the dominant knee was flexed to 135 ° (23.49% MVIC) versus the traditional 90 ° (75.34% MVIC), while gluteal activation remained similarly high (51.01% and 57.81% MVIC in the traditional position, versus 47.35% and 57.23% MVIC in the modified position for the gluteus maximus and medius, respectively). Modifying the traditional single-leg bridge by flexing the

  18. Efficacy of vibration on venipuncture pain scores in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Secil, Aydinoz; Fatih, Celikel; Gokhan, Aydemir; Alpaslan, Genc Fatih; Gonul, Sezer Rabia

    2014-10-01

    Venipuncture is a frequent source of painful procedures for infants. It has been well documented that infants react to pain with a combination of physiologic and behavioral responses. Infants are unable to describe pain and at particularly high risk for inadequate pain management. The Vibration Anesthesia Device is a specifically designed device for management of pain from minor procedures. It has been shown to reduce venipuncture pain in older children but has not been studied in infants. The mechanism of its effects has been described by a gate control theory, which states that vibration stimulates the dorsal horn neurons where the pain signal is being modulated. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this device on pain during and after venipuncture procedures in infants. Study participants were 60 healthy infants undergoing venipuncture procedure for routine laboratory tests. Infants were divided into 2 groups as follows: group 1 (n = 30) was placed vibration anesthesia device 5 to 10 cm proximally through the site of venipuncture, and group 2 (n = 30) underwent venipuncture only. A single observer rated pain responses using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability scale before, during, and after the procedure. The χ distribution and Student t test were used for statistical analysis. Groups did not differ by sex. Mean age of group 2 is less than group 1 and is statistically significant (P = 0.026). There were no differences between pain scores of groups assessed by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability scale before, during, and after venipuncture procedure (P = 0.359, P = 0.907, and P = 0.400 respectively). We assessed the efficacy of a vibration anesthesia device, and our results suggested that this device did not reduce pain scores in infants during and after venipuncture procedure.

  19. Ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator propeller flaps for the reconstruction of lower third leg soft- tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Thalaivirithan Margabandu; Ramkumar, Jayagosh; Jaganmohan, Janardhanan

    2017-01-01

    Lower third leg soft tissue defects with anatomical and pathological constraints are posing formidable challenges to reconstructive surgeon. This retrospective study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator-propeller flaps for the reconstruction of small and medium sized soft tissue defects in the lower third leg. 22 patients (16 were males and 6 were females) were involved in this study between period of January 2012 and December 2016.We followed the protocol of initial non delineating exploratory incision made to find out single best perforator in all patients. All the defects in leg reconstructed with adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps. All 22 flaps survived well. All in an average of 13 months follow up period, had pain free walking, with minimal scarring and acceptable aesthesis at the reconstruction sites with no need for any secondary procedure. With inability of preoperatively dopplering the perforators in the lower third leg region, the exploratory posterior nondelineating incision was used in all cases to secure the single best perforator for the propeller flaps. Thus adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps are dependable, easily adoptable for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the lower third leg region.

  20. Ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator propeller flaps for the reconstruction of lower third leg soft- tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Thalaivirithan Margabandu; Ramkumar, Jayagosh; Jaganmohan, Janardhanan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Lower third leg soft tissue defects with anatomical and pathological constraints are posing formidable challenges to reconstructive surgeon. Aim: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator-propeller flaps for the reconstruction of small and medium sized soft tissue defects in the lower third leg. Patients and Methods: 22 patients (16 were males and 6 were females) were involved in this study between period of January 2012 and December 2016.We followed the protocol of initial non delineating exploratory incision made to find out single best perforator in all patients. All the defects in leg reconstructed with adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps. Results: All 22 flaps survived well. All in an average of 13 months follow up period, had pain free walking, with minimal scarring and acceptable aesthesis at the reconstruction sites with no need for any secondary procedure. Conclusion: With inability of preoperatively dopplering the perforators in the lower third leg region, the exploratory posterior nondelineating incision was used in all cases to secure the single best perforator for the propeller flaps. Thus adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps are dependable, easily adoptable for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the lower third leg region. PMID:29618863

  1. Non-specific low back pain in primary care in the Spanish National Health Service: a prospective study on clinical outcomes and determinants of management

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Fernández, Carmen; Cordero, Antonio; Muriel, Alfonso; González-Luján, Luis; Gil del Real, María Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Background The Spanish National Health Service is a universal and free health care system. Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent disorder, generating large health and social costs. The objectives of this study were to describe its management in primary care, to assess patient characteristics that influence physicians' decisions, and to describe clinical outcome at 2 months. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 648 patients with non-specific low back pain was recruited by 75 physicians (out of 361 – 20.8%) working in 40 primary care centers in 10 of the 17 administrative regions in Spain, covering 693,026 out of the 40,499,792 inhabitants. Patients were assessed on the day they were recruited, and prospectively followed-up 14 and 60 days later. The principal patient characteristics that were analyzed were: sex, duration of the episode, history of LBP, working status, severity of LBP, leg pain and disability, and results of straight leg raising test. Descriptors of management were: performance of the straight leg raising test, ordering of diagnostic procedures, prescription of drug treatment, referral to physical therapy, rehabilitation or surgery, and granting of sick leave. Regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between patients' baseline characteristics and physicians' management decisions. Only workers were included in the models on sick leave. Results Mean age (SD) of included patients was 46.5 (15.5) years, 367 (56.6%) were workers, and 338 (52.5%) were females. Median (25th–75th interquartile range) duration of pain when entering the study was 4 (2–10) days and only 28 patients (4.3%) had chronic low back pain. Diagnostic studies included plain radiographs in 43.1% of patients and CT or MRI scans in 18.8%. Drug medication was prescribed to 91.7% of patients, 19.1% were sent to physical therapy or rehabilitation, and 9.6% were referred to surgery. The main determinants of the clinical management were duration of the episode and

  2. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Diagnosis and Characters of Non-Specific Low Back Pain in Japan: The Yamaguchi Low Back Pain Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Imajo, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional data from the Yamaguchi low back pain study conducted in Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan, was used for this analysis. Methods A total of 320 patients were recruited from walk-in orthopedic clinics in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. Patients visited the clinics primarily for low back pain (LBP) and sought treatment between April and May 2015. A self-questionnaire was completed by patients, while radiographic testing and neurological and physical examination was performed by the orthopedist in each hospital. The cause and characters of LBP was determined following examination of the data, regional anesthesia and block injection. Results ‘Specific LBP’ was diagnosed in 250 (78%) patients and non-diagnosable, ‘non-specific LBP’ in 70 (22%) patients. The VAS scores of patients were: LBP, 5.8±0.18; leg pain, 2.9±0.18 and the intensity of leg numbness was 1.9±0.16. Item scores for SF-8 were: general health, 46.6±0.40; physical function, 43.5±0.51; physical limitations, 42.8±0.53; body pain, 42.1±0.52; vitality, 48.4±0.37; social function, 46.9±0.53; emotional problems, 48.9±0.43; mental health, 46.9±0.43. Conclusions The incidence of non-specific LBP in Japan was lower than previous reports from western countries, presumably because of variation in the diagnosis of LBP between different health care systems. In Japan, 78% of cases were classified as ‘specific LBP’ by orthopedists. Identification of the definitive cause of LBP should help to improve the quality of LBP treatment. PMID:27548658

  4. Successful Thrombolysis and Spasmolysis of Acute Leg Ischemia after Accidental Intra-arterial Injection of Dissolved Flunitrazepam Tablets

    SciTech Connect

    Radeleff, B., E-mail: Boris_radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stampfl, U.; Sommer, C.-M.

    2011-10-15

    A 37-year-old man with known intravenous drug abuse presented in the surgical ambulatory care unit with acute leg ischemia after accidental intra-arterial injection of dissolved flunitrazepam tablets into the right femoral artery. A combination of anticoagulation, vasodilatation, and local selective and superselective thrombolysis with urokinase was performed to salvage the leg. As a result of the severe ischemia-induced pain, the patient had to be monitored over the complete therapy period on the intensive care unit with permanent administration of intravenous fluid and analgetics. We describe the presenting symptoms and the interventional technique, and we discuss the recent literature regarding themore » management of accidental intra-arterial injection of dissolved flunitrazepam tablets.« less

  5. Are the hamstrings from the drive leg or landing leg more active in baseball pitchers? An electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Zaferiou, Antonia; Chalmers, Peter N; Ruby, Deana; Malloy, Phillip; Luchetti, Timothy J; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2017-11-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) has become a common procedure among baseball players of all levels. There are several graft choices in performing UCLR, one of which is a hamstring (gracilis or semitendinosus) autograft. It is unclear whether the hamstring muscle from a pitcher's drive leg (ipsilateral side of the UCLR) or landing leg (contralateral side of the UCLR) is more active during the pitching motion. We hypothesized that the landing leg semitendinosus will be more electromyographically active than the drive leg. Healthy, elite male pitchers aged 16-21 years were recruited. Sixteen pitchers (average age, 17.6 ± 1.6 years; 67% threw right handed) underwent electromyographic analysis. Pitchers threw 5 fastballs at 100% effort from the wind-up with electromyographic analysis of every pitch. Activation of the semitendinosus and biceps femoris in both legs was compared within pitchers and between pitchers. Hamstring activity was higher in the drive leg than in the landing leg during each phase and in sum, although the difference was significant only during the double support phase (P = .021). On within-pitcher analysis, 10 of 16 pitchers had significantly more sum hamstring activity in the drive leg than in the landing leg, while only 4 of 16 had more activity in the landing leg (P = .043). During the baseball pitch, muscle activity of the semitendinosus was higher in the drive leg than in the landing leg in most pitchers. Surgeons performing UCLR using hamstring autograft should consider harvesting the graft from the pitcher's landing leg to minimize disruption to the athlete's pitching motion. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy and safety of dextromethorphan/quinidine at two dosage levels for diabetic neuropathic pain: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz I; Pope, Laura E; Thisted, Ronald; Hepner, Adrian

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate dextromethorphan coadministered with quinidine as treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain. In a 13-week, phase 3, randomized controlled trial, 379 adults with daily symmetric diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) leg pain for ≥3 months received double-blind placebo, dextromethorphan/quinidine (DMQ) 45/30 mg, or DMQ 30/30 mg, administered once daily for 7 days and twice daily thereafter. Efficacy measures included four pain rating scales applied daily using patient diaries, and another two applied at five clinic visits. On all six scales, DMQ 45/30 mg was significantly superior to placebo, including the primary efficacy analysis, which utilized mixed-effects modeling to test all scores on an 11-point numerical Pain Rating Scale (P < 0.0001). Sensitivity analyses gave consistent results. Efficacy vs placebo was also seen for diary ratings of present pain intensity, and pain interference with sleep and with activities (all P < 0.0001). Among clinic visit assessments, DMQ 45/30 mg demonstrated greater leg pain relief (P = 0.0002) and greater reduction of leg pain intensity (P = 0.0286) vs placebo. The efficacy of DMQ 30/30 mg was numerically less than for 45/30 mg but for most outcomes remained significantly greater vs placebo. Adverse events were mostly mild or moderate and of expected types. Discontinuation for adverse events in the DMQ groups was at least twice as common as placebo. Throughout a 13-week trial, DMQ was effective, with an acceptable safety profile, for treatment of DPN pain. Other fixed-dose combinations of DMQ should be studied to improve overall tolerability while maintaining significant efficacy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The dynamics of the pain system is intact in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Klokker, Louise; Ellegaard, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-12-29

    Background and aims Despite the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) it remains one of the most frequent knee disorders without a cure. Pain and disability are prominent clinical features of knee OA. Knee OA pain is typically localized but can also be referred to the thigh or lower leg. Widespread hyperalgesia has been found in knee OA patients. In addition, patients with hyperalgesia in the OA knee joint show increased pain summation scores upon repetitive stimulation of the OA knee suggesting the involvement of facilitated central mechanisms in knee OA. The dynamics of the pain system (i.e., the adaptive responses to pain) has been widely studied, but mainly from experiments on healthy subjects, whereas less is known about the dynamics of the pain system in chronic pain patients, where the pain system has been activated for a long time. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the nociceptive system quantitatively in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients before and after induction of experimental knee pain. Methods Ten knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients participated in this randomized crossover trial. Each subject was tested on two days separated by 1 week. The most affected knee was exposed to experimental pain or control, in a randomized sequence, by injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad and a control injection of isotonic saline. Pain areas were assessed by drawings on anatomical maps. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the knee, thigh, lower leg, and arm were assessed before, during, and after the experimental pain and control conditions. Likewise, temporal summation of pressure pain on the knee, thigh and lower leg muscles was assessed. Results Experimental knee pain decreased the PPTs at the knee (P <0.01) and facilitated the temporal summation on the knee and adjacent muscles (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found at the control site (the contralateral arm) (P =0.77). Further, the experimental knee pain revealed

  8. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P < 0.02) and also significantly and positively associated with SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores (r = 0.16, P < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple covariates, muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Evaluation of lower leg function in patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Gustavsson, Alexander; Thomeé, Roland; Karlsson, Jon

    2006-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is considered to be one of the most common overuse injuries in elite and recreational athletes. However, the effect that the Achilles tendinopathy has on patients' physical performance is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if Achilles tendinopathy caused functional deficits on the injured side compared with the non-injured side in patients. A test battery comprised of tests for different aspects of muscle-tendon function of the gastrocnemius, soleus and Achilles tendon complex was developed to evaluate lower leg function. The test battery's test-retest reliability and sensitivity (the percent probability that the tests would demonstrate abnormal lower limb symmetry index in patients) were also evaluated. The test battery consisted of three jump tests, a counter movements jump (CMJ), a drop counter movement jump (drop CMJ) and hopping, and two strength tests, concentric toe-raises, eccentric-concentric toe-raises and toe-raises for endurance. The reliability was evaluated through a test-retest design on 15 healthy subjects. The test battery's sensitivity and possible functional deficits in patients with Achilles tendinopathy were evaluated on 42 patients (19 women and 23 men). An excellent reliability was found between test days 1-2 and 2-3 for all tests (ICC = 0.76-0.94) except for concentric toe-raise, test 2-3, which had fair reliability (ICC = 0.73). The methodological error ranged from 8 to 17%. There were significant differences (P = 0.001-0.049) between the non-injured (or least symptomatic) side and injured (most symptomatic) side for hopping, drop CMJ, concentric and eccentric-concentric toe-raises, and significant differences (P = 0.000-0.012) in the level of pain during CMJ, hopping, and drop CMJ. The sensitivity of the test battery at a 90% capacity was 88. Achilles tendinopathy causes not only pain and symptoms in patients but also apparent impairments in various aspects of lower leg muscle-tendon function as

  10. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximum deviation, and velocity on the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes of center of pressure were measured. [Results] In balance assessment with eyes open, there were significant differences between groups according to hip joint angle, except for maximum deviation on the anteroposterior axis. In balance assessment with eyes closed, there were significant differences between total length measurements at 0° and 30°, 60° and between 30° and 90°. There were significant differences between sway velocity measurements at 0° and 30° and between 30° and 90°. [Conclusion] Thus, there were differences in static balance according to hip joint angle. It is necessary to clearly identify the hip joint angle during one-leg standing testing.

  11. Lumbar segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics, pain relief, and motor function: a prospective double-blind study between lidocaine and ropivacaine.

    PubMed

    Wolff, André P; Wilder Smith, Oliver H G; Crul, Ben J P; van de Heijden, Marc P; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2004-08-01

    Selective segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics are applied for diagnostic purposes in patients with chronic back pain to determine the segmental level of the pain. We performed this study to establish myotomal motor effects after L4 spinal nerve blocks by lidocaine and ropivacaine and to evaluate the relationship with pain. Therefore, 20 patients, of which 19 finished the complete protocol, with chronic lumbosacral radicular pain without neurological deficits underwent segmental nerve blocks at L4 with both lidocaine and ropivacaine. Pain intensity scores (verbal numeric rating scale; VNRS) and the maximum voluntary muscle force (MVMF; using a dynamometer expressed in newtons) of the tibialis anterior and quadriceps femoris muscles were measured on the painful side and on the control side. The median VNRS decrease was 4.0 (P < 0.00001; Wilcoxon's signed rank test), without significant differences between ropivacaine and lidocaine (Mann-Whitney U-test). A difference in effect on MVMF was found for affected versus control side (P = 0.016; Tukey test). Multiple regression revealed a significant negative correlation for change in VNRS score versus change in median MVMF (Spearman R = -0.48: P = 0.00001). This study demonstrates that in patients with unilateral chronic low back pain radiating to the leg, pain reduction induced by local anesthetic segmental nerve (L4) block is associated with increased quadriceps femoris and tibialis anterior MVMF, without differences for lidocaine and ropivacaine.

  12. Characterization of skin reactions and pain reported by patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer at different sites.

    PubMed

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Walker, Joanna; Heckler, Charles E; Morrow, Gary R; Ryan, Julie L

    2013-12-01

    Skin reactions and pain are commonly reported side effects of radiation therapy (RT). To characterize RT-induced symptoms according to treatment site subgroups and identify skin symptoms that correlate with pain. A self-report survey-adapted from the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and the McGill Pain Questionnaire--assessed RT-induced skin problems, pain, and specific skin symptoms. Wilcoxon Sign Ranked tests compared mean severity or pre- and post-RT pain and skin problems within each RT-site subgroup. Multiple linear regression (MLR) investigated associations between skin symptoms and pain. Survey respondents (N = 106) were 58% female and on average 64 years old. RT sites included lung, breast, lower abdomen, head/neck/brain, and upper abdomen. Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in treatment site pain and skin problems (P < or = .007). Patients receiving head/neck/brain RT reported increased skin problems (P < .0009). MLR showed that post-RT skin tenderness and tightness were most strongly associated with post-RT pain (P = .066 and P = .122, respectively). Small sample size, exploratory analyses, and nonvalidated measure. Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in pain and skin problems at the RT site while patients receiving head/neck/brain RT had increased skin problems but not pain. These findings suggest that the severity of skin problems is not the only factor that contributes to pain and that interventions should be tailored to specifically target pain at the RT site, possibly by targeting tenderness and tightness. These findings should be confirmed in a larger sampling of RT patients.

  13. Lack of analgesia by oral standardized cannabis extract on acute inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Birgit; Frickey, Nathalie A; Kaufmann, Rainer M; Reif, Marcus; Frey, Richard; Gustorff, Burkhard; Kress, Hans G

    2008-07-01

    Cannabinoid-induced analgesia was shown in animal studies of acute inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In humans, controlled clinical trials with Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol or other cannabinoids demonstrated analgesic efficacy in chronic pain syndromes, whereas the data in acute pain were less conclusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of oral cannabis extract in two different human models of acute inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia. The authors conducted a double-blind, crossover study in 18 healthy female volunteers. Capsules containing Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol-standardized cannabis extract or active placebo were orally administered. A circular sunburn spot was induced at one upper leg. Heat and electrical pain thresholds were determined at the erythema, the area of secondary hyperalgesia, and the contralateral leg. Intradermal capsaicin-evoked pain and areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were measured. Primary outcome parameters were heat pain thresholds in the sunburn erythema and the capsaicin-evoked area of secondary hyperalgesia. Secondary measures were electrical pain thresholds, sunburn-induced secondary hyperalgesia, and capsaicin-induced pain. Cannabis extract did not affect heat pain thresholds in the sunburn model. Electrical thresholds (250 Hz) were significantly lower compared with baseline and placebo. In the capsaicin model, the area of secondary hyperalgesia, flare, and spontaneous pain were not altered. To conclude, no analgesic or antihyperalgesic activity of cannabis extract was found in the experiments. Moreover, the results even point to the development of a hyperalgesic state under cannabinoids. Together with previous data, the current results suggest that cannabinoids are not effective analgesics for the treatment of acute nociceptive pain in humans.

  14. An Easy Tool to Predict Survival in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Paulien G., E-mail: p.g.westhoff@umcutrecht.nl; Graeff, Alexander de; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases have a widely varying survival. A reliable estimation of survival is needed for appropriate treatment strategies. Our goal was to assess the value of simple prognostic factors, namely, patient and tumor characteristics, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and patient-reported scores of pain and quality of life, to predict survival in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: In the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study, 1157 patients were treated with radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. At randomization, physicians determined the KPS; patients rated general health on a visual analogue scale (VAS-gh), valuation of life on amore » verbal rating scale (VRS-vl) and pain intensity. To assess the predictive value of the variables, we used multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses and C-statistics for discriminative value. Of the final model, calibration was assessed. External validation was performed on a dataset of 934 patients who were treated with radiation therapy for vertebral metastases. Results: Patients had mainly breast (39%), prostate (23%), or lung cancer (25%). After a maximum of 142 weeks' follow-up, 74% of patients had died. The best predictive model included sex, primary tumor, visceral metastases, KPS, VAS-gh, and VRS-vl (C-statistic = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.70-0.74). A reduced model, with only KPS and primary tumor, showed comparable discriminative capacity (C-statistic = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.69-0.72). External validation showed a C-statistic of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.70-0.73). Calibration of the derivation and the validation dataset showed underestimation of survival. Conclusion: In predicting survival in patients with painful bone metastases, KPS combined with primary tumor was comparable to a more complex model. Considering the amount of variables in complex models and the additional burden on patients, the simple model is preferred for daily use. In addition, a risk table for survival is

  15. Using verbal instructions to influence lifting mechanics - Does the directive "lift with your legs, not your back" attenuate spinal flexion?

    PubMed

    Beach, Tyson A C; Stankovic, Tatjana; Carnegie, Danielle R; Micay, Rachel; Frost, David M

    2018-02-01

    "Use your legs" is commonly perceived as sound advice to prevent lifting-related low-back pain and injuries, but there is limited evidence that this directive attenuates the concomitant biomechanical risk factors. Body segment kinematic data were collected from 12 men and 12 women who performed a laboratory lifting/lowering task after being provided with different verbal instructions. The main finding was that instructing participants to lift "without rounding your lower back" had a greater effect on the amount of spine flexion they exhibited when lifting/lowering than instructing them to lift "with your legs instead of your back" and "bend your knees and hips". It was concluded that if using verbal instructions to discourage spine flexion when lifting, the instructions should be spine- rather than leg-focused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Nitya; Morris, Claudia R

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO), polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its contribution to pain pathways likely extends beyond NO. Low global arginine bioavailability is associated with pain severity in both adults and children with SCD as well as other non-SCD pain syndromes. Preliminary clinical studies of arginine therapy in SCD demonstrate efficacy in treating acute vaso-occlusive pain, as well as leg ulcers and pulmonary hypertension. Restoration of arginine bioavailability through exogenous supplementation of arginine is, therefore, a promising therapeutic target. Phase II clinical trials of arginine therapy for sickle-related pain are underway and a Phase III randomized controlled trial is anticipated in the near future.

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes Associated With Use of Physical Therapist Services by Older Adults With a New Visit for Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Mock, Charles; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Among older adults, it is not clear how different types or amounts of physical therapy may be associated with improvements in back pain and function. Objective The study objective was to investigate the association between types or amounts of physical therapist services and 1-year outcomes among older adults with back pain. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods A total of 3,771 older adults who were enrolled in a cohort study and who had a new primary care visit for back pain participated. Physical therapy use was ascertained from electronic health records. The following patient-reported outcomes were collected over 12 months: back-related disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire) and back and leg pain intensity (11-point numerical rating scale). Marginal structural models were used to estimate average effects of different amounts of physical therapy use on disability and pain for all types of physical therapy and for active, passive, and manual physical therapy. Results A total of 1,285 participants (34.1%) received some physical therapy. There was no statistically significant gradient in relationships between physical therapy use and back-related disability score. The use of passive or manual therapy was not consistently associated with pain outcomes. Higher amounts of active physical therapy were associated with decreased back and leg pain and increased odds of clinically meaningful improvements in back and leg pain relative to results obtained with no active physical therapy. Limitations The fact that few participants had high amounts of physical therapy use limited precision and the ability to test for nonlinear relationships for the amount of use. Conclusions Higher amounts of active physical therapy were most consistently related to the greatest improvements in pain intensity; however, as with all observational studies, the results must be interpreted with caution. PMID:25278334

  18. Relationship between lower limb dynamics and knee joint pain.

    PubMed

    Radin, E L; Yang, K H; Riegger, C; Kish, V L; O'Connor, J J

    1991-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that appropriate and timely neuromuscular control of limb motions plays an important role in the preservation of joint health, we kinematically and kinetically examined the behavior of the legs of young adult subjects at heel strike during natural walking. We compared a group of 18 volunteers, who, we presumed, were preosteoarthrotic because of mild, intermittent, activity-related knee joint pain, with 14 age-matched asymptomatic normal subjects. The two groups of subjects exhibited similar gait patterns with equivalent cadences, walking speeds, terminal stance phase knee flexion, maximum (peak) swing angular velocity, and overall shape of the vertical ground reaction. However, our instrumentation detected statistically significant differences between the two groups within a few milliseconds of heel strike. In the knee pain group, the heel hit the floor with a stronger impact in this brief interval. Just before heel strike, there was a faster downward velocity of the ankle with a larger angular velocity of the shank. The follow-through of the leg immediately after heel strike was more violent with larger peak axial and angular accelerations of the leg echoed by a more rapid rise of the ground reaction force. This sequence of events represents repetitive impulsive loading, which consistently provoked osteoarthrosis in animal experiments. We refer to this micro-incoordination of neuromuscular control not visible to the naked eye as "microklutziness."

  19. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekbom, Karl; Ulfberg, J

    2009-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological sensory-motor disorder that is characterized by intense restlessness and unpleasant creeping sensations deep inside the lower legs. Symptoms appear when the legs are at rest and are worst in the evening and at night. They force patients to keep moving their legs, and often to get out of bed and wander about. Periodic limb movements (PLMS) are also common during sleep amongst those suffering from RLS, and sleep efficiency is severely reduced. There are idiopathic as well as symptomatic forms of RLS, the latter being associated with e.g. pregnancy, iron deficiency and chronic renal failure. A family history of RLS is very common and pedigrees in these cases suggest an autosomal-dominant transmission with high penetrance. Genetic investigations have been performed in order to identify genes associated with RLS. Several loci have been found (on chromosomes 12q, 14q, 9p, 2q, 20p and 16p). Pathophysiology of RLS remains incompletely understood. However, advanced brain imaging studies and positive results of dopaminergic treatment suggest that RLS may be generated by dopamine dysfunction locally within the central nervous system. At present, there is a wide range of treatment options including levodopa, dopamine agonists, opioids, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs and iron supplements.

  20. The sensitivity and specificity of the Slump and the Straight Leg Raising tests in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Javid; Togay, Halit; Unalan, Halil; Toprak, Sadk

    2008-04-01

    An accurate and specific diagnosis prevents the recurrences of low back pain and chronic spinal pain. The physical examination is the most useful tool to diagnosis. The examiner must aim to determine the exact tissue that pain arises from to make the specific diagnosis. Lumbar disc herniation is 1 disease that physical examination, symptoms, and findings on imaging technique do not always correlate with each other. The Straight Leg Raising (SLR) test has been used as the primary test to diagnosis lumbar disc herniations and found to have high correlation with findings on operation since its sensitivity is high in only disc herniations leading to root compression that may eventually need operation. More sensitive test, like the Slump, might be used in herniations in which the SLR is negative. The Slump test is really a variant of the SLR and the Lasègue's tests performed in the seated position and is a progressive series of maneuvers designed to place the sciatic nerve roots under increasing tension. At each step in the procedure, the patient informs the examiner what is being felt and whether radicular pain is produced. As a result, the Slump test applies traction to the nerve roots by incorporating spinal and hip joint flexion into the leg raising and would warn the examiner of the presence of nerve root compression when there is a negative SLR test. This study measured the sensitivity and specificity of the Slump test and compare it with the SLR test in patients with and without lumbar disc herniations. A prospective case control study of 75 patients with complaints suggestive of lumbar disc herniation was carried out in the outpatient clinics of the neurosurgery department of a state teaching hospital. Seventy-five referred or self-admitted patients with low back, leg, or low back and leg pain who had results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients had signs of herniation demonstrated by MRI

  1. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug.

  2. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, John T., E-mail: johnthomas75@gmail.com; Nida, Adrian M.; Isom, Scott

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportionalmore » hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using

  3. The Motor and the Brake of the Trailing Leg in Human Walking: Leg Force Control Through Ankle Modulation and Knee Covariance

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Megan E.; Chang, Young-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Human walking is a complex task, and we lack a complete understanding of how the neuromuscular system organizes its numerous muscles and joints to achieve consistent and efficient walking mechanics. Focused control of select influential task-level variables may simplify the higher-level control of steady state walking and reduce demand on the neuromuscular system. As trailing leg power generation and force application can affect the mechanical efficiency of step-to-step transitions, we investigated how joint torques are organized to control leg force and leg power during human walking. We tested whether timing of trailing leg force control corresponded with timing of peak leg power generation. We also applied a modified uncontrolled manifold analysis to test whether individual or coordinated joint torque strategies most contributed to leg force control. We found that leg force magnitude was adjusted from step-to-step to maintain consistent leg power generation. Leg force modulation was primarily determined by adjustments in the timing of peak ankle plantar-flexion torque, while knee torque was simultaneously covaried to dampen the effect of ankle torque on leg force. We propose a coordinated joint torque control strategy in which the trailing leg ankle acts as a motor to drive leg power production while trailing leg knee torque acts as a brake to refine leg power production. PMID:27334888

  4. Characterization of skin reactions and pain reported by patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer at different sites

    PubMed Central

    Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Walker, Joanna; Heckler, Charles E.; Morrow, Gary R.; Ryan, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin reactions and pain are commonly reported side effects of radiation therapy (RT). Objective To characterize RT-induced symptoms according to treatment site subgroups and identify skin symptoms that correlate with pain. Methods A self-report survey, adapted from the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and the McGill Pain Questionnaire, assessed RT-induced skin problems, pain, and specific skin symptoms. Wilcoxon Sign Ranked tests compared mean severity of pre- and post-RT pain and skin problems within each RT-site subgroup. Multiple linear regression (MLR) investigated associations between skin symptoms and pain. Results Survey respondents (n=106) were 58% female and on average 64 years old. RT sites included lung, breast, lower abdomen, head/neck/brain, and upper abdomen. Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in treatment site pain and skin problems (p≤0.007). Patients receiving head/neck/brain RT reported increased skin problems (p<0.0009). MLR showed that post-RT skin tenderness and tightness were most strongly associated with post-RT pain (p=0.066 and p=0.122, respectively). Limitations Small sample size, exploratory analyses, and non-validated measure. Conclusions Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in pain and skin problems at the RT site, while patients receiving head/neck/brain RT had increased skin problems, but not pain. These findings suggest that the severity of skin problems is not the only factor that contributes to pain, and interventions should be tailored to specifically target pain at the RT site, possibly by targeting tenderness and tightness. These findings should be confirmed in a larger sampling of RT patients. PMID:24645338

  5. Fixed or adapted conditioning intensity for repeated conditioned pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Hoegh, M; Petersen, K K; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-12-29

    Aims Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is used to assess descending pain modulation through a test stimulation (TS) and a conditioning stimulation (CS). Due to potential carry-over effects, sequential CPM paradigms might alter the intensity of the CS, which potentially can alter the CPM-effect. This study aimed to investigate the difference between a fixed and adaptive CS intensity on CPM-effect. Methods On the dominant leg of 20 healthy subjects the cuff pressure detection threshold (PDT) was recorded as TS and the pain tolerance threshold (PTT) was assessed on the non-dominant leg for estimating the CS. The difference in PDT before and during CS defined the CPM-effect. The CPM-effect was assessed four times using a CS with intensities of 70% of baseline PTT (fixed) or 70% of PTT measured throughout the session (adaptive). Pain intensity of the conditioning stimulus was assessed on a numeric rating scale (NRS). Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. Results No difference was found comparing the four PDTs assessed before CSs for the fixed and the adaptive paradigms. The CS pressure intensity for the adaptive paradigm was increasing during the four repeated assessments (P < 0.01). The pain intensity was similar during the fixed (NRS: 5.8±0.5) and the adjusted paradigm (NRS: 6.0±0.4). The CPM-effect was higher using the fixed condition compared with the adaptive condition (P < 0.05). Conclusions The current study found that sequential CPM paradigms using a fixed conditioning stimulus produced an increased CPM-effect compared with adaptive and increasing conditioning intensities.

  6. Tri-length laser therapy associated to tecar therapy in the treatment of low-back pain in adults: a preliminary report of a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Osti, Raffaella; Pari, Carlotta; Salvatori, Giada; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is very frequent, especially in active adult population. There are several different orthopaedic condition that can cause low-back pain, and the pain worsen the quality of life significantly. The treatments vary from drugs, physical therapies, kinesiology, local infiltrations, and so on. Laser therapy has an important role in the treatment of the inflammatory causes of pain, with several studies that demonstrate the efficacy of low and high energy laser therapy in the treatment of low-back pain. Sixty-six consecutive patients with low-back pain with or without leg pain were treated using a combination of Tri-length laser I-Triax® (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy) and Pharon® tecar therapy (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy). The patients were treated three times a week, every other day, for a total of 10 sessions. Clinical results were evaluated using visual analogic scale for individual pain (0 to 10) and the Oswestry disability scale (ODS). Tests started before the beginning of therapies and 8 weeks after the end of the therapies. Visual analogic scale (VAS) score significantly improved from an average value of 8.1 ± 1.58 pre-treatment to an average value 8-weeks post-treatment of 2.63 ± 2.74 (P < .01). ODS values start from a pre-treatment average value of 53.0 ± 13.0 to a post-treatment average value of 23.5 ± 19.8 (P < .01). A higher improvement both in VAS and in ODS was denoted in the group of patient with low-back pain and leg pain (respectively, VAS from 8.66 ± 1.58 to 2.86 ± 2.94 and ODS from 57.8 ± 15.5 to 23.7 ± 19.5). Low-back pain, associated or not with leg pain, is a very common clinical situation. The treatments of this condition are different, and an important role can be given to the laser therapy. The conclusion of this study is that the association between laser therapy iLux-Triax® and tecar therapy Pharon® in the treatment of low-back pain, with or without leg pain, can

  7. A colored leg banding technique for Amazona parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for individual identification of Amazona was developed using plastic leg bands. Bands were made from 5- and 7-mm-wide strips of laminated PVC coiled 2.5 times with an inside diameter 4-5 mm gt the maximum diameter of the parrot's leg. Seventeen parrots were captured in Puerto Rico, marked with individual plastic leg bands, and observed for 204-658 d with only one lost or damaged plastic band. Plastic leg bands did not cause injury to or calluses on parrots' legs. The plastic material used for making leg bands was available in 18 colors in 1994, which would allow unique marking of 306 individuals using one plastic leg band on each leg.

  8. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 31. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: diagnosis and management. Am Fam Physician . 2013;88( ...

  9. Rehabilitation of a female dancer with patellofemoral pain syndrome: applying concepts of regional interdependence in practice.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Caitlyn; Hanney, William J; Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J

    2010-06-01

    Due to complex movements and high physical demands, dance is often associated with a multitude of impairments including pain of the low back, pelvis, leg, knee, and foot. This case report provides an exercise progression, emphasizing enhancement of strength and neuromuscular performance using the concept of regional interdependence in a 17 year old female dancer with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  10. Outcomes and radiation exposure of emergency department patients with chest pain and shortness of breath and ultralow pretest probability: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Shapiro, Nathan I; Jones, Alan E; Hernandez, Jackeline; Hogg, Melanie M; Troyer, Jennifer; Nelson, R Darrell

    2014-03-01

    Excessive radiation exposure remains a concern for patients with symptoms suggesting acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism but must be judged in the perspective of pretest probability and outcomes. We quantify and qualify the pretest probability, outcomes, and radiation exposure of adults with both chest pain and dyspnea. This was a prospective, 4-center, outcomes study. Patients were adults with dyspnea and chest pain, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed with a validated method; ultralow risk was defined as pretest probability less than 2.5% for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Patients were followed for diagnosis and total medical radiation exposure for 90 days. Eight hundred forty patients had complete data; 23 (3%) had acute coronary syndrome and 15 (2%) had pulmonary embolism. The cohort received an average of 4.9 mSv radiation to the chest, 48% from computed tomography pulmonary angiography. The pretest probability estimates for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism were less than 2.5% in 227 patients (27%), of whom 0 of 277 (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 1.7%) had acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism and 7 of 227 (3%) had any significant cardiopulmonary diagnosis. The estimated chest radiation exposure per patient in this ultralow-risk group was 3.5 mSv, including 26 (3%) with greater than 5 mSv radiation to the chest and no significant cardiopulmonary diagnosis. One quarter of patients with chest pain and dyspnea had ultralow risk and no acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism but were exposed to an average of 3.5 mSv radiation to the chest. These data can be used in a clinical guideline to reduce radiation exposure. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  12. Effect of yogic colon cleansing (Laghu Sankhaprakshalana Kriya) on pain, spinal flexibility, disability and state anxiety in chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Haldavnekar, Richa Vivek; Tekur, Padmini; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that Integrated Yoga reduces pain, disability, anxiety and depression and increases spinal flexibility and quality-of-life in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the effect of two yoga practices namely laghu shankha prakshalana (LSP) kriya, a yogic colon cleansing technique and back pain specific asanas (Back pain special technique [BST]) on pain, disability, spinal flexibility and state anxiety in patients with CLBP. Materials and Methods: In this randomized control (self as control) study, 40 in-patients (25 were males, 15 were females) between 25 and 70 years (44.05 ± 13.27) with CLBP were randomly assigned to receive LSP or BST sessions. The measurements were taken immediately before and after each session of either of the practices (30 min) in the same participant. Randomization was used to decide the day of the session (3rd or 5th day after admission) to ensure random distribution of the hang over effect of the two practices. Statistical analysis was performed using the repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Significant group * time interaction (P < 0.001) was observed in 11 point numerical rating scale, spinal flexibility (on Leighton type Goniometer) and (straight leg raise test in both legs), Oswestry Disability Index, State Anxiety (XI component of Spieldberger's state and trait anxiety inventory. There was significantly (P < 0.001, between groups) better reduction in LSP than BST group on all variables. No adverse effects were reported by any participant. Conclusion: Clearing the bowel by yoga based colon cleansing technique (LSP) is safe and offers immediate analgesic effect with reduced disability, anxiety and improved spinal flexibility in patients with CLBP. PMID:25035620

  13. Radiographic and clinical factors associated with one-leg standing and gait in patients with mild-to-moderate secondary hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Koyama, Yumiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Goto, Koji; So, Kazutaka; Kuroda, Yutaka; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    A decline in physical function associated with secondary hip osteoarthritis (OA) may be caused by both radiographic and clinical factors; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how joint degeneration, hip morphology, pain, hip range of motion (ROM), and hip muscle strength relate to one-leg standing (OLS) and gait in patients with mild-to-moderate secondary hip osteoarthritis. Fifty-five female patients (ages 22-65 years) with mild-to-moderate hip OA secondary to hip dysplasia were consecutively enrolled. Balance during OLS and three-dimensional hip angle changes while maintaining the OLS and at foot-off of the raised leg were measured. Gait speed and peak three-dimensional hip joint angles during gait were also measured. The associations between dependent variables (balance, gait speed, and hip kinematic changes) and independent variables (age, body mass index, pain, joint degeneration, hip morphologic abnormality, passive hip ROM, and hip muscle strength) were determined. While lower hip muscle strength was associated with hip kinematic changes such as flexion and internal rotation while maintaining OLS, decreased acetabular head index (AHI) and increased pain were associated with hip extension and abduction at foot-off in OLS. Decreased passive hip ROM was associated with decreased peak hip angles (extension, adduction, and external and internal rotation) during gait, although increased pain and decreased hip extension muscle strength were associated with slower gait speed. In this study of patients with secondary hip OA, AHI, pain, and hip impairments were associated with OLS and gait independently from age and radiographic degeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  15. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  16. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawlmore » through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.« less

  17. The Benslimane's Artistic Model for Leg Beauty.

    PubMed

    Benslimane, Fahd

    2012-08-01

    In 2000, the author started observing legs considered to be attractive. The goal was to have an ideal aesthetic model and compare the disparity between this model and a patient's reality. This could prove helpful during leg sculpturing to get closer to this ideal. Postoperatively, the result could then be compared to the ideal curves of the model legs and any remaining deviations from the ideal curves could be pointed out and eventually corrected in a second session. The lack of anthropometric studies of legs from the knee to the ankle led the author to select and study attractive legs to find out the common denominators of their beauty. The study consisted in analyzing the features that make legs look attractive. The legs of models in magazines were scanned and inserted into a PowerPoint program. The legs of live models, Barbie dolls, and athletes were photographed. Artistic drawings by Leonardo da Vinci were reviewed and Greek sculptures studied. Sculptures from the National Archaeological Museum of Athens were photographed and included in the PowerPoint program. This study shows that the first criterion for beautiful legs is the straightness of the leg column. Not a single attractive leg was found to deviate from the vertical, and each was in absolute continuity with the thigh. The second criterion is the similarity of curve distribution and progression from knee to ankle. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors at www.springer.com/00266.

  18. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  19. On the biomimetic design of agile-robot legs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  20. The specific scintigraphic pattern of "shin splints in the lower leg": concise communication.

    PubMed

    Holder, L E; Michael, R H

    1984-08-01

    The clinical entity, "shin splints," is now being recognized, and more specifically characterized by the findings of exercise-induced pain and tenderness to palpation along the posterior medial border of the tibia. In this prospective study, ten patients with this syndrome were evaluated using three-phase bone scintigrams, and a specific scintigraphic pattern was determined. Radionuclide angiograms and blood-pool images were all normal. On delayed images, tibial lesions involved the posterior cortex, were longitudinally oriented, were long, involving one third of the length of the bone, and often showed varying tracer uptake along that length. Obtaining both lateral and medial views was crucial. The location of activity suggested that this entity is related to the soleus muscle. These scintigraphic findings can be used to differentiate shin splints from stress fractures or other conditions causing pain in the lower leg in athletes.

  1. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis of the leg in an elderly French woman.

    PubMed

    Monié, Marguerite; Drieux, Laurence; Nzili, Bernadette; Dicko, Michèle; Goursot, Catherine; Greffard, Sandrine; Decré, Dominique; Mézière, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection in regions outside of Asia. Here, we present a case of necrotizing fasciitis of the leg caused by K. pneumoniae in a 92-year-old French woman hospitalized in a geriatric rehabilitation unit. The patient initially presented with dermohypodermitis of the leg that developed from a dirty wound following a fall. A few hours later, this painful injury extended to the entire lower limb, with purplish discoloration of the skin, bullae, and necrosis. Septic shock rapidly appeared and the patient died 9 hours after the onset of symptoms. The patient was Caucasian, with no history of travel to Asia or any underlying disease. Computed tomography revealed no infectious metastatic loci. Blood cultures showed growth of capsular serotype K2 K. pneumoniae strains with virulence factors RmpA, yersiniabactin and aerobactin. This rare and fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by a virulent strain of K. pneumoniae occurred in a hospitalized elderly woman without risk factors. Clinicians and geriatricians in particular should be aware of this important albeit unusual differential diagnosis.

  3. Chronic musculoskeletal pain: ultrasound guided pain control.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chou, Yi-Hong; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2014-09-01

    The review demonstrates the unique advantages of ultrasonography in pain control. Several imaging modalities can be used to guide pain control, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiography. Ultrasonography has unique advantages over these other modalities in terms of its non-ionizing radiation, real-time imaging, portability, and cost-effectiveness. Ultrasonography with color Doppler and elastography can provide safer guidance to avoid blood vessels and the nerve trunk when using steroid or xylocaine infusions to encase the nerve trunk. This review focuses on the control of chronic pain in the upper limbs, lower limbs, and trunk. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Single-leg squats identify independent stair negotiation ability in older adults referred for a physiotherapy mobility assessment at a rural hospital.

    PubMed

    Hockings, Rowena L; Schmidt, David D; Cheung, Christopher W

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether single-leg squats identify ability to negotiate stairs in older adults at a rural hospital. Cross-sectional analytical study. Acute wards and emergency department of a rural hospital in Australia. A systematic sample of 143 older adults (72 men, 71 women, 80.0 ± 6.8 years) from the emergency department or acute wards of Shoalhaven Hospital referred for a physiotherapy mobility assessment. Ability to complete up to three single-leg squats and negotiate up to three steps were measured. Covariates and demographic variables were collected. The squat test had 86% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 49% negative predictive value in correctly identifying stair negotiation ability. Participants who could complete single-leg squats were 57 times more likely to be able to independently negotiate stairs than participants who could not complete squats. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that walker use, pain severity and whether participants lived alone were significant and independent predictors of ability to negotiate stairs independently. Single-leg squats may be an accurate identifier of stair negotiation ability in older adults admitted to the hospital for an acute illness or injury. A traditional stairs assessment would be required if older adults were unable to complete the squat test or had moderate to severe pain, used a walker to ambulate, or did not live alone. The squat test is a potentially more-efficient assessment tool than traditional stair assessments in determining an individual's ability to negotiate stairs and suitability for discharge where poor mobility is a problem. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Negative affect and sleep disturbance may be associated with response to epidural steroid injections for spine-related pain.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jordan F; Yu, Lan; Friedly, Janna; Amtmann, Dagmar; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2014-02-01

    To describe whether negative affect and sleep impairment are associated with the clinical effect of epidural steroid injections (ESIs) for low back pain. Observational study; patients were evaluated before ESI and 1 and 3 months after ESI. Spine center and related treatment sites. Participants (N=158) seeking treatment for low back pain with or without radiculopathy. ESI for low back pain with or without radiculopathy. We assessed the dependent (global pain severity for back and leg pain, pain behavior, pain interference) and independent variables (depression, sleep disturbance, and covariates of back pain response) with the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and legacy measures. Outcome was assessed cross-sectionally using multiple regression and longitudinally with path analysis. After 1 month, sleep disturbance was the only predictor for the global ratings of improvement in back pain (R(2)=16.8%) and leg pain (R(2)=11.4%). The proportions of variance explained by sleep disturbance and negative affect for all dependent variables were greater at 3 months than 1 month. Mediation analysis was significant for negative affect for the 3-month outcomes on PROMIS pain behavior (β=.87, P<.01) and pain interference (β=.37, P<.01). There was no evidence of mediation by sleep disturbance for any outcome. Negative affect and sleep disturbance are associated with worse outcomes after ESI. Further research is needed to determine if treatment of negative affect and sleep disturbance prior to or concurrently with ESI will improve outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Why do flamingos stand on one leg?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Williams, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    A series of observational studies of captive Caribbean flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber were conducted to determine why flamingos rest on one leg. While frequently asked by the general public, this basic question has remained unanswered by the scientific community. Here we suggest that the latency of flamingos to initiate forward locomotion following resting on one leg is significantly longer than following resting on two, discounting the possibility that unipedal resting reduces muscle fatigue or enhances predatory escape. Additionally, we demonstrate that flamingos do not display lateral preferences at the individual or group levels when resting on one leg, with each bird dividing its resting time across both legs. We show that while flamingos prefer resting on one leg to two regardless of location, the percentage of birds resting on one leg is significantly higher among birds standing in the water than among those on land. Finally, we demonstrate a negative relationship between temperature and the percentage of observed birds resting on one leg, such that resting on one leg decreases as temperature rises. Results strongly suggest that unipedal resting aids flamingos in thermoregulation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Exercise increases pressure pain tolerance but not pressure and heat pain thresholds in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, H B; Hoeger Bement, M; Madsen, A B; Fridriksson, J; Dasa, M; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-01-01

    Exercise causes an acute decrease in the pain sensitivity known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH), but the specificity to certain pain modalities remains unknown. This study aimed to compare the effect of isometric exercise on the heat and pressure pain sensitivity. On three different days, 20 healthy young men performed two submaximal isometric knee extensions (30% maximal voluntary contraction in 3 min) and a control condition (quiet rest). Before and immediately after exercise and rest, the sensitivity to heat pain and pressure pain was assessed in randomized and counterbalanced order. Cuff pressure pain threshold (cPPT) and pain tolerance (cPTT) were assessed on the ipsilateral lower leg by computer-controlled cuff algometry. Heat pain threshold (HPT) was recorded on the ipsilateral foot by a computer-controlled thermal stimulator. Cuff pressure pain tolerance was significantly increased after exercise compared with baseline and rest (p < 0.05). Compared with rest, cPPT and HPT were not significantly increased by exercise. No significant correlation between exercise-induced changes in HPT and cPPT was found. Test-retest reliability before and after the rest condition was better for cPPT and CPTT (intraclass correlation > 0.77) compared with HPT (intraclass correlation = 0.54). The results indicate that hypoalgesia after submaximal isometric exercise is primarily affecting tolerance of pressure pain compared with the pain threshold. These data contribute to the understanding of how isometric exercise influences pain perception, which is necessary to optimize the clinical utility of exercise in management of chronic pain. The effect of isometric exercise on pain tolerance may be relevant for patients in chronic musculoskeletal pain as a pain-coping strategy. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: The results indicate that hypoalgesia after submaximal isometric exercise is primarily affecting tolerance of pressure pain compared with the heat and pressure pain

  8. Lower limb and back pain in Guillain-Barré syndrome and associated contrast enhancement in MRI of the cauda equina.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, J M; Thomas, N H; Robinson, R O; Bingham, J B; Pohl, K R

    2001-06-01

    This study assesses the frequency of lower limb and back pain in children with Guillain-Barré syndrome and reviews the magnetic resonance imaging results of those undergoing spinal imaging. Over an 8-y period, nine children presented with various combinations of severe back pain, leg pains, impairment of gait and bladder dysfunction. Guillain-Barré syndrome was confirmed on clinical examination and peripheral electrophysiology (n = 8). Magnetic resonance imaging in four patients, following contrast injection, showed enhancement of the cauda equine and, additionally, of the cervical nerve roots in one of the patients. A further patient, who was not scanned with contrast, had abnormal thickening of the lumbar roots. Carbamazepine and steroids were effectively used for analgesia in three cases. All the patients recovered. Guillain-Barré syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with back and/or leg pain. Early diagnosis ensures prompt monitoring for autonomic dysfunction and respiratory compromise.

  9. Stratified cost-utility analysis of C-Leg versus mechanical knees: Findings from an Italian sample of transfemoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Lettieri, Emanuele; Del Maestro, Martina; Radaelli, Giovanni; Luchetti, Martina; Verni, Gennero; Masella, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    The fitting rate of the C-Leg electronic knee (Otto-Bock, D) has increased steadily over the last 15 years. Current cost-utility studies, however, have not considered the patients' characteristics. To complete a cost-utility analysis involving C-Leg and mechanical knee users; "age at the time of enrollment," "age at the time of first prosthesis," and "experience with the current type of prosthesis" are assumed as non-nested stratification parameters. Cohort retrospective. In all, 70 C-Leg and 57 mechanical knee users were selected. For each stratification criteria, we evaluated the cost-utility of C-Leg versus mechanical knees by computing the incremental cost-utility ratio, that is, the ratio of the "difference in cost" and the "difference in utility" of the two technologies. Cost consisted of acquisition, maintenance, transportation, and lodging expenses. Utility was measured in terms of quality-adjusted life years, computed on the basis of participants' answers to the EQ-5D questionnaire. Patients over 40 years at the time of first prosthesis were the only group featuring an incremental cost-utility ratio (88,779 €/quality-adjusted life year) above the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence practical cost-utility threshold (54,120 €/quality-adjusted live year): C-Leg users experience a significant improvement of "mobility," but limited outcomes on "usual activities," "self-care," "depression/anxiety," and reduction of "pain/discomfort." The stratified cost-utility results have relevant clinical implications and provide useful information for practitioners in tailoring interventions. Clinical relevance A cost-utility analysis that considered patients characteristics provided insights on the "affordability" of C-Leg compared to mechanical knees. In particular, results suggest that C-Leg has a significant impact on "mobility" for first-time prosthetic users over 40 years, but implementation of specific low-cost physical

  10. Is physiotherapy integrated virtual walking effective on pain, function, and kinesiophobia in patients with non-specific low-back pain? Randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz Yelvar, Gul Deniz; Çırak, Yasemin; Dalkılınç, Murat; Parlak Demir, Yasemin; Guner, Zeynep; Boydak, Ayşenur

    2017-02-01

    According to literature, virtual reality was found to reduce pain and kinesiophobia in patients with chronic pain. The purpose of the study was to investigate short-term effect of the virtual reality on pain, function, and kinesiophobia in patients with subacute and chronic non-specific low-back pain METHODS: This randomised controlled study in which 44 patients were randomly assigned to the traditional physiotherapy (control group, 22 subjects) or virtual walking integrated physiotherapy (experimental group, 22 subjects). Before and after treatment, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), TAMPA Kinesiophobia Scale (TKS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Timed-up and go Test (TUG), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), and Single-Leg Balance Test were assessed. The interaction effect between group and time was assessed by using repeated-measures analysis of covariance. After treatment, both groups showed improvement in all parameters. However, VAS, TKS, TUG, and 6MWT scores showed significant differences in favor of the experimental group. Virtual walking integrated physiotherapy reduces pain and kinesiophobia, and improved function in patients with subacute and chronic non-specific low-back pain in short term.

  11. Rehabilitation of a Female Dancer with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Applying Concepts of Regional Interdependence in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Caitlyn; Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to complex movements and high physical demands, dance is often associated with a multitude of impairments including pain of the low back, pelvis, leg, knee, and foot. This case report provides an exercise progression, emphasizing enhancement of strength and neuromuscular performance using the concept of regional interdependence in a 17 year old female dancer with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589665

  12. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +}more » Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.« less

  13. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1991-04-02

    This invention is comprised of a pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing. between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair laying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is widemore » and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.« less

  14. Randomized trial of standard pain control with or without gabapentin for pain related to radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Tomoko; Kiyota, Naomi; Shimada, Takanobu; Funakoshi, Yohei; Chayahara, Naoko; Toyoda, Masanori; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nibu, Ken-Ichi; Komori, Takahide; Sasaki, Ryohei; Mukohara, Toru; Minami, Hironobu

    2016-12-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis (RIM) in chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) causes severe pain and worsens CRT compliance, QOL and outcome. Following retrospective reports, we conducted a randomized trial of the safety and efficacy of gabapentin for RIM-associated pain during CRT. HNC patients (pts) receiving CRT were randomized to standard pain control (SPC) with acetaminophen and opioids, or SPC plus gabapentin (SPC+G). Gabapentin was maintained at 900mg/day for 4 weeks after CRT. Primary endpoint was maximum visual analogue scale (VAS) score during CRT, and secondary endpoints were total opioid dose, changes in QOL (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-HN 35) from baseline to 4 weeks after CRT, and adverse events. Twenty-two eligible Stage III or IV pts were randomly assigned to SPC or SPC+G (n=11 each). Twelve were treated in a locally advanced setting and 10 in a postoperative setting. Median maximum VAS scores, median total dose of opioids at maximum VAS and total dose of opioids at 4 weeks after CRT tended to be higher in the SPC+G arm (47 in SPC vs. 74 in SPC+G, p=0.517; 215mg vs. 745.3mg, p=0.880; and 1260mg vs. 1537.5mg, p=0.9438, respectively), without significance. QOL analysis showed significantly worse scores in the SPC+G arm for weight gain (p=0.005). Adverse events related to gabapentin were manageable. This pilot study is the first prospective randomized trial of gabapentin for RIM-related pain. Gabapentin had no apparent beneficial effect. Further research into agents for RIM-related pain is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A pilot investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon low back pain in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Smadi, J; Warke, K; Wilson, I; Cramp, A F L; Noble, G; Walsh, D M; Lowe-Strong, A S

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon low back pain (LBP) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical pilot study. Fifteen people with MS were recruited and randomly allocated to one of the following groups under double blind conditions (n = 5 per group): TENS 1 (4 Hz, 200 micros), TENS 2 (110 Hz, 200 micros), placebo TENS. Treatment was applied for 45 minutes three times a week for six weeks with a four-week follow-up. The following outcome measures were taken at weeks 1, 6, and 10: visual analogue scale (VAS) (for current LBP, right leg pain, left leg pain); Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Questionnaire; Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire; Short Form-36 (SF-36) Version 1; and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). VAS for current LBP, right and left leg pain were also taken before and after treatment, and once a week during the follow-up period. Analysis showed no statistically significant effects for any of the data. However, both active treatment groups showed a trend of improvement in the majority of the outcome measures. Active TENS was more effective than placebo TENS in decreasing VAS scores following each treatment although results were not statistically significant. Further work in this area is warranted and should include a larger number of participants in the form of a randomized controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of this modality.

  16. The Legs Problem--For All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an example of a versatile multi-solution problem that can be used right across the primary years. The basic problem is: "Noah saw 16 legs go past him into the Ark. How many creatures did he see?" Any even number can be used, although, 2 legs allows only one answer and with 16 legs there are already 14 different…

  17. Do oarsmen have asymmetries in the strength of their back and leg muscles?

    PubMed

    Parkin, S; Nowicky, A V; Rutherford, O M; McGregor, A H

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether asymmetry of the strength of the leg and trunk musculature is more prominent in rowers than in controls. Nineteen oarsmen and 20 male controls matched for age, height and body mass performed a series of isokinetic and isometric strength tests on an isokinetic dynamometer. These strength tests focused on the trunk and leg muscles. Comparisons of strength were made between and within groups for right and left symmetry patterns, hamstring: quadriceps ratios, and trunk flexor and extensor ratios. The results revealed no left and right asymmetries in either the knee extensor or flexor strength parameters (including both isometric and isokinetic measures). Knee extensor strength was significantly greater in the rowing population, but knee flexor strength was similar between the two groups. No difference was seen between the groups for the hamstring: quadriceps strength ratio. In the rowing population, stroke side had no influence on leg strength. No differences were observed in the isometric strength of the trunk flexors and extensors between groups, although EMG activity was significantly higher in the rowing population. Patterns of asymmetry of muscle activity were observed between the left and right erector spinae muscles during extension, which was significantly related to rowing side (P < 0.01). These observations could be related to the high incidence of low back pain in oarsmen.

  18. Pilot study: whole body manual subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) therapy improved pain and SAT structure in women with lipedema.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L; Ussery, Christopher; Eekema, Alyna

    2017-09-20

    Background Lipedema is a common painful subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) disorder in women affecting the limbs. SAT therapy is a manual therapy to improve soft tissue quality. Objective Determine if SAT therapy improves pain and structure of lipedema SAT. Design Single arm prospective pilot study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients Seven women, 46 ± 5 years, weight 90 ± 19 kg, with lipedema. Intervention Twelve 90-min SAT therapy sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, SAT ultrasound (Vevo 2100), leg volumetrics, skin caliper assessment, tissue exam, weight, resting metabolic rate, pain assessment, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and body shape questionnaire (BSQ) at baseline and end of study. Results Weight, resting metabolic rate and BSQ did not change significantly. Limb fat over total body fat mass (p = 0.08) and trunk fat over total body mass trended down from baseline (p = 0.08) by DXA. Leg volume and caliper assessments in eight of nine areas (p < 0.007), LEFS (p = 0.002) and average pain (p = 0.007) significantly decreased from baseline. Fibrosis significantly decreased in the nodules, hips and groin. Ultrasound showed improved SAT structure in some subjects. Side effects included pain, bruising, itching, swelling and gastroesophageal reflux disease. All women said they would recommend SAT therapy to other women with lipedema. Limitations Small number of subjects. Conclusion SAT therapy in 4 weeks improved tissue structure, perceived leg function, and volume although shape was not affected. While side effects of SAT therapy were common, all women felt the therapy was beneficial.

  19. Examining the relationship between endogenous pain modulation capacity and endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Flood, Andrew; Waddington, Gordon; Cathcart, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between pain modulatory capacity and endurance exercise performance. Twenty-seven recreationally active males between 18 and 35 years of age participated in the study. Pain modulation was assessed by examining the inhibitory effect of a noxious conditioning stimulus (cuff occlusion) on the perceived intensity of a second noxious stimulus (pressure pain threshold). Participants completed two, maximal voluntary contractions followed by a submaximal endurance time task. Both performance tasks involved an isometric contraction of the non-dominant leg. The main analysis uncovered a correlation between pain modulatory capacity and performance on the endurance time task (r = -.425, p = .027), such that those with elevated pain modulation produced longer endurance times. These findings are the first to demonstrate the relationship between pain modulation responses and endurance exercise performance.

  20. Neuropathic pain treatment provides unexpected benefit.

    PubMed

    Keesling, Adam D; Wilson, Meg; Wilkins, Robert

    2017-06-01

    A 57-year-old African American woman was being treated at our clinic for neurogenic urinary incontinence (UI). The UI, which occurred day and night, began 2 years earlier following a laminectomy of vertebrae C3 to C6 with spinal fusion of C3 to C7 for cervical spinal stenosis. The UI persisted despite physical therapy and trials of oxybutynin and imipramine. Since the surgery, the patient had also been experiencing chronic (debilitating) neuropathic pain in both legs, and the sensation of incomplete bladder emptying. She denied bowel incontinence or saddle anesthesia. Her prescription medications included hydrocodone-acetaminophen 7.5/325 mg every 6 hours as needed for pain and lisinopril 20 mg/d for essential hypertension. The patient's body mass index was 23.3.

  1. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Distribution and impact on quality of life of the pain modalities assessed by the King's Parkinson's disease pain scale.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Manuel Rojo-Abuin, Jose; Rizos, Alexandra; Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Perkins, Lauren; Sauerbier, Anna; Odin, Per; Antonini, Angelo; Chaudhuri, Kallol Ray

    2017-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, pain is a prevalent and complex symptom of diverse origin. King's Parkinson's disease pain scale, assesses different pain syndromes, thus allowing exploration of its differential prevalence and influence on the health-related quality of life of patients. Post hoc study 178 patients and 83 matched controls participating in the King's Parkinson's disease pain scale validation study were used. For determining the respective distribution, King's Parkinson's disease pain scale items and domains scores = 0 meant absence and ≥1 presence of the symptom. The regular scores were used for the other analyses. Health-related quality of lifewas evaluated with EQ-5D-3L and PDQ-8 questionnaires. Parkinson's disease patients experienced more pain modalities than controls. In patients, Pain around joints (King's Parkinson's disease pain scale item 1) and Pain while turning in bed (item 8) were the most prevalent types of pain, whereas Burning mouth syndrome (item 11) and Pain due to grinding teeth (item 10) showed the lowest frequency. The total number of experienced pain modalities closely correlated with the PDQ-8 index, but not with other variables. For all pain types except Pain around joints (item 1) and pain related to Periodic leg movements/RLS (item 7), patients with pain had significantly worse health-related quality of life. The influence of pain, as a whole, on the health-related quality of life was not remarkable after adjustment by other variables. When the particular types of pain were considered, adjusted by sex, age, and Parkinson's disease duration, pain determinants were different for EQ-5D-3L and PDQ-8. King's Parkinson's disease pain scale allows exploring the distribution of the diverse syndromic pain occurring in Parkinson's disease and its association with health-related quality of life.

  3. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  4. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-07-21

    Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spring mass model and stabilized by applying swing leg control. Here, linear adaptations of the three leg parameters, leg angle, leg length and leg stiffness during late swing phase are assumed. Experimentally observed kinematic control parameters (leg rotation and leg length change) of human and avian running are compared, and interpreted within the context of this model, with specific focus on stability and robustness characteristics. The results suggest differences in stability characteristics and applied control strategies of human and avian running, which may relate to differences in leg posture (straight leg posture in humans, and crouched leg posture in birds). It has been suggested that crouched leg postures may improve stability. However, as the system of control strategies is overdetermined, our model findings suggest that a crouched leg posture does not necessarily enhance running stability. The model also predicts different leg stiffness adaptation rates for human and avian running, and suggests that a crouched avian leg posture, which is capable of both leg shortening and lengthening, allows for stable running without adjusting leg stiffness. In contrast, in straight-legged human running, the preparation of the ground contact seems to be more critical, requiring leg stiffness adjustment to remain stable. Finally, analysis of a simple robustness measure, the normalized maximum drop, suggests that the crouched leg posture may provide greater robustness to changes in terrain height

  5. Don't break a leg: running birds from quail to ostrich prioritise leg safety and economy on uneven terrain.

    PubMed

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Hubicki, Christian M; Blum, Yvonne; Renjewski, Daniel; Hurst, Jonathan W; Daley, Monica A

    2014-11-01

    Cursorial ground birds are paragons of bipedal running that span a 500-fold mass range from quail to ostrich. Here we investigate the task-level control priorities of cursorial birds by analysing how they negotiate single-step obstacles that create a conflict between body stability (attenuating deviations in body motion) and consistent leg force-length dynamics (for economy and leg safety). We also test the hypothesis that control priorities shift between body stability and leg safety with increasing body size, reflecting use of active control to overcome size-related challenges. Weight-support demands lead to a shift towards straighter legs and stiffer steady gait with increasing body size, but it remains unknown whether non-steady locomotor priorities diverge with size. We found that all measured species used a consistent obstacle negotiation strategy, involving unsteady body dynamics to minimise fluctuations in leg posture and loading across multiple steps, not directly prioritising body stability. Peak leg forces remained remarkably consistent across obstacle terrain, within 0.35 body weights of level running for obstacle heights from 0.1 to 0.5 times leg length. All species used similar stance leg actuation patterns, involving asymmetric force-length trajectories and posture-dependent actuation to add or remove energy depending on landing conditions. We present a simple stance leg model that explains key features of avian bipedal locomotion, and suggests economy as a key priority on both level and uneven terrain. We suggest that running ground birds target the closely coupled priorities of economy and leg safety as the direct imperatives of control, with adequate stability achieved through appropriately tuned intrinsic dynamics. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Don't break a leg: running birds from quail to ostrich prioritise leg safety and economy on uneven terrain

    PubMed Central

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Hubicki, Christian M.; Blum, Yvonne; Renjewski, Daniel; Hurst, Jonathan W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    Cursorial ground birds are paragons of bipedal running that span a 500-fold mass range from quail to ostrich. Here we investigate the task-level control priorities of cursorial birds by analysing how they negotiate single-step obstacles that create a conflict between body stability (attenuating deviations in body motion) and consistent leg force–length dynamics (for economy and leg safety). We also test the hypothesis that control priorities shift between body stability and leg safety with increasing body size, reflecting use of active control to overcome size-related challenges. Weight-support demands lead to a shift towards straighter legs and stiffer steady gait with increasing body size, but it remains unknown whether non-steady locomotor priorities diverge with size. We found that all measured species used a consistent obstacle negotiation strategy, involving unsteady body dynamics to minimise fluctuations in leg posture and loading across multiple steps, not directly prioritising body stability. Peak leg forces remained remarkably consistent across obstacle terrain, within 0.35 body weights of level running for obstacle heights from 0.1 to 0.5 times leg length. All species used similar stance leg actuation patterns, involving asymmetric force–length trajectories and posture-dependent actuation to add or remove energy depending on landing conditions. We present a simple stance leg model that explains key features of avian bipedal locomotion, and suggests economy as a key priority on both level and uneven terrain. We suggest that running ground birds target the closely coupled priorities of economy and leg safety as the direct imperatives of control, with adequate stability achieved through appropriately tuned intrinsic dynamics. PMID:25355848

  7. Effects of myofascial release leg pull and sagittal plane isometric contract-relax techniques on passive straight-leg raise angle.

    PubMed

    Hanten, W P; Chandler, S D

    1994-09-01

    Experimental evidence does not currently exist to support the claims of clinical effectiveness for myofascial release techniques. This presents an obvious need to document the effects of myofascial release. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two techniques, sagittal plane isometric contract-relax and myofascial release leg pull for increasing hip flexion range of motion (ROM) as measured by the angle of passive straight-leg raise. Seventy-five nondisabled, female subjects 18-29 years of age were randomly assigned to contract-relax, leg pull, or control groups. Pretest hip flexion ROM was measured for each subject's right hip with a passive straight-leg raise test using a fluid-filled goniometer. Subjects in the treatment groups received either contract-relax or leg pull treatment applied to the right lower extremity; subjects in the control group remained supine quietly for 5 minutes. Following treatment, posttest straight-leg raise measurements were performed. A one-way analysis of variance followed by a Newman-Keuls post hoc comparison of mean gain scores showed that subjects receiving contract-relax treatment increased their ROM significantly more than those who received leg pull treatment, and the increase in ROM of subjects in both treatment groups was significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest that while both contract-relax and leg pull techniques can significantly increase hip flexion ROM in normal subjects, contract-relax treatment may be more effective and efficient than leg pull treatment.

  8. Leg Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Long-term Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-term Ankle Problems Breast Problems in Men Breast Problems in Women Chest Pain in Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea ...

  9. Tightness of hamstring- and psoas major muscles. A prospective study of back pain in young men during their military service.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, A L

    1988-01-01

    Muscular tightness and the therapeutic effect of stretching has been widely discussed during the last few years in sports training and physiotherapy. Within a prospective study of back function and pain before and after compulsory military service, tightness of hamstring- and psoas muscles was assessed. Around 600 young men were examined three times over a period of four years. Tight hamstring muscles were found to be very common in this group. Only 43% of the right and 35% of the left legs reached an angle of at least 80 degrees from the couch during the straight-leg-raising test (Lasegue's test). The test of muscular tightness showed a significant test-retest reliability over all examinations. Tight hamstring- or psoas muscles could not be shown to correlate to current back pain or to the incidence of back pain during the follow-up period.

  10. Intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα prevents radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Isabel; Alsner, Jan; Behlke, Mark A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Overgaard, Jens; Howard, Kenneth A; Kjems, Jørgen

    2010-10-01

    One of the most common and dose-limiting long-term adverse effects of radiation therapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), which is characterized by restricted tissue flexibility, reduced compliance or strictures, pain and in severe cases, ulceration and necrosis. Several strategies have been proposed to ameliorate RIF but presently no effective one is available. Recent studies have reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a role in fibrogenesis. Male CDF1 mice were radiated with a single dose of 45 Gy. Chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα were intraperitoneal injected and late radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) was assessed using a modification of the leg contracture model. Additionally, the effect of these nanoparticles on tumor growth and tumor control probability in the absence of radiation was examined in a C3H mammary carcinoma model. We show in this work, that targeting TNFα in macrophages by intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles completely prevented radiation-induced fibrosis in CDF1 mice without revealing any cytotoxic side-effects after a long-term administration. Furthermore, such TNFα targeting was selective without any significant influence on tumor growth or irradiation-related tumor control probability. This nanoparticle-based RNAi approach represents a novel approach to prevent RIF with potential application to improve clinical radiation therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced laser-evoked potential habituation detects abnormal central pain processing in painful radiculopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Hüllemann, P; von der Brelie, C; Manthey, G; Düsterhöft, J; Helmers, A K; Synowitz, M; Baron, R

    2017-05-01

    Repetitive painful laser stimuli lead to physiological laser-evoked potential (LEP) habituation, measurable by a decrement of the N2/P2 amplitude. The time course of LEP-habituation is reduced in the capsaicin model for peripheral and central sensitization and in patients with migraine and fibromyalgia. In the present investigation, we aimed to assess the time course of LEP-habituation in a neuropathic pain syndrome, i.e. painful radiculopathy. At the side of radiating pain, four blocks of 25 painful laser stimuli each were applied to the ventral thigh at the L3 dermatome in 27 patients with painful radiculopathy. Inclusion criteria were (1) at least one neurological finding of radiculopathy, (2) low back pain with radiation into the foot and (3) a positive one-sided compression of the L5 and/or S1 root in the MRI. The time course of LEP-habituation was compared to 20 healthy height and age matched controls. Signs of peripheral (heat hyperalgesia) and central sensitization (dynamic mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia) at the affected L5 or S1 dermatome were assessed with quantitative sensory testing. Painful radiculopathy patients showed decreased LEP-habituation compared to controls. Patients with signs of central sensitization showed a more prominent LEP-habituation decrease within the radiculopathy patient group. Laser-evoked potential habituation is reduced in painful radiculopathy patients, which indicates an abnormal central pain processing. Central sensitization seems to be a major contributor to abnormal LEP habituation. The LEP habituation paradigm might be useful as a clinical tool to assess central pain processing alterations in nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Abnormal central pain processing in neuropathic pain conditions may be revealed with the laser-evoked potential habituation paradigm. In painful radiculopathy patients, LEP-habituation is reduced compared to healthy controls. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  12. Leg stiffness and expertise in men jumping.

    PubMed

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Bardy, Benoît G; Durey, Alain

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate: a) the leg spring behavior in the one-leg vertical jump, b) the contribution of impulse parameters to this behavior, and c) the effect of jumping expertise on leg stiffness. Four categories of experts (handball, basketball, volleyball players, and Fosbury athletes), as well as novice subjects performed a run-and-jump test to touch a ball with the head. Five experimental conditions were tested from 55 to 95% of the maximum jump height. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using six cameras and a force plate. The mechanical behavior of the musculoskeleton component of the human body can be modeled as a simple mass-spring system, from which leg stiffness values can be extracted to better understand energy transfer during running or jumping. The results indicate that leg stiffness (mean value of 11.5 kN.m) decreased with jumping height. Leg shortening at takeoff also increased with jumping height, whereas contact time decreased (-18%). No difference was found between experts and novices for leg stiffness. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) indicated the contribution of two main factors to the performance. The first factor emerged out of vertical force, stiffness, and duration of impulse. The second factor included leg shortening and jumping height. Differences between experts and novices were observed in terms of the contribution of leg stiffness to jump height, and more importantly, clear differences existed between experts in jumping parameters. The analysis performed on the sport categories indeed revealed different jumping profiles, characterized by specific, sport-related impulse parameters.

  13. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Giummarra, Melita J; Bradshaw, John L; Nicholls, Michael Er; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Gibson, Stephen J

    2011-05-25

    We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various clinical specialists, including oncologists, neurologists, prosthetists, and

  14. Anatomic and functional leg-length inequality: A review and recommendation for clinical decision-making. Part II, the functional or unloaded leg-length asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Gary A

    2005-01-01

    Background Part II of this review examines the functional "short leg" or unloaded leg length alignment asymmetry, including the relationship between an anatomic and functional leg-length inequality. Based on the reviewed evidence, an outline for clinical decision making regarding functional and anatomic leg-length inequality will be provided. Methods Online databases: Medline, CINAHL and Mantis. Plus library searches for the time frame of 1970–2005 were done using the term "leg-length inequality". Results and Discussion The evidence suggests that an unloaded leg-length asymmetry is a different phenomenon than an anatomic leg-length inequality, and may be due to suprapelvic muscle hypertonicity. Anatomic leg-length inequality and unloaded functional or leg-length alignment asymmetry may interact in a loaded (standing) posture, but not in an unloaded (prone/supine) posture. Conclusion The unloaded, functional leg-length alignment asymmetry is a likely phenomenon, although more research regarding reliability of the measurement procedure and validity relative to spinal dysfunction is needed. Functional leg-length alignment asymmetry should be eliminated before any necessary treatment of anatomic LLI. PMID:16080787

  15. INTRA-RATER RELIABILITY OF THE MULTIPLE SINGLE-LEG HOP-STABILIZATION TEST AND RELATIONSHIPS WITH AGE, LEG DOMINANCE AND TRAINING.

    PubMed

    Sawle, Leanne; Freeman, Jennifer; Marsden, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Balance is a complex construct, affected by multiple components such as strength and co-ordination. However, whilst assessing an athlete's dynamic balance is an important part of clinical examination, there is no gold standard measure. The multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test is a functional test which may offer a method of evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance, but it needs to show adequate intra-tester reliability. The purpose of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of a dynamic balance test, the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test on the dominant and non-dominant legs. Intra-rater reliability study. Fifteen active participants were tested twice with a 10-minute break between tests. The outcome measure was the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test score, based on a clinically assessed numerical scoring system. Results were analysed using an Intraclass Correlations Coefficient (ICC 2,1 ) and Bland-Altman plots. Regression analyses explored relationships between test scores, leg dominance, age and training (an alpha level of p = 0.05 was selected). ICCs for intra-rater reliability were 0.85 for the dominant and non-dominant legs (confidence intervals = 0.62-0.95 and 0.61-0.95 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed scores within two standard deviations. A significant correlation was observed between the dominant and non-dominant leg on balance scores (R 2 =0.49, p<0.05), and better balance was associated with younger participants in their non-dominant leg (R 2 =0.28, p<0.05) and their dominant leg (R 2 =0.39, p<0.05), and a higher number of hours spent training for the non-dominant leg R 2 =0.37, p<0.05). The multiple single-leg hop-stabilisation test demonstrated strong intra-tester reliability with active participants. Younger participants who trained more, have better balance scores. This test may be a useful measure for evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance. 3.

  16. An increased response to experimental muscle pain is related to psychological status in women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck-shoulder pain conditions, e.g., chronic trapezius myalgia, have been associated with sensory disturbances such as increased sensitivity to experimentally induced pain. This study investigated pain sensitivity in terms of bilateral pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles and pain responses after a unilateral hypertonic saline infusion into the right legs tibialis anterior muscle and related those parameters to intensity and area size of the clinical pain and to psychological factors (sleeping problems, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and fear-avoidance). Methods Nineteen women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain but without simultaneous anatomically widespread clinical pain (NSP) and 30 age-matched pain-free female control subjects (CON) participated in the study. Results NSP had lower pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and over the tibialis anterior muscles and experienced hypertonic saline-evoked pain in the tibialis anterior muscle to be significantly more intense and locally more widespread than CON. More intense symptoms of anxiety and depression together with a higher disability level were associated with increased pain responses to experimental pain induction and a larger area size of the clinical neck-shoulder pain at its worst. Conclusion These results indicate that central mechanisms e.g., central sensitization and altered descending control, are involved in chronic neck-shoulder pain since sensory hypersensitivity was found in areas distant to the site of clinical pain. Psychological status was found to interact with the perception, intensity, duration and distribution of induced pain (hypertonic saline) together with the spreading of clinical pain. The duration and intensity of pain correlated negatively with pressure pain thresholds. PMID:21992460

  17. Predictors of lost time from work among nursing personnel who sought treatment for back pain.

    PubMed

    Pompeii, Lisa A; Lipscomb, Hester J; Dement, John M

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible predictors of lost workdays among nurses and nurses' aides who sought treatment for work-related back pain. Nursing staff employed at a tertiary care medical center over a 13-year time period (1994 through 2006). We used existing data from clinic surveys administered to nursing personnel during their initial treatment visit to the hospital's occupational health clinic. Predictors of losing ≤ 7 and ≥ 8 workdays was examined. 589 of 708 (83%) nursing personnel with complaints of work-related back pain completed the survey, with 31% resulting in lost workdays. Experiencing sudden onset of pain (RR:1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1), a combination of severe pain with numbness and tingling in the back/legs (RR: 7.4; 95% CI: 2.9, 18.6), severe pain only (RR: 4.4; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1), numbness and tingling in the back/legs only (RR: 3.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.2), and working < 5 years at the hospital (RR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2, 4.7) were predictive of losing ≥ 8 workdays. Job title, work demands, work conflicts, and most psychosocial factors were not predictive. Severe pain, neurologic symptoms and sudden onset of pain were predictive of delayed return-to-work; however, these symptoms alone should not be considered indicators of poor outcomes given that most workers who reported these symptoms returned to work in less than 8~days. Among these health care workers, lost workdays appear to be related to more severe pathology rather than workplace characteristics.

  18. Referred Pain Patterns Provoked on Intra-Pelvic Structures among Women with and without Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Stephen; Peterson, Magnus; Eriksson, Margaretha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic structures in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) persisting after childbirth with the purpose to improve diagnostics and give implications for treatment. Materials and Methods In this descriptive and comparative study 36 parous women with CPP were recruited from a physiotherapy department waiting list and by advertisements in newspapers. A control group of 29 parous women without CPP was consecutively assessed for eligibility from a midwifery surgery. Inclusion criterion for CPP was: moderate pain in the sacral region persisting at least six months after childbirth confirmed by pelvic pain provocation tests. Exclusion criteria in groups with and without CPP were: persistent back or pelvic pain with onset prior to pregnancy, previous back surgery and positive neurological signs. Pain was provoked by palpation of 13 predetermined intra-pelvic anatomical landmarks. The referred pain distribution was expressed in pain drawings and described in pain maps and calculated referred pain areas. Results Pain provoked by palpation of the posterior intra-pelvic landmarks was mostly referred to the sacral region and pain provoked by palpation of the ischial and pubic bones was mostly referred to the groin and pubic regions, with or without pain referred down the ipsilateral leg. The average pain distribution area provoked by palpation of all 13 anatomical landmarks was 30.3 mm² (19.2 to 53.7) in women with CPP as compared to 3.2 mm² (1.0 to 5.1) in women without CPP, p< 0.0001. Conclusions Referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic landmarks in women with CPP are consistent with sclerotomal sensory innervation. Magnification of referred pain patterns indicates allodynia and central sensitization. The results suggest that pain mapping can be used to evaluate and confirm the pain experience among women with CPP and contribute to diagnosis. PMID:25793999

  19. Leg pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 81. Marcussen B, Hogrefe C, ... Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 112. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. ...

  20. Broken Leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices into the broken bone to maintain proper alignment during healing. Other injuries may be treated with ... that extend into the joint and poor bone alignment can cause osteoarthritis years later. If your leg ...

  1. An MRI-based leg model used to simulate biomechanical phenomena during cuff algometry: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Manafi-Khanian, Bahram; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cuff pressure stimulation is applicable for assessing deep-tissue pain sensitivity by exciting a variety of deep-tissue nociceptors. In this study, the relative transfer of biomechanical stresses and strains from the cuff via the skin to the muscle and the somatic tissue layers around bones were investigated. Cuff pressure was applied on the lower leg at three different stimulation intensities (mild pressure to pain). Three-dimensional finite element models including bones and three different layers of deep tissues were developed based on magnetic resonance images (MRI). The skin indentation maps at mild pressure, pain threshold, and intense painful stimulations were extracted from MRI and applied to the model. The mean stress under the cuff position around tibia was 4.6, 4.9 and around fibula 14.8, 16.4 times greater than mean stress of muscle surface in the same section at pain threshold and intense painful stimulations, respectively. At the same stimulation intensities, the mean strains around tibia were 36.4, 42.3 % and around fibula 32.9, 35.0 %, respectively, of mean strain on the muscle surface. Assuming strain as the ideal stimulus for nociceptors the results suggest that cuff algometry is less capable to challenge the nociceptors of tissues around bones as compared to more superficially located muscles.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain, fatigue and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol G T; Liebano, Richard E; Amrit, Anand S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Because transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design to test the effects of a single treatment of TENS with people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS and no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and in movement; pressure pain thresholds, 6-m walk test, range of motion; 5-time sit-to-stand test, and single-leg stance. Conditioned pain modulation was completed at the end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. Pressure pain thresholds increased at the site of TENS (spine) and outside the site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During active TENS, conditioned pain modulation was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to the way in which TENS is used clinically on pain, fatigue, function, and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome among Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Controlled Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in fibromyalgia (FM) and determine the presence and amount of sleep disruption in FM patients with RLS. RLS and FM have been associated in uncontrolled studies using a variety of RLS definitions. We explored this relationship using a cross-sectional study design. Methods: FM cases that met the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were recruited through an academic referral clinic and advertising. Pain- and fatigue-free controls were recruited from the Seattle metropolitan area. We enrolled 172 FM patients (mean age 50 years, 93% female) and 63 pain- and fatigue-free controls (mean age 41 years, 56% female). RLS was ascertained by a self-administered validated diagnostic interview. Results: The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence of RLS was higher in the FM group than the control group (33.0%; 95% CI: 25.9, 40.1 vs. 3.1%; 95% CI: 0.0, 7.4; p = 0.001). Likewise, the FM group was more likely to report RLS (OR = 11.7; 95% CI: 2.6, 53.0), even after adjusting for age and gender. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score was higher among FM patients with RLS than those without (11.8 vs. 9.9; p = 0.01) but subjective limb pain measures did not differ between these 2 groups. Conclusions: There is a higher prevalence and odds of RLS in those with FM compared to controls. Clinicians should routinely query FM patients regarding RLS symptoms because treatment of RLS can potentially improve sleep and quality of life in these patients. Citation: Viola-Saltzman M; Watson NF; Bogart A; Goldberg J; Buchwald D. High prevalence of restless legs syndrome among patients with fibromyalgia: a controlled cross-sectional study. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(5):423-427. PMID:20957840

  4. The susceptibility of the knee extensors to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage is not affected by leg dominance but by exercise order.

    PubMed

    Hody, S; Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Laglaine, T; Croisier, J-L

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of symptoms associated with intense eccentric protocols. Eighteen young men performed three sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic (60° s(-1)) contractions of the knee extensors (range of motion, ROM: 0°-100°, 0 = full extension) using either dominant or non-dominant leg. They repeated a similar eccentric bout using the contralateral leg 6 weeks later. The sequence of leg's use was allocated to create equally balanced groups. Four indirect markers of muscle damage including subjective pain intensity, maximal isometric strength, muscle stiffness and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before and 24 h after exercise. All markers changed significantly following the eccentric bout performed either by dominant or non-dominant legs, but no significant difference was observed between legs. Interestingly, the comparison between the first and second eccentric bouts revealed that muscle soreness (-42%, P<0.001), CK activity (-62%, P<0.05) and strength loss (-54%, P<0.01) were significantly lower after the second bout. This study suggests that leg dominance does not influence the magnitude of exercise-induced muscle damage and supports for the first time the existence of a contralateral protection against exercise-induced muscle damage in the lower limbs. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Role of central sensitization in symptoms beyond muscle pain, and the evaluation of a patient with widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Muhammad B

    2007-06-01

    Patients with widespread pain or fibromyalgia syndrome have many symptoms besides musculoskeletal pain: e.g. fatigue, sleep difficulties, a swollen feeling in tissues, paresthesia, cognitive dysfunction, dizziness, and symptoms of overlapping conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and restless legs syndrome. There is evidence for central sensitization in these conditions, but further studies are needed. Anxiety, stress and depression are also present in 30-45% of patients. Other factors that may contribute to symptoms include endocrine dysfunction, psychosocial distress, trauma, and disrupted sleep. Evaluation of a patient presenting with widespread pain includes history and physical examination to diagnose both fibromyalgia and associated or concomitant conditions. Fibromyalgia should be diagnosed by its own characteristic features. Some patients with otherwise typical symptoms of fibromyalgia may have as few as four to six tender points in clinical practice. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus should be evaluated for fibromyalgia, since 20-30% of them have associated fibromyalgia, requiring a different treatment approach.

  6. Minimum Clinically Important Difference and Substantial Clinical Benefit in Pain, Functional, and Quality of Life Scales in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Byung; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Me-Riong; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Shin, Kyung-Min; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Cho, Jae-Heung; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2017-04-15

    .: Prospective observational 1-year study. .: To determine minimum clinically important difference (MCID) and substantial clinical benefit (SCB) of outcome measures in failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients, as these metrics enable assessment of whether and when an intervention produces clinically meaningful effects in a patient. .: Several methods have been devised to quantify clinically important difference, but MCID and SCB for FBSS patients has yet to be determined. .: Patients with persisting/recurrent low back pain (LBP) and/or leg pain after lumbar surgery who completed 16 weeks of treatment (n = 105) at two hospitals in Korea from November 2011 to September 2014 were analyzed. Global perceived effect was used to determine receiver operating characteristic curves in visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and short form-36 (SF-36) in an anchor-based approach. .: MCIDs for ODI, LBP and leg pain VAS, physical component summary, mental health component summary (MCS), and overall health scores of SF-36 were 9.0, 22.5, 27.5, 10.2, 4.0, and 8.9, and SCBs were 15.0, 32.5, 37.0, 19.7, 19.3, and 21.1, respectively. MCID and SCB area under the curve was ≥0.8, and ≥0.7, respectively. .: LBP and leg pain VAS, ODI, and physical component summary of SF-36 may be used to measure responsiveness in FBSS patients. 3.

  7. Forefoot running improves pain and disability associated with chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diebal, Angela R; Gregory, Robert; Alitz, Curtis; Gerber, J Parry

    2012-05-01

    Anterior compartment pressures of the leg as well as kinematic and kinetic measures are significantly influenced by running technique. It is unknown whether adopting a forefoot strike technique will decrease the pain and disability associated with chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) in hindfoot strike runners. For people who have CECS, adopting a forefoot strike running technique will lead to decreased pain and disability associated with this condition. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Ten patients with CECS indicated for surgical release were prospectively enrolled. Resting and postrunning compartment pressures, kinematic and kinetic measurements, and self-report questionnaires were taken for all patients at baseline and after 6 weeks of a forefoot strike running intervention. Run distance and reported pain levels were recorded. A 15-point global rating of change (GROC) scale was used to measure perceived change after the intervention. After 6 weeks of forefoot run training, mean postrun anterior compartment pressures significantly decreased from 78.4 ± 32.0 mm Hg to 38.4 ± 11.5 mm Hg. Vertical ground-reaction force and impulse values were significantly reduced. Running distance significantly increased from 1.4 ± 0.6 km before intervention to 4.8 ± 0.5 km 6 weeks after intervention, while reported pain while running significantly decreased. The Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) significantly increased from 49.9 ± 21.4 to 90.4 ± 10.3, and the Lower Leg Outcome Survey (LLOS) significantly increased from 67.3 ± 13.7 to 91.5 ± 8.5. The GROC scores at 6 weeks after intervention were between 5 and 7 for all patients. One year after the intervention, the SANE and LLOS scores were greater than reported during the 6-week follow-up. Two-mile run times were also significantly faster than preintervention values. No patient required surgery. In 10 consecutive patients with CECS, a 6-week forefoot strike running intervention led to decreased

  8. Comparison of a flexible versus a rigid breast compression paddle: pain experience, projected breast area, radiation dose and technical image quality.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Mireille J M; Ten Voorde, Marloes; Veldkamp, Wouter J H; van Engen, Ruben E; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; 't Jong-Gunneman, Machteld N L; de Win, Jos; Greve, Kitty Droogh-de; Paap, Ellen; den Heeten, Gerard J

    2015-03-01

    To compare pain, projected breast area, radiation dose and image quality between flexible (FP) and rigid (RP) breast compression paddles. The study was conducted in a Dutch mammographic screening unit (288 women). To compare both paddles one additional image with RP was made, consisting of either a mediolateral-oblique (MLO) or craniocaudal-view (CC). Pain experience was scored using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Projected breast area was estimated using computer software. Radiation dose was estimated using the model by Dance. Image quality was reviewed by three radiologists and three radiographers. There was no difference in pain experience between both paddles (mean difference NRS: 0.08 ± 0.08, p = 0.32). Mean radiation dose was 4.5 % lower with FP (0.09 ± 0.01 p = 0.00). On MLO-images, the projected breast area was 0.79 % larger with FP. Paired evaluation of image quality indicated that FP removed fibroglandular tissue from the image area and reduced contrast in the clinically relevant retroglandular area at chest wall side. Although FP performed slightly better in the projected breast area, it moved breast tissue from the image area at chest wall side. RP showed better contrast, especially in the retroglandular area. We therefore recommend the use of RP for standard MLO and CC views.

  9. Evaluation of arm-leg coordination in flat breaststroke.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D; Seifert, L; Leblanc, H; Boulesteix, L; Carter, M

    2004-10-01

    This study proposes a new method to evaluate arm-leg coordination in flat breaststroke. Five arm and leg stroke phases were defined with a velocity-video system. Five time gaps quantified the time between arm and leg actions during three paces of a race (200 m, 100 m and 50 m) in 16 top level swimmers. Based on these time gaps, effective glide, effective propulsion, effective leg insweep and effective recovery were used to identify the different stroke phases of the body. A faster pace corresponded to increased stroke rate, decreased stroke length, increased propulsive phases, shorter glide phases, and a shorter T1 time gap, which measured the effective body glide. The top level swimmers showed short time gaps (T2, T3, T4, measuring the timing of arm-leg recoveries), which reflected the continuity in arm and leg actions. The measurement of these time gaps thus provides a pertinent evaluation of swimmers' skill in adapting their arm-leg coordination to biomechanical constraints.

  10. Modulation of corticospinal input to the legs by arm and leg cycling in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, R; Alvarado, L; Kim, S; Chong, S L; Mushahwar, V K

    2017-10-01

    The spinal cervico-lumbar interaction during rhythmic movements in humans has recently been studied; however, the role of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs is not well understood. The goals of this study were to investigate the effect of active rhythmic arm movements on the corticospinal drive to the legs ( study 1 ) and assess the effect of simultaneous arm and leg training on the corticospinal pathway after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) ( study 2). In study 1 , neurologically intact (NI) participants or participants with iSCI performed combinations of stationary and rhythmic cycling of the arms and legs while motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle. In the NI group, arm cycling alone could facilitate the VL MEP amplitude, suggesting that dynamic arm movements strongly modulate the corticospinal pathway to the legs. No significant difference in VL MEP between conditions was found in participants with iSCI. In study 2 , participants with iSCI underwent 12 wk of electrical stimulation-assisted cycling training: one group performed simultaneous arm and leg (A&L) cycling and the other legs-only cycling. MEPs in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were compared before and after training. After training, only the A&L group had a significantly larger TA MEP, suggesting increased excitability in the corticospinal pathway. The findings demonstrate the importance of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs and suggest that active engagement of the arms in lower limb rehabilitation may produce better neural regulation and restoration of function. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study aimed to demonstrate the importance of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs. It provides direct evidence in humans that active movement of the arms could facilitate corticospinal transmission to the legs and, for the first time, shows that facilitation is absent after spinal cord

  11. Correlations Between the SF-36, the Oswestry-Disability Index and Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Decompression According to Types of Spine Origin Pain.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sangbong; Chae, Seungbum

    2017-07-01

    Cross-sectional study. To determine the correlation between SF-36 (a measure for overall health status in patients) and Oswestry-Disability Index (ODI) or Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) confined to spine according to the type of pain from the spine. Data showed moderate correlation between ODI and SF-36 Physical Component Score (PCS), Physical Functioning (PF) (r=-0.46), Physical Role Functioning (RP) (r=-0.284), Bodily Pain (BP) (r=-0.327), and Mental Component Score (MCS), Emotional Role Functioning (r=-0.250), Social Role Functioning (r=0.254), Vitality (r=0.296). Between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013, a total of 69 patients were enrolled in this study. They were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis and underwent decompression surgery such as laminotomy in this hospital. The 3 standardized questionnaires (ODI, RMDQ, and SF-36) were given to these patients, at least 1 year after the surgery. ODI and SF-36 had a statistically significant (P=0.001) and moderate correlation. Small correlations were also seen between Physical Functioning (r=-0.46), Physical Role Functioning (r=-0.284), and Bodily Pain (r=-0.327) of SF-36 PCS and ODI, and between Emotional Role Functioning (r=-0.250), Social Role Functioning (r=-0.254), and Vitality (r=-0.296) of SF-36 Mental Component Score and ODI. Items in ODI for the level of pain while standing and traveling were mostly related to axial back pain, while item of lifting was related to referred buttock pain. Sleeping disturbance section in the ODI was mainly caused by radiated leg pain. In addition, RMDQ was also associated to the 3 types of pain. Moderate correlation was found between ODI or RMDQ as a condition-specific outcome and the SF-36, indicating overall health status. ODI was found to be a more adequate measure to evaluate axial back pain rather than referred pain or radiating pain. RMDQ was adequate to measure the health status and to evaluate the 3 types of spine pain. These 3 instruments could

  12. Leg stiffness and stride frequency in human running.

    PubMed

    Farley, C T; González, O

    1996-02-01

    When humans and other mammals run, the body's complex system of muscle, tendon and ligament springs behaves like a single linear spring ('leg spring'). A simple spring-mass model, consisting of a single linear leg spring and a mass equivalent to the animal's mass, has been shown to describe the mechanics of running remarkably well. Force platform measurements from running animals, including humans, have shown that the stiffness of the leg spring remains nearly the same at all speeds and that the spring-mass system is adjusted for higher speeds by increasing the angle swept by the leg spring. The goal of the present study is to determine the relative importance of changes to the leg spring stiffness and the angle swept by the leg spring when humans alter their stride frequency at a given running speed. Human subjects ran on treadmill-mounted force platform at 2.5ms-1 while using a range of stride frequencies from 26% below to 36% above the preferred stride frequency. Force platform measurements revealed that the stiffness of the leg spring increased by 2.3-fold from 7.0 to 16.3 kNm-1 between the lowest and highest stride frequencies. The angle swept by the leg spring decreased at higher stride frequencies, partially offsetting the effect of the increased leg spring stiffness on the mechanical behavior of the spring-mass system. We conclude that the most important adjustment to the body's spring system to accommodate higher stride frequencies is that leg spring becomes stiffer.

  13. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure.

  14. Macro- and microperfusion during application of a new compression system, designed for patients with leg ulcer and concomitant peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Jünger, Michael; Haase, Hermann; Schwenke, Linda; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Ladwig, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To investigate macro- and microperfusion during 14 days of treatment with a new 2-layer compression system (3M™ Coban™ 2 Lite), designed for patients with leg ulcer and concomitant peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A single-centre, open-label, prospective pilot study was performed with 15 subjects suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease with an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) of 0.5-0.8, who volunteered to have their 'study leg' bandaged with the new system. Coincident leg ulcer or chronic venous disease was not mandatory. All subjects received the new compression system, which stayed in place from 1 up to 4 days according to scheduled study visits. The system was reapplied by study personnel at each clinical visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The study participation stopped after 14 days. At each clinical visit safety assessments were performed: measurement of acral pulsation to capture macroperfusion; laser Doppler fluxmetry to capture microperfusion; clinical signs of pressure related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain and sub-bandage pressure measurement. In addition, the leg volume was measured and a comfort questionnaire was completed. An average sub-bandage pressure in standing position of approximately 30 mmHg was measured at the B1 location immediately after bandage application. Laser Doppler fluxmetry demonstrated positive effects on microcirculation regarding vasomotion and respiratory reflux. No change of the cardiac signal appeared. For acrale pulsations a high intraindividual variability was found with no clear interference to the bandage application. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was detected. After application of the new compression system in subjects with moderate PAOD, laser Doppler fluxmetry indicated significant improvements of the microcirculation. High variability and lack of correlation to clinical symptoms was found for the acral pulsation. The new compression system revealed a high

  15. In search of optimal compression therapy for venous leg ulcers: a meta-analysis of studies comparing diverse [corrected] bandages with specifically designed stockings.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Felix; Willenberg, Torsten; Blättler, Werner

    2009-09-01

    In search of an optimal compression therapy for venous leg ulcers, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing compression systems based on stockings (MCS) with divers bandages. RCT were retrieved from six sources and reviewed independently. The primary endpoint, completion of healing within a defined time frame, and the secondary endpoints, time to healing, and pain were entered into a meta-analysis using the tools of the Cochrane Collaboration. Additional subjective endpoints were summarized. Eight RCT (published 1985-2008) fulfilled the predefined criteria. Data presentation was adequate and showed moderate heterogeneity. The studies included 692 patients (21-178/study, mean age 61 years, 56% women). Analyzed were 688 ulcerated legs, present for 1 week to 9 years, sizing 1 to 210 cm(2). The observation period ranged from 12 to 78 weeks. Patient and ulcer characteristics were evenly distributed in three studies, favored the stocking groups in four, and the bandage group in one. Data on the pressure exerted by stockings and bandages were reported in seven and two studies, amounting to 31-56 and 27-49 mm Hg, respectively. The proportion of ulcers healed was greater with stockings than with bandages (62.7% vs 46.6%; P < .00001). The average time to healing (seven studies, 535 patients) was 3 weeks shorter with stockings (P = .0002). In no study performed bandages better than MCS. Pain was assessed in three studies (219 patients) revealing an important advantage of stockings (P < .0001). Other subjective parameters and issues of nursing revealed an advantage of MCS as well. Leg compression with stockings is clearly better than compression with bandages, has a positive impact on pain, and is easier to use.

  16. Survey Results of Pain Treatments in Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Adam T.; Kratz, Anna L.; Engel, Joyce M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify the types and frequencies of pain treatments used by individuals with cerebral palsy (CP); examine the perceived effectiveness of these treatments; and identify the types of healthcare providers that were accessed for pain-related services. Design A cross-sectional survey design was employed. 83 adults (mean age=40.3 years, SD=13.6) with CP indicated their pain location and intensity during the past 3 months. Next, they indicated their use of 24 different pain treatments and the effectiveness of each. Finally, participants indicated the frequency of pain-related healthcare visits to specific providers over the past 6 months. Results 63% of participants reported experiencing chronic pain and rated their pain intensity over the past week as 5.1/10, on average. The most common pain locations were the lower back, hips, and legs. Physical interventions (e.g., physical therapy, strengthening) were the most common pain treatments reportedly used, and were rated as moderately effective. Many other treatments were also used, and participants sought pain-related care from a variety of providers. Conclusions Although participants reportedly accessed pain care from a variety of providers, and perceived that several types of treatments were effective, many of the treatments rated as effective were rarely used or provided. Future research using clinical trial methods would further elucidate the specific pain treatments that are most beneficial for adults with CP. PMID:21273894

  17. Effective spine triage: patterns of pain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of recurring lost time from work, low back pain is a huge burden on society. Medical training dictates that we must establish a cause for pain before we can treat it and then base our treatment on a recognized and agreed-upon pathology. But in the overwhelming majority of low back pain cases, the issue is nothing more than a minor mechanical malfunction, the inevitable consequence of normal wear and tear. The severity of the pain does not reflect the benign nature of the underlying problem and its limited extent makes a definitive diagnosis impossible. One important component of the solution is improved spinal triage. Using patterns or syndromes in the initial assessment of low back pain is gaining renewed interest and clinical acceptance. Identifying a patient's pain pattern is achieved primarily through an assessment of the patient's history. The patient interview begins with a series of questions to determine the specific syndrome. A subsequent physical examination supports or refutes the findings in history. Combining information from the history with the findings of the physical examination, the clinician has the ability to rule out a number of potentially grim diagnoses. More than 90% of back pain patients have benign mechanical problems and their pain can be classified into 4 distinct patterns: 2 back-dominant patterns and 2 leg-dominant patterns. A clinical perspective capable of recognizing a defined syndrome at first contact will lead to a better outcome. Most patients with low back pain can be treated successfully with simple, pattern-specific, noninvasive primary management. Patients without a pattern and those who do not respond as anticipated require further investigation and specialized care.

  18. A new leg voxel model in two different positions for simulation of the non-uniform distribution of (241)Am in leg bones.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Majid; Brey, Richard R; Meldrum, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    A new leg voxel model in two different positions (straight and bent) has been developed for in vivo measurement calibration purposes. This voxel phantom is a representation of a human leg that may provide a substantial enhancement to Monte Carlo modeling because it more accurately models different geometric leg positions and the non-uniform distribution of Am throughout the leg bones instead of assuming a one-position geometry and a uniform distribution of radionuclides. This was accomplished by performing a radiochemical analysis on small sections of the leg bones from the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) case 0846. USTUR case 0846 represents an individual who was repeatedly contaminated by Am via chronic inhalation. To construct the voxel model, high resolution (2 mm) computed tomography (CT) images of the USTUR case 0846 leg were obtained in different positions. Thirty-six (36) objects (universes) were segmented manually from the CT images using 3D-Doctor software. Bones were divided into 30 small sections with an assigned weight exactly equal to the weight of bone sections obtained from radiochemical analysis of the USTUR case 0846 leg. The segmented images were then converted into a boundary file, and the Human Monitoring Laboratory (HML) voxelizer was used to convert the boundary file into the leg voxel phantom. Excluding the surrounding air regions, the straight leg phantom consists of 592,023 voxels, while the bent leg consists of 337,567 voxels. The resulting leg voxel model is now ready for use as an MCNPX input file to simulate in vivo measurement of bone-seeking radionuclides.

  19. Spinal cord stimulation to abort painful spasms of atypical stiff limb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ughratdar, I; Sivakumar, G; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Stiff limb syndrome (SLS) is a rare chronic condition which can result in significant debility. We report the case of a 44-year-old man suffering from severe painful spasms in his right leg with a diagnosis of SLS. He had been initially treated for his pain with a spinal cord stimulator but presented with exacerbation of pain secondary to a lead fracture for which he underwent revision of the stimulator. Postoperative programming unexpectedly resulted in not only control of his pain but also an ability to abort his spasmodic episodes related to SLS. To our knowledge, spinal cord stimulation has not been previously used for SLS and our report opens up another avenue for this rare condition. We provide a brief overview of SLS and propose an underlying mechanism for the observed phenomenon.

  20. Comparison of Chest Pain Protocols for Electrocardiography-Gated Dual-Source Cardiothoracic CT in Children and Adults: The Effect of Tube Current Saturation on Radiation Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Objective To compare radiation doses between conventional and chest pain protocols using dual-source retrospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-gated cardiothoracic computed tomography (CT) in children and adults and assess the effect of tube current saturation on radiation dose reduction. Materials and Methods This study included 104 patients (16.6 ± 7.7 years, range 5–48 years) that were divided into two groups: those with and those without tube current saturation. The estimated radiation doses of retrospectively ECG-gated spiral cardiothoracic CT were compared between conventional, uniphasic, and biphasic chest pain protocols acquired with the same imaging parameters in the same patients by using paired t tests. Dose reduction percentages, patient ages, volume CT dose index values, and tube current time products per rotation were compared between the two groups by using unpaired t tests. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results The volume CT dose index values of the biphasic chest pain protocol (10.8 ± 3.9 mGy) were significantly lower than those of the conventional protocol (12.2 ± 4.7 mGy, p < 0.001) and those of the uniphasic chest pain protocol (12.9 ± 4.9 mGy, p < 0.001). The dose-saving effect of biphasic chest pain protocol was significantly less with a saturated tube current (4.5 ± 10.2%) than with unsaturated tube current method (14.8 ± 11.5%, p < 0.001). In 76 patients using 100 kVp, patient age showed no significant differences between the groups with and without tube current saturation in all protocols (p > 0.05); the groups with tube current saturation showed significantly higher volume CT dose index values (p < 0.01) and tube current time product per rotation (p < 0.001) than the groups without tube current saturation in all protocols. Conclusion The radiation dose of dual-source retrospectively ECG-gated spiral cardiothoracic CT can be reduced by approximately 15% by using the biphasic chest pain protocol instead of the

  1. [Tips for taking history of pain].

    PubMed

    Noda, Kazutaka; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2012-11-01

    Pain is physiologically classified as nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, and psychogenic pain. Nociceptive pain is further divided into visceral pain, somatic pain, and referred pain. Visceral pain is dull, and it is difficult to locate the origin of such pain. Somatic pain is sharp, severe, and well localized. On receiving visceral input for pain, it affects somatic nerve inputting to the same spinal segments, then referred pain is felt in the skin and muscles supplied by it. Referred pain is felt in an area that is located at a distance from its cause. History taking is the most important factor for determining the cause of pain. Generally, all the necessary information regarding pain can be acquired if pain-related history is obtained using the "OPQRST" mnemonic, that is, onset, provocation/palliative factor, quality, region/radiation/related symptoms, severity, and time characteristics.

  2. Different underlying pain mechanisms despite identical pain characteristics: a case report of a patient with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Andrea; Krumova, Elena K; Pennekamp, Werner; Horch, Christoph; Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    Pain following spinal cord injury has been classified as nociceptive (musculoskeletal, visceral) or neuropathic (above, at, below level). There is no clear relation between the etiology and reported symptoms. Thus, due to different underlying mechanisms, the treatment is often ineffective. We report on a patient with spinal cord injury with neurological level of injury at T8 suffering from bilateral burning and prickling pain in the T9-11 dermatomes bilaterally (at-level pain), as well as diffusely in both legs from below the torso (below-level pain), accompanied by musculoskeletal low back pain. Bilateral comparison of quantitative sensory testing (QST) and skin biopsy revealed completely different findings in the dermatome T9 despite identical at-level pain characteristics. On the right side, QST revealed a normal sensory profile; the intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) was reduced, but not as severe as the contralateral side. On the left side there was a severe sensory loss with a stronger reduction of the IENDF, similar to the areas below the neurological level. These findings were significantly related to the treatment results. Pregabalin induced unilateral pain relief only in the area with remaining sensory function, whereas the left-sided at-level pain was unchanged. Thus, 2 different underlying mechanisms leading to bilaterally neuropathic pain with identical symptoms and with different treatment success were demonstrated in a single patient. The at-level pain in areas with remaining sensory function despite IENFD reduction could be relieved by pregabalin. Thus, in an individual case, QST may be helpful to better understand pain-generating mechanisms and to initiate successful treatment. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Endofibrosis: an unusual cause of leg pain in an athlete.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Anas; Murney, Sean; Jordan, Kim; Laperna, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Endofibrosis of the external iliac artery can occur as a rare complication of high endurance physical activities, particularly cycling, running, and rowing. Symptoms mimic claudication and typically occur with vigorous exercise and improve with rest. Patients can experience thigh pain, swelling and paresthesias in the affected extremity. The diagnosis of endofibrosis is often delayed given the patient's overall normal appearance and lack of significant medical history. This report outlines the presentation and evaluation of a case of endofibrosis of the external iliac artery in an otherwise healthy 42-year-old healthy woman. Her diagnosis was delayed for two years before appropriate diagnostic testing and subsequent surgical intervention allowed for return to a normal, active lifestyle.

  4. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by

  5. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets: Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Janine; Voorde, Marloes Ten; Engen, Ruben E van; Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary van; Pijnappel, Ruud; Greve, Kitty Droogh-de; Heeten, Gerard J den; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-10-01

    To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have one additional image taken with positioning sheets. 5 cases were excluded (missing data). Pain was scored using the Numeric Rating Scale. Radiation dose was estimated using the Dance model and projected breast area using computer software. Two radiologists and two radiographers assessed image quality. With positioning sheets significantly more pectoral muscle, lateral and medial breast tissue was projected (CC-views) and more and deeper depicted pectoral muscle (MLO-views). In contrast, visibility of white and darker areas was better on images without positioning sheets, radiologists were therefore better able to detect abnormalities (MLO-views). Women experienced more pain with positioning sheets (MLO-views only, mean difference NRS 0.98; SD 1.71; p=0,00). Mammograms with positioning sheets showed more breast tissue. Increased breast thickness after compression with sheets resulted in less visibility of white and darker areas and thus reduced detection of abnormalities. Also, women experienced more pain (MLO-views) due to the sheet material. A practical consideration is the fact that more subcutaneous fat tissue and skin are being pulled forward leading to folds in the nipple area. On balance, improvement to the current design is required before implementation in screening practice can be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ocean Drilling Program: Completed Legs

    Science.gov Websites

    . Austin Leg summary Repository Wolfgang Schlager 102 14-Mar-85 25-Apr-85 Miami, Florida 418 Bermuda Rise Lisbon, Portugal 902-906 New Jersey Sea-Level Transect Peter Blum Gregory Mountain Leg summary Repository , Nova Scotia 1071-1073 Continuing the New Jersey Sea-Level Transect Mitchell J. Malone James A. Austin

  7. Estimating EQ-5D values from the Oswestry Disability Index and numeric rating scales for back and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Bratcher, Kelly R; Das, Nandita; Nienhuis, Jacob B; Glassman, Steven D

    2014-04-15

    Cross-sectional cohort. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D) can be derived from commonly available low back disease-specific health-related quality of life measures. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and numeric rating scales (0-10) for back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP) are widely used disease-specific measures in patients with lumbar degenerative disorders. Increasingly, the EQ-5D is being used as a measure of utility due to ease of administration and scoring. The EQ-5D, ODI, BP, and LP were prospectively collected in 14,544 patients seen in clinic for lumbar degenerative disorders. Pearson correlation coefficients for paired observations from multiple time points between ODI, BP, LP, and EQ-5D were determined. Regression modeling was done to compute the EQ-5D score from the ODI, BP, and LP. The mean age was 53.3 ± 16.4 years and 41% were male. Correlations between the EQ-5D and the ODI, BP, and LP were statistically significant (P < 0.0001) with correlation coefficients of -0.77, -0.50, and -0.57, respectively. The regression equation: [0.97711 + (-0.00687 × ODI) + (-0.01488 × LP) + (-0.01008 × BP)] to predict EQ-5D, had an R2 of 0.61 and a root mean square error of 0.149. The model using ODI alone had an R2 of 0.57 and a root mean square error of 0.156. The model using the individual ODI items had an R2 of 0.64 and a root mean square error of 0.143. The correlation coefficient between the observed and estimated EQ-5D score was 0.78. There was no statistically significant difference between the actual EQ-5D (0.553 ± 0.238) and the estimated EQ-5D score (0.553 ± 0.186) using the ODI, BP, and LP regression model. However, rounding off the coefficients to less than 5 decimal places produced less accurate results. Unlike previous studies showing a robust relationship between low back-specific measures and the Short Form-6D, a similar relationship was not seen between the ODI, BP, LP, and the EQ-5D. Thus, the EQ-5D cannot be

  8. Functional and Neuromuscular Changes in the Hamstrings After Drop Jumps and Leg Curls

    PubMed Central

    Sarabon, Nejc; Panjan, Andrej; Rosker, Jernej; Fonda, Borut

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase), perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production), kinaesthesia (active torque tracking) and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles. Key Points Hamstring function is significantly reduced following specifically damaging exercise. It fully recovers 120 hours after the exercise. Prevention of exercise-induced muscle damage is cruicial for maintaining normal training regime. PMID:24149148

  9. RELAP5 Analyses of OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Experiments on Intermediate-Break LOCAs at Hot Leg or Cold Leg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Maruyama, Yu; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Experiments simulating PWR intermediate-break loss-of-coolant accidents (IBLOCAs) with 17% break at hot leg or cold leg were conducted in OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project using the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). In the hot leg IBLOCA test, core uncovery started simultaneously with liquid level drop in crossover leg downflow-side before loop seal clearing (LSC) induced by steam condensation on accumulator coolant injected into cold leg. Water remained on upper core plate in upper plenum due to counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) because of significant upward steam flow from the core. In the cold leg IBLOCA test, core dryout took place due to rapid liquid level drop in the core before LSC. Liquid was accumulated in upper plenum, steam generator (SG) U-tube upflow-side and SG inlet plenum before the LSC due to CCFL by high velocity vapor flow, causing enhanced decrease in the core liquid level. The RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2 post-test analyses of the two LSTF experiments were performed employing critical flow model in the code with a discharge coefficient of 1.0. In the hot leg IBLOCA case, cladding surface temperature of simulated fuel rods was underpredicted due to overprediction of core liquid level after the core uncovery. In the cold leg IBLOCA case, the cladding surface temperature was underpredicted too due to later core uncovery than in the experiment. These may suggest that the code has remaining problems in proper prediction of primary coolant distribution.

  10. Leg extensor muscle strength, postural stability, and fear of falling after a 2-month home exercise program in women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rätsepsoo, Monika; Gapeyeva, Helena; Sokk, Jelena; Ereline, Jaan; Haviko, Tiit; Pääsuke, Mati

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to compare the leg extensor muscle strength, the postural stability, and the fear of falling in the women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) before and after a 2-month home exercise program (HEP). MATERIAL AND METHODS. In total, 17 women aged 46-72 years with late-stage knee joint OA scheduled for total knee arthroplasty participated in this study before and after the 2-month HEP with strengthening, stretching, balance, and step exercises. The isometric peak torque (PT) of the leg extensors and postural stability characteristics when standing on a firm or a foam surface for 30 seconds were recorded. The fear of falling and the pain intensity (VAS) were estimated. RESULTS. A significant increase in the PT and the PT-to-body weight (PT-to-BW) ratio of the involved leg as well as the bilateral PT and the PT-to-BW ratio was found after the 2-month HEP compared with the data before the HEP (P<0.05). The PT and the PT-to-BW ratio of the involved leg were significantly lower compared with the uninvolved leg before the HEP (P<0.05). The center of the pressure sway length (foam surface) decreased significantly after the HEP (P<0.05). Significant correlations were found between the PT of the involved leg and the bilateral PT and the fear of falling and between the PT of the involved leg and the postural sway (foam surface) before the HEP. CONCLUSIONS. After the 2-month HEP, the leg extensor muscle strength increased and the postural sway length on a foam surface decreased. The results indicate that the increased leg extensor muscle strength improves postural stability and diminishes the fear of falling in women with late-stage knee joint OA.

  11. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert; Wasan, Ajay D.; Gollub, Randy L.; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically-relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, fronto-parietal control and default mode networks; SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity MRI, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable with no significant changes of subjects’ pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala, was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity. PMID:23718988

  12. CT-angiography protocol with low dose radiation and low volume contrast medium for non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Ozkurt, Huseyin; Tokgoz, Safiye; Karabay, Esra; Ucan, Berna; Akdogan, Melek Pala; Basak, Muzaffer

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the diagnostic quality of a new multiple detector-row computed tomography angiography (MDCT-A) protocol using low dose radiation and low volume contrast medium techniques for evaluation of non-cardiac chest pain. Methods Forty-five consecutive patients with clinically suspected noncardiac chest pain and requiring contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) were examined. The patients were assigned to the protocol, with 80 kilovolt (peak) (kV[p]) and 150 effective milliampere-second (eff mA-s). In our study group, 40 mL of low osmolar contrast material was administered at 3.0 mL/s. Results In the study group, four patients with pulmonary embolism, four with pleural effusion, two with ascending aortic aneurysm and eight patients with pneumonic consolidation were detected. The mean attenuation of the pulmonary truncus and ascendant aortic locations was considered 264±44 and 249±51 HU, respectively. The mean effective radiation dose was 0.83 mSv for MDCT-A. Conclusions Pulmonary artery and the aorta scanning simultaneously was significantly reduced radiation exposure with the mentioned dose saving technique. Additionally, injection of low volume (40 cc) contrast material may reduce the risk of contrast induced nephropathy, therefore, facilitate the diagnostic approach. This technique can be applied to all cases and particularly patients at high risk of contrast induced nephropathy due to its similar diagnostic quality with a low dose and high levels of arteriovenous enhancement simultaneously. PMID:25392818

  13. Patterns of pain and interference in patients with painful bone metastases: a brief pain inventory validation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jackson S Y; Beaton, Dorcas; Smith, Peter M; Hagen, Neil A

    2010-02-01

    Bone metastases are prevalent, painful, and carry a poorer prognosis for pain control compared with other cancer pain syndromes. Standard tools to measure pain have not been validated in this patient population, and particular subgroups with more challenging symptoms have yet to be identified and studied. The objectives of this study were 1) to validate the psychometric properties of the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and its Pain and Interference subscales in patients with clinically significant metastatic bone pain requiring palliative radiotherapy and 2) to examine differences in BPI subscales among predefined subgroups of bone metastases patients. A total of 258 patients evaluated and treated through a rapid access radiation therapy clinic between July 2002, and November 2006, were included in the analysis. High internal consistency of the BPI subscales of Pain, Activity interference, and Affect interference was demonstrated by Cronbach's alpha between 0.81 and 0.89. Removing sleep interference improved model fit in confirmatory factor analysis. The BPI revealed an alarming pattern in patients with lower body metastases, who reported substantial interference of activity even though pain levels were mild or moderate. Such patients may require prompt clinical attention to better meet their needs. Finally, the allocation of interference from sleep within the BPI framework, in our population of pain patients, requires further study. Copyright 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A prospective study of pain reduction and knee dysfunction comparing femoral skeletal traction and splinting in adult trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bumpass, David B; Ricci, William M; McAndrew, Christopher M; Gardner, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    To determine if distal femoral traction pins result in knee dysfunction in patients with femoral or pelvic fracture, and to determine if skeletal traction relieves pain more effectively than splinting for femoral shaft fractures. Prospective cohort trial. Level I urban trauma center. One hundred twenty adult patients with femoral shaft, acetabular, and unstable pelvic fractures. Patients with femoral shaft fractures were placed into distal femoral skeletal traction or a long-leg splint, based on an attending-specific protocol. Patients with pelvic or acetabular fractures with instability or intraarticular bone fragments were placed into skeletal traction. An initial Lysholm knee survey was administered to assess preinjury knee pain and function; the survey was repeated at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Also, a 10-point visual analog scale was used to document pain immediately before, during, and immediately after fracture immobilization with traction or splinting. Thirty-five patients (29%) were immobilized with a long-leg splint, and 85 (71%) were immobilized with a distal femoral traction pin. Eighty-four patients (70%) completed a 6-month follow-up. Lysholm scores decreased by a mean 9.3 points from preinjury baseline to 6 months postinjury in the entire cohort (P < 0.01); no significant differences were found between the splint and traction pin groups. During application of immobilization, visual analog scale pain scores were significantly lower in traction patients as compared with splinted patients (mean, 1.9 points less, P < 0.01). Traction pins caused no infections, neurovascular injuries, or iatrogenic fractures. Distal femoral skeletal traction does not result in detectable knee dysfunction at 6 months after insertion, and results in less pain during and after immobilization than long-leg splinting. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. FDG PET/CT Findings in Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma, Leg Type.

    PubMed

    Ni, Chiayi; Lewis, Michael; Berenji, Gholam

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with complaints of worsening left foot pain and swelling. MRI showed a soft tissue mass overlying the dorsolateral aspect of the left foot. Following a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT), the left foot mass was biopsied and pathology indicated a diagnosis of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PDLBCL, LT). Review of the PET/CT images demonstrated hypermetabolic activity associated with the left foot mass, multiple subcutaneous nodules/nodes, sclerotic osseous lesions in the lower extremities, and left external iliac/left inguinal lymphadenopathy. At the moment, the patient is undergoing chemotherapy.

  16. Ultrasonographic findings of the various diseases presenting as calf pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Ok Hwa; Choo, Hye Jung; Park, Jun Ho; Park, Yeong-Mi; Jeong, Hae Woong; Lee, Sung Moon; Cho, Kil Ho; Choi, Jung-Ah; Jacobson, Jon A

    2016-01-01

    There are various causes of calf pain. The differential diagnoses affecting the lower leg include cystic lesions, trauma-related lesions, infection or inflammation, vascular lesions, neoplasms, and miscellaneous entities. Ultrasound (US) provide detailed anatomical information of the calf structures, and it offers the ability to confirm, other calf abnormalities, particularly when deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is ruled out. The purpose of this article is to review the causes of a painful calf presenting as DVT and incidental findings found as part of the work-up of DVT, and to provide a broad overview of US findings and clinical features of these pathologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlled trial of balneotherapy in treatment of low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, K; Tatrai, T; Hunka, A; Vereckei, E; Korondi, I

    1992-01-01

    Three treatments for non-specific lumbar pain--balneotherapy, underwater traction bath, and underwater massage--were assessed in a randomised prospective controlled trial in 158 outpatients. Each group was treated for four weeks and patients were reviewed at the end of this period and at 12 months after entry to the trial. The prescription of analgesics and the pain score were significantly reduced in all three treated groups, but there was no difference between the three groups. No significant change occurred in spinal motion and the straight leg raising test. After one year only the analgesic consumption was significantly lower than in the control group. PMID:1535495

  18. Not letting the left leg know what the right leg is doing: limb-specific locomotor adaptation to sensory-cue conflict.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Frank H; Fox, Laura F; Hoon Kim, Dong

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of limb-specific locomotor adaptation in order to adjudicate between sensory-cue-conflict theory and motor-adaptation theory. The results were consistent with cue-conflict theory in demonstrating that two different leg-specific hopping aftereffects are modulated by the presence of conflicting estimates of self-motion from visual and nonvisual sources. Experiment 1 shows that leg-specific increases in forward drift during attempts to hop in place on one leg while blindfolded vary according to the relationship between visual information and motor activity during an adaptation to outdoor forward hopping. Experiment 2 shows that leg-specific changes in performance on a blindfolded hopping-to-target task are similarly modulated by the presence of cue conflict during adaptation to hopping on a treadmill. Experiment 3 shows that leg-specific aftereffects from hopping additionally produce inadvertent turning during running in place while blindfolded. The results of these experiments suggest that these leg-specific locomotor aftereffects are produced by sensory-cue conflict rather than simple motor adaptation.

  19. Treatment of phantom limb pain with botulinum toxin type A.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lingjing; Kollewe, Katja; Krampfl, Klaus; Dengler, Reinhard; Mohammadi, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    Phantom limb pain and sensations are common in amputees. The pathophysiology remains unclear and the treatment difficult and often unsuccessful. Opioids are frequently used when non-narcotics have failed, but are not effective in many cases. We report on three phantom and stump pain patients, refractive to previous treatments, who were successfully treated with botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A). Three patients who had previously undergone amputation of their leg due to accident (N = 2) or injury by a landmine (N = 1) were treated with BoNT-A (Dysport). We injected a total dose of up to 500 units (U) BoNT-A under EMG-control. Global clinical improvement was based on a 0-3 scale (0 = no effect; 3 = marked improvement) and on a questionnaire rating pain intensity (based on the visual analog scale), intake of pain medication and phantom limb sensations. All three patients evaluated the clinical global improvement with 3 (marked improvement). The pain intensity and pain medication was reduced significantly in all three cases. No side effects were reported. The duration of response lasted up to 11 weeks. These three successfully treated phantom and stump pain patients show that therapy with BoNT-A may be worth studying as an effective and safe treatment option for this kind of pain.

  20. Quantifying Leg Movement Activity During Sleep.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Raffaele; Fulda, Stephany

    2016-12-01

    Currently, 2 sets of similar rules for recording and scoring leg movement (LM) exist, including periodic LM during sleep (PLMS) and periodic LM during wakefulness. The former were published in 2006 by a task force of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group, and the second in 2007 by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. This article reviews the basic recording methods, scoring rules, and computer-based programs for PLMS. Less frequent LM activities, such as alternating leg muscle activation, hypnagogic foot tremor, high-frequency LMs, and excessive fragmentary myoclonus are briefly described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in other chronic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Muhammad B

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild.

  2. The relationship of temperature rise to specific absorption rate and current in the human leg for exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the high frequency band.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P R

    2003-10-07

    Of the biological effects of human exposure to radiofrequency and microwave radiation, the best-established are those due to elevation of tissue temperature. To prevent harmful levels of heating, restrictions have been proposed on the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the relationship between SAR and temperature rise is not an invariant, since not only the heat capacity but also the efficiency of heat dissipation varies between different tissues and exposure scenarios. For small enough SAR, the relationship is linear and may be characterized by a 'heating factor' deltaT/SAR. Under whole-body irradiation the SAR may be particularly high in the ankles due to the concentration of current flowing through a relatively small cross-sectional area. In a previous paper, the author has presented calculations of the SAR distribution in a human leg in the high frequency (HF) band. In this paper, the heating factor for this situation is derived using a finite element approximation of the Pennes bioheat equation. The sensitivity of the results to different blood perfusion rates is investigated, and a simple local thermoregulatory model is applied. Both time-dependent and steady-state solutions are considered. Results confirm the appropriateness of the ICNIRP reference level of 100 mA on current through the leg, but suggest that at higher currents significant thermoregulatory adjustments to muscle blood flow will occur.

  3. Effect of patellar strap and sports tape on pain in patellar tendinopathy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Vries, A; Zwerver, J; Diercks, R; Tak, I; van Berkel, S; van Cingel, R; van der Worp, H; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2016-10-01

    Numerous athletes with patellar tendinopathy (PT) use a patellar strap or sports tape during sports. This study's aim was to investigate the short-term effect of these orthoses on patellar tendon pain. Participants performed the single-leg decline squat, vertical jump test, and triple-hop test under four different conditions (patellar strap, sports tape, placebo, and control). Subsequently, participants practiced sports as usual for 2 weeks; during 1 week, they were assigned to one of the four conditions. Pain was measured with the visual analog scale (VAS). In total, 97 athletes with PT [61% male, age 27.0 (SD8.1), VISA-P 58.5 (SD12.7)] were analyzed. On the single-leg decline squat, the VAS pain score reduced significantly in the patellar strap (14 mm, P = 0.04) and the sports tape condition (13 mm, P = 0.04), compared with control, but not placebo. A significant decrease in VAS pain during sports was found in the sports tape (7 mm, P = 0.04) and placebo group (6 mm, P = 0.04). The VAS pain score two hours after sports decreased significantly in the patellar strap, sports tape and placebo group (8-mm, P < 0.001, 10 mm, P = 0.001 and 7 mm, P = 0.03, respectively). This study's findings indicate that an orthosis (including placebo tape) during sports can reduce pain in PT patients in the short term. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Loading and performance of the support leg in kicking.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    The punt kick is important in many football codes and support leg kinematics and ground reaction forces have been implicated in injury and performance in kicking. To evaluate ground reaction forces and support leg kinematics in the punt kick. Cross sectional study. Seven elite Australian football players performed maximal kicks into a net using both the preferred and non-preferred legs. A force plate measured ground reaction forces and an optical motion capture system (200Hz) collected kinematic data during the stance phase of the kick. Preferred and non-preferred legs were compared and performance was evaluated by correlating parameters with foot speed at ball contact. Vertical forces were larger than running at a similar speed but did not reach levels that might be considered an injury risk. Braking forces were directed solely posteriorly, as for soccer kicks, but lateral force patterns varied with some players experiencing greater forces medially and others laterally. A more extended support leg, larger peak vertical and braking force during the stance phase and a shorter stance contact time was associated with larger kick leg foot speed at ball contact. No difference existed between the preferred and non-preferred legs for ground reaction forces or support leg mechanics. To punt kick longer, a straighter support leg, less time on the ground and stronger braking should be encouraged. Conditioning the support leg to provide stronger braking potential is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Towards a Comparative Measure of Legged Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    body movement with change of velocity or direction in response to a stimulus” [18]. Notwithstanding the many informative and inspiring studies of legged...specific power (watts per kilogram taken over a gait cycle of leg power output relative to leg muscle mass or body mass) [22, 26–28] but it is not scale...closest to the body mass normalized mea- sure we will introduce below. In contrast, characterizing directional aspects of agility performance seems

  6. Effective Spine Triage: Patterns of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common cause of recurring lost time from work, low back pain is a huge burden on society. Medical training dictates that we must establish a cause for pain before we can treat it and then base our treatment on a recognized and agreed-upon pathology. But in the overwhelming majority of low back pain cases, the issue is nothing more than a minor mechanical malfunction, the inevitable consequence of normal wear and tear. The severity of the pain does not reflect the benign nature of the underlying problem and its limited extent makes a definitive diagnosis impossible. One important component of the solution is improved spinal triage. Using patterns or syndromes in the initial assessment of low back pain is gaining renewed interest and clinical acceptance. Methods Identifying a patient's pain pattern is achieved primarily through an assessment of the patient's history. The patient interview begins with a series of questions to determine the specific syndrome. A subsequent physical examination supports or refutes the findings in history. Combining information from the history with the findings of the physical examination, the clinician has the ability to rule out a number of potentially grim diagnoses. Results More than 90% of back pain patients have benign mechanical problems and their pain can be classified into 4 distinct patterns: 2 back-dominant patterns and 2 leg-dominant patterns. Conclusion A clinical perspective capable of recognizing a defined syndrome at first contact will lead to a better outcome. Most patients with low back pain can be treated successfully with simple, pattern-specific, noninvasive primary management. Patients without a pattern and those who do not respond as anticipated require further investigation and specialized care. PMID:24688339

  7. Motion of the center of mass in children with spastic hemiplegia: balance, energy transfer, and work performed by the affected leg vs. the unaffected leg.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Pierce, Rosemary; Do, K Patrick; Aiona, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry between limbs in people with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HEMI) adversely affects limb coordination and energy generation and consumption. This study compared how the affected leg and the unaffected leg of children with HEMI would differ based on which leg trails. Full-body gait analysis data and force-plate data were analyzed for 31 children (11.9 ± 3.8 years) with HEMI and 23 children (11.1 ± 3.1 years) with typical development (TD). Results showed that peak posterior center of mass-center of pressure (COM-COP) inclination angles of HEMI were smaller than TD when the affected leg trailed but not when the unaffected leg trailed. HEMI showed greater peak medial COM-COP inclination angles and wider step width than TD, no matter which leg trailed. More importantly, when the affected leg of HEMI trailed, it did not perform enough positive work during double support to propel COM motion. Consequently, the unaffected leg had to perform additional positive work during the early portion of single support, which costs more energy. When the unaffected leg trailed, the affected leg performed more negative work during double support; therefore, more positive work was still needed during early single support, but energy efficiency was closer to that of TD. Energy recovery factor was lower when the affected leg trailed than when the unaffected leg trailed; both were lower than TD. These findings suggest that the trailing leg plays a significant role in propelling COM motion during double support, and the 'unaffected' side of HEMI may not be completely unaffected. It is important to strengthen both legs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  9. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or in mechanically deboned chicken meat gamma irradiated in air or vacuum at temperatures of -20 to +20 C

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1991-04-01

    Response-surface methodology was used to develop predictive equations for the response of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or within mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) to the effects of {gamma} radiation doses of 0 to 3.60 kGy (100 krad = 1 kGy) at temperatures of -20 to +20 C in air or vacuum. A streptomycin-resistant mutant was used in these studies to allow accurate estimations of the surviving salmonellae in the presence of residual normal flora. This strain has been demonstrated to have no significant shift in its biological properties nor in its resistance to ionizingmore » radiation. The response of S. typhimurium to gamma radiation was similar on both chicken legs and MDCM. The radiation was significantly more lethal to the bacterial cells at temperatures above freezing. The response-surface equations developed from the studies predict that the number of viable cells per gram of MDCM or per square centimeter of the surface of chicken legs would be reduced approximately 2.8 to 5.1 log units at 0 C by radiation doses within the range of 1.5 to 3.0 kGy. The results of the present studies are similar to those obtained previously with sterile mechanically deboned chicken meat.« less

  10. Survey results of pain treatments in adults with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Adam T; Kratz, Anna L; Engel, Joyce M; Jensen, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the types and frequencies of pain treatments used by individuals with cerebral palsy, examine the perceived effectiveness of these treatments, and identify the types of healthcare providers that were accessed for pain-related services. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A total of 83 adults (mean [SD] age, 40.3 [13.6] yrs) with cerebral palsy indicated their pain location and intensity during the past 3 mos. Next, they indicated their use of 24 different pain treatments and the effectiveness of each. Finally, participants indicated the frequency of pain-related healthcare visits to specific providers over the past 6 mos. Of the participants, 63% reported experiencing chronic pain and rated their pain intensity over the past week as 5.1 of 10, on average. The most common pain locations were the lower back, hips, and legs. Physical interventions (e.g., physical therapy, strengthening) were the most common pain treatments reportedly used and were rated as moderately effective. Many other treatments were also used, and participants sought pain-related care from a variety of providers. Although participants reportedly accessed pain care from a variety of providers and perceived that several types of treatments were effective, many of the treatments rated as effective were rarely used or provided. Future research using clinical trial methods would further elucidate the specific pain treatments that are most beneficial for adults with cerebral palsy.

  11. Shin splints: painful to have and to treat.

    PubMed

    Story, Julie; Cymet, Tyler Childs

    2006-01-01

    When people overuse their legs they develop an uncomfortable awareness of these limbs manifested as a dull burning or aching. The cause is often clear to the person with the problem as a result of the often obvious relationship to overdoing an exercise or activity and the pain. "Shin splints" is the lay term; physicians use the term medial tibial stress syndrome. The pathophysiology that leads to this pain is unclear, although there are a number of competing theories. Differential diagnosis includes stress fractures and compartment syndromes. Bone tumors or lipomas can also cause similar pain to shin splints. Diagnosis can be made by history alone in a majority of cases, but if the diagnosis is unclear, an X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging should be considered. Treatment is still mostly supportive and symptom related. Rest is the most important aspect of treatment. Locally applied cold and anti-inflammatory medication have also been felt to be beneficial.

  12. Human hopping on damped surfaces: strategies for adjusting leg mechanics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Chet T; Farley, Claire T

    2003-08-22

    Fast-moving legged animals bounce along the ground with spring-like legs and agilely traverse variable terrain. Previous research has shown that hopping and running humans maintain the same bouncing movement of the body's centre of mass on a range of elastic surfaces by adjusting their spring-like legs to exactly offset changes in surface stiffness. This study investigated human hopping on damped surfaces that dissipated up to 72% of the hopper's mechanical energy. On these surfaces, the legs did not act like pure springs. Leg muscles performed up to 24-fold more net work to replace the energy lost by the damped surface. However, considering the leg and surface together, the combination appeared to behave like a constant stiffness spring on all damped surfaces. By conserving the mechanics of the leg-surface combination regardless of surface damping, hoppers also conserved centre-of-mass motions. Thus, the normal bouncing movements of the centre of mass in hopping are not always a direct result of spring-like leg behaviour. Conserving the trajectory of the centre of mass by maintaining spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination may be an important control strategy for fast-legged locomotion on variable terrain.

  13. Skeletal sequelae of radiation therapy for malignant childhood tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; Rate, W.

    1990-02-01

    One hundred forty-three patients who received radiation therapy for childhood tumors, and survived to the age of skeletal maturity, were studied by retrospective review of oncology records and roentgenograms. Diagnoses for the patients were the following: Hodgkin's lymphoma (44), Wilms's tumor (30), acute lymphocytic leukemia (26), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (18), Ewing's sarcoma (nine), rhabdomyosarcoma (six), neuroblastoma (six), and others (four). Age at the follow-up examination averaged 18 years (range, 14-28 years). Average length of follow-up study was 9.9 years (range, two to 18 years). Asymmetry of the chest and ribs was seen in 51 (36%) of these children. Fifty (35%) hadmore » scoliosis; 14 had kyphosis. In two children, the scoliosis was treated with a brace, while one developed significant kyphosing scoliosis after laminectomy and had spinal fusion. Twenty-three (16%) patients complained of significant pain at the radiation sites. Twelve of the patients developed leg-length inequality; eight of those were symptomatic. Three patients developed second primary tumors. Currently, the incidence of significant skeletal sequelae is lower and the manifestations are less severe than reported in the years from 1940 to 1970. The reduction in skeletal complications may be attributed to shielding of growth centers, symmetric field selection, decreased total radiation doses, and sequence changes in chemotherapy.« less

  14. Acupuncture-induced changes of pressure pain threshold are mediated by segmental inhibition--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baeumler, Petra I; Fleckenstein, Johannes; Benedikt, Franziska; Bader, Julia; Irnich, Dominik

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to distinguish between spinal and supraspinal mechanisms in the intact nervous system by comparing homosegmental and heterosegmental effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and manual acupuncture (MA) on sensory perception in healthy volunteers by means of quantitative sensory testing. Seventy-two healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive either MA or EA at SP 6, SP 9, GB 39, and ST 36 at the left leg or relaxed for 30 minutes (control group [CG]). Blinded examiners assessed 13 sensory modalities (thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds) at the upper arms and lower legs before and after intervention by means of a standardized quantitative sensory testing battery. Change scores of all 13 sensory thresholds were compared between groups. The main outcome measure was the change score of the pressure pain threshold (PPT). There were no baseline differences between groups. Pressure pain threshold change scores at the lower left leg, in the same segment as the needling site, differed significantly (P = 0.008) between the EA (median: 103.01 kPa) and CG groups (median: 0.00 kPa) but not between the MA (median: 0.00 kPa) and CG groups. No further significant change score differences were found between one of the acupuncture groups and the CG. The PPT can be changed by EA. The PPT increase was confined to the segment of needling, which indicates that it is mainly mediated by segmental inhibition in the spinal cord. This underscores the importance of segmental needling and electrical stimulation in clinical practice.

  15. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  16. Clinical outcomes and frontal plane two-dimensional biomechanics during the 30-second single leg stance test in patients before and after hip abductor tendon reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Rose E; Ackland, Timothy R; Janes, Gregory C; Ebert, Jay R

    2017-07-01

    Hip abductor tendon tears are a common cause of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome. Conservative treatments are often ineffective and surgical reconstruction may be recommended. This study investigated the improvement in clinical outcomes and frontal plane two-dimensional biomechanics during a 30-second single leg stance test, in patients undergoing reconstruction. We hypothesized that clinical scores and pertinent biomechanical variables would significantly improve post-surgery, and these outcomes would be significantly correlated. Twenty-one patients with symptomatic tendon tears underwent reconstruction. Patients were evaluated pre-surgery, and at 6 and 12months post-surgery, using patient-reported outcome measures, assessment of hip abductor strength and six-minute walk capacity. Frontal plane, two-dimensional, biomechanical variables including pelvis-on-femur angle, pelvic drop, trunk lean and lateral pelvic shift, were evaluated throughout a 30-second single leg stance test. ANOVA evaluated outcomes over time, while Pearson's correlations investigated associations between clinical scores, pain, functional and biomechanical outcome variables. While clinical and functional measures significantly improved (P<0.05) over time, no significant group differences (P>0.05) were observed in biomechanical variables from pre- to post-surgery. While five patients displayed a positive Trendelenburg sign pre-surgery, only one was positive post-surgery. Clinical outcomes and biomechanical variables during the single leg stance test were not correlated. Despite improvements in clinical and functional measures over time, biomechanical changes during a weight bearing single leg stance test were not significantly different following tendon repair. Follow up beyond 12months may be required, whereby symptomatic relief may precede functional and biomechanical improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ODYSSEUS autonomous walking robot: The leg/arm design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourbakis, N. G.; Maas, M.; Tascillo, A.; Vandewinckel, C.

    1994-01-01

    ODYSSEUS is an autonomous walking robot, which makes use of three wheels and three legs for its movement in the free navigation space. More specifically, it makes use of its autonomous wheels to move around in an environment where the surface is smooth and not uneven. However, in the case that there are small height obstacles, stairs, or small height unevenness in the navigation environment, the robot makes use of both wheels and legs to travel efficiently. In this paper we present the detailed hardware design and the simulated behavior of the extended leg/arm part of the robot, since it plays a very significant role in the robot actions (movements, selection of objects, etc.). In particular, the leg/arm consists of three major parts: The first part is a pipe attached to the robot base with a flexible 3-D joint. This pipe has a rotated bar as an extended part, which terminates in a 3-D flexible joint. The second part of the leg/arm is also a pipe similar to the first. The extended bar of the second part ends at a 2-D joint. The last part of the leg/arm is a clip-hand. It is used for selecting several small weight and size objects, and when it is in a 'closed' mode, it is used as a supporting part of the robot leg. The entire leg/arm part is controlled and synchronized by a microcontroller (68CH11) attached to the robot base.

  18. Human hopping on damped surfaces: strategies for adjusting leg mechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Chet T; Farley, Claire T

    2003-01-01

    Fast-moving legged animals bounce along the ground with spring-like legs and agilely traverse variable terrain. Previous research has shown that hopping and running humans maintain the same bouncing movement of the body's centre of mass on a range of elastic surfaces by adjusting their spring-like legs to exactly offset changes in surface stiffness. This study investigated human hopping on damped surfaces that dissipated up to 72% of the hopper's mechanical energy. On these surfaces, the legs did not act like pure springs. Leg muscles performed up to 24-fold more net work to replace the energy lost by the damped surface. However, considering the leg and surface together, the combination appeared to behave like a constant stiffness spring on all damped surfaces. By conserving the mechanics of the leg-surface combination regardless of surface damping, hoppers also conserved centre-of-mass motions. Thus, the normal bouncing movements of the centre of mass in hopping are not always a direct result of spring-like leg behaviour. Conserving the trajectory of the centre of mass by maintaining spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination may be an important control strategy for fast-legged locomotion on variable terrain. PMID:12965003

  19. Analysis of lower back pain disorder using deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritwik Kulkarni, K.; Gaonkar, Abhijitsingh; Vijayarajan, V.; Manikandan, K.

    2017-11-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is caused because of assorted reasons involving body parts such as the interconnected network of spinal cord, nerves, bones, discs or tendons in the lumbar spine. LBP is pain, muscle pressure, or stiffness localized underneath the costal edge or more the substandard gluteal folds, with or without leg torment for the most part sciatica, and is characterized as endless when it holds on for 12 weeks or more then again, non-particular LBP is torment not credited to an unmistakable pathology such as infection, tumour, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, or inflammation. Over 70% of people usually suffer from such backpain disorder at some time. But recovery is not always favorable, 82% of non-recent-onset patients still experience pain 1 year later. Even though not having any history of lower back pain, many patients suffering from this disorder spend months or years healing from it. Hence aiming to look for preventive measure rather than curative, this study suggests a classification methodology for Chronic LBP disorder using Deep Learning techniques.

  20. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) reduces pain, fatigue, and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol GT; Liebano, Richard E; Anand, Amrit S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Because TENS works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo controlled cross-over design to test effects of a single treatment of TENS in people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS, no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and movement, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), 6 minute walk test (6MWT), range of motion (ROM), five time sit to stand test (FTSTS), and single leg stance (SLS). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was completed at end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. PPTs increased at site of TENS (spine) and outside site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During Active TENS CPM was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to how TENS is used clinically, on pain, fatigue, function and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. PMID:23900134

  1. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  2. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... anything that contains metal into the scanner room. Considerations Tests that may be done instead of an ... Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg Patient Instructions Femur fracture repair - discharge Hip fracture - discharge ...

  3. Sympathetically maintained pain presenting first as temporomandibular disorder, then as parotid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Giri, Subha; Nixdorf, Donald

    2007-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic condition that usually affects extremities, such as the arms or legs. It is characterized by intense pain, swelling, redness, hypersensitivity in a region not defined by a single peripheral nerve and additional sudomotor effects, such as excessive sweating. The clinical criteria for the diagnosis of sympathetically maintained pain as outlined by the International Association for the Study of Pain include: Onset following an initiating noxious event (CRPS-type I) or nerve injury (CRPS-type II). Spontaneous allodynia that is not limited to peripheral nerve distribution and is not proportionate to the inciting event; abnormal sudomotor activity, skin blood flow abnormality, edema, other autonomic symptoms; and exclusion of other conditions that may otherwise contribute to the extent of the symptoms. Only 13 cases of CRPS involving sympathetically maintained pain in the head and neck region have been described, and all reported trauma as the identifiable etiologic factor. The case presented here is another occurrence of sympathetically maintained pain in the head and neck region, but without nerve injury as a clear initiating factor.

  4. A load-based mechanism for inter-leg coordination in insects

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Animals rely on an adaptive coordination of legs during walking. However, which specific mechanisms underlie coordination during natural locomotion remains largely unknown. One hypothesis is that legs can be coordinated mechanically based on a transfer of body load from one leg to another. To test this hypothesis, we simultaneously recorded leg kinematics, ground reaction forces and muscle activity in freely walking stick insects (Carausius morosus). Based on torque calculations, we show that load sensors (campaniform sensilla) at the proximal leg joints are well suited to encode the unloading of the leg in individual steps. The unloading coincides with a switch from stance to swing muscle activity, consistent with a load reflex promoting the stance-to-swing transition. Moreover, a mechanical simulation reveals that the unloading can be ascribed to the loading of a specific neighbouring leg, making it exploitable for inter-leg coordination. We propose that mechanically mediated load-based coordination is used across insects analogously to mammals. PMID:29187626

  5. Preoperative pain neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Landers, Merrill R; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2014-08-15

    Multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on preoperative pain neuroscience education (NE) for lumbar radiculopathy. To determine if the addition of NE to usual preoperative education would result in superior outcomes with regard to pain, function, surgical experience, and health care utilization postsurgery. One in 4 patients after lumbar surgery (LS) for radiculopathy experience persistent pain and disability, which is nonresponsive to perioperative treatments. NE focusing on the neurophysiology of pain has been shown to decrease pain and disability in populations with chronic low back pain. Eligible patients scheduled for LS for radiculopathy were randomized to receive either preoperative usual care (UC) or a combination of UC plus 1 session of NE delivered by a physical therapist (verbal one-on-one format) and a NE booklet. Sixty-seven patients completed the following outcomes prior to LS (baseline), and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after LS: low back pain (numeric rating scale), leg pain (numeric rating scale), function (Oswestry Disability Index), various beliefs and experiences related to LS (10-item survey with Likert scale responses), and postoperative utilization of health care (utilization of health care questionnaire). At 1-year follow-up, there were no statistical differences between the experimental and control groups with regard to primary outcome measure of low back pain (P = 0.183), leg pain (P = 0.075), and function (P = 0.365). In a majority of the categories regarding surgical experience, the NE group scored significantly better: better prepared for LS (P = 0.001); preoperative session preparing them for LS (P < 0.001) and LS meeting their expectations (P = 0.021). Health care utilization post-LS also favored the NE group (P = 0.007) resulting in 45% less health care expenditure compared with the control group in the 1-year follow-up period. NE resulted in significant behavior change. Despite a similar pain and functional trajectory during the 1-year

  6. Design of robotic leg and physiotherapy (ROLEP) assist with interactive game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, A. F.; Husin, M. F. Che; Hashim, M. N.; Rosli, K. A.; Roslim, F. R. A.; Abidin, A. F. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Injuries in certain parts of the feet can cause a person to have difficulty in walking or running if it is not treated through physiotherapy. In Malaysia, therapy centers only provide a service or the use of basic tools that are not efficient as more sophisticated equipment requires a high cost. In fact, exercise requiring close monitoring physiotherapist are also at a high cost. Therefore, using robot therapy is a new technology that can provide an alternative way to solve this problem. The implementation of this project has produced a robotic physiotherapy which has one degree of freedom, portable and inexpensive way to help the movement of the patient's leg. It covers basic electrical circuits, mechanical components, programming and has been combined with an interactive game as the main driver. ROLEP (Robotic-Leg-Physiotherapy) is able to help patients through the therapy process. It was built using CT-UNO as its microprocessor connected to MD10-C which acted as the motor driver. The interactive game produced by using Unity game software is a key driver in getting rid of boredom and reduce pain. As a result, ROLEP designed can operate well within its range of the patient's weight. It has the advantage of portability and easy to use by the patients. ROLEP expected to help patients undergoing therapy process more efficient and interesting in the process of recovery.

  7. Frustrated S = 1/2 Two-Leg Ladder with Different Leg Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Okamoto, Kiyomi; Hikihara, Toshiya; Sakai, Tôru

    2017-04-01

    We explore the ground-state phase diagram of the S = 1/2 two-leg ladder. The isotropic leg interactions J1,a and J1,b between nearest neighbor spins in the legs a and b, respectively, are different from each other. The xy and z components of the uniform rung interactions are denoted by Jr and ΔJr, respectively, where Δ is the XXZ anisotropy parameter. This system has a frustration when J1,aJ1,b < 0 irrespective of the sign of Jr. The phase diagrams on the Δ (0≤Δ<1) versus J1,b plane in the cases of J1,a = - 0.2 and J1,a = 0.2 with Jr = -1 are determined numerically. We employ the physical consideration, the level spectroscopy analysis of the results obtained by the exact diagonalization method and also the density-matrix renormalization-group method. It is found that the non-collinear ferrimagnetic (NCFR) state appears as the ground state in the frustrated region of the parameters. Furthermore, the direct-product triplet-dimer (TD) state in which all rungs form the TD pair is the exact ground state, when J1,a + J1,b = 0 and 0≤ Δ ≲ 0.83. The obtained phase diagrams consist of the TD, XY and Haldane phases as well as the NCFR phase.

  8. A Biomechanical Comparison of Single-Leg Landing and Unplanned Sidestepping.

    PubMed

    Chinnasee, Chamnan; Weir, Gillian; Sasimontonkul, Siriporn; Alderson, Jacqueline; Donnelly, Cyril

    2018-06-14

    Unplanned sidestepping and single-leg landing have both been used to screen athletes for injury risk in sport. The aim of this study was to directly compare the lower limb mechanics of three single-leg landing tasks and an unplanned sidestepping task. Thirteen elite female team sport athletes completed a series of non-contact single-leg drop landings, single-leg countermovement jumps, single-leg jump landings and unplanned sidestepping in a randomized counterbalanced design. Three dimensional kinematics (250 Hz) and ground reaction force (2,000 Hz) data with a participant specific lower limb skeletal model were used to calculate and compare hip, knee and ankle joint kinematics, peak joint moments, instantaneous joint power and joint work during the weight acceptance phase of each sporting task (α=0.05). Peak knee joint moments and relevant injury risk thresholds were used to classify each athlete's anterior cruciate ligament injury risk during unplanned sidestepping and single-leg jump landing. Results showed that peak joint moments, power and work were greater during the single-leg jump landing task when compared to the single-leg drop landings and single-leg countermovement jumps tasks. Peak frontal and sagittal plane knee joint moments, knee joint power, as well as hip and knee joint work were greater during unplanned sidestepping when compared to the landing tasks. Peak ankle joint moments, power and work were greater during the landing tasks when compared to unplanned sidestepping. For 4 of the 13 athletes tested, their anterior cruciate ligament injury risk classification changed depending on whether they performed an unplanned sidestepping or single-leg jump landing testing procedure. To summarize, a single-leg jump landing testing procedure places a larger mechanical on the ankle joint when compared to single-leg drop landings, single-leg countermovement jumps and unplanned sidestepping. An unplanned sidestepping testing procedure places a larger

  9. The relationship of hip muscle performance to leg, ankle and foot injuries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Dar, Gali; Dunlop, Martin; Gaida, James Edmund

    2017-02-01

    Hip control affects movement and muscle firing patterns in the leg, ankle and foot, and may contribute to overuse injuries. Muscle performance can be measured as strength, endurance or muscle activation patterns. Our objective was to systematically review whether hip muscle performance is associated with leg, ankle and foot injuries. A structured and comprehensive search of six medical literature databases was combined with forward and backward citation tracking (AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Scopus and SportDiscus). Eligible studies measured hip muscle performance in individuals with musculoskeletal injuries below the tibial tuberosity, using dynamometry or electromyography (EMG). All studies compared an injured group with a control group or compared the injured and non-injured limb in the same individual. Data was extracted from each study independently by two authors. Twenty case-control and four prospective studies (n = 24) met the inclusion criteria. Injury classifications included chronic ankle instability (n = 18), Achilles tendinopathy (n = 2), medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture (n = 1), posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (n = 1), and exertional medial tibial pain (n = 2). Eleven of the studies revealed differences in hip muscle performance indicating less strength, delayed onset activation and decreased duration of activation in the injured groups. Two studies found evidence for differences between groups only in some of their measurements. Three out of the four prospective studies revealed that hip muscle performance was not a risk factor for leg, ankle and foot injuries. This review provides limited evidence that hip muscle performance variables are related to leg, ankle and foot injuries. Emerging evidence indicates this might be a result of the injury rather than a contributor to the injury.

  10. Exposure to non-ionizing radiation provokes changes in rat thyroid morphology and expression of HSP-90

    PubMed Central

    Misa-Agustiño, Maria J; Jorge-Mora, Teresa; Jorge-Barreiro, Francisco J; Suarez-Quintanilla, Juan; Moreno-Piquero, Eduardo; Ares-Pena, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Non-ionizing radiation at 2.45 GHz may modify the morphology and expression of genes that codify heat shock proteins (HSP) in the thyroid gland. Diathermy is the therapeutic application of non-ionizing radiation to humans for its beneficial effects in rheumatological and musculo-skeletal pain processes. We used a diathermy model on laboratory rats subjected to maximum exposure in the left front leg, in order to study the effects of radiation on the nearby thyroid tissue. Fifty-six rats were individually exposed once or repeatedly (10 times in two weeks) for 30 min to 2.45 GHz radiation in a commercial chamber at different non-thermal specific absorption rates (SARs), which were calculated using the finite difference time domain technique. We used immunohistochemistry methods to study the expression of HSP-90 and morphological changes in thyroid gland tissues. Ninety minutes after radiation with the highest SAR, the central and peripheral follicles presented increased size and the thickness of the peripheral septa had decreased. Twenty-four hours after radiation, only peripheral follicles radiated at 12 W were found to be smaller. Peripheral follicles increased in size with repeated exposure at 3 W power. Morphological changes in the thyroid tissue may indicate a glandular response to acute or repeated stress from radiation in the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis. Further research is needed to determine if the effect of this physical agent over time may cause disease in the human thyroid gland. PMID:25649190

  11. The Effects of Pain, Gender, and Age on Sleep/Wake and Circadian Rhythm Parameters in Oncology Patients at the Initiation of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buffum, David; Koetters, Theresa; Cho, Maria; Macera, Liz; Paul, Steven M.; West, Claudia; Aouizerat, Bradley; Dunn, Laura; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; Cooper, Bruce; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick; Miaskowski, Christin

    2010-01-01

    To date, no studies have evaluated for differences in subjective and objective measures of sleep disturbance in oncology outpatients with and without pain. This descriptive study recruited 182 patients from two radiation therapy (RT) departments at the time of the patient’s simulation visit. Approximately 38% of the sample reported moderate to severe pain (i.e., worst pain intensity of 6.2 ± 2.4). After controlling for age, patients with pain reported worse sleep quality and more sleep disturbance using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. With the General Sleep Disturbance Scale, patients with pain reported poorer sleep quality, increased use of sleep medications, and more daytime sleepiness. In addition using an objective measure of sleep disturbance (i.e., actigraphy), significant Gender × Pain interactions were found for sleep onset latency, percentage of time awake at night, wake duration, total sleep time, and sleep efficiency. While no differences were found in female patients, males with pain had worse scores than males without pain. Findings from this study suggest that pain and sleep disturbance are prevalent in oncology outpatients and that a patient’s age and gender need to be considered in any evaluation of the relationship between pain and sleep. Perspective: The effects of pain on subjective and objective sleep parameters appear to be influenced by both patients’ age and gender. PMID:21146465

  12. Sensitivity of sensor-based sit-to-stand peak power to the effects of training leg strength, leg power and balance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Regterschot, G Ruben H; Folkersma, Marjanne; Zhang, Wei; Baldus, Heribert; Stevens, Martin; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2014-01-01

    Increasing leg strength, leg power and overall balance can improve mobility and reduce fall risk. Sensor-based assessment of peak power during the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer may be useful for detecting changes in mobility and fall risk. Therefore, this study investigated whether sensor-based STS peak power and related measures are sensitive to the effects of increasing leg strength, leg power and overall balance in older adults. A further aim was to compare sensitivity between sensor-based STS measures and standard clinical measures of leg strength, leg power, balance, mobility and fall risk, following an exercise-based intervention. To achieve these aims, 26 older adults (age: 70-84 years) participated in an eight-week exercise program aimed at improving leg strength, leg power and balance. Before and after the intervention, performance on normal and fast STS transfers was evaluated with a hybrid motion sensor worn on the hip. In addition, standard clinical tests (isometric quadriceps strength, Timed Up and Go test, Berg Balance Scale) were performed. Standard clinical tests as well as sensor-based measures of peak power, maximal velocity and duration of normal and fast STS showed significant improvements. Sensor-based measurement of peak power, maximal velocity and duration of normal STS demonstrated a higher sensitivity (absolute standardized response mean (SRM): ≥ 0.69) to the effects of training leg strength, leg power and balance than standard clinical measures (absolute SRM: ≤ 0.61). Therefore, the presented sensor-based method appears to be useful for detecting changes in mobility and fall risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Do functional tests predict low back pain?

    PubMed

    Takala, E P; Viikari-Juntura, E

    2000-08-15

    A cohort of 307 nonsymptomatic workers and another cohort of 123 workers with previous episodes of low back pain were followed up for 2 years. The outcomes were measured by symptoms, medical consultations, and sick leaves due to low back disorders. To study the predictive value of a set of tests measuring the physical performance of the back in a working population. The hypothesis was that subjects with poor functional capacity are liable to back disorders. Reduced functional performance has been associated with back pain. There are few data to show whether reduced functional capacity is a cause or a consequence of pain. Mobility of the trunk in forward and side bending, maximal isokinetic trunk extension, flexion and lifting strength, and static endurance of back extension were measured. Standing balance and foot reaction time were recorded with a force plate. Clinical tests for the provocation of back or leg pain were performed. Gender, workload, age, and anthropometrics were managed as potential confounders in the analysis. Marked overlapping was seen in the measures of the subjects with different outcomes. Among the nonsymptomatic subjects, low performance in tests of mobility and standing balance was associated with future back disorders. Among workers with previous episodes of back pain, low isokinetic extension strength, poor standing balance, and positive clinical signs predicted future pain. Some associations were found between the functional tests and future low back pain. The wide variation in the results questions the value of the tests in health examinations (e.g., in screening or surveillance of low back disorders).

  14. Microgravity, Mesh-Crawling Legged Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Marzwell, Neville; Matthews, Jaret; Richardson, Krandalyn; Wall, Jonathan; Poole, Michael; Foor, David; Rodgers, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and microgravity flight-testing are part of a continuing development of palm-sized mobile robots that resemble spiders (except that they have six legs apiece, whereas a spider has eight legs). Denoted SpiderBots (see figure), they are prototypes of proposed product line of relatively inexpensive walking robots that could be deployed in large numbers to function cooperatively in construction, repair, exploration, search, and rescue activities in connection with exploration of outer space and remote planets.

  15. Ruling out coronary artery disease in women with atypical chest pain: results of calcium score combined with coronary computed tomography angiography and associated radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    van der Zant, Friso M; Wondergem, Maurits; Lazarenko, Sergiy V; Geenen, Remy W F; Umans, Victor A; Cornel, Jan-Hein; Knol, Remco J J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in women with atypical chest pain with low or intermediate risk for significant CAD by means of calcium scoring (CaSc) combined with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and to estimate the equivalent radiation dose in women. From December 2011 until July 2013, all consecutively performed cardiac CTs in women with atypical chest pain were included prospectively in the present study. Both CaSc and CCTA were obtained by a dual source flying focal spot 2×64 slice Somatom Definition Flash. Absence of CAD was defined as CaSc 0 and absence of noncalcified plaques. Presence of CAD was determined as CaSc>0 and/or presence of noncalcified plaques. The impact on patient management was also scored within our patient cohort. A total of 1033 procedures in 1014 women (mean age 59±10 years; mean BMI 26±8) were analyzed. In 520 (51%) women, CAD was absent. In 494 (49%) women, CAD was diagnosed, and in this subgroup the mean CaSc was 137±229. Thirty-seven (7%) of 494 women with CAD showed only noncalcified plaques. The mean equivalent radiation dose for the cardiac CTs of 1014 women was 2.2±1.6 mSv. Combined CaSc and CCTA excludes CAD in approximately 50% of women with atypical chest pain, and delivers a modest radiation dose of 2.2±1.6 mSv. CCTA has a substantial impact on patient management and can thus be advocated as first diagnostic tool in excluding CAD in women with atypical chest pain in terms of latest generation equipment with emphasize on radiation reduction techniques.

  16. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactormore » (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.« less

  17. Link Between Foot Pain Severity and Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Awale, Arunima; Dufour, Alyssa B; Katz, Patricia; Menz, Hylton B; Hannan, Marian T

    2016-06-01

    Associations between pain and depression are well known, yet foot pain, common in populations, has been understudied. This cross-sectional study examined foot pain and severity of foot pain with depressive symptoms in adults. Framingham Foot Study (2002-2008) participants completed questionnaires that included questions about foot pain (yes/no; none, mild, moderate, or severe pain) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (scores ≥16 indicated depressive symptoms). Age and body mass index (BMI) were also assessed. Sex-specific logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for associations of foot pain with depressive symptoms, adjusting for age and BMI. In a subset, further models adjusted for leg pain, back pain, or other joint pain. Of 1,464 men and 1,857 women, the mean ± SD age was 66 ± 10 years. Depressive symptoms were reported in 21% of men and 27% of women. Compared to those with no foot pain and independent of age and BMI, both men and women with moderate foot pain had approximately a 2-fold increased odds of depressive symptoms (men with severe foot pain OR of 4 [95% CI 2.26-8.48], women with severe foot pain OR of 3 [95% CI 2.02-4.68]). Considering other pain regions attenuated ORs, but the pattern of results remained unchanged. Even after we adjusted for age, BMI, and other regions of pain, those reporting worse foot pain were more likely to report depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that foot pain may be a part of a broader pain spectrum, with an impact beyond localized pain and discomfort. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Sleep, chronic pain, and opioid risk for apnea.

    PubMed

    Marshansky, Serguei; Mayer, Pierre; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2017-07-19

    Pain is an unwelcome sleep partner. Pain tends to erode sleep quality and alter the sleep restorative process in vulnerable patients. It can contribute to next-day sleepiness and fatigue, affecting cognitive function. Chronic pain and the use of opioid medications can also complicate the management of sleep disorders such as insomnia (difficulty falling and/or staying asleep) and sleep-disordered breathing (sleep apnea). Sleep problems can be related to various types of pain, including sleep headache (hypnic headache, cluster headache, migraine) and morning headache (transient tension type secondary to sleep apnea or to sleep bruxism or tooth grinding) as well as periodic limb movements (leg and arm dysesthesia with pain). Pain and sleep management strategies should be personalized to reflect the patient's history and ongoing complaints. Understanding the pain-sleep interaction requires assessments of: i) sleep quality, ii) potential contributions to fatigue, mood, and/or wake time functioning; iii) potential concomitant sleep-disordered breathing (SDB); and more importantly; iv) opioid use, as central apnea may occur in at-risk patients. Treatments include sleep hygiene advice, cognitive behavioral therapy, physical therapy, breathing devices (continuous positive airway pressure - CPAP, or oral appliance) and medications (sleep facilitators, e.g., zolpidem; or antidepressants, e.g., trazodone, duloxetine, or neuroleptics, e.g., pregabalin). In the presence of opioid-exacerbated SDB, if the dose cannot be reduced and normal breathing restored, servo-ventilation is a promising avenue that nevertheless requires close medical supervision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sciatica-like symptoms and the sacroiliac joint: clinical features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Visser, L H; Nijssen, P G N; Tijssen, C C; van Middendorp, J J; Schieving, J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical features of patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ)-related sciatica-like symptoms to those with sciatica from nerve root compression and to investigate the necessity to perform radiological imaging in patients with sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ. Patients with pain radiating below the buttocks with a duration of 4 weeks to 1 year were included. After physical and radiological examinations, a diagnosis of SI joint-related pain, pain due to disk herniation, or a combination of these two causes was made. Patients with SIJ-related leg pain (n = 77/186) were significantly more often female, had shorter statue, a shorter duration of symptoms, and had more often pain radiating to the groin and a history of a fall on the buttocks. Muscle weakness, corkscrew phenomenon, finger-floor distance ≥25 cm, lumbar scoliosis, positive Bragard or Kemp sign, and positive leg raising test were more often present when radiologic nerve root compression was present. Although these investigations may help, MRI of the spine is necessary to discriminate between the groups. Sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ can clinically mimic a radiculopathy. We suggest to perform a thorough physical examination of the spine, SI joints, and hips with additional radiological tests to exclude other causes.

  20. Skipping on uneven ground: trailing leg adjustments simplify control and enhance robustness.

    PubMed

    Müller, Roy; Andrada, Emanuel

    2018-01-01

    It is known that humans intentionally choose skipping in special situations, e.g. when descending stairs or when moving in environments with lower gravity than on Earth. Although those situations involve uneven locomotion, the dynamics of human skipping on uneven ground have not yet been addressed. To find the reasons that may motivate this gait, we combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations on a bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum model (BSLIP). To drive the model, the following parameters were estimated from nine subjects skipping across a single drop in ground level: leg lengths at touchdown, leg stiffness of both legs, aperture angle between legs, trailing leg angle at touchdown (leg landing first after flight phase), and trailing leg retraction speed. We found that leg adjustments in humans occur mostly in the trailing leg (low to moderate leg retraction during swing phase, reduced trailing leg stiffness, and flatter trailing leg angle at lowered touchdown). When transferring these leg adjustments to the BSLIP model, the capacity of the model to cope with sudden-drop perturbations increased.

  1. The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad B.

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild. PMID:22191024

  2. Heat Transfer and Geometrical Analysis of Thermoelectric Converters Driven by Concentrated Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Clemens; Tomeš, Petr; Weidenkaff, Anke; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer model that couples radiation/conduction/convection heat transfer with electrical potential distribution is developed for a thermoelectric converter (TEC) subjected to concentrated solar radiation. The 4-leg TEC module consists of two pairs of p-type La1.98Sr0.02CuO4 and n-type CaMn0.98Nb0.02O3 legs that are sandwiched between two ceramic Al2O3 hot/cold plates and connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. The governing equations for heat transfer and electrical potential are formulated, discretized and solved numerically by applying the finite volume (FV) method. The model is validated in terms of experimentally measured temperatures and voltages/power using a set of TEC demonstrator modules, subjected to a peak radiative flux intensity of 300 suns. The heat transfer model is then applied to examine the effect of the geometrical parameters (e.g. length/width of legs) on the solar-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency.

  3. Course of Quality of Life After Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Detailed Analysis From the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Paulien G., E-mail: p.g.westhoff@umcutrecht.nl; Department of Radiotherapy, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; Verdam, Mathilde G.E.

    Purpose: To study the course of quality of life (QoL) after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. Patients and Methods: The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study randomized 1157 patients with painful bone metastases between a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy between 1996 and 1998. The study showed a comparable pain response of 74%. Patients filled out weekly questionnaires for 13 weeks, then monthly for 2 years. In these analyses, physical, psychosocial, and functional QoL domain scores and a score of general health were studied. Mixed modeling was used to model the course of QoL and to study the influence ofmore » several characteristics. Results: In general, QoL stabilized after 1 month. Psychosocial QoL improved after treatment. The level of QoL remained stable, steeply deteriorating at the end of life. For most QoL domains, a high pain score and intake of opioids were associated with worse QoL, with small effect sizes (−0.11 to −0.27). A poor performance score was associated with worse functional QoL, with a medium effect size (0.41). There is no difference in QoL between patients receiving a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy, except for a temporary worsening of physical QoL after 6 fractions. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy for painful bone metastases leads to a meaningful pain response, most domains of QoL do not improve after treatment. Only psychosocial QoL improves slightly after treatment. The level of QoL is related to the actual survival, with a rather stable course of QoL for most of the remaining survival time and afterward a sharp decrease, starting only a few weeks before the end of life. Six fractions of 4 Gy lead to a temporary worse physical QoL compared with a single fraction of 8 Gy.« less

  4. Lower Limb Symmetry: Comparison of Muscular Power Between Dominant and Nondominant Legs in Healthy Young Adults Associated With Single-Leg-Dominant Sports.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Alex; Guiloff, Rodrigo; Rojas, Juan; Delgado, Iris; Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    Achieving a symmetrical power performance (difference <15%) between lower limbs is generally recommended during sports rehabilitation. However, athletes in single-leg-dominant sports, such as professional soccer players, could develop significant asymmetry between their dominant and nondominant legs, such that symmetry does not act as a viable comparison. To (1) compare maximal muscular power between the dominant and nondominant legs in healthy young adults, (2) evaluate the effect of a single-leg-dominant sport activity performed at the professional level, and (3) propose a parameter of normality for maximal power difference in the lower limbs of this young adult population. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 78 healthy, male, young adults were divided into 2 groups according to sport activity level. Group 1 consisted of 51 nonathletes (mean ± SD age, 20.8 ± 1.5 years; weight, 71.9 ± 10.5 kg) who participated in less than 8 hours a week of recreational physical activity with nonspecific training; group 2 consisted of 27 single-leg-dominant professional soccer players (age, 18.4 ± 0.6 years; weight, 70.1 ± 7.5 kg) who specifically trained and competed at their particular activity 8 hours or more a week. For assessment of maximal leg power, both groups completed the single-leg squat jump test. Dominance was determined when participants completed 2 of 3 specific tests with the same extremity. Statistical analysis included the Student t test. No statistical difference was found for maximal power between dominant and nondominant legs for nonathletes ( t = -1.01, P = .316) or single-leg-dominant professional soccer players ( t = -1.10, P = .281). A majority (95%) of participants studied showed a power difference of less than 15% between their lower extremities. Among young healthy adults, symmetrical power performance is expected between lower extremities independent of the existence of dominance and difference in sport activity level. A less than 15

  5. [The Activation of Interlimb Interactions Increase the Motor Output in Legs in Healthy Subjects under the Conditions of Arm and Leg Unloading].

    PubMed

    Selionov, V A; Solopova, I A; Zhvansky, D S

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effect of arm movements and movements of separate arm joints on the electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of voluntary and vibration-triggered stepping-like leg movements under the conditions of horizontal support of upper and lower limbs. The horizontal support of arms provided a significantly increase in the rate of activation of locomotor automatism by non-invasive impact on tonic sensory inputs. The addition of active arm movements during involuntary rhytmic stepping-like leg movements led to an increase in EMG activity of hip muscles and was accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of hip and shin movements. Passive arm movements had the same effect on induced leg movements. The movement of the shoulder joints led to an increase in the activity of hip muscles and an increase in the amplitude of movements of the knee and hip joints. At the same time, the movement of forearms. and wrists had similar facilitating effect on electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of rhytmic stepping-like movements, but influenced the distal segments of legs to a greater extent. Under the conditions of sub-threshold vibration of leg muscles, voluntary arm movements led to the activation of involuntary rhytmic stepping movements. During voluntary leg movements, the addition of arm movements had a significantly smaller impact on the parameters of rhytmic stepping than during involuntary leg movements. Thus, the simultaneous movements of upper and lower limbs are an effective method of activation of neural networks connecting the rhythm generators of arms and legs. Under the conditions of arm and leg unloading, the interactions between the cervical and lumbosacral segments of the spinal cord seem to play the major role in the impact of arm movements on the patterns of leg movements. The described methods of activation of interlimb interactions can be used in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients and patients with spinal cord injuries

  6. Comparison of short-term effects of mobilization with movement and Kinesiotaping on pain, function and balance in patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Serdar; Kinikli, Gizem Irem; Callaghan, Michael J; Tunay, Volga Bayrakci

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of Mobilization with movement (MWM) and Kinesiotaping (KT) on patients with patellofemoral pain (PFP) respect to pain, function and balance. Thirty-five female patients diagnosed with unilateral PFP were assigned into 2 groups. The first group (n = 18) received two techniques of MWM intervention (Straight Leg-Raise with Traction and Tibial Gliding) while KT was applied to the other group (n = 17). Both groups received 4 sessions of treatment twice a week for a period of 2 weeks with a 6-week-home exercise program. Pain severity, knee range of motion, hamstring flexibility, and physical performance (10-step stair climbing test, timed up and go test), Kujala Patellofemoral Pain Scoring and Y-Balance test were assessed. These outcomes were evaluated before the treatment, 45 min after the initial treatment, at the end of the 4-session-treatment during 2-week period and 6 weeks later in both groups. Both treatment groups had statistically significant improvements on pain, function and balance (p < 0.05). Pain at rest (p = 0.008) and the hamstring muscle flexibility (p = 0.027) were demonstrated significant improvements in favor of MWM group. Our results demonstrated similar results for both treatment techniques in terms of pain, function and balance. The MWM technique with exercise had a short-term favorable effect on pain at rest and hamstring muscle flexibility than the KT technique with exercise in patients with PFP. Level I, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Leg pairs as virtual wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Russel; Duttweiler, Mark; Khanlian, Luke; Setrakian, Mark

    2005-05-01

    We propose the use of virtual wheels as the starting point of a new vehicle design. Each virtual wheel incorporates a pair of simple legs that, by simulating the rotary motion and ground contact of a traditional wheel, combine many of the benefits of legged and wheeled motion. We describe the use of virtual wheels in the design of a robotic mule, presenting an analysis of the mule's mobility the results of our efforts to model and build such a device.

  8. Fiber-type distribution in insect leg muscles parallels similarities and differences in the functional role of insect walking legs.

    PubMed

    Godlewska-Hammel, Elzbieta; Büschges, Ansgar; Gruhn, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) enzyme activity in muscle fibers determines their contraction properties. We analyzed mATPase activities in muscles of the front, middle and hind legs of the orthopteran stick insect (Carausius morosus) to test the hypothesis that differences in muscle fiber types and distributions reflected differences in their behavioral functions. Our data show that all muscles are composed of at least three fiber types, fast, intermediate and slow, and demonstrate that: (1) in the femoral muscles (extensor and flexor tibiae) of all legs, the number of fast fibers decreases from proximal to distal, with a concomitant increase in the number of slow fibers. (2) The swing phase muscles protractor coxae and levator trochanteris, have smaller percentages of slow fibers compared to the antagonist stance muscles retractor coxae and depressor trochanteris. (3) The percentage of slow fibers in the retractor coxae and depressor trochanteris increases significantly from front to hind legs. These results suggest that fiber-type distribution in leg muscles of insects is not identical across leg muscles but tuned towards the specific function of a given muscle in the locomotor system.

  9. Posterior Epidural Migration of an Extruded Lumbar Disc Mimicking a Facet Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young Sun; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Dong Min

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal extradural migration of extruded disc material is clinically uncommon. We report a rare case of posterior epidural migration of an extruded lumbar disc mimicking a facet cyst. A 32-year-old man was admitted to our institute with a 2-week history of severe low back pain and radiating pain in the left leg. The magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a dorsally located, left-sided extradural cystic mass at the L2-3 level. The initial diagnosis was an epidural facet cyst because of the high signal intensity on MR images and its location adjacent to the facet joint. Intraoperatively, an encapsulated mass of soft tissue adherent to the dural sac was observed and excised. The pathological diagnosis was degenerated disc material. After surgery, the patient experienced complete relief from leg pain. PMID:25883662

  10. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  11. Injury due to leg bands in willow flycatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of banding and color banding. Color bands and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) bands applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color band(s) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS band and a color band (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS bands alone, yielding an overall USFWS band injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.

  12. The effect of leg preference on postural stability in healthy athletes.

    PubMed

    Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; Hupperets, Maarten D W; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-03

    In research regarding postural stability, leg preference is often tested and controlled for. However, leg preference may vary between tasks. As athletes are a group of interest for postural stability testing, we evaluated the effect of five leg preference tasks categorization (step up, hop, ball kick, balance, pick up) on single-leg postural stability of 16 field hockey athletes. The 'center of pressure speed' was calculated as the primary outcome variable of single-leg postural stability. Secondary variables were 'mean length of the GRF vector in the horizontal plane', 'mean length of the ankle angular velocity vector', and 'mean length of the hip angular velocity vector', as well as the separate outcomes per degree of freedom. Results showed that leg preference was inconsistent between leg preference tasks. Moreover, the primary and secondary variables yielded no significant difference between the preferred and non-preferred legs, regardless of the applied leg preference task categorization (p>0.05). The present findings do not support the usability of leg preference tasks in controlling for bias of postural stability. In conclusion, none of the applied leg preference tasks revealed a significant effect on postural stability in healthy field hockey athletes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Do older adults with chronic low back pain differ from younger adults in regards to baseline characteristics and prognosis?

    PubMed

    Manogharan, S; Kongsted, A; Ferreira, M L; Hancock, M J

    2017-05-01

    Low back pain (LBP) in older adults is poorly understood because the vast majority of the LBP research has focused on the working aged population. The aim of this study was to compare older adults consulting with chronic LBP to middle aged and young adults consulting with chronic LBP, in terms of their baseline characteristics, and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Data were systematically collected as part of routine care in a secondary care spine clinic. At initial presentation patients answered a self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients older than 65 were classified as older adults and compared to middle aged (45-65 years old) and younger adults (17-44 years old) for 10 baseline characteristics. Pain intensity and disability were collected at 6 and 12 month follow-ups and compared between age groups. A total of 14,479 participants were included in the study. Of these 3087 (21%) patients were older adults, 6071 (42%) were middle aged and 5321 (37%) were young adults. At presentation older adults were statistically different to the middle aged and younger adults for most characteristics measured (e.g. less intense back pain, more leg pain and more depression); however, the differences were small. The change in pain and disability over 12 months did not differ between age groups. This study found small baseline differences in older people with chronic LBP compared to middle aged and younger adults. There were no associations between age groups and the clinical course. Small baseline differences exist in older people with chronic low back pain compared to middle aged and younger adults referred to secondary care for chronic low back pain. Older adults present with slightly less intense low back pain but slightly more intense leg pain. Changes in pain intensity and disability over a 12 month period were similar across all age groups. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  14. [Clinical observation on auricular point magnetotherapy for treatment of senile low back pain].

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Ping

    2007-02-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of auricular point magnetotherapy and auricular point sticking of Vaccaria seed on senile low back pain. Sixty cases, aged 60 or over 60 years with back pain, were randomly divided into 2 groups, a control group and a test group. The control group were treated with auricular sticking of Vaccaria seed with no pressing, and the test group with sticking magnetic bead of 66 gauss each piece with no pressing. Auricular points, Shenmen, Kidney, Bladder, Yaodizhui, Gluteus, Liver and Spleen were selected. Three weeks constituted one course. The effects before, during and after the course were assessed by questionnaire about back pain. Compared with the control group, in the test group the back pain was more effectively improved, including reducing pain and numbness in the back and the legs, decreasing the disorder of physical strength induced by this disease, and improving daily life quality of the patient. Follow-up survey for 2-4 weeks showed the effects still were kept. Auricular magnetotherapy can effectively improve senile back pain.

  15. Integrated system for single leg walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Reid; Krotkov, Eric; Roston, Gerry

    1990-07-01

    The Carnegie Mellon University Planetary Rover project is developing a six-legged walking robot capable of autonomously navigating, exploring, and acquiring samples in rugged, unknown environments. This report describes an integrated software system capable of navigating a single leg of the robot over rugged terrain. The leg, based on an early design of the Ambler Planetary Rover, is suspended below a carriage that slides along rails. To walk, the system creates an elevation map of the terrain from laser scanner images, plans an appropriate foothold based on terrain and geometric constraints, weaves the leg through the terrain to position it above the foothold, contacts the terrain with the foot, and applies force enough to advance the carriage along the rails. Walking both forward and backward, the system has traversed hundreds of meters of rugged terrain including obstacles too tall to step over, trenches too deep to step in, closely spaced obstacles, and sand hills. The implemented system consists of a number of task-specific processes (two for planning, two for perception, one for real-time control) and a central control process that directs the flow of communication between processes.

  16. Compliant leg behaviour explains basic dynamics of walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    The basic mechanics of human locomotion are associated with vaulting over stiff legs in walking and rebounding on compliant legs in running. However, while rebounding legs well explain the stance dynamics of running, stiff legs cannot reproduce that of walking. With a simple bipedal spring–mass model, we show that not stiff but compliant legs are essential to obtain the basic walking mechanics; incorporating the double support as an essential part of the walking motion, the model reproduces the characteristic stance dynamics that result in the observed small vertical oscillation of the body and the observed out-of-phase changes in forward kinetic and gravitational potential energies. Exploring the parameter space of this model, we further show that it not only combines the basic dynamics of walking and running in one mechanical system, but also reveals these gaits to be just two out of the many solutions to legged locomotion offered by compliant leg behaviour and accessed by energy or speed. PMID:17015312

  17. Randomized controlled trial comparing treatment outcome of two compression bandaging systems and standard care without compression in patients with venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wong, I K Y; Andriessen, A; Charles, H E; Thompson, D; Lee, D T F; So, W K W; Abel, M

    2012-01-01

    In Hong Kong, at the time of the study, compression treatment was not considered usual care for venous leg ulcer patients. This randomized controlled trial compared quality of life (QOL) aspects in venous leg ulcer patients of over 55-years of age, of short-stretch compression (SSB), four-layer compression bandaging (4LB) and usual care (UC) (moist wound healing dressing, no compression). Study period was 24-weeks, the primary outcome was the patient functional status, disease-specific and generic health-related QOL measures and ulcer healing rates, comparing week 1 vs. week 24 (end) results. Assessments included photogrammetry, Brief Pain Inventory, SF-12 Health Survey, Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire and Frenchay Activity Index. Data analysis was performed using, where appropriate; Kaplan Meier and log rank chi-square and the repeated measures analysis of variance test. A total of 321 patients participated in the study, 45 (14%) withdrew for various reasons. Compression bandaging in both groups significantly reduced pain (P < 0.0001) and improved functional status and QOL. Healing rate at 24 weeks for both compression groups was significant (P < 0.001); for SSB this was 72.0% (77/107) vs. 67.3% in the 4LB group (72/107) and 29.0% (31/107) with usual care. The reduction in ulcer area from weeks 12 to 24 was significant only for SSB (P < 0.047). Compression was shown to be feasible for elderly community care patients in Hong Kong and is currently implemented as part of standard venous leg ulcer treatment. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals, and healthcare and socioeconomic costs. VLUs are a common and costly problem worldwide; prevalence is estimated to be between 1.65% to 1.74% in the western world and is more common in adults aged 65 years and older. The main treatment for a VLU is a firm compression bandage. Compression assists by reducing venous hypertension, enhancing venous return and reducing peripheral oedema. However, studies show that it only has moderate effects on healing, with up to 50% of VLUs unhealed after two years of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness of aspirin on ulcer healing and recurrence in high quality RCTs is currently lacking. To assess the benefits and harms of oral aspirin on the healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers. In May 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Additional searches were made in trial registers and reference lists of relevant publications for

  19. Functional nerve disorders in the athlete's foot, ankle, and leg.

    PubMed

    Baxter, D E

    1993-01-01

    Although neuropathies in the athlete's foot, ankle, and leg are uncommon, they are often underdiagnosed, primarily because of the complex interplay of causative factors. The physician should be aware of the possible occurrence of these neuropathies, and should be familiar with the anatomy and course of the nerves. Often, the problem only occurs during functional activity and cannot be demonstrated during the routine static examination. Other problems should also be considered when there is the possibility of a nerve compression syndrome. Metabolic processes, such as diabetes or abuse of alcohol, can certainly cause neuropathies. A double crush syndrome or pain from a higher source should also be considered. Finally, if surgery is done for chronic problems, only the area of constriction should be released, without interfering with the nerve itself. Release the fascia but leave the perineural fat intact. If instability is a factor, the joint should also be stabilized.

  20. Swimming with stiff legs at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke

    2015-08-01

    Locomotion at low Reynolds number is not possible with cycles of reciprocal motion, an example being the oscillation of a single pair of rigid paddles or legs. Here, I demonstrate the possibility of swimming with two or more pairs of legs. They are assumed to oscillate collectively in a metachronal wave pattern in a minimal model based on slender-body theory for Stokes flow. The model predicts locomotion in the direction of the traveling wave, as commonly observed along the body of free-swimming crustaceans. The displacement of the body and the swimming efficiency depend on the number of legs, the amplitude, and the phase of oscillations. This study shows that paddling legs with distinct orientations and phases offers a simple mechanism for driving flow.

  1. Dimensional synthesis of a leg mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, F.; Lovasz, E.-Ch; Pop, C.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    An eight bar leg mechanism dimensional synthesis is presented. The mathematical model regarding the synthesis is described and the results obtained after computation are verified with help of 2D mechanism simulation in Matlab. This mechanism, inspired from proposed solution of Theo Jansen, is integrated into the structure of a 2 DOF quadruped robot. With help of the kinematic synthesis method described, it is tried to determine new dimensions for the mechanism, based on a set of initial conditions. These are established by taking into account the movement of the end point of the leg mechanism, which enters in contact with the ground, during walking. An optimization process based on the results obtained can be conducted further in order to find a better solution for the leg mechanism.

  2. Distraction Kits for Pain Management of Children Undergoing Painful Procedures in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Ariane; Le May, Sylvie; Khadra, Christelle; Lachance Fiola, Jacinthe; Charette, Sylvie; Charest, Marie-Claude; Gagnon, Hélène; Bailey, Benoit; Villeneuve, Edith; Tsimicalis, Argerie

    2017-12-01

    To assess the feasibility, usefulness, and acceptability of using distraction kits, tailored to age, for procedural pain management of young children visiting the emergency department and requiring a needle-related procedure. A pre-experimental design was piloted. A kit, tailored to age (infants-toddlers: 3 months