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Sample records for radiation carcinogenesis comprehensive

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive final report, 16 May 1979-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S; Brown, C E; Gates, O

    1981-03-01

    This abstract covers three main areas of investigation: mesothelioma induction by asbestos, radiation tumorigenesis and transplantable tumors. Canadian and Rhodesian asbestos fibers have been administered under anesthesia to rats by intratracheal, intrapleural and intraperitoneal injection. Additional groups were given 3-methylcholanthrene or x-radiation along with asbestos. A large series of mice also treated as above have displayed mesotheliomas. In addition, glass fiber injections and feeding of asbestos were done and have produced negative results to date. The carcinogenic effect of whole-body radiation on hemi-irradiated parabiont partners exposed to a single 1000 R dose of x-ray was evidenced by a significant increase in the incidence of malignant tumors in only six tissues: skin, supporting soft tissue, kidney, bone, pancreatic islets and ovary. In the male adrenal medulla and in the female breast genetic and parabiotic hormonal factors were judged to exert a significant effect. The occurrence of incisional (anastomotic) sarcomas in significant numbers in hemi-irradiated and parabiont control pairs suggests the operation of mechanical factors complicating the healing process, only slightly enhanced by radiation. One of the very valuable but unanticipated developments of the rat radiation program was the isolation of two transplantable endocrine tumors with strong hormonal potentials: an insulinoma of the pancreas and a pheochromocytoma of the adrenal medulla.

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis: lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Williams, D

    2008-12-01

    Radiation is a carcinogen, interacting with DNA to produce a range of mutations. Irradiated cells also show genomic instability, as do adjacent non-irradiated cells (the bystander effect); the importance to carcinogenesis remains to be established. Current knowledge of radiation effects is largely dependent on evidence from exposure to atomic bomb whole body radiation, leading to increases in a wide range of malignancies. In contrast, millions of people were exposed to radioactive isotopes in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident, within the first 20 years there was a large increase in thyroid carcinoma incidence and a possible radiation-related increase in breast cancer, but as yet there is no general increase in malignancies. The increase in thyroid carcinoma, attributable to the very large amounts of iodine 131 released, was first noticed in children with a strong relationship between young age at exposure and risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The extent of the increase, the reasons for the relationship to age at exposure, the reduction in attributable fraction with increasing latency and the role of environmental factors are discussed. The large number of radiation-induced PTCs has allowed new observations. The subtype and molecular findings change with latency; most early cases were solid PTCs with RET-PTC3 rearrangements, later cases were classical PTCs with RET-PTC1 rearrangements. Small numbers of many other RET rearrangements have occurred in 'Chernobyl' PTCs, and also rearrangement of BRAF. Five of the N-terminal genes found in papillary carcinoma rearrangements are also involved in rearrangements in hematological malignancies; three are putative tumor suppressor genes, and two are further genes fused to RET in PTCs. Radiation causes double-strand breaks; the rearrangements common in these radiation-induced tumors reflect their etiology. It is suggested that oncogenic rearrangements may commonly involve both a tumor-suppressor gene

  4. A Systems Approach to Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlatky, Lynn

    Understanding carcinogenesis risk is complicated by a number of factors, among these the lack of a common platform to integrate and analyze the available data, and the inherently systemsbiologic nature of the problem. We have investigated mechanistic approaches to radiogenic risk estimation that draw on unifying biological principles and incorporate data from multiscale sources. The resultant modeling takes into account that carcinogenesis is a multi-scale phenomenon, critically influenced by determinants not only at the molecular level, but at the cell and tissue-levels as well. To account for cell-level carcinogenesis progression as influenced by inter-tissue signaling, we have developed a dynamic carrying capacity construct that couples the growth of a tumor with the degree of induced vascularization. We have also characterized the molecular responses to radiation incorporating tissue-level angiogenesis implications, and have found striking radiation-quality-dependent responses. The molecular-level events of initiation and promotion are considered in our Two-Stage Logistic model, while incorporating in a rudimentary way the larger-scale growth-limiting role of cell-cell interactions. These and other recent studies undertaken to elaborate radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed, in pursuit of a more complete paradigm for understanding radiation induction of cancer and the consequent risk.

  5. High-let radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads.

  6. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  7. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  8. Clonal theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    In some cases, usually involving high-LET radiations, the dose response at low doses follows a power function of dose with exponent less than one over a wide dose range. This type of response is of great interest since (a) it implies greater effect per unit dose at progressively smaller doses, and (b) it is not predicted by most models and theories of radiobiology. A theoretical framework is presented for responses having the above characteristics over a dose range extending over a factor of 1000. The model postulates precursor cells which occur in clones. Different numbers of precursor cells per clone are assumed. Suitable transformation of a single cell in a clone completes initiation of that clone and raises the probability of tumor formation. At low doses, clones with large numbers of cells at risk have relatively high probability of response. However, depletion of the number of untransformed large clones with increasing dose leaves primarily untransformed smaller clones with smaller probability of response per unit dose. The analytical results demonstrate that power functions with exponent less than one can result even for doses so small that the mean number of charged particle traversals per cell is much less than one. The results also demonstrate that response functions may change from nearly approx. D/sup 0.4/ to nearly linear as linear energy transfer (LET) of the charged particle secondaries decreases. (ERB)

  9. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  10. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  11. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  12. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  13. Modification of radiation carcinogenesis by marijuana

    SciTech Connect

    Montour, J.L.; Dutz, W.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-03-15

    Male, female, and ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 400 rads, 150 rads, or 300 rads, respectively, of /sup 60/Co gamma rays when they were between 40 and 50 days of age. The animals were injected three times weekly with either marihuana extract or with alcohol-emulphor carrier. Comparable unirradiated groups were similarly injected. Mean survival time in males was significantly shorter in the 400 rad + marihuana group compared with the three other groups whose mean survival times did not differ. Through the 546 days that the males were observed, the total number of tumors other than fibrosarcomas was significantly greater following radiation and marihuana (22) than radiation alone (6). Fifteen of the tumors were of breast or endocrine tissues. No differences were seen in the unirradiated groups. In the females, which were observed for 635 days, the total number of breast tumors was greater with the combined treatment (38) compared with radiation alone (22). This was entirely due to a marked difference in the adenocarcinoma incidence, which was 21 (radiation + marihuana) compared with four (radiation alone). The number of adenofibromas was similar in the two groups. In the unirradiated female groups the breast adenocarcinoma incidence was eight in the marihuana group and two in the control group. Ovariectomy resulted in a lower breast tumor incidence in all groups. Nonbreast tumors were more frequent in the ovariectomized-irradiated groups. Radiation plus marihuana produced more nonbreast tumors (25) than radiation alone (17) in the ovariectomized females.

  14. Modification of radiation carcinogenesis by marihuana

    SciTech Connect

    Montour, J.L.; Dutz, W.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-03-15

    Male, female, and ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 400 rads, 150 rads, or 300 rads, respectively, of /sup 60/Co gamma rays when they were between 40 and 50 days of age. The animals were injected three times weekly with either marihuana extract or with alcohol-emulphor carrier. Comparable unirradiated groups were similarly injected. Mean survival time in males was significantly shorter in the 400 rad + marihuana group compared with the three other groups whose mean survival times did not differ. Through the 546 days that the males were observed, the total number of tumors other than fibrosarcomas was significantly greater following radiation and marihuana (22) than radiation alone (6). Fifteen of the tumors were of breast or endocrine tissues. No differences were seen in the unirradiated groups. In the females, which were observed for 635 days, the total number of breast tumors was greater with the combined treatment (38) compared with radiation alone (22). This was entirely due to a marked difference in the adenocarcinoma incidence, which was 21 (radiation + marihuana) compared with four (radiation alone). The number of adenofibromas was similar in the two groups. In the unirradiated female groups the breast adenocarcinoma incidence was eight in the marihuana group and two in the control group. Ovariectomy resulted in a lower breast tumor incidence in all groups. Nonbreast tumors were more frequent in the ovariectomized-irradiated groups. Radiation plus marihuana produced more nonbreast tumors (25) than radiation alone (17) in the ovariectomized females.

  15. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation. PMID:22641644

  16. Evidence Report: Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice; Carnell, Lisa; Blattnig, Steve; Chappell, Lori; Kerry, George; Lumpkins, Sarah; Simonsen, Lisa; Slaba, Tony; Werneth, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As noted by Durante and Cucinotta (2008), cancer risk caused by exposure to space radiation is now generally considered a main hindrance to interplanetary travel for the following reasons: large uncertainties are associated with the projected cancer risk estimates; no simple and effective countermeasures are available, and significant uncertainties prevent scientists from determining the effectiveness of countermeasures. Optimizing operational parameters such as the length of space missions, crew selection for age and sex, or applying mitigation measures such as radiation shielding or use of biological countermeasures can be used to reduce risk, but these procedures have inherent limitations and are clouded by uncertainties. Space radiation is comprised of high energy protons, neutrons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) nuclei (HZE). The ionization patterns and resulting biological insults of these particles in molecules, cells, and tissues are distinct from typical terrestrial radiation, which is largely X-rays and gamma-rays, and generally characterized as low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are comprised mostly of highly energetic protons with a small component of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei. Prominent HZE nuclei include He, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe. GCR ions have median energies near 1 GeV/n, and energies as high as 10 GeV/n make important contributions to the total exposure. Ionizing radiation is a well known carcinogen on Earth (BEIR 2006). The risks of cancer from X-rays and gamma-rays have been established at doses above 50 mSv (5 rem), although there are important uncertainties and on-going scientific debate about cancer risk at lower doses and at low dose rates (<50 mSv/h). The relationship between the early biological effects of HZE nuclei and the probability of cancer in humans is poorly understood, and it is this missing knowledge that leads to significant uncertainties in projecting cancer risks during space

  17. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.; Ley, R.D.; Grube, D.; Staffeldt, E.

    1980-01-01

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion.

  18. Smoking and Hormesis as Confounding Factors in Radiation Pulmonary Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.; Scott, Bobby R.

    2008-01-01

    Confounding factors in radiation pulmonary carcinogenesis are passive and active cigarette smoke exposures and radiation hormesis. Significantly increased lung cancer risk from ionizing radiation at lung doses < 1 Gy is not observed in never smokers exposed to ionizing radiations. Residential radon is not a cause of lung cancer in never smokers and may protect against lung cancer in smokers. The risk of lung cancer found in many epi-demiological studies was less than the expected risk (hormetic effect) for nuclear weapons and power plant workers, shipyard workers, fluoroscopy patients, and inhabitants of high-dose background radiation. The protective effect was noted for low- and mixed high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations in both genders. Many studies showed a protection factor (PROFAC) > 0.40 (40% avoided) against the occurrence of lung cancer. The ubiquitous nature of the radiation hormesis response in cellular, animal, and epidemio-logical studies negates the healthy worker effect as an explanation for radiation hormesis. Low-dose radiation may stimulate DNA repair/apoptosis and immunity to suppress and eliminate cigarette-smoke-induced transformed cells in the lung, reducing lung cancer occurrence in smokers. PMID:18648572

  19. Radiation carcinogenesis risk assessments for never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Chappell, Lori J; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Wang, Minli

    2012-11-01

    Cigarette smoking, which is presently associated with more than 20% of adult deaths in the United States, is a large confounder to radiation risk estimates derived from epidemiology data. Astronauts and other exposed groups are classified as never-smokers (NS), defined as lifetime use of less than 100 cigarettes. In the past, radiation risk estimates have been made using average U.S. population rates for cancer and all causes of death, which may lead to overestimation of radiation risks for NS. In this report, age- and gender-specific radiation carcinogenesis risk calculations for NS and the average U.S. population are compared. Lung is the major tissue site for smoking and radiation-related cancer. However, other radiogenic cancers where tobacco has been shown to increase population cancer rates are esophagus, oral cavity, salivary gland, bladder, stomach, liver, colorectal, and leukemia. After adjusting U.S. cancer rates to remove smoking effects, radiation risks for lung and other cancers were estimated using the multiplicative risk model and a mixture model, with weighted contributions for additive and multiplicative risk transfer. Radiation mortality risks for NS were reduced compared to the average U.S. population by more than 20% and 50% in the mixture model and multiplicative transfer models, respectively. The authors discuss possible mechanisms of cancer risks from radiation and tobacco that suggest multiplicative effects could occur. These results suggest that improved understanding of possible synergisms between cancer initiators and promoters, such as radiation and tobacco, would greatly improve risk estimates and reduce uncertainties for differentially exposed groups, including NS. PMID:23032894

  20. Molecular characterization of cancer reveals interactions between ionizing radiation and chemicals on rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Doi, Kazutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Although various mechanisms have been inferred for combinatorial actions of multiple carcinogens, these mechanisms have not been well demonstrated in experimental carcinogenesis models. We evaluated mammary carcinogenesis initiated by combined exposure to various doses of radiation and chemical carcinogens. Female rats at 7 weeks of age were γ-irradiated (0.2-2 Gy) and/or exposed to 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) (20 or 40 mg/kg, single intraperitoneal injection) or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (40 mg/kg/day by gavage for 10 days) and were observed until 50 weeks of age. The incidence of mammary carcinoma increased steadily as a function of radiation dose in the absence of chemicals; mathematical analysis supported an additive increase when radiation was combined with a chemical carcinogen, irrespective of the chemical species and its dose. Hras mutations were characteristic of carcinomas that developed after chemical carcinogen treatments and were overrepresented in carcinomas induced by the combination of radiation and MNU (but not PhIP), indicating an interaction of radiation and MNU at the level of initiation. The expression profiles of seven classifier genes, previously shown to distinguish two classes of rat mammary carcinomas, categorized almost all examined carcinomas that developed after individual or combined treatments with radiation (1 Gy) and chemicals as belonging to a single class; more comprehensive screening using microarrays and a separate test sample set failed to identify differences in gene expression profiles among these carcinomas. These results suggest that a complex, multilevel interaction underlies the combinatorial action of radiation and chemical carcinogens in the experimental model.

  1. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  2. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  3. [Relationship to Carcinogenesis of Repetitive Low-Dose Radiation Exposure].

    PubMed

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose. PMID:27302731

  4. [Relationship to Carcinogenesis of Repetitive Low-Dose Radiation Exposure].

    PubMed

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose.

  5. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: Possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers. PMID:25483826

  6. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-02-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers. PMID:25483826

  7. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-02-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers.

  8. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mozdarani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity). It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation therapy, all these

  9. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  10. Important step in radiation carcinogenesis may be inactivation of cellular genes

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.A.; Diamond, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of genetic material may result in a predisposition to malignant disease. The best studied example is retinoblastoma where deletion or transcriptional inactivation of a specific gene is associated with the development of the tumor. When hereditary retinoblastoma patients are treated with radiation, the incidence of osteosarcoma within the treatment field is extremely high compared to other cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. These data, together with cytogenetic and molecular data on the development of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment suggest that radiation-induced deletions of critical DNA sequences may be an important event in radiation carcinogenesis. Therefore, we propose that radiation-induced tumors may result from deletion of tissue specific regulatory genes. Base alterations caused by radiation in dominantly transforming oncogenes may also contribute to radiation carcinogenesis.62 references.

  11. Risks of carcinogenesis from electromagnetic radiation of mobile telephony devices.

    PubMed

    Yakymenko, I; Sidorik, E

    2010-07-01

    Intensive implementation of mobile telephony technology in everyday human life during last two decades has given a possibility for epidemiological estimation of long-term effects of chronic exposure of human organism to low-intensive microwave (MW) radiation. Latest epidemiological data reveal a significant increase in risk of development of some types of tumors in chronic (over 10 years) users of mobile phone. It was detected a significant increase in incidence of brain tumors (glioma, acoustic neuroma, meningioma), parotid gland tumor, seminoma in long-term users of mobile phone, especially in cases of ipsilateral use (case-control odds ratios from 1.3 up to 6.1). Two epidemiological studies have indicated a significant increase of cancer incidence in people living close to the mobile telephony base station as compared with the population from distant area. These data raise a question of adequacy of modern safety limits of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure for humans. For today the limits were based solely on the conception of thermal mechanism of biological effects of RF/MW radiation. Meantime the latest experimental data indicate the significant metabolic changes in living cell under the low-intensive (non-thermal) EMR exposure. Among reproducible biological effects of low-intensive MWs are reactive oxygen species overproduction, heat shock proteins expression, DNA damages, apoptosis. The lack of generally accepted mechanism of biological effects of low-intensive non-ionizing radiation doesn't permit to disregard the obvious epidemiological and experimental data of its biological activity. Practical steps must be done for reasonable limitation of excessive EMR exposure, along with the implementation of new safety limits of mobile telephony devices radiation, and new technological decisions, which would take out the source of radiation from human brain.

  12. Multiple stages in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, F J; Albert, R E; Garte, S J

    1989-01-01

    Epithelial cell cancers are induced in rat skin by ionizing radiation in a manner that is consistent with the dual action (i.e., two alterations) hypothesis of radiation effects on DNA. This hypothesis states simply that two initial alterations, presumably in the DNA, are necessary to start a normal cell on the pathway to cancer. The initial radiation-induced alteration in the DNA is repairable as indicated by the reduction in tumor incidence with increasing time between dose fractions; the repair halftime is estimated to be 3.0 +/- 1.0 hr. Theoretical predictions of a specific dependence of tumor incidence on linear energy transfer (LET) have been verified experimentally for two specific LET values. However, the theoretical formulation provides no guidance regarding the observed reduction in the carcinogenic action of radiation with age at the time of exposure. Analysis of the tumor DNA for oncogene activation indicated k-ras and c-myc oncogenes were activated in highly anaplastic rat skin cancers, whereas only one of these oncogenes, usually c-myc, was activated in comparatively benign basal cell carcinomas and in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:2667987

  13. Age, sex and other factors in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.; Carnes, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been held for a long time that the young are more susceptible than adults to the induction of cancer by radiation. The data in support of that contention are accumulating especially from human studies. In an exposed population a significant fraction of the total population risk may be attributed to the risk associated with those who were young at the time of exposure. Since cancer may not appear for decades after exposure estimates of risk may require models for projecting the lifetime risk. Two such models, additive or absolute risk and multiplicative or relative risk have been used. The appropriateness of the latter model is supported by the finding in mice of a positive relationship between natural incidence and the susceptibility for induction by radiation of solid cancer. The choice of model for leukemias is not clear cut. The incidence of cancer increases with age, but the susceptibility for induction decreases. The incidence of cancers increases to a peak and then begins to decline at different ages, dependent on the type of cancer. Sex-dependent differences in both the natural incidence and the susceptibility for induction of cancer are not restricted to sex organs. For example, the susceptibility for the induction by radiation for myeloid leukemia is greater in males than females, whereas in the case of thymic lymphoma it is vice versa. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  15. Does Imaging Technology Cause Cancer? Debunking the Linear No-Threshold Model of Radiation Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jeffry A; Welsh, James S

    2016-04-01

    In the past several years, there has been a great deal of attention from the popular media focusing on the alleged carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation exposures received by patients undergoing medical imaging studies such as X-rays, computed tomography scans, and nuclear medicine scintigraphy. The media has based its reporting on the plethora of articles published in the scientific literature that claim that there is "no safe dose" of ionizing radiation, while essentially ignoring all the literature demonstrating the opposite point of view. But this reported "scientific" literature in turn bases its estimates of cancer induction on the linear no-threshold hypothesis of radiation carcinogenesis. The use of the linear no-threshold model has yielded hundreds of articles, all of which predict a definite carcinogenic effect of any dose of radiation, regardless of how small. Therefore, hospitals and professional societies have begun campaigns and policies aiming to reduce the use of certain medical imaging studies based on perceived risk:benefit ratio assumptions. However, as they are essentially all based on the linear no-threshold model of radiation carcinogenesis, the risk:benefit ratio models used to calculate the hazards of radiological imaging studies may be grossly inaccurate if the linear no-threshold hypothesis is wrong. Here, we review the myriad inadequacies of the linear no-threshold model and cast doubt on the various studies based on this overly simplistic model.

  16. HZE Radiation Non-Targeted Effects on the Microenvironment That Mediate Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clear mechanistic understanding of the biological processes elicited by radiation that increase cancer risk can be used to inform prediction of health consequences of medical uses, such as radiotherapy, or occupational exposures, such as those of astronauts during deep space travel. Here, we review the current concepts of carcinogenesis as a multicellular process during which transformed cells escape normal tissue controls, including the immune system, and establish a tumor microenvironment. We discuss the contribution of two broad classes of radiation effects that may increase cancer: radiation targeted effects that occur as a result of direct energy deposition, e.g., DNA damage, and non-targeted effects (NTE) that result from changes in cell signaling, e.g., genomic instability. It is unknown whether the potentially greater carcinogenic effect of high Z and energy (HZE) particle radiation is a function of the relative contribution or extent of NTE or due to unique NTE. We addressed this problem using a radiation/genetic mammary chimera mouse model of breast cancer. Our experiments suggest that NTE promote more aggressive cancers, as evidenced by increased growth rate, transcriptomic signatures, and metastasis, and that HZE particle NTE are more effective than reference γ-radiation. Emerging evidence suggest that HZE irradiation dampens antitumor immunity. These studies raise concern that HZE radiation exposure not only increases the likelihood of developing cancer but also could promote progression to more aggressive cancer with a greater risk of mortality.

  17. HZE Radiation Non-Targeted Effects on the Microenvironment That Mediate Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clear mechanistic understanding of the biological processes elicited by radiation that increase cancer risk can be used to inform prediction of health consequences of medical uses, such as radiotherapy, or occupational exposures, such as those of astronauts during deep space travel. Here, we review the current concepts of carcinogenesis as a multicellular process during which transformed cells escape normal tissue controls, including the immune system, and establish a tumor microenvironment. We discuss the contribution of two broad classes of radiation effects that may increase cancer: radiation targeted effects that occur as a result of direct energy deposition, e.g., DNA damage, and non-targeted effects (NTE) that result from changes in cell signaling, e.g., genomic instability. It is unknown whether the potentially greater carcinogenic effect of high Z and energy (HZE) particle radiation is a function of the relative contribution or extent of NTE or due to unique NTE. We addressed this problem using a radiation/genetic mammary chimera mouse model of breast cancer. Our experiments suggest that NTE promote more aggressive cancers, as evidenced by increased growth rate, transcriptomic signatures, and metastasis, and that HZE particle NTE are more effective than reference γ-radiation. Emerging evidence suggest that HZE irradiation dampens antitumor immunity. These studies raise concern that HZE radiation exposure not only increases the likelihood of developing cancer but also could promote progression to more aggressive cancer with a greater risk of mortality. PMID:27014632

  18. HZE Radiation Non-Targeted Effects on the Microenvironment That Mediate Mammary Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clear mechanistic understanding of the biological processes elicited by radiation that increase cancer risk can be used to inform prediction of health consequences of medical uses, such as radiotherapy, or occupational exposures, such as those of astronauts during deep space travel. Here, we review the current concepts of carcinogenesis as a multicellular process during which transformed cells escape normal tissue controls, including the immune system, and establish a tumor microenvironment. We discuss the contribution of two broad classes of radiation effects that may increase cancer: radiation targeted effects that occur as a result of direct energy deposition, e.g., DNA damage, and non-targeted effects (NTE) that result from changes in cell signaling, e.g., genomic instability. It is unknown whether the potentially greater carcinogenic effect of high Z and energy (HZE) particle radiation is a function of the relative contribution or extent of NTE or due to unique NTE. We addressed this problem using a radiation/genetic mammary chimera mouse model of breast cancer. Our experiments suggest that NTE promote more aggressive cancers, as evidenced by increased growth rate, transcriptomic signatures, and metastasis, and that HZE particle NTE are more effective than reference γ-radiation. Emerging evidence suggest that HZE irradiation dampens antitumor immunity. These studies raise concern that HZE radiation exposure not only increases the likelihood of developing cancer but also could promote progression to more aggressive cancer with a greater risk of mortality. PMID:27014632

  19. Stable loss of global DNA methylation in the radiation-target tissue-A possible mechanism contributing to radiation carcinogenesis?

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga . E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2005-11-18

    Radiation-induced lymphomagenesis and leukemogenesis are complex processes involving both genetic and epigenetic changes. Although genetic alterations during radiation-induced lymphoma- and leukemogenesis are fairly well studied, the role of epigenetic changes has been largely overlooked. Rodent models are valuable tools for identifying molecular mechanisms of lymphoma and leukemogenesis. A widely used mouse model of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma is characterized by a lengthy 'pre-lymphoma' period. Delineating molecular changes occurring during the pre-lymphoma period is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia/lymphoma development. In the present study, we investigated the role of radiation-induced DNA methylation changes in the radiation carcinogenesis target organ-thymus, and non-target organ-muscle. This study is the first report on the radiation-induced epigenetic changes in radiation-target murine thymus during the pre-lymphoma period. We have demonstrated that acute and fractionated whole-body irradiation significantly altered DNA methylation pattern in murine thymus leading to a massive loss of global DNA methylation. We have also observed that irradiation led to increased levels of DNA strand breaks 6 h following the initial exposure. The majority of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks were repaired 1 month after exposure. DNA methylation changes, though, were persistent and significant radiation-induced DNA hypomethylation was observed in thymus 1 month after exposure. In sharp contrast to thymus, no significant persistent changes were noted in the non-target muscle tissue. The presence of stable DNA hypomethylation in the radiation-target tissue, even though DNA damage resulting from initial genotoxic radiation insult was repaired, suggests of the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of radiation-related pathologies. The possible role of radiation-induced DNA hypomethylation in radiation-induced genome

  20. NSBRI Radiation Effects: Carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley Rats Irradiated with Iron Ions, Protons, or Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, J. F.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gridley, D. S.; Howard, S. P.; Novak, G. R.; Ricart-Arbona, R.; Strandberg, J. D.; Vazquez, M. E.; Williams, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Huso, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Our ability to confidently develop appropriate countermeasures for radiations in space in terms of shielding and design of a spacecraft, the mission scenario, or chemoprevention is severely limited by the uncertainties in both the risk itself and the change in that risk with intervention. Despite the fact that the risk of carcinogenesis from exposures of personnel to radiations on long-term missions is considered one of the worst hazards in space, only a limited amount of in-vivo data exist for tumor induction from exposures to protons or energetic heavy ions (HZEs) at lower doses. The most extensive work remains the landmark study. for tumor development in the harderian gland of the mouse. The objective of this study is to characterize the level of risk for tumor induction in another relevant animal model. Subsequent experiments are designed to test the hypothesis that the level of risk can be reduced by pharmaceutical intervention in the promoting and progressing stages of the disease rather than in the initiating stage. The work presented here results from a cooperative effort on the part of investigators from two projects of the Radiation-Effects Team of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The collaborating projects are the Core Project which is investigating the risk of carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats and the Chemoprevention Project which is investigating the ability of Tamoxifen to reduce the number of malignant tumors in the irradiated animals. Research at the cellular and subcellular levels is being conducted in two other projects of the Radiation-Effects Team, Cytogenetics with J. R. Williams as Principal Investigator and Mutations from Repeated DNA Sequences. Results for these other projects also are being presented at this Workshop.

  1. Multistage Carcinogenesis Modelling of Low and Protracted Radiation Exposure for Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugmans, M. J. P.; Bijwaard, H.

    Exposure to cosmic radiation in space poses an increased risk for radiation-induced cancer later in life. Modelling is essential to quantify these excess risks from low and protracted exposures to a mixture of radiation types, since they cannot be determined directly in epidemiological studies. Multistage carcinogenesis models provide a mechanistic basis for the extrapolation of epidemiological data to the regime that is relevant for radiation protection. In recent years, we have exploited the well-known two-mutation carcinogenesis model to bridge the gap between radiobiology and epidemiology. We have fitted this model to a number of animal and epidemiological data sets, using dose-response relationships for the mutational steps that are well established in cellular radiobiology. The methodology and implications for radiation risks are illustrated with analyses of two radiation-induced tumours: bone cancer from internal (high-LET and low-LET) emitters and lung cancer after radon exposure. For the risks of bone-seeking radionuclides (Ra-226, Sr-90, Pu-239), model fits to beagle data show that the dose-effect relationship for bone cancer at low intakes is linear-quadratic. This is due to a combination of equally strong linear dose-effects in the two subsequent mutational steps in the model. This supra-linear dose-effect relationship is also found in a model analysis of bone cancer in radium dial painters. This implies that at low intakes the risks from bone seekers are significantly lower than estimated from a linear extrapolation from high doses. Model analyses of radon-exposed rats and uranium miners show that lung-cancer induction is dominated by a linear radiation effect in the first mutational step. For two miner cohorts with significantly different lung cancer baselines a uniform description of the effect of radon is obtained in a joint analysis. This demonstrates the possibility to model risk transfer across populations. In addition to biologically based risk

  2. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  3. Medical radiation exposure and human carcinogenesis-genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Yildiz; Sezgin, Zeynep

    2014-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potential carcinogen. Evidence for the carcinogenic effect of IR radiation has been shown after long-term animal investigations and observations on survivors of the atom bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, IR has been widely used in a controlled manner in the medical imaging for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases and also in cancer therapy. The collective radiation dose from medical imagings has increased six times in the last two decades, and grow continuously day to day. A large number of evidence has revealed the increased cancer risk in the people who had frequently exposed to x-rays, especially in childhood. It has also been shown that secondary malignancy may develop within the five years in cancer survivors who have received radiotherapy, because of IR-mediated damage to healthy cells. In this article, we review the current knowledge about the role of medical x-ray exposure in cancer development in humans, and recently recognized epigenetic mechanisms in IR-induced carcinogenesis.

  4. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study: Insufficient Statistical Power to Select Radiation Carcinogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the "neutron discrepancy problem" - the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima - was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required.

  5. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study: Insufficient Statistical Power to Select Radiation Carcinogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the "neutron discrepancy problem" - the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima - was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  6. Estimation of risk based on multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, F. J.; Jin, Y.; Garte, S. J.; Hosselet, S.

    1994-10-01

    In the multistage theory of carcinogenesis, cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible, heritable genetic alterations or mutations. However data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that some part of an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to the following radiations: 1. an electron beam (LET = 0.34 keV/um, 2. a neon ion beam (LET = 25 keV/um and 3. an argon ion beam (LET = 125 keV/um. The latter 2 beams were generated by the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. About 6.0 cm2 of skin was irradiated per rat. The rats were observed every 6 weeks for at least 78 weeks and tumors were scored at first occurrence. Several histological types of cancer, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas, were induced. The cancer yield versus radiation dose was fitted by the quadratic equation (Y (D) = CLD + BD2), and the parameters C and B were estimated for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated in all tumors tested, although only a small proportion of neon-induced tumors showed similar activation. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable, linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage in the multistage model. The model, if validated, permits the direct calculation of cancer risk in rat skin in a way that can be subjected to experimental testing.

  7. Low-level X-radiation effects on functional vascular changes in Syrian hamster cheek pouch epithelium during hydrocarbon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.; Coghill, J.E.; Rippey, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    Effects of repeated low-level X radiation on functional microvascular changes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium during and following carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were studied. Hamsters were treated with either radiation, DMBA, radiation + DMBA, or no treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 3-week intervals from 0 to 39 weeks after treatments began. Pouch vascular volume and permeability changes were studied by fractional distributions of radiotracers and were analyzed by a variety of statistical methods which explored the vascular parameters, treatment types, elapsed time, presence of the carcinogen, and histopathologic changes. All treatments resulted in significant changes in vascular volume with time, while only DMBA treatments alone resulted in significant changes in vascular permeability with time. As in prior studies, there were significant vascular volume differences between DMBA and DMBA + radiation groups of tumor-bearing cheek pouches. Radiation significantly affected DMBA-associated vascular volume and permeability changes during carcinogenesis. Several possible explanations for the relationship of these changes to the enhancement of DMBA carcinogenesis are discussed.

  8. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  9. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  10. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  11. A new perspective of carcinogenesis from protracted high-let radiation arises from the two-stage clonal expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Luebeck, E. G.; Hazelton, W. D.; Moolgavkar, S. H.

    When applied to the Colorado Plateau miner population, the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model of radiation carcinogenesis predicts that radiation-induced promotion dominates radiation-induced initiation. Thus, according to the model, at least for alpha-particle radiation from inhaled radon daughters, lung cancer induction over long periods of protracted irradiation appears to be dominated by radiation-induced modification of the proliferation kinetics of already-initiated cells rather than by direct radiation-induced initiation (i.e., mutation) of normal cells. We explore the possible consequences of this result for radiation exposures to space travelers on long missions. Still unknown is the LET dependence of this effect. Speculations of the cause of this phenomenon include the suggestion that modification of cell kinetics is caused by a "bystander" effect, i.e., the traversal of normal cells by alpha particles, followed by the signaling of these cells to nearby initiated cells which then modify their proliferation kinetics.

  12. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  13. Radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanistically based differences between gamma-rays and neutrons, and interactions with DMBA.

    PubMed

    Shuryak, Igor; Brenner, David J; Ullrich, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Different types of ionizing radiation produce different dependences of cancer risk on radiation dose/dose rate. Sparsely ionizing radiation (e.g. γ-rays) generally produces linear or upwardly curving dose responses at low doses, and the risk decreases when the dose rate is reduced (direct dose rate effect). Densely ionizing radiation (e.g. neutrons) often produces downwardly curving dose responses, where the risk initially grows with dose, but eventually stabilizes or decreases. When the dose rate is reduced, the risk increases (inverse dose rate effect). These qualitative differences suggest qualitative differences in carcinogenesis mechanisms. We hypothesize that the dominant mechanism for induction of many solid cancers by sparsely ionizing radiation is initiation of stem cells to a pre-malignant state, but for densely ionizing radiation the dominant mechanism is radiation-bystander-effect mediated promotion of already pre-malignant cell clone growth. Here we present a mathematical model based on these assumptions and test it using data on the incidence of dysplastic growths and tumors in the mammary glands of mice exposed to high or low dose rates of γ-rays and neutrons, either with or without pre-treatment with the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz-alpha-anthracene (DMBA). The model provides a mechanistic and quantitative explanation which is consistent with the data and may provide useful insight into human carcinogenesis.

  14. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  15. An Examination of Radiation Hormesis Mechanisms Using a Multistage Carcinogenesis Model

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, H.; Stewart, R. D.; Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hofmann, W.

    2004-01-01

    A multistage cancer model that describes the putative rate-limiting steps in carcinogenesis is developed and used to investigate the potential impact on cumulative lung cancer incidence of the hormesis mechanisms suggested by Feinendegen and Pollycove. In the model, radiation and endogenous processes damage the DNA of target cells in the lung. Some fraction of the misrepaired or unrepaired DNA damage induces genomic instability and, ultimately, leads to the accumulation of malignant cells. The model explicitly accounts for cell birth and death processes, the clonal expansion of initiated cells, malignant conversion, and a lag period for tumor formation. Radioprotective mechanisms are incorporated into the model by postulating dose and dose-rate-dependent radical scavenging. The accuracy of DNA damage repair also depends on dose and dose rate. As currently formulated, the model is most applicable to low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation delivered at low dose rates. Sensitivity studies are conducted to identify critical model inputs and to help define the shapes of the cumulative lung cancer incidence curves that may arise when dose and dose-rate-dependent cellular defense mechanisms are incorporated into a multistage cancer model. For lung cancer, both linear no-threshold (LNT-), and non-LNT-shaped responses can be obtained. If experiments demonstrate that the effects of DNA damage repair and radical scavenging are enhanced at least three-fold under low-dose conditions, our studies would support the existence of U-shaped responses. The overall fidelity of the DNA damage repair process may have a large impact on the cumulative incidence of lung cancer. The reported studies also highlight the need to know whether or not (or to what extent) multiply damaged DNA sites are formed by endogenous processes. Model inputs that give rise to U-shaped responses are consistent with an effective cumulative lung cancer incidence threshold that may be as high as 300 mGy (4 m

  16. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profiles by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.

  17. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  18. Protection from inflammation, immunosuppression and carcinogenesis induced by UV radiation in mice by topical Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Sime, Suzann; Reeve, Vivienne E

    2004-02-01

    Pycnogenol is a standardized extract of the bark of the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., that has multiple biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. This study describes the effect of topical application of lotions containing Pycnogenol to Skh:hr hairless mice undergoing minimally inflammatory daily exposures to solar-simulated UV radiation (SSUV). We report that concentrations of Pycnogenol of 0.05-0.2% applied to the irradiated dorsal skin immediately after exposure resulted in dose-dependent reduction of the inflammatory sunburn reaction, measured as its edema component. When mice received three consecutive daily exposures of minimally edematous SSUV, their ability to raise a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reaction was suppressed by 54%. Pycnogenol lotions applied postirradiation reduced this immunosuppression to 22% (0.05% Pycnogenol) and 13% (0.1% Pycnogenol). Furthermore, when CHS was suppressed by 71% with exogenous treatment with cis-urocanic acid, the putative epidermal mediator of photoimmunosuppression, 0.2% Pycnogenol lotion reduced the immunosuppression to 18%. Chronic exposure to SSUV on 5 days/week for 10 weeks induced skin tumors from 11 weeks in both control mice and in mice receiving daily applications of 0.05% Pycnogenol, but tumor appearance was significantly delayed until 20 weeks in mice receiving 0.2% Pycnogenol. Furthermore, whereas 100% of control mice had at least one tumor by 30 weeks, and mice treated with 0.05% Pycnogenol by 33 weeks, the maximum tumor prevalence in mice treated with 0.2% Pycnogenol was significantly reduced to 85%, with some mice remaining tumor free. Average tumor multiplicity was also significantly reduced by 0.2% Pycnogenol, from 5.2 in control mice to 3.5 at 35 weeks. Thus, topical Pycnogenol offered significant and dose-dependent protection from SSUV-induced acute inflammation, immunosuppression and carcinogenesis, when applied to the skin after daily

  19. Radiation carcinogenesis and acute radiation mortality in the rat as produced by 2.2 GeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shellabarger, C. J.; Straub, R. F.; Jesseph, J. E.; Montour, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Biological studies, proton carcinogenesis, the interaction of protons and gamma-rays on carcinogenesis, proton-induced acute mortality, and chemical protection against proton-induced acute mortality were studied in the rat and these proton-produced responses were compared to similar responses produced by gamma-rays or X-rays. Litter-mate mice were assigned to each experimental and control group so that approximately equal numbers of litter mates were placed in each group. Animals to be studied for mammary neoplasia were handled for 365 days post-exposure when all animals alive were killed. All animals were examined frequently for mammary tumors and as these were found, they were removed, sectioned and given a pathologic classification.

  20. Validation of comprehensive space radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.L.; Simonsen, L.C.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1998-12-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation.

  1. An ultraviolet-radiation-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis in the red hair/fair skin background.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Devarati; Luo, Xi; Morgan, Ann; Wang, Jin; Hoang, Mai P; Lo, Jennifer; Guerrero, Candace R; Lennerz, Jochen K; Mihm, Martin C; Wargo, Jennifer A; Robinson, Kathleen C; Devi, Suprabha P; Vanover, Jillian C; D'Orazio, John A; McMahon, Martin; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Haigis, Kevin M; Haber, Daniel A; Wang, Yinsheng; Fisher, David E

    2012-11-15

    People with pale skin, red hair, freckles and an inability to tan--the 'red hair/fair skin' phenotype--are at highest risk of developing melanoma, compared to all other pigmentation types. Genetically, this phenotype is frequently the product of inactivating polymorphisms in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R encodes a cyclic AMP-stimulating G-protein-coupled receptor that controls pigment production. Minimal receptor activity, as in red hair/fair skin polymorphisms, produces the red/yellow pheomelanin pigment, whereas increasing MC1R activity stimulates the production of black/brown eumelanin. Pheomelanin has weak shielding capacity against ultraviolet radiation relative to eumelanin, and has been shown to amplify ultraviolet-A-induced reactive oxygen species. Several observations, however, complicate the assumption that melanoma risk is completely ultraviolet-radiation-dependent. For example, unlike non-melanoma skin cancers, melanoma is not restricted to sun-exposed skin and ultraviolet radiation signature mutations are infrequently oncogenic drivers. Although linkage of melanoma risk to ultraviolet radiation exposure is beyond doubt, ultraviolet-radiation-independent events are likely to have a significant role. Here we introduce a conditional, melanocyte-targeted allele of the most common melanoma oncoprotein, BRAF(V600E), into mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the Mc1r gene (these mice have a phenotype analogous to red hair/fair skin humans). We observed a high incidence of invasive melanomas without providing additional gene aberrations or ultraviolet radiation exposure. To investigate the mechanism of ultraviolet-radiation-independent carcinogenesis, we introduced an albino allele, which ablates all pigment production on the Mc1r(e/e) background. Selective absence of pheomelanin synthesis was protective against melanoma development. In addition, normal Mc1r(e/e) mouse skin was found to have significantly greater oxidative DNA and lipid

  2. Test of the linear-NO threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis for inhaled radon decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1995-02-01

    Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations-rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers-are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found. 46 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. A Rat Model to Study the Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Radiation-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Akimoto, Kenta; Furukawa, Yuki; Fukushi, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the relationship between radiation-induced breast cancer and obesity is needed for appropriate risk management and to prevent the development of a secondary cancer in patients who have been treated with radiation. Our goal was to develop an animal model to study the relationship by combining two existing Sprague-Dawley rat models of radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Female rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks and categorized as obesity prone or obesity resistant based on their body weight at 7 weeks of age, at which time the rats were irradiated with 4 Gy. Control rats were fed a standard diet and irradiated at the same time and in the same manner. All rats were maintained on their initial diets and assessed for palpable mammary cancers once a week for the next 30 weeks. The obesity-prone rats were heavier than those in the other groups. The obesity-prone rats were also younger than the other animals at the first detection of mammary carcinomas and their carcinoma weights were greater. A tendency toward higher insulin and leptin blood levels were observed in the obesity-prone rats compared to the other two groups. Blood angiotensin II levels were elevated in the obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Genes related to translation and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the carcinomas of obesity-prone rats. Expression profiles from human breast cancers were used to validate this animal model. As angiotensin is potentially an important factor in obesity-related morbidities and breast cancer, a second set of rats was fed in a similar manner, irradiated and then treated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, losartan and candesartan. Neither blocker altered mammary carcinogenesis; analyses of losartan-treated animals indicated that expression of renin in the renal cortex and of Agtr1a (angiotensin II receptor, type 1) in cancer tissue was significantly upregulated, suggesting the presence of

  4. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Marianne S.; Arthurs, Benjamin J.; Estes, Brian J.; Morgan, William F.

    2006-03-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizingradiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  5. Epigenetic Alterations in Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis: Interaction of Bioactive Dietary Components on Epigenetic Targets†

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Sun, Qian; Vaid, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    The importance of epigenetic alterations in the development of various diseases including the cancers has been realized. As epigenetic changes are reversible heritable changes, these can be utilized as an effective strategy for the prevention of cancers. DNA methylation is the most characterized epigenetic mechanism that can be inherited without changing the DNA sequence. Although limited, but available data suggest that silencing of tumor suppressor genes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation-exposed epidermis leads to photocarcinogenesis and is associated with a network of epigenetic modifications including alterations in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases and histone acetylations. Various bioactive dietary components have been shown to protect skin from UV radiation-induced skin tumors in animal models. The role of bioactive dietary components, such as, (−)-epicatechins from green tea and proanthocyanidins from grape seeds, has been assessed in chemoprevention of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis and underlying epigenetic mechanism in vitro and in vivo animal models. These bioactive components have the ability to block UV-induced DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications in the skin required for the silencing of tumor suppressor genes (e.g., Cip1/p21, p16INK4a). These information are of importance for understanding the role of epigenetic modulation in UV-induced skin tumor and the chemopreventive mechanism of bioactive dietary components. PMID:22017262

  6. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  7. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  8. Carcinogenesis induced by UVA (365-nm) radiation: the dose-time dependence of tumor formation in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    de Laat, A; van der Leun, J C; de Gruijl, F R

    1997-05-01

    Although ultraviolet B (UVB wavelengths 280-315 nm) dominates the carcinogenic effect of sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA 315-400 nm) is estimated to contribute 10-20% to the carcinogenic dose; a substantial background that is not affected by a depletion of the ozone layer. Furthermore, certain high-power modern tanning lamps emit mainly long wave UVA (UVA1; 340-400 nm). For a proper risk estimate of UVA exposure its carcinogenicity relative to that of UVB exposure needs to be determined more accurately. To this end we determined the dose-time relationship for skin tumor induction in hairless mice that were irradiated daily with custom-made Philips 365-nm sources. Irradiation of the group exposed to the highest of the four daily doses (430, 240, 140 and 75 kJ/m2) had to be discontinued because severe scratching set in after 3 months (no tumors). In the lower dose-groups the prevalence curves for skin carcinomas (percentage of tumor-bearing mice versus logarithm of time) ran virtually parallel, and were similar to those found with daily UVB exposure. However, the relationship between the daily dose (D) and the median tumor induction time (t50) appeared to differ: with UVB we found that t50 D(r) = constant, with r = 0.6, whereas with UVA1 we found r approximately 0.4. This would imply that 365-nm carcinogenesis shows less of a dose-dependency than UVB carcinogenesis, and that 365-nm radiation becomes more carcinogenic, relative to UVB, as the daily doses are lowered. This relative shift at low doses complicates extrapolation of UVB to UVA risks in humans. Based on the t50 from the lowest dose-group we found that the carcinogenicity at 365 nm (per J/m2) is 0.9 x 10(-4) times that at 293 nm, the wavelength of maximum carcinogenicity in hairless mice. This result for 365-nm carcinogenicity falls well within the margins of error of the wavelength dependency that was estimated earlier from experiments with broadband UV sources.

  9. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sishc, Brock J; Nelson, Christopher B; McKenna, Miles J; Battaglia, Christine L R; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L; Bailey, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  10. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sishc, Brock J.; Nelson, Christopher B.; McKenna, Miles J.; Battaglia, Christine L. R.; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  11. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  12. Interactions between 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and repeated low-level X radiation in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis: dependence on the relative timing of DMBA and radiation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.

    1982-04-01

    Low-level X radiation was shown to enhance Syrian hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) when radiation was administered concurrently with and following DMBA applications. We studied the effects of altering the timing of radiation and DMBA applications on this enhancement. DMBA in mineral oil was applied twice weekly for 10 weeks and 20 R head and neck X radiation once weekly for 17 weeks. In duplicate studies, animals received radiation, DMBA, or DMBA plus X radiation. In the DMBA plus X-ray group, there were 9 weeks of preirradiation and 7 weeks of concurrent treatments. Radiation alone did not result in any histologically detectable changes. In one study, preirradiation may have reduced the carcinogenic activity of DMBA, while in the second study there were no significant differences in tumor incidences between X radiation plus DMBA and DMBA only groups. Thus, while repeated 20-R-X-ray exposures during the following DMBA applications enhance DMBA carcinogenesis, identical X-ray exposures prior to and during DMBA applications appear either to slightly inhibit or to have no appreciable effect on DMBA carcinogenesis.

  13. Tumor suppression function of the Big-h3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we show here that expression of Big-h3 gene, a secreted adhesion molecule induced by transforming growth factor- beta (TGF-beta ), is markedly decreased in independently generated, high LET radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Expression of this gene was restored to control level in fusion cell lines between the tumorigenic and parental BEP2D cells that were no longer tumorigenic in nude mice. Transfection of Big-h3 gene into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth. While integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level of control BEP2D cells after Big-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Big-h3 is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1. . WWee We further show that down regulation of Big-h3 results from loss of expression of TGFbeta1 in tumor cells. The findings provide strong evidence that the Big-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  14. Comprehensive Craniospinal Radiation for Controlling Central Nervous System Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Shihadeh, Ferial; Kantarjian, Hagop; Allen, Pamela; Rondon, Gabriela; Kebriaei, Partow; O'Brien, Susan; Kedir, Aziza; Said, Mustefa; Grant, Jonathan D.; Thomas, Deborah A.; Gidley, Paul W.; Arzu, Isidora; Pinnix, Chelsea; Reed, Valerie; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the benefit of radiation therapy (RT) in resolution of neurologic symptoms and deficits and whether the type of RT fields influences central nervous system (CNS) control in adults with CNS leukemia. Methods and Materials: A total of 163 adults from 1996 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Potential associations between use of radiation and outcome were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The median survival time was 3.8 months after RT. Common presenting symptoms were headache in 79 patients (49%), cranial nerve VII deficit in 46 (28%), and cranial nerve II deficit in 44 (27%). RT was delivered to the base of skull in 48 patients (29%), to the whole brain (WB) in 67 (41%), and to the craniospinal axis (CS) in 48 (29%). Among 149 patients with a total of 233 deficits, resolution was observed in 34 deficits (15%), improvement in 126 deficits (54%), stability in 34 deficits (15%), and progression in 39 deficits (17%). The 12-month CNS progression-free survival was 77% among those receiving CS/WB and 51% among those receiving base of skull RT (P=.02). On multivariate analysis, patients who did not undergo stem cell transplantation after RT and base of skull RT were associated with worse CNS progression-free survival. Conclusions: Improvement or resolution of symptoms occurred in two thirds of deficits after RT. Comprehensive radiation to the WB or CS seems to offer a better outcome, especially in isolated CNS involvement.

  15. Nickel carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S; Sunderman, F William; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2003-12-10

    Human exposure to highly nickel-polluted environments, such as those associated with nickel refining, electroplating, and welding, has the potential to produce a variety of pathologic effects. Among them are skin allergies, lung fibrosis, and cancer of the respiratory tract. The exact mechanisms of nickel-induced carcinogenesis are not known and have been the subject of numerous epidemiologic and experimental investigations. These mechanisms are likely to involve genetic and epigenetic routes. The present review provides evidence for the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of Ni(II) particularly at high doses. Such doses are best delivered into the cells by phagocytosis of sparingly soluble nickel-containing dust particles. Ni(II) genotoxicity may be aggravated through the generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the inhibition of DNA repair by this metal. Broad spectrum of epigenetic effects of nickel includes alteration in gene expression resulting from DNA hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation, as well as activation or silencing of certain genes and transcription factors, especially those involved in cellular response to hypoxia. The investigations of the pathogenic effects of nickel greatly benefit from the understanding of the chemical basis of Ni(II) interactions with intracellular targets/ligands and oxidants. Many pathogenic effects of nickel are due to the interference with the metabolism of essential metals such as Fe(II), Mn(II), Ca(II), Zn(II), or Mg(II). Research in this field allows for identification of putative Ni(II) targets relevant to carcinogenesis and prediction of pathogenic effects caused by exposure to nickel. Ultimately, the investigations of nickel carcinogenesis should be aimed at the development of treatments that would inhibit or prevent Ni(II) interactions with critical target molecules and ions, Fe(II) in particular, and thus avert the respiratory tract cancer and other adverse health effects in nickel workers

  16. Combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arivalagan, Sivaranjani; Thomas, Nisha Susan; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Mani, Vijay; Siddique, Aktarul Islam; Kuppsamy, Thayalan; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-12-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol (CVC) and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control; group 2 received 40 mg/kg b.wt of CVC orally everyday throughout the experimental period (32 weeks); groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.wt), once a week for the first 15 weeks; group 4 received a single dose of X-radiation at the 31st week; group 5 received CVC (40 mg/kg b.wt) two days after the last injection of DMH and continued everyday till the end of the experimental period; group 6 received CVC as in group 5 and radiation as in group 4. DMH-treated rats showed increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (DACF), mast cell number, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions; elevated activities of phase I enzymes, decreased activities of phase II enzymes, decreased mucin content and altered colonic and liver histology as compared to control rats. Though the individual treatments with CVC and X-radiation to DMH-treated rats reversed the above changes, the combined treatment with both CVC and X-radiation showed a marked effect. Our findings emphasize the potential role of combined therapeutic effect of CVC and X-radiation against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26264073

  17. Modeling intercellular interactions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Chan, Michael; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2005-09-01

    By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or premalignant cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells can play a key role in carcinogenesis. However, current commonly used quantitative models for induction of cancers by ionizing radiation focus on single cells and their progeny. Intercellular interactions are neglected or assumed to be confined to unidirectional radiation bystander effect signals from cells of the same tissue type. We here formulate a parsimoniously parameterized two-stage logistic (TSL) carcinogenesis model that incorporates some effects of intercellular interactions during the growth of premalignant cells. We show that for baseline tumor rates, involving no radiation apart from background radiation, this TSL model gives acceptable fits to a number of data sets. Specifically, it gives the same baseline hazard function, using the same number of adjustable parameters, as does the commonly used two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model, so it is automatically applicable to the many data sets on baseline cancer that have been analyzed using the TSCE model. For perturbations of baseline rates due to radiation, the models differ. We argue from epidemiological and laboratory evidence, especially results for the atomic bomb survivors, that for radiation carcinogenesis the TSL model gives results at least as realistic as the TSCE or similar models, despite involving fewer adjustable parameters in many cases. PMID:16137206

  18. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure.

  19. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  20. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Georgy, K A; Mei, M; Durante, M; Craise, L M

    1995-10-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  1. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  2. Use of a State-Vector Model of Radiation Carcinogenesis to Integrate Information from in vitro, in vivo, Epidemiological and Physiological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Crawford-Brown; Marc Serre

    2006-06-01

    This project focused on extension of a generalized state-vector model developed by Crawford-Brown and Hofmann (1-4). The model incorporates phenomena such as DNA damage and repair, intercellular communication mechanisms, both spontaneous and radiation-induced cell death and cell division, to predict cellular transformation following exposure to ionizing radiation. Additionally, this model may be simulated over time periods that correspond to the temporal scale of biological mechanisms. The state-vector model has been shown to generally reproduce transformation frequency patterns for in vitro studies (2), but still significantly underpredicted in vivo cancer incidence data at the higher doses for high-LET radiations when biologically realistic rate constants for cell killing are included (1). Mebust et al. (1) claimed that one reason for this underprediction might be that the model's ability to fit the in vitro data is due in part to compensating errors that only reveal themselves when the more complex in vivo and epidemiological data are considered. This implies that the original in vitro model may be based on incomplete assumptions regarding the underlying biological mechanisms. The present research considered this explanation for the case of low LET radiation. An extension of the in vitro state-vector model was tested that includes additional biological mechanisms in order to improve model predictions with respect to dose-response data on in vitro oncogenic transformation of C3H10T1/2 mouse fibroblast cells exposed to acute doses of X-radiation (5). These data display a plateau of transformation frequency per surviving cell in the X-ray dose range of 0.1 to 1 Gy, with an increase in transformation frequency at higher acute doses. To reproduce these trends in the data, additional biological processes were formulated mathematically and incorporated into the existing model as parameters whose values could be adjusted and tested by an optimization method (genetic

  3. Somatic cell mutations at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes of atomic bomb survivors: Implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Tanabe, Kazumi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Umeki, Shigeko

    1996-07-01

    To clarify the relationship between somatic cell mutations and radiation exposure, the frequency of hemizygous mutant erythrocytes at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus was measured by flow cytometry for 1,226 heterozygous atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in HIroshima and Nagasaki. For statistical analysis, both GPA mutant frequency and radiation dose were log-transformed to normalize skewed distributions of these variables. The GPA mutant frequency increased slightly but significantly with age at testing and with the number of cigarettes smoked. Also, mutant frequency was significantly higher in males than in females even with adjustment for smoking and was higher to Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. These characteristics of background GPA mutant frequency are qualitatively similar to those of background solid cancer incidence or mortality obtained from previous epidemiological studies of survivors. An analysis of the mutant frequency dose response using a descriptive model showed that the doubling dose is about 1.20 Sv [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-1.56], whereas the minimum dose for detecting a significant increase in mutant frequency is about 0.24 Sv (95% CI: 0.041-0.51). No significant effects of sex, city or age at the time of exposure on the dose response were detected. Interestingly, the doubling dose of the GPA mutant frequency was similar to that of solid cancer incidence in A-bomb survivors. This observation is in line with the hypothesis that radiation-induced somatic cell mutations are the major cause of excess cancer risk after radiation. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Probability of Causation for Space Radiation Carcinogenesis Following International Space Station, Near Earth Asteroid, and Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Chappell, Lori J.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer risk is an important concern for International Space Station (ISS) missions and future exploration missions. An important question concerns the likelihood of a causal association between a crew members radiation exposure and the occurrence of cancer. The probability of causation (PC), also denoted as attributable risk, is used to make such an estimate. This report summarizes the NASA model of space radiation cancer risks and uncertainties, including improvements to represent uncertainties in tissue-specific cancer incidence models for never-smokers and the U.S. average population. We report on tissue-specific cancer incidence estimates and PC for different post-mission times for ISS and exploration missions. An important conclusion from our analysis is that the NASA policy to limit the risk of exposure-induced death to 3% at the 95% confidence level largely ensures that estimates of the PC for most cancer types would not reach a level of significance. Reducing uncertainties through radiobiological research remains the most efficient method to extend mission length and establish effective mitigators for cancer risks. Efforts to establish biomarkers of space radiation-induced tumors and to estimate PC for rarer tumor types are briefly discussed.

  5. 2013 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel Status Review for: The Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure, The Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs), The Risk Of Degenerative Tissue Or Other Health Effects From Radiation Exposure, and The Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed with the strong research program presented by the scientists and staff associated with NASA's Space Radiation Program Element and National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The presentations given on-site and the reports of ongoing research that were provided in advance indicated the potential Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS) and were extensively discussed by the SRP. This new data leads the SRP to recommend that a higher priority should be placed on research designed to identify and understand these risks at the mechanistic level. To support this effort the SRP feels that a shift of emphasis from Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) and carcinogenesis to CNS-related endpoints is justified at this point. However, these research efforts need to focus on mechanisms, should follow pace with advances in the field of CNS in general and should consider the specific comments and suggestions made by the SRP as outlined below. The SRP further recommends that the Space Radiation Program Element continue with its efforts to fill the vacant positions (Element Scientist, CNS Risk Discipline Lead) as soon as possible. The SRP also strongly recommends that NASA should continue the NASA Space Radiation Summer School. In addition to these broad recommendations, there are specific comments/recommendations noted for each risk, described in detail below.

  6. Carcinogenesis From Inhaled (PuO2)-Pu-239 in Beagles: Evidence for Radiation Homeostasis at Low Doses?

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Weller, Richard E.

    2010-09-01

    From the early 1970s to the late 1980s, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted life-span studies in beagle dogs on the biological effects of inhaled plutonium (239PuO2, 238PuO2, and 239Pu[NO3]4) to help predict risks associated with accidental intakes in workers. Years later, the purpose of the present follow-up study is to reassess the dose-response relationship for lung cancer induction in the 239PuO2 dogs compared to controls, with particular focus on the dose-response at low lung doses. A 239PuO2 aerosol (2.3 μm AMAD, 1.9 μm GSD) was administered to six groups of 20 young (18-month old) beagle dogs (10 males and 10 females) by inhalation at six different activity levels, as previously described in Laboratory reports. Control dogs were sham-exposed. In dose level 1, initial pulmonary lung depositions were 130 ± 48 Bq (3.5 ± 1.3 nCi), corresponding to 1 Bq g-1 lung tissue (0.029 ± 0.001 nCi g-1. Groups 2 through 6 received initial lung depositions (mean values) of 760, 2724, 10345, 37900, and 200000 Bq (22, 79, 300, 1100, and 5800 nCi) 239PuO2, respectively. For each dog, the absorbed dose to lungs was calculated from the initial lung burden and the final lung burden at time of death and lung mass, assuming a single, long-term retention function. Insoluble plutonium oxide exhibited long retention times in the lungs. Increased dose-dependent mortality due to lung cancer (bronchiolar-alveolar carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma) and radiation pneumonitis (highest exposures group) was observed in dogs exposed to 239PuO2. Calculated lung doses ranged from a few cGy in early-sacrificed dogs to 7764 cGy in dogs that experienced early deaths from radiation pneumonitis. Data were regrouped by lifetime lung dose and plotted as a function of lung tumor incidence. Lung tumor incidence in controls and zero-dose exposed dogs was 18% (5/28). However, no lung tumors were observed in 16 dogs with the lowest lung doses (8 to 22 cGy, mean 14.4 ± 7.6 c

  7. Dietary feeding of silibinin prevents early biomarkers of UVB radiation-induced carcinogenesis in SKH-1 hairless mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mallikarjuna; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2005-05-01

    Solar radiation is the causal etiologic factor in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer leads to an increase in ambient UV radiation loads, which are expected to further raise skin cancer incidence in many temperate parts of the world, including the United States, suggesting that skin cancer chemopreventive approaches via biomarker efficacy studies or vice versa are highly warranted. Based on our recent study reporting strong efficacy of silibinin against photocarcinogenesis, we assessed here the protective effects of its dietary feeding on UVB-induced biomarkers involved in NMSC providing a mechanistic rationale for an early-on silibinin efficacy in skin cancer prevention. Dietary feeding of silibinin at 1% dose (w/w) to SKH-1 hairless mice for 2 weeks before a single UVB irradiation at 180 mJ/cm(2) dose resulted in a strong and significant (P < 0.001) decrease in UVB-induced thymine dimer-positive cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, and apoptotic sunburn cells together with an increase (P < 0.001) in p53 and p21/cip1-positive cell population in epidermis. These findings suggest that dietary feeding of silibinin affords strong protection against UVB-induced damages in skin epidermis by (a) either preventing DNA damage or enhancing repair, (b) reducing UVB-induced hyperproliferative response, and (c) inhibiting UVB-caused apoptosis and sunburn cell formation, possibly via silibinin-caused up-regulation of p53 and p21/cip1 as major UVB-damage control sensors.

  8. Validation of a comprehensive space radiation transport code.

    PubMed

    Shinn, J L; Cucinotta, F A; Simonsen, L C; Wilson, J W; Badavi, F F; Badhwar, G D; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L; Tripathi, R K; Clowdsley, M S; Heinbockel, J H; Xapsos, M A

    1998-12-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation.

  9. RAPID BODY WEIGHT GAIN INCREASES THE RISK OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION-INDUCED SKIN CARCINOGENESIS IN SKH-1 HAIRLESS MICE

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fahey, Jed W.; Jenkins, Stephanie N.; Wehage, Scott L.; Talalay, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Although it is well known that caloric restriction reduces the risk of chronic diseases including cancer, the role of weight gain in the development of ultraviolet light-induced tumors has not, to our knowledge, been investigated. In view of the increase in obesity worldwide, we asked the question whether there is any relationship between body weight gain and skin tumor development. We subjected three groups, each comprising 30 SKH-1 hairless female mice, to UV radiation (30 mJ/cm2 twice weekly for 17 weeks) and observed tumor formation over the ensuing 8–13 weeks: Group 1 received pelleted diet; Group 2 received pellets during the irradiation period and was then switched to powder; and, Group 3 received powder exclusively. At the end of the experiment, the mean body weight of Group 1 was 32.1 ± 0.5 g, whereas that of Groups 2 and 3 was 39.0 ± 1.5 g and 39.5 ± 1.4 g, respectively. Tumor incidence reached 90% at 8 weeks after completion of irradiation for the animals in Group 3 and at 13 weeks for the animals in Group 2. Similarly, at 8 weeks after irradiation when all animals of Group 3 were euthanized, tumor multiplicity was 0.8, 1.2, and 3.2 for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Thus, in comparison with the mice consuming pellets, the powder-fed mice gained weight more rapidly, and developed tumors much faster. Considering the escalating numbers of individuals worldwide who are overweight or obese, our findings provide further impetus for advocating healthier diets and maintenance of constant body weight in adults. PMID:19083457

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis in man: influence of dose-response models and risk projection models in the estimation of risk coefficients following exposure to low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-02-01

    The somatic effects of concern in human populations exposed to low doses and low dose rates of ionizing radiations are those that may be induced by mutation in individual cells, singly or in small numbers. The most important of these is considered to be cancer induction. Current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man has been reviewed in two recent reports: the 1977 UNSCEAR Report; and the 1980 BEIR-III Report. Both reports emphasize that cancers of the breast, thyroid, hematopoietic tissues, lung, and bone can be induced by radiation. Other cancers, including the stomach, pancreas, pharynx, lymphatic, and perhaps all tissues of the body, may also be induced by radiation. Both reports calculate risk estimates in absolute and relative terms for low-dose, low-LET whole-body exposure, and for leukemia, breast cancer, thyroid cancer, lung cancer, and other cancers. These estimates derive from exposure and cancer incidence data at high doses and at high dose rates. There are no compelling scientific reasons to apply these values of risk to the very low doses and low dose rates of concern in human radiation protection. In the absence of reliable human data for calculating risk estimates, dose-response models have been constructed from extrapolations of animal data and high-dose-rate human data for projection of estimated risks at low doses and low dose rates. (ERB)

  11. Radiation levels in cyclotron-radiochemistry facility measured by a novel comprehensive computerized monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishani, E.; Lifshits, N.; Osavistky, A.; Kaufman, J.; Ankry, N.; Tal, N.; Chisin, R.

    1999-04-01

    Radiation levels in a cyclotron-radiochemistry facility were measured during the production of commonly used PET radiopharmaceuticals by a comprehensive computerized monitoring system. The system consists of three major components: on-line radiation monitoring channels, an area control unit, and a gas waste management unit. During production the radiation levels were measured in the cyclotron vault, inside automatic chemistry production and research shielded cells, in the radiochemistry room, in the gas waste decay tank, in the chimney filters, and at the top of the cells chimney. Each detector was calibrated in a known radiation field, and a special detector dead time correction was performed in order to achieve detected signal-to-radiation linearity for the Geiger tubes located in the radiochemistry production and research cells. During production of C-11 and O-15 PET radiopharmaceuticals, high radiation levels were measured in the gas waste decay tank (240 and 80 mR/h, respectively). In contrast, the radiation levels at the chimney filters and at the top of the cells chimney did not exceed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Drive Air Concentration (DAC) recommended for C-11 or O-15. During production of FDG, high radiation levels were measured at the chimney filters, however the radiation level at the top of the chimney (3.7 μCi/m 3) did not exceed the F-18 DAC recommendation (27 μCi/m 3). Low radiation levels of approximately 0.5-1 mR/h were measured in the radiochemistry room during production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In the cyclotron vault, 2 min after bombardment the radiation levels at 2 m from the cyclotron decreased to 1-2 mR/h. The addition of a gas waste decay system to computerized monitoring channels located near each strategic point of the site allows for a comprehensive survey of the radiochemical processes.

  12. Comprehensibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    This paper addresses the difficulty involved in creating easily understood information. The act of communicating is not complete until the message has been both received and understood by the audience. Messages must always be comprehensible, otherwise they will have no effect. The readability, legibility, and reading value of a graphic message is…

  13. Secondary carcinogenesis in patients treated with radiation: a review of data on radiation-induced cancers in human, non-human primate, canine and rodent subjects.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Hall, Eric; Goitein, Michael; Wong, Winifred; Paganetti, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Concern for risk of radiation-induced cancer is growing with the increasing number of cancer patients surviving long term. This study examined data on radiation transformation of mammalian cells in vitro and on the risk of an increased cancer incidence after irradiation of mice, dogs, monkeys, atomic bomb survivors, occupationally exposed persons, and patients treated with radiation. Transformation of cells lines in vitro increased linearly with dose from approximately 1 to approximately 4-5 Gy. At <0.1 Gy, transformation was not increased in all studies. Dose-response relationships for cancer incidence varied with mouse strain, gender and tissue/organ. Risk of cancer in Macaca mulatta was not raised at 0.25-2.8 Gy. From the atomic bomb survivor study, risk is accepted as increasing linearly to 2 Sv for establishing exposure standards. In irradiated patients, risk of cancer increased significantly from 1 to 45 Gy (a low to a high dose level) for stomach and pancreas, but not for bladder and rectum (1-60 Gy) or kidney (1-15 Gy). Risk for several organs/tissues increased substantially at doses far above 2 Gy. There is great heterogeneity in risk of radiation-associated cancer between species, strains of a species, and organs within a species. At present, the heterogeneity between and within patient populations of virtually every parameter considered in risk estimation results in substantial uncertainty in quantification of a general risk factor. An implication of this review is that reduced risks of secondary cancer should be achieved by any technique that achieved a dose reduction down to approximately [corrected] 0.1 Gy, i.e. dose to tissues distant from the target. The proportionate gain should be greatest for dose decrement to less than 2 Gy. PMID:17214511

  14. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  15. Wound-healing error model for radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei

    1995-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of lung cancer in uranium miners exposed to radon suggest that radon is a tumor promoter. I will refine this notion by applying the wound-healing error model proposed for radiation carcinogenesis in general.

  16. Results of a comprehensive program for analysis of thermal radiative properties.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.; Gates, D. W.; Carroll, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    An extensive program has been developed to identify, collect, extract, analyze, and disseminate thermal radiative property data on materials of use to the aerospace endeavors under conditions likely to exist in their application. The properties examined include thermal emittance, reflectance, absorptance, and transmittance. Reference is made to the coverage of the results which is organized in three major volumes, representing the most comprehensive treatment on this subject matter.

  17. Carcinogenesis and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    A suggested mechanism of carcinogenesis is presented. This scheme takes into account the effect of carcinogens at different integration levels: subcellular, tissue, and organism. Any of these levels may be age dependent. Age-associated changes in the activity of enzymes responsible for activation and inactivation of carcinogens, and variations in concentrations of lipids and proteins contributing to the transport of carcinogenic agents into cells, may play an important role in the modifying effect of age on carcinogenesis. The effects of age-associated changes in DNA repair need clarification. However, they are thought to exert a permissive influence on the age-associated rise in tumor incidence. It seems that proliferative activity of target tissues is the important modifying factor of carcinogenesis. Age-related changes of regulation at tissue and organism levels are also powerful factors in carcinogenesis modification. Age-dependent changes in the neuroendocrine system provide conditions for metabolic immunodepression and promotion of carcinogenesis. On the other hand, carcinogens per se (especially chemical and radiological) may intensify aging processes in the organism. Normalization, by drugs, of age-associated shifts requiring synthetic and energetic changes of a transformed tumor cells, and of immunological shifts, may exert both antitumor and geroprotective effects.

  18. Global fine-mode aerosol radiative effect, as constrained by comprehensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul E.; Chu, Jung-Eun; Lee, Yunha; van Noije, Twan; Jeoung, Hwayoung; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Marks, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Aerosols directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. Although the contributions of absorption (heating) and scattering (cooling) of sunlight have proved difficult to quantify, the consensus is that anthropogenic aerosols cool the climate, partially offsetting the warming by rising greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent estimates of global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (i.e., global radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions) are -0.35 ± 0.5 W m-2, and these estimates depend heavily on aerosol simulation. Here, we integrate a comprehensive suite of satellite and ground-based observations to constrain total aerosol optical depth (AOD), its fine-mode fraction, the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and the collocation of clouds and overlying aerosols. We find that the direct fine-mode aerosol radiative effect is -0.46 W m-2 (-0.54 to -0.39 W m-2). Fine-mode aerosols include sea salt and dust aerosols, and we find that these natural aerosols result in a very large cooling (-0.44 to -0.26 W m-2) when constrained by observations. When the contribution of these natural aerosols is subtracted from the fine-mode radiative effect, the net becomes -0.11 (-0.28 to +0.05) W m-2. This net arises from total (natural + anthropogenic) carbonaceous, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, which suggests that global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is less negative than -0.35 W m-2.

  19. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion. PMID:25539270

  20. Effect of LET and microdistribution of radiation on the transformation in vitro and in vivo. Comprehensive progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.B.

    1983-09-01

    Work has involved the following three areas: (1) an investigation of the mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis by studying the events involved in the process of malignant transformation of mouse 10 T-1/2 cells; (2) an investigation of the effects of promoting agents on radiation-induced transformation in vitro; and (3) an investigation of the induction of transformation by internally emitting radionuclides incorporated into cellular DNA. The latter area has been extended to include studies of mutagenesis by these radionuclides in human lymphoblasts, and molecular measurements of DNA strand breaks. During the past year, research has focused on the first area, as well as on studies of the mutagenic effects of incorporated radionuclides.

  1. [The Main Target of Carcinogenesis Is Not DNA].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami

    2015-12-01

    The first target of radiation carcinogenesis is thought to be DNA. However, this has not been demonstrated for radiation carcinogenesis. We found that the frequency of aneuploid cells was closely related to that of radiation-induced cell transformation and natural cell transformation by high-density cultivation, but the frequency of gene mutations was not. Cells containing a functional p53 gene become tetraploid, but do not exhibit tumorigenicity. In contrast, cells without a functional p53 gene readily become triploid and acquire tumorigenicity. Both radiation exposure and high-density cultivation elevated the level of intracellular oxidative radicals. One of these radicals, such as long-lived radical, induced centrosome destabilization and produced cells carrying extra centrosomes, which together promote merotelic attachment of the chromosome by altering spindle geometry. Unresolved merotelic attachments can give rise to lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Aneuploidy was observed at high frequency in the early stages of cell transformation. These results strongly suggest that the main target in carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation is not DNA, but is rather the centrosomes, which are proteins involved in the chromosomal homeostasis maintenance mechanism. In addition, the route of radiation carcinogenesis may be the same as that of natural carcinogenesis. PMID:26809297

  2. Comprehensive quality assurance phantom for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP)

    PubMed Central

    Jermoumi, M.; Korideck, H.; Bhagwat, M.; Zygmanski, P.; Makrigiogos, G.M.; Berbeco, R.I.; Cormack, R.C.; Ngwa, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP). Methods and materials A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including: imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of 15 (60 × 60 × 5 mm3) kV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs. The phantom can incorporate optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD), Mosfet or film. One slab, with inserts and another slab with hole patterns are particularly designed for image QA. Results Output constancy measurement results showed daily variations within 3%. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, results showed that the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Annual QA results for the Percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, lateral beam profiles, beam flatness and beam profile symmetry were found consistent with results obtained at commissioning. PDD curves obtained using film and OSLDs showed good agreement. Image QA was performed monthly, with image-quality parameters assessed in terms of CBCT image geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, image spatial resolution, noise and image uniformity. Conclusions The results show that the developed QA phantom can be employed as a tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a useful reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP and other similar small animal irradiators, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests. PMID:25964129

  3. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  4. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  5. Cadmium carcinogenesis in review.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cadmium is an inorganic toxicant of great environmental and occupational concern which was classified as a human carcinogen in 1993. Occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer in humans. Cadmium exposure has also, on occasion, been linked to human prostate cancer. The epidemiological data linking cadmium and pulmonary cancer are much stronger than for prostatic cancer. Other target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in humans (liver, kidney, stomach) are considered equivocal. In rodents, cadmium causes tumors at several sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats results in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, supporting a role in human lung cancer. Prostate tumors and preneoplastic proliferative lesions can be induced in rats after cadmium ingestion or injection. Prostatic carcinogenesis in rats occurs only at cadmium doses below those that induce chronic degeneration and dysfunction of the testes, a well-known effect of cadmium, confirming the androgen dependency of prostate tumors. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the testes, adrenals, injection sites, and hematopoietic system. Various treatments can modify cadmium carcinogenesis including supplemental zinc, which prevents cadmium-induced injection site and testicular tumors while facilitating prostatic tumors. Cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect mechanisms, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown. PMID:10830873

  6. Cadmium carcinogenesis in review.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cadmium is an inorganic toxicant of great environmental and occupational concern which was classified as a human carcinogen in 1993. Occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer in humans. Cadmium exposure has also, on occasion, been linked to human prostate cancer. The epidemiological data linking cadmium and pulmonary cancer are much stronger than for prostatic cancer. Other target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in humans (liver, kidney, stomach) are considered equivocal. In rodents, cadmium causes tumors at several sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats results in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, supporting a role in human lung cancer. Prostate tumors and preneoplastic proliferative lesions can be induced in rats after cadmium ingestion or injection. Prostatic carcinogenesis in rats occurs only at cadmium doses below those that induce chronic degeneration and dysfunction of the testes, a well-known effect of cadmium, confirming the androgen dependency of prostate tumors. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the testes, adrenals, injection sites, and hematopoietic system. Various treatments can modify cadmium carcinogenesis including supplemental zinc, which prevents cadmium-induced injection site and testicular tumors while facilitating prostatic tumors. Cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect mechanisms, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown.

  7. Oxidants, antioxidants and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Gibanananda; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2002-11-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), such as superoxide anions (O2*-) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (*OH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) are directly or indirectly involved in multistage process of carcinogenesis. They are mainly involved in DNA damage leading sometimes to mutations in tumour suppressor genes. They also act as initiator and/or promotor in carcinogenesis. Some of them are mutagenic in mammalian systems. O2*-, H2O2 and *OH are reported to be involved in higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome breaks and gaps (CBGs). MDA, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), is said to be involved in DNA adduct formations, which are believed to be responsible for carcinogenesis. NO, on the other hand, plays a duel role in cancer. At high concentration it kills tumour cells, but at low concentration it promotes tumour growth and metastasis. It causes DNA single and double strand breaks. The metabolites of NO such as peroxynitrite (OONO-) is a potent mutagen that can induce transversion mutations. NO can stimulate O2*-/H2O2/*OH-induced LPO. These deleterious actions of oxidants can be countered by antioxidant defence system in humans. There are first line defense antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). SOD converts O2*- to H2O2, which is further converted to H2O with the help of GPx and CAT. SOD inhibits *OH production. SOD also act as antipoliferative agent, anticarcinogens, and inhibitor at initiation and promotion/transformation stage in carcinogenesis. GPx is another antioxidative enzyme which catalyses to convert H2O2, to H2O. The most potent enzyme is CAT. GPx and CAT are important in the inactivation of many environmental mutagens. CAT is also found to reduce the SCE levels and chromosomal aberrations. Antioxidative vitamins such as vitamin A, E, and C have a number of biological activities such as immune stimulation, inhibition of

  8. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Pius

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  9. Endothelins and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Olender, Jacek; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Endothelins are a family of four endogenous peptides (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, ET-4) secreted primarily in an inactive form by the endothelium. They are activated with the participation of converting enzyme. Numerous studies have described their pleiotropic biological activity. These peptides are involved, inter alia, in the regulation of processes such as cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Their important role in the regulation of blood pressure, tissue perfusion (especially in the central nervous system), and myocardial systolic function is also known. Moreover, changes in transcriptional activity of endothelin and its receptors may be involved, with the participation of a number of signaling pathways, in carcinogenesis, and the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (heart, kidney, lung and skin disorders, especially with the component of fibrosis). Their role has been documented in the development of breast, prostatic, colorectal, ovarian, lung, kidney, and endometrial cancer, and in melanoma. In this article we present a brief description of the endothelin group and the participation of them and their receptors in carcinogenesis. We also try to show their role as prognostic and predictive factors in human malignant tumors. The article also refers to clinical trials on the use of preparations of endothelin receptor antagonists in the design of molecular therapeutic strategies in human malignancies. PMID:27594562

  10. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  11. Sawmill chemicals and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    2001-01-01

    Workers in wood industries are exposed to variable medleys of chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Additional exposures include fungi, bacteria, bark and wood dusts, solvents, paints, and various other wood coatings. These individual and conglomerate exposures have been associated with diverse occupational illnesses and hazards, including cancers. In this commentary, I summarize both experimental and epidemiologic carcinogenesis results for several chemicals used in the wood industry, as well as for wood dust. Working in the wood industries entails excess risks of cancers, among other diseases and workplace injuries. A key to preventing occupationally and environmentally associated cancers, as in the wood industries, is avoiding exposures to chemicals and wood dusts and, in particular, chemicals known to cause cancer in animals or/and humans. PMID:11333179

  12. Carcinogenesis models: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1992-12-31

    Biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are not only an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment but also raise fundamental questions about the nature of the events leading to malignancy. In this paper two such models are reviewed. The first is the multistage model proposed by Armitage and Doll in the 1950s; most of the paper is devoted to a discussion of the two-mutation model proposed by the author and his colleagues. This model is a generalization of the idea of recessive oncogenesis proposed by Knudson and has been shown to be consistent with a large body of epidemiologic and experimental data. The usefulness of the model is illustrated by analyzing a large experimental data set in which rats exposed to radon developed malignant lung tumors.

  13. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  14. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. )

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  15. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  16. Nutritional factors in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, M L

    1993-09-01

    There have been varying estimates of the role of nutritional as opposed to other contributors to carcinogenesis. Several considerations probably account for the different estimates: (1) genetic overestimates because of foetal and early life rearing practices and the nutritional modulation of genetic expression (2) errors in food intake methodology (3) the limitations of nutrient carcinogenesis hypotheses, ie models which are too naive and do not allow for non-nutrients in food, food patterns and the overall package which is food culture (4) indirect pathways connecting nutrition and cancer such as that via immunosurveillance. Examples of cancers where rapid change in nutritional thinking is underway are breast, prostatic, colorectal and pancreatic. With breast cancer, weakly oestrogenic compounds from foods may be comparable to tamoxifen. Changing food culture away from that rich in phyto-oestrogens may increase the risk of prostatic cancer in men as well. Colorectal cancer incidence has continued at high rates in urbanized society despite an awareness of dietary contribution comparable to the knowledge of diet and coronary heart disease is the analysis sufficiently stratified for large bowel site or nutritionally sophisticated enough to allow for aggregate food pattern effects? Pancreatic cancer on the rise presents questions about unidentified changes continuing in the diets of industrialized societies, possibly from an early age, and even during infant feeding. Nutritional surveillance with mathematical modelling of food intake at a more sophisticated level will be required to understand present food-cancer relationships, and those which may emerge with newer food technologies, especially those related to designer foods.

  17. Nutritional factors in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, M L

    1993-09-01

    There have been varying estimates of the role of nutritional as opposed to other contributors to carcinogenesis. Several considerations probably account for the different estimates: (1) genetic overestimates because of foetal and early life rearing practices and the nutritional modulation of genetic expression (2) errors in food intake methodology (3) the limitations of nutrient carcinogenesis hypotheses, ie models which are too naive and do not allow for non-nutrients in food, food patterns and the overall package which is food culture (4) indirect pathways connecting nutrition and cancer such as that via immunosurveillance. Examples of cancers where rapid change in nutritional thinking is underway are breast, prostatic, colorectal and pancreatic. With breast cancer, weakly oestrogenic compounds from foods may be comparable to tamoxifen. Changing food culture away from that rich in phyto-oestrogens may increase the risk of prostatic cancer in men as well. Colorectal cancer incidence has continued at high rates in urbanized society despite an awareness of dietary contribution comparable to the knowledge of diet and coronary heart disease is the analysis sufficiently stratified for large bowel site or nutritionally sophisticated enough to allow for aggregate food pattern effects? Pancreatic cancer on the rise presents questions about unidentified changes continuing in the diets of industrialized societies, possibly from an early age, and even during infant feeding. Nutritional surveillance with mathematical modelling of food intake at a more sophisticated level will be required to understand present food-cancer relationships, and those which may emerge with newer food technologies, especially those related to designer foods. PMID:24352145

  18. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-01

    thermal, epithermal, evaporation and intra-nuclear cascade neutrons. This comprehensive spectrometry analysis can also help in understanding the tremendous literature data based rem-counters while also being of great value for general neutron shielding and radiation safety studies. PMID:27171358

  19. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    , epithermal, evaporation and intra-nuclear cascade neutrons. This comprehensive spectrometry analysis can also help in understanding the tremendous literature data based rem-counters while also being of great value for general neutron shielding and radiation safety studies.

  20. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    , epithermal, evaporation and intra-nuclear cascade neutrons. This comprehensive spectrometry analysis can also help in understanding the tremendous literature data based rem-counters while also being of great value for general neutron shielding and radiation safety studies.

  1. Facts and theories concerning the mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pitot, H C; Dragan, Y P

    1991-06-01

    Carcinogenesis can be induced experimentally by exposure to exogenous agents or it can occur spontaneously without intentional or active intervention. Carcinogenesis can be actively induced by chemicals, radiation, infectious biological agents, transgenesis, or selective breeding. In the human and occasionally when testing potential carcinogens in animals, cancer may result from passive exposure to carcinogens encountered in the ambient environment or from changes in the internal milieu of the animal. Many carcinogens alter the structure of DNA resulting in carcinogenesis, but a significant number of carcinogens do not appear to act through this mechanism. When the action of specific carcinogenic agents is considered in relation to the stages of cancer development, initiation, promotion, and progression, the mechanism of the induction of carcinogenesis by DNA-reactive agents that alter genomic structure can be reconciled with those agents that do not act in this manner. As some cells are fortuitously initiated by uncontrolled variables such as irradiation and through changes in normal processes, the stimulation of growth and altered genetic expression by nongenotoxic agents may result indirectly in cancer development. The final stage of carcinogenesis, progression, can occur spontaneously, enhanced by formation and propagation of genetic errors due to increased cellular proliferation associated with the promotion stage. In addition, chemical and viral agents that lack the capacity for initiation and promotion may actively convert cells in the stage of promotion to the stage of progression. Therefore, the diverse mechanisms of action of carcinogenic agents in relation to their effects on specific stages in the natural history of cancer development allow for greater congruence of many of the theories of carcinogenesis. The influence of the roles of nongenotoxic carcinogenic agents and the potential role of progressor agents on the carcinogenesis process allow a more

  2. DNA methylation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, A V; Kisseljova, N P

    2001-03-01

    In the world of easy things truth is opposed to lie; in the world of complicated things one profound truth is opposed to another not less profound than the first. Neils Bohr The hypothesis of the exclusively genetic origin of cancer ("cancer is a disease of genes, a tumor without any damage to the genome does not exist") dominated in the oncology until recently. A considerable amount of data confirming this hypothesis was accumulated during the last quarter of the last century. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of damage of specific genes lies at the origin of a tumor and its following progression. The damage gives rise to structural changes in the respective proteins and, consequently, to inappropriate mitogenic stimulation of cells (activation of oncogenes) or to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes that inhibit cell division, or to the combination of both (in most cases). According to an alternative (epigenetic) hypothesis that was extremely unpopular until recently, a tumor is caused not by a gene damage, but by an inappropriate function of genes ("cancer is a disease of gene regulation and differentiation"). However, recent studies led to the convergence of these hypotheses that initially seemed to be contradictory. It was established that both factors--genetic and epigenetic--lie at the origin of carcinogenesis. The relative contribution of each varies significantly in different human tumors. Suppressor genes and genes of repair are inactivated in tumors due to their damage or methylation of their promoters (in the latter case an "epimutation", an epigenetic equivalent of a mutation, occurs, producing the same functional consequences). It is becoming evident that not only the mutagens, but various factors influencing cell metabolism, notably methylation, should be considered as carcinogens.

  3. Oral Feeding of Pomegranate Fruit Extract Inhibits Early Biomarkers of UVB Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis in SKH-1 Hairless Mouse Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Syed, Deeba N.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Pomegranate from the plant Punica granatum possesses strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, we have demonstrated that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes with pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. Here, we evaluated the effect of PFE on early biomarkers of photocarcinogenesis employing SKH-1 hairless mice. PFE was provided in drinking water (0.2%, wt/vol) to SKH-1 hairless mice for 14 days before a single UVB (180 mJ/cm2) irradiation. We found that oral feeding of PFE inhibited UVB-induced: (i) skin edema, (ii) hyperplasia, (iii) infiltration of leukocytes, (iv) lipid peroxidation, (v) hydrogen peroxide generation, (vi) ODC activity, and (vii) ODC, COX-2 and PCNA protein expression. Oral feeding of PFE enhanced repair of UVB-mediated formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Importantly, PFE treatment further enhanced UVB-mediated increase in tumor suppressor p53 and cyclin kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, oral feeding of PFE inhibited UVB-mediated: (i) nuclear translocation of NF-κB, (ii) activation of IKKα, and (iii) phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Taken together, we provide evidence that oral feeding of PFE to mice affords substantial protection from the adverse effects of UVB radiation via modulation in early biomarkers of photocarcinogenesis and provide suggestion for its photochemopreventive potential. PMID:20946358

  4. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  5. Carcinogenesis studies with benzoyl peroxide (Panoxyl gel 5%)

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, O.H.

    1986-04-01

    Several groups of hairless mice were given UV radiation with and without pretreatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), 5% benzoyl peroxide in a gel (Panoxyl), and gel alone, in various combinations, with appropriate control groups included, in order to see whether benzoyl peroxide, which is known to enhance chemical skin carcinogenesis after a single, small dose of DMBA, also enhances UV carcinogenesis. The mice were observed for skin tumors, and all skin lesions were histologically investigated. The percentage of tumor-bearing animals with time is called the tumor rate, the total number of tumors occurring is called the tumor yield. Continual treatment with 5% benzoyl peroxide in gel twice a week, with or without a short pretreatment period of UV radiation resulted in only 2 skin carcinomas, which is remarkable, but not significant. Both Panoxyl and gel alone enhanced tumorigenicity significantly in animals pretreated with a single dose of 51.2 micrograms DMBA. There was no difference between the enhancement caused by Panoxyl and the gel as regards the tumor rate, but when measured as final tumor yield, Panoxyl was slightly more tumor-enhancing than gel alone. However, both Panoxyl and gel protected significantly against UV tumorigenesis (all tumors). There was no difference between the protective effect of the 2 types of treatment. Neither Panoxyl nor gel alone influenced significantly UV skin carcinogenesis (malignant tumors). It is concluded that under these experimental conditions both Panoxyl and gel alone tend to protect against the tumorigenicity and do not enhance the carcinogenicity of UV radiation in hairless mice, whereas both gel and Panoxyl enhance chemical carcinogenesis. The carcinogenic mechanisms may be different for UV and chemical carcinogenesis, respectively.

  6. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    An array of epidemiological results and databases on test animal indicate that risk of cancer and atherosclerosis can be up- or down-regulated by diet through a range of 200%. Other factors contribute incrementally and include the natural terrestrial environment and various human activities that jointly produce complex exposures to endotoxin-producing microorganisms, ionizing radiations, and chemicals. Ordinary personal habits and simple physical irritants have been demonstrated to affect the immune response and risk of disease. There tends to be poor statistical correlation of long-term risk with single agent exposures incurred throughout working careers. However, Agency recommendations for control of hazardous exposures to humans has been substance-specific instead of contextually realistic even though there is consistent evidence for common mechanisms of toxicological and carcinogenic action. That behavior seems to be best explained by molecular stresses from cellular oxygen metabolism and phagocytosis of antigenic invasion as well as breakdown of normal metabolic compounds associated with homeostatic- and injury-related renewal of cells. There is continually mounting evidence that marrow stroma, comprised largely of monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts, is important to phagocytic and cytokinetic response, but the complex action of the immune process is difficult to infer from first-principle logic or biomarkers of toxic injury. The many diverse database studies all seem to implicate two important processes, i.e., the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen and breakdown of aginuine, an amino acid, by hydrolysis or digestion of protein which is attendant to normal antigen-antibody action. This behavior indicates that protection guidelines and risk coefficients should be context dependent to include reference considerations of the composite action of parameters that mediate oxygen metabolism. A logic of this type permits the realistic common-scale modeling of

  7. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  8. Environmental and chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wogan, Gerald N; Hecht, Stephen S; Felton, James S; Conney, Allan H; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2004-12-01

    People are continuously exposed exogenously to varying amounts of chemicals that have been shown to have carcinogenic or mutagenic properties in experimental systems. Exposure can occur exogenously when these agents are present in food, air or water, and also endogenously when they are products of metabolism or pathophysiologic states such as inflammation. It has been estimated that exposure to environmental chemical carcinogens may contribute significantly to the causation of a sizable fraction, perhaps a majority, of human cancers, when exposures are related to "life-style" factors such as diet, tobacco use, etc. This chapter summarizes several aspects of environmental chemical carcinogenesis that have been extensively studied and illustrates the power of mechanistic investigation combined with molecular epidemiologic approaches in establishing causative linkages between environmental exposures and increased cancer risks. A causative relationship between exposure to aflatoxin, a strongly carcinogenic mold-produced contaminant of dietary staples in Asia and Africa, and elevated risk for primary liver cancer has been demonstrated through the application of well-validated biomarkers in molecular epidemiology. These studies have also identified a striking synergistic interaction between aflatoxin and hepatitis B virus infection in elevating liver cancer risk. Use of tobacco products provides a clear example of cancer causation by a life-style factor involving carcinogen exposure. Tobacco carcinogens and their DNA adducts are central to cancer induction by tobacco products, and the contribution of specific tobacco carcinogens (e.g. PAH and NNK) to tobacco-induced lung cancer, can be evaluated by a weight of evidence approach. Factors considered include presence in tobacco products, carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, human uptake, metabolism and adduct formation, possible role in causing molecular changes in oncogenes or suppressor genes, and other relevant data

  9. Comprehensive Review of Ultraviolet Radiation and the Current Status on Sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Summer; Armstrong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In the past, manufacturers’ labeling of sunscreen varied greatly, confusing the consumers regarding efficacy and the appropriate photoprotection provided by their products. Therefore, in June 2011, the United States Food and Drug Administration issued new guidelines for sunscreen labeling. Sunscreen products are over-the-counter drugs; therefore, they are regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration to determine safety, efficacy, and labeling. This article discusses ultraviolet radiation and the positive and negative effects of ultraviolet radiation, provides a review of sunscreens, and discusses the new United States Food and Drug Administration regulations for sunscreens. PMID:23050030

  10. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  11. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  12. CT Radiation Dose Management: A Comprehensive Optimization Process for Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Anushri; Kortesniemi, Mika; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2016-09-01

    Rising concerns of radiation exposure from computed tomography have caused various advances in dose reduction technologies. While proper justification and optimization of scans has been the main focus to address increasing doses, the value of dose management has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this article is to explain the importance of dose management, provide an overview of the available options for dose tracking, and discuss the importance of a dedicated dose team. The authors also describe how a digital radiation tracking software can be used for analyzing the big data on doses for auditing patient safety, scanner utilization, and productivity, all of which have enormous personal and institutional implications. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27533027

  13. A comprehensive dose reconstruction methodology for former rocketdyne/atomics international radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Boice, John D; Leggett, Richard W; Ellis, Elizabeth Dupree; Wallace, Phillip W; Mumma, Michael; Cohen, Sarah S; Brill, A Bertrand; Chadda, Bandana; Boecker, Bruce B; Yoder, R Craig; Eckerman, Keith F

    2006-05-01

    Incomplete radiation exposure histories, inadequate treatment of internally deposited radionuclides, and failure to account for neutron exposures can be important uncertainties in epidemiologic studies of radiation workers. Organ-specific doses from lifetime occupational exposures and radionuclide intakes were estimated for an epidemiologic study of 5,801 Rocketdyne/Atomics International (AI) radiation workers engaged in nuclear technologies between 1948 and 1999. The entire workforce of 46,970 Rocketdyne/AI employees was identified from 35,042 Kardex work histories cards, 26,136 electronic personnel listings, and 14,189 radiation folders containing individual exposure histories. To obtain prior and subsequent occupational exposure information, the roster of all workers was matched against nationwide dosimetry files from the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Landauer dosimetry company, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Air Force. Dosimetry files of other worker studies were also accessed. Computation of organ doses from radionuclide intakes was complicated by the diversity of bioassay data collected over a 40-y period (urine and fecal samples, lung counts, whole-body counts, nasal smears, and wound and incident reports) and the variety of radionuclides with documented intake including isotopes of uranium, plutonium, americium, calcium, cesium, cerium, zirconium, thorium, polonium, promethium, iodine, zinc, strontium, and hydrogen (tritium). Over 30,000 individual bioassay measurements, recorded on 11 different bioassay forms, were abstracted. The bioassay data were evaluated using ICRP biokinetic models recommended in current or upcoming ICRP documents (modified for one inhaled material to reflect site-specific information) to estimate annual doses for 16 organs or tissues taking into account time of exposure, type of radionuclide, and excretion patterns. Detailed internal exposure scenarios were developed and annual internal doses were derived

  14. Radiation induced oxidation of sulphydryl molecules in aqueous solutions. A comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Manohar

    1994-06-01

    Radiation degradation studies of thiols in aqueous solutions under variety of conditions during the past more than three decades are reviewed. Radiolytic mechanism of γ-irradiated air free, air and N 2O-saturated solutions of cysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol, mercaptoethanol, glutathione and papain are high lighted. A large variety of thiols repair organic radicals by H atom transfer from SH group. The repair rate constants are found to be between 5 × 10 6M -1s -1 to 4.0 × 10 8M -1s -1. The data are tabulated. The rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with variety of thiols evaluated by pulse radioanalysis and flash photolysis are found to be very high and are computed. Sulphur centered radicals e.g. RṠ;, RSSR ⨪ generated in the pulse radioanalysis of thiols are very important species. Their reactions with oxygen and other compounds are of relevance to radiation biology. The results, reaction mechanism, the repair rate constant, the rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with thiols and the rate constants of sulphur centered radicals with oxygen and other compounds of biological interest can be of great use in the interpretation of the mechanism of the protection of cells, animals, DNA and other biological molecules and may well provide basic essential information for the understanding of radiation biology. The protection of biological target at chemical level is generally understood in terms of protecting compounds participating directly in the radiochemical event and reducing the damage to biological target. The damage to the biological target is repaired by the hydrogen transfer from the thiol. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms are quite complex. There is no single mechanism which explains all the experimental observations on the metabolism of thiols. More work needs to be done in order to understand the metabolic aspect of the protection mechanism.

  15. Towards a comprehensive CT image segmentation for thoracic organ radiation dose estimation and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Ruppertshofen, Heike; Vik, Torbjörn; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Administered dose of ionizing radiation during medical imaging is an issue of increasing concern for the patient, for the clinical community, and for respective regulatory bodies. CT radiation dose is currently estimated based on a set of very simplifying assumptions which do not take the actual body geometry and organ specific doses into account. This makes it very difficult to accurately report imaging related administered dose and to track it for different organs over the life of the patient. In this paper this deficit is addressed in a two-fold way. In a first step, the absorbed radiation dose in each image voxel is estimated based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of X-ray absorption and scattering. In a second step, the image is segmented into tissue types with different radio sensitivity. In combination this allows to calculate the effective dose as a weighted sum of the individual organ doses. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of automatic organ specific dose estimation. With respect to a commercially applicable solution and respective robustness and efficiency requirements, we investigated the effect of dose sampling rather than integration over the organ volume. We focused on the thoracic anatomy as the exemplary body region, imaged frequently by CT. For image segmentation we applied a set of available approaches which allowed us to cover the main thoracic radio-sensitive tissue types. We applied the dose estimation approach to 10 thoracic CT datasets and evaluated segmentation accuracy and administered dose and could show that organ specific dose estimation can be achieved.

  16. Comprehensive radiative forcing assesment highlights trade-offs in climate mitigation potential of managed boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Berninger, Frank; Bäck, Jaana; Boy, Michael; Kuusinen, Nea; Mäkelä, Annikki; Matthies, Brent; Minkkinen, Kari; Mogensen, Ditte; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sievänen, Risto; Zhou, Luxi; Vanhatalo, Anni; Valsta, Lauri; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests have an important role in the mitigation of climate change. In this study we evaluated four key climate impacts of forest management: (1) carbon sequestration (in forest ecosystems and wood products), (2) surface albedo of forest area, (3) forest originating Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) and (4) avoided CO2-emissions from wood energy and product substitution. We calculated their net effect at both a single stand and regional level using Finland as a case study. We made analyses both in current climate up to a year 2050 and in the projected climate of year 2050. At the stand level, the carbon sequestration effect and avoided CO2 emissions due to substituted materials dominated in net RF in current climate. The warming effect of surface albedo of forest cover was lower or of same magnitude than cooling effect of SOAs. Together, the rarely considered SOAs and product substitution corresponded over 70% of the total cooling effect of forest cover. The cooling effect of net radiative forcing increased along the increasing site fertility. Although the carbon stocks of broadleaved trees were smaller than that of conifers their total radiative cooling effect was larger due to the integrated albedo and aerosol effects. In the projected climate of 2050, the radiative cooling of aerosols approached the level of forest carbon fixation. These results emphasize the need for holistic evaluation of climate impacts over simple carbon sequestration analysis to understand the role of forest management in climate change mitigation. Landscape level analyses emphasized the broad range of options to reach the cooling effect. The lowest harvest regime, 50% of current annual increment (CAI), yielded the largest cooling effect. Yet, harvests up to CAI produced only slightly less cooling RF if avoided emissions were considered. This result was highly sensitive to used substitution factors. Our result highlights that the combination of intensive harvests and the use of wood

  17. Comprehensive analysis of radiative properties of brass and Al arranged in nested cylindrical wire arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Osborne, Glenn C.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Shrestha, I.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Shlyaptseva, V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Williamson, K. M.; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Safronova, Alla S.; Weller, M. E.

    2010-11-01

    Experimental results of nested cylindrical wire arrays (NCWA) consisting of brass (70% Cu and 30% Zn) wires on one array and Al (5056, 5% Mg) wires on the other array performed on the UNR Zebra generator at 1.0 MA current are compared and analyzed. Specifically, radiative properties of K-shell Al and Mg ions and L-shell Cu and Zn ions are compared as functions of the placements of the brass and Al wires on the inner and outer arrays. A full diagnostic set which included more than ten different beam-lines was implemented. Identical loads were fielded to allow the timing of time-gated pinhole and x-ray spectrometers to be shifted to get a more complete understanding of the evolution of plasma parameters over the x-ray pulse. The importance of the study of NCWAs with different wire materials is discussed.

  18. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  19. A Comprehensive Quality Assurance Program for Personnel and Procedures in Radiation Oncology: Value of Voluntary Error Reporting and Checklists

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Zafirovski, Aleksandar; Smith, Jeffery; Fisher, Paul; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Barnard, Cynthia; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Rave, Nick; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: This report describes the value of a voluntary error reporting system and the impact of a series of quality assurance (QA) measures including checklists and timeouts on reported error rates in patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A voluntary error reporting system was instituted with the goal of recording errors, analyzing their clinical impact, and guiding the implementation of targeted QA measures. In response to errors committed in relation to treatment of the wrong patient, wrong treatment site, and wrong dose, a novel initiative involving the use of checklists and timeouts for all staff was implemented. The impact of these and other QA initiatives was analyzed. Results: From 2001 to 2011, a total of 256 errors in 139 patients after 284,810 external radiation treatments (0.09% per treatment) were recorded in our voluntary error database. The incidence of errors related to patient/tumor site, treatment planning/data transfer, and patient setup/treatment delivery was 9%, 40.2%, and 50.8%, respectively. The compliance rate for the checklists and timeouts initiative was 97% (P<.001). These and other QA measures resulted in a significant reduction in many categories of errors. The introduction of checklists and timeouts has been successful in eliminating errors related to wrong patient, wrong site, and wrong dose. Conclusions: A comprehensive QA program that regularly monitors staff compliance together with a robust voluntary error reporting system can reduce or eliminate errors that could result in serious patient injury. We recommend the adoption of these relatively simple QA initiatives including the use of checklists and timeouts for all staff to improve the safety of patients undergoing radiation therapy in the modern era.

  20. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  1. Comprehensive vacuum ultraviolet photoionization study of the CF3• trifluoromethyl radical using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossmann (Soldi-Lose), Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; de Miranda, Barbara K. C.; Alcaraz, Christian

    2012-05-01

    The trifluoromethyl radical, CF3•, is studied for the first time by means of threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES). The radical is produced in the gas phase using the flash-pyrolysis technique from hexafluoroethane as a precursor. CF3+ total ion yield and mass-selected TPES of the radical are recorded using a spectrometer based upon velocity map imaging and Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The high resolution of the instrument and of the photons allows the observation of rich vibrational progressions in the TPES of CF3•. By using Franck-Condon factors computed by Bowman and coworkers, we have been able to simulate the TPES. The initial vibrational temperature of the radical beam has been evaluated at 350 ± 70 K. The structures have been identified as transitions between (n1,n2) and (n1+,n2+) vibrational levels of CF3 and CF3+ with small excitation of the breathing mode, ν1+, and large excitation (n2+ = 10-26) of the umbrella mode, ν2+, in the cation. From the energy separation between the two resolved peaks of each band, a value of 994 ± 16 cm-1 has been derived for the ν1+ breathing frequency of CF3+. For the high-lying n2+ levels, the apparent ν2+ umbrella spacing, 820 ± 14 cm-1, is fairly constant. Taking into account the ν2+ anharmonicity calculated by Bowman and coworkers, we have deduced ν2+ = 809 ± 14 cm-1, and semi-empirical estimations of the adiabatic ionization energy IEad.(CF3•) are proposed in good agreement with most of previous works. A value of the vertical ionization potential, IEvert.(CF3•) = 11.02 eV, has been derived from the observation of a photoelectron spectrum recorded at a fixed photon energy of 12 eV.

  2. Systems biology perspectives on the carcinogenic potential of radiation

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Adams, Cassandra; Balmain, Allan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Demaria, Sandra; Illa-Bochaca, Irineu; Mao, Jian Hua; Ouyang, Haoxu; Sebastiano, Christopher; Tang, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on recent experimental and modeling studies that attempt to define the physiological context in which high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation increases epithelial cancer risk and the efficiency with which it does so. Radiation carcinogenesis is a two-compartment problem: ionizing radiation can alter genomic sequence as a result of damage due to targeted effects (TE) from the interaction of energy and DNA; it can also alter phenotype and multicellular interactions that contribute to cancer by poorly understood non-targeted effects (NTE). Rather than being secondary to DNA damage and mutations that can initiate cancer, radiation NTE create the critical context in which to promote cancer. Systems biology modeling using comprehensive experimental data that integrates different levels of biological organization and time-scales is a means of identifying the key processes underlying the carcinogenic potential of high-LET radiation. We hypothesize that inflammation is a key process, and thus cancer susceptibility will depend on specific genetic predisposition to the type and duration of this response. Systems genetics using novel mouse models can be used to identify such determinants of susceptibility to cancer in radiation sensitive tissues following high-LET radiation. Improved understanding of radiation carcinogenesis achieved by defining the relative contribution of NTE carcinogenic effects and identifying the genetic determinants of the high-LET cancer susceptibility will help reduce uncertainties in radiation risk assessment.

  3. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  4. [Genetic factors in gastric carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, H

    1983-02-01

    Genetic control of susceptibility of rats to gastro-carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was studied in susceptible ACI strain rats, resistant Buffalo strain rats, and their F1 and F2 offsprings. Rats were given MNNG at a concentration of 83 micrograms/ml in drinking water for 32 weeks and sacrificed on week 72. The incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas in F1 was as low as that in Buffalo rats. The results showed that susceptibility to MNNG was controlled genetically and that the resistance of Buffalo strain rats was autosomal dominant. To clarify the mechanisms which determine susceptibility to MNNG, some biochemical parameters such as pH of gastric juice, glutathione content in the gastric mucosa and the binding of MNNG to DNA, were analysed. No difference was observed between ACI and Buffalo strains in regard to the events leading to the binding of MNNG to DNA.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies. Intensive investigation of molecular pathogenesis might lead to identifying useful molecules for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma harbors complicated aberrations of alleles including losses of 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q, and gains of 8q and 20q. Pancreatic cancer is usually initiated by mutation of KRAS and aberrant expression of SHH. Overexpression of AURKA mapping on 20q13.2 may significantly enhance overt tumorigenesity. Aberrations of tumor suppressor genes synergistically accelerate progression of the carcinogenic pathway through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. Abrogation of CDKN2A occurs in low-grade/early PanIN, whereas aberrations of TP53 and SMAD4 occur in high-grade/late PanIN. SMAD4 may play suppressive roles in tumorigenesis by inhibition of angiogenesis. Loss of 18q precedes SMAD4 inactivation, and restoration of chromosome 18 in pancreatic cancer cells results in tumor suppressive phenotypes regardless of SMAD4 status, indicating the possible existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) other than SMAD4 on 18q. DUSP6 at 12q21-q22 is frequently abrogated by loss of expression in invasive ductal adenocarcinomas despite fairly preserved expression in PanIN, which suggests that DUSP6 works as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Restoration of chromosome 12 also suppresses growths of pancreatic cancer cells despite the recovery of expression of DUSP6; the existence of yet another tumor suppressor gene on 12q is strongly suggested. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis will likely provide novel clues for preventing, detecting, and ultimately curing this life-threatening disease. PMID:16367914

  6. Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Radiometric Validation Protocol for the CERES Earth Radiation Budget Climate Record Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priestley, K. J.; Matthews, G.; Thomas, S.

    2006-01-01

    The CERES Flight Models 1 through 4 instruments were launched aboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua Spacecraft into 705 Km sun-synchronous orbits with 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. equatorial crossing times. These instruments supplement measurements made by the CERES Proto Flight Model (PFM) instrument launched aboard NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) into a 350 Km, 38-degree mid-inclined orbit. CERES Climate Data Records consist of geolocated and calibrated instantaneous filtered and unfiltered radiances through temporally and spatially averaged TOA, Surface and Atmospheric fluxes. CERES filtered radiance measurements cover three spectral bands including shortwave (0.3 to 5 microns), total (0.3 to 100 microns) and an atmospheric window channel (8 to 12 microns). The CERES Earth Radiation Budget measurements represent a new era in radiation climate data, realizing a factor of 2 to 4 improvement in calibration accuracy and stability over the previous ERBE climate records, while striving for the next goal of 0.3-percent per decade absolute stability. The current improvement is derived from two sources: the incorporation of lessons learned from the ERBE mission in the design of the CERES instruments and the development of a rigorous and comprehensive radiometric validation protocol consisting of individual studies covering different spatial, spectral and temporal time scales on data collected both pre and post launch. Once this ensemble of individual perspectives is collected and organized, a cohesive and highly rigorous picture of the overall end-to-end performance of the CERES instrument's and data processing algorithms may be clearly established. This approach has resulted in unprecedented levels of accuracy for radiation budget instruments and data products with calibration stability of better than 0.2-percent and calibration traceability from ground to flight of 0.25-percent. The current work summarizes the development, philosophy

  7. Easy Aerosol - Robust and non-robust circulation responses to aerosol radiative forcing in comprehensive atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn; Boucher, Olivier; Medeiros, Brian; Pincus, Robert; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Lewinschal, Anna; Bellouin, Nicolas; Yang, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent studies illustrated the potential of aerosols to change the large-scale atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the proposed aerosol-induced changes reflect robust model behavior or are affected by uncertainties in the models' treatment of parametrized physical processes, such as those related to clouds. "Easy Aerosol", a model-intercomparison project organized within the Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity of the World Climate Research Programme, addresses this question by subjecting a suite of comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) to the same set of idealized "easy" aerosol perturbations. This contribution discusses the aerosol perturbations as well as their impact on the model's precipitation and surface winds. The aerosol perturbations are designed based on a global aerosol climatology and mimic the gravest mode of the anthropogenic aerosol. Specifically, the meridional and zonal distributions of total aerosol optical depth are approximated by a superposition of Gaussian plumes; the vertical distribution is taken as constant within the lowest 1250m of the atmosphere followed by an exponential decay with height above. The aerosol both scatters and absorbs shortwave radiation, but in order to focus on direct radiative effects aerosol-cloud interactions are omitted. Each model contributes seven simulations. A clean control case with no aerosol-radiative effects at all is compared to six perturbed simulations with differing aerosol loading, zonal aerosol distributions, and SSTs. To estimate the role of natural variability, one of the models, MPI-ESM, contributes a 5-member ensemble for each simulation. If the observed SSTs from years 1979-2005 are prescribed, the aerosol leads to a local depression of precipitation at the Northern Hemisphere center of the aerosol and a northward shift of the

  8. Arsenic carcinogenesis in the skin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Liao, Wei-Ting; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2006-09-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning is a world public health issue. Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) from drinking water has been documented to induce cancers in lung, urinary bladder, kidney, liver and skin in a dose-response relationship. Oxidative stress, chromosomal abnormality and altered growth factors are possible modes of action in arsenic carcinogenesis. Arsenic tends to accumulate in the skin. Skin hyperpigmentation and hyperkeratosis have long been known to be the hallmark signs of chronic As exposure. There are significant associations between these dermatological lesions and risk of skin cancer. The most common arsenic-induced skin cancers are Bowen's disease (carcinoma in situ), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) is able to transform into invasive BCC and SCC. Individuals with As-BD are considered for more aggressive cancer screening in the lung and urinary bladder. As-BD provides an excellent model for studying the early stages of chemical carcinogenesis in human beings. Arsenic exposure is associated with G2/M cell cycle arrest and DNA aneuploidy in both cultured keratinocytes and As-BD lesions. These cellular abnormalities relate to the p53 dysfunction induced by arsenic. The characteristic clinical figures of arsenic-induced skin cancer are: (i) occurrence on sun-protected areas of the body; (ii) multiple and recrudescent lesions. Both As and UVB are able to induce skin cancer. Arsenic treatment enhances the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and clastogenicity of UV in mammalian cells. Both As and UVB induce apoptosis in keratinocytes by caspase-9 and caspase-8 signaling, respectively. Combined UVB and As treatments resulted in the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects by stimulating both caspase pathways in the keratinocytes. UVB irradiation inhibited mutant p53 and ki-67 expression, as well as increased in the number of apoptotic cells in As-BD lesions which resulted in an

  9. Quantitation of multistage carcinogenesis in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Pitot, H C; Dragan, Y P; Teeguarden, J; Hsia, S; Campbell, H

    1996-01-01

    A well characterized model of multistage carcinogenesis is that of hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat. The histopathology as well as the cell and molecular biology of the stages of initiation, promotion, and progression have been elucidated to varying degrees in this system. Putatively single initiated hepatocytes are identified by their expression of the ubiquitous marker of hepatocarcinogenesis, glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP). 0.5-1.0 x 10(6) GSTP-positive "initiated" hepatocytes developed within 14 days after initiation with a subcarcinogenic dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Approximately 1% of these cells develop clonally into altered hepatic foci (AHF) in animals administered promoting agents, such as phenobarbital, chronically for 4-8 mo. Hepatocytes within AHF during the stage of promotion exhibit normal diploid karyotypes but various phenotypes depending on the chemical nature of the promoting agent. Continued administration of the promoting agent results in the infrequent development of hepatocellular carcinomas; however, administration of a complete carcinogen or a progressor agent during the stage of promotion results in substantial numbers of hepatic neoplasms. In order to quantitate the development of the stage of progression more accurately, markers selective for this stage have been sought. Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) appears to be such a marker of progression. About 500 TGF-alpha-positive lesions develop spontaneously following initiation and continued promotion, usually within GSTP-positive AHF, but administration of a single dose of a progressor agent such as ethylnitrosourea may increase this number 3-fold or more. Some agents such as gamma radiation and hydroxyurea, when administered as single or a few closely spaced multiple doses, result in no increased number in TGF-alpha-positive lesions but a markedly enhanced increase in their growth rate. By monitoring gene expression using quantitative stereology, the stages of

  10. Ultrastructural alterations in field carcinogenesis measured by enhanced backscattering spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Optical characterization of biological tissue in field carcinogenesis offers a method with which to study the mechanisms behind early cancer development and the potential to perform clinical diagnosis. Previously, low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) has demonstrated the ability to discriminate between normal and diseased organs based on measurements of histologically normal-appearing tissue in the field of colorectal (CRC) and pancreatic (PC) cancers. Here, we implement the more comprehensive enhanced backscattering (EBS) spectroscopy to better understand the structural and optical changes which lead to the previous findings. EBS provides high-resolution measurement of the spatial reflectance profile P(rs) between 30 microns and 2.7 mm, where information about nanoscale mass density fluctuations in the mucosa can be quantified. A demonstration of the length-scales at which P(rs) is optimally altered in CRC and PC field carcinogenesis is given and subsequently these changes are related to the tissue’s structural composition. Three main conclusions are made. First, the most significant changes in P(rs) occur at short length-scales corresponding to the superficial mucosal layer. Second, these changes are predominantly attributable to a reduction in the presence of subdiffractional structures. Third, similar trends are seen for both cancer types, suggesting a common progression of structural alterations in each. PMID:24008865

  11. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    experimental carcinogenesis by providing an environment devoid of this potent pan-RTK inhibitor. Thus, our results support future utilization of decorin as an antitumor agent in liver cancer. PMID:24361483

  12. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  13. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, assessing cancer risk, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from research using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as interventions with molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21772845

  14. Multistage carcinogenesis modeling including cell cycle and DNA damage states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, W.; Moolgavkar, S.

    The multistage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis is generalized to include cell cycle states and corresponding DNA damage states with imperfect repair for normal and initiated stem cells. Initiated cells may undergo transformation to a malignant state, eventually leading to cancer incidence or death. The model allows oxidative or radiation induced DNA damage, checkpoint delay, DNA repair, apoptosis, and transformation rates to depend on the cell cycle state or DNA damage state of normal and initiated cells. A probability generating function approach is used to represent the time dependent probability distribution for cells in all states. The continuous time coupled Markov system representing this joint distribution satisfies a partial differential equation (pde). Time dependent survival and hazard functions are found through numerical solution of the characteristic equations for the pde. Although the hazard and survival can be calculated numerically, number and size distributions of pre-malignant lesions from models that are developed will be approximated through simulation. We use the model to explore predictions for hazard and survival as parameters representing cell cycle regulation and arrest are modified. Modification of these parameters may influence rates for cell division, apoptosis and malignant transformation that are important in carcinogenesis. We also explore enhanced repair that may be important for low-dose hypersensitivity and adaptive response, and degradation of repair processes or loss of checkpoint control that may drive genetic instability.

  15. Nature and nurture - lessons from chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luch, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The roles of genetic constitution versus environmental factors in cancer development have been a matter of debate even long before the discovery of 'oncogenes'. Evidence from epidemiological, occupational and migration studies has consistently pointed to environmental factors as the major contributing factors to cancer, so it seems reasonable to discuss the importance of chemical carcinogenesis in the present 'age of cancer genetics'. PMID:15660110

  16. Multiple genetic alterations in human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, T; Terada, M; Yokota, J; Hirohashi, S; Wakabayashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Cancer development in man appeared to be a multistage process as suggested by epidemiological studies on commonly occurring gastric, colon, and breast cancers and also on human retrovirus-related leukemia, and by the finding by physicians and surgeons of precancerous lesions for many types of neoplasias. In the last 10 years it has become evident that human cancers have multiple genetic alterations caused by point mutations, recombinations, amplifications, and/or deletions. The genes affected include both oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes and genes that accelerate cell proliferation and metastasis. Cancers with more malignant properties and poorer prognosis are generally associated with larger numbers of genetic alterations. These multiple genetic alterations are considered to be a direct reflection of the multiple steps involved in carcinogenesis. The multiple genetic alterations are caused by multiple environmental carcinogenic substances or factors, each of which usually exists only at minute concentrations and does not exert any major impact alone except under particular occupational, iatrogenic, and locally geographic conditions. The fact that carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving multiple genetic alterations clearly needs to be taken into consideration in assessing the risks of environmental carcinogenic substances or factors. The increasing incidence of multiple primary cancers is also most easily understood from the viewpoint of multiple steps in carcinogenesis. Possible multiple approaches to cancer prevention should therefore be considered in relation to multistep carcinogenesis and multiple carcinogenic factors. PMID:1486862

  17. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  18. Comprehensive tool for calculation of radiative fluxes: illustration of shortwave aerosol radiative effect sensitivities to the details in aerosol and underlying surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derimian, Yevgeny; Dubovik, Oleg; Huang, Xin; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Kostinski, Alex B.; Dubuisson, Philippe; Ducos, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation of aerosol radiative effect on broadband hemispherical solar flux is often performed using simplified spectral and directional scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol and underlying surface reflectance. In this study we present a rigorous yet fast computational tool that accurately accounts for detailed variability of both spectral and angular scattering properties of aerosol and surface reflectance in calculation of direct aerosol radiative effect. The tool is developed as part of the GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) project. We use the tool to evaluate instantaneous and daily average radiative efficiencies (radiative effect per unit aerosol optical thickness) of several key atmospheric aerosol models over different surface types. We then examine the differences due to neglect of surface reflectance anisotropy, nonsphericity of aerosol particle shape and accounting only for aerosol angular scattering asymmetry instead of using full phase function. For example, it is shown that neglecting aerosol particle nonsphericity causes mainly overestimation of the aerosol cooling effect and that magnitude of this overestimate changes significantly as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA) if the asymmetry parameter is used instead of detailed phase function. It was also found that the nonspherical-spherical differences in the calculated aerosol radiative effect are not modified significantly if detailed BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is used instead of Lambertian approximation of surface reflectance. Additionally, calculations show that usage of only angular scattering asymmetry, even for the case of spherical aerosols, modifies the dependence of instantaneous aerosol radiative effect on SZA. This effect can be canceled for daily average values, but only if sun reaches the zenith; otherwise a systematic bias remains. Since the daily average radiative effect is obtained by integration over a range

  19. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  20. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment.

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  2. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  3. Zinc and zinc transporters in prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kolenko, Vladimir; Teper, Ervin; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The healthy human prostate accumulates the highest level of zinc of any soft tissue in the body. This unique property is retained in BPH, but is lost in prostatic malignancy, which implicates changes in zinc and its transporters in carcinogenesis. Indeed, zinc concentrations diminish early in the course of prostate carcinogenesis, preceding histopathological changes, and continue to decline during progression toward castration-resistant disease. Numerous studies suggest that increased zinc intake might protect against progression of prostatic malignancy. Despite increased dietary intake, zinc accumulation might be limited by the diminished expression of zinc uptake transporters, resulting in decreased intratumoural zinc levels. This finding can explain the conflicting results of various epidemiological studies evaluating the role of zinc supplementation on primary and secondary prostate cancer prevention. Overall, more research into the mechanisms of zinc homeostasis are needed to fully understand its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Only then can the potential of zinc and zinc transport proteins be harnessed in the diagnosis and treatment of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23478540

  4. Lesser-Known Molecules in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lozneanu, Ludmila; Cojocaru, Elena; Giuşcă, Simona Eliza; Cărăuleanu, Alexandru; Căruntu, Irina-Draga

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the deciphering of the signaling pathways brings about new advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of ovarian carcinogenesis, which is based on the interaction of several molecules with different biochemical structure that, consequently, intervene in cell metabolism, through their role as regulators in proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Given that the ensemble of biomarkers in OC includes more than 50 molecules the interest of the researchers focuses on the possible validation of each one's potential as prognosis markers and/or therapeutic targets. Within this framework, this review presents three protein molecules: ALCAM, c-FLIP, and caveolin, motivated by the perspectives provided through the current limited knowledge on their role in ovarian carcinogenesis and on their potential as prognosis factors. Their structural stability, once altered, triggers the initiation of the sequences characteristic for ovarian carcinogenesis, through their role as modulators for several signaling pathways, contributing to the disruption of cellular junctions, disturbance of pro-/antiapoptotic equilibrium, and alteration of transmission of the signals specific for the molecular pathways. For each molecule, the text is built as follows: (i) general remarks, (ii) structural details, and (iii) particularities in expression, from different tumors to landmarks in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:26339605

  5. The Comprehensive Mouse Radiation Hybrid Map Densely Cross-Referenced to the Recombination Map: A Tool to Support the Sequence Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Lucy B.; Barter, Mary E.; Kelmenson, Jennifer A.; Eppig, Janan T.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a unique comprehensive mouse radiation hybrid (RH) map of nearly 23,000 markers integrating data from three international genome centers and over 400 independent laboratories. We have cross-referenced this map to the 0.5-cM resolution recombination-based Jackson Laboratory (TJL) backcross panel map, building a complete set of RH framework chromosome maps based on a high density of known-ordered anchor markers. We have systematically typed markers to improve coverage and resolve discrepancies, and have reanalyzed data sets as needed. The cross-linking of the RH and recombination maps has resulted in a highly accurate genome-wide map with consistent marker order. We have compared these linked framework maps to the Ensembl mouse genome sequence assembly, and show that they are a useful medium resolution tool for both validating sequence assembly and elucidating chromosome biology. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12529315

  6. Predicting cancer rates in astronauts from animal carcinogenesis studies and cellular markers.

    PubMed

    Williams, J R; Zhang, Y; Zhou, H; Osman, M; Cha, D; Kavet, R; Cuccinotta, F; Dicello, J F; Dillehay, L E

    1999-12-01

    The radiation space environment includes particles such as protons and multiple species of heavy ions, with much of the exposure to these radiations occurring at extremely low average dose-rates. Limitations in databases needed to predict cancer hazards in human beings from such radiations are significant and currently do not provide confidence that such predictions are acceptably precise or accurate. In this article, we outline the need for animal carcinogenesis data based on a more sophisticated understanding of the dose-response relationship for induction of cancer and correlative cellular endpoints by representative space radiations. We stress the need for a model that can interrelate human and animal carcinogenesis data with cellular mechanisms. Using a broad model for dose-response patterns which we term the "subalpha-alpha-omega (SAO) model", we explore examples in the literature for radiation-induced cancer and for radiation-induced cellular events to illustrate the need for data that define the dose-response patterns more precisely over specific dose ranges, with special attention to low dose, low dose-rate exposure. We present data for multiple endpoints in cells, which vary in their radiosensitivity, that also support the proposed model. We have measured induction of complex chromosome aberrations in multiple cell types by two space radiations, Fe-ions and protons, and compared these to photons delivered at high dose-rate or low dose-rate. Our data demonstrate that at least three factors modulate the relative efficacy of Fe-ions compared to photons: (i) intrinsic radiosensitivity of irradiated cells; (ii) dose-rate; and (iii) another unspecified effect perhaps related to reparability of DNA lesions. These factors can produce respectively up to at least 7-, 6- and 3-fold variability. These data demonstrate the need to understand better the role of intrinsic radiosensitivity and dose-rate effects in mammalian cell response to ionizing radiation. Such

  7. Predicting cancer rates in astronauts from animal carcinogenesis studies and cellular markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Osman, M.; Cha, D.; Kavet, R.; Cuccinotta, F.; Dicello, J. F.; Dillehay, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation space environment includes particles such as protons and multiple species of heavy ions, with much of the exposure to these radiations occurring at extremely low average dose-rates. Limitations in databases needed to predict cancer hazards in human beings from such radiations are significant and currently do not provide confidence that such predictions are acceptably precise or accurate. In this article, we outline the need for animal carcinogenesis data based on a more sophisticated understanding of the dose-response relationship for induction of cancer and correlative cellular endpoints by representative space radiations. We stress the need for a model that can interrelate human and animal carcinogenesis data with cellular mechanisms. Using a broad model for dose-response patterns which we term the "subalpha-alpha-omega (SAO) model", we explore examples in the literature for radiation-induced cancer and for radiation-induced cellular events to illustrate the need for data that define the dose-response patterns more precisely over specific dose ranges, with special attention to low dose, low dose-rate exposure. We present data for multiple endpoints in cells, which vary in their radiosensitivity, that also support the proposed model. We have measured induction of complex chromosome aberrations in multiple cell types by two space radiations, Fe-ions and protons, and compared these to photons delivered at high dose-rate or low dose-rate. Our data demonstrate that at least three factors modulate the relative efficacy of Fe-ions compared to photons: (i) intrinsic radiosensitivity of irradiated cells; (ii) dose-rate; and (iii) another unspecified effect perhaps related to reparability of DNA lesions. These factors can produce respectively up to at least 7-, 6- and 3-fold variability. These data demonstrate the need to understand better the role of intrinsic radiosensitivity and dose-rate effects in mammalian cell response to ionizing radiation. Such

  8. Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bunton, T E

    2000-06-01

    Alternative models using fish species have been tested in liver toxicity and carcinogenesis bioassays. Similar models have not been developed for skin. The brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) has shown potential as a model for skin carcinogenesis studies due to its sensitivity to environmental chemical pollutants. The present study is an initial morphologic and biochemical characterization of the normal and neoplastic brown bullhead skin to assess its suitability as a model of skin carcinogenesis. Brown bullhead were removed from Back River in the Chesapeake Bay region, an area historically polluted with heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Histology, histochemistry, and electron microscopy were used to stage the morphologic development and progression of neoplasia in skin. The distribution of keratin, a family of structural proteins with altered expression in mammalian tumorigenesis, was analyzed with one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose blots of extracts from normal skin. Keratin expression in skin and other organs was also assessed with immunohistochemistry using AE1, AE3, and PCK 26 antibodies, and the proliferation index in skin and neoplasms with PCNA antibody. Skin lesions appeared to progress from hyperplasia through carcinoma, and the proliferation index was increased in papilloma. Also in papilloma, intercellular interdigitations appeared increased and desmosomes decreased which may in future studies correlate with changes in expression of other molecular markers of neoplastic progression. Both Type I and Type II keratin subfamilies were detected in skin using gel electrophoresis with the complimentary keratin blot-binding assay. For further development of the brown bullhead model, future studies can compare and relate these baseline data to alterations in expression of keratin and other markers in fish neoplasms and to molecular events which occur in man. PMID:10930121

  9. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  10. Evaluation of Four Techniques Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Comprehensive Locoregional Irradiation of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean; Marsh, Robin; Masi, Kathryn; Griffith, Kent A.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To establish optimal intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for treating the left breast and regional nodes, using moderate deep-inspiration breath hold. Methods and Materials: We developed four IMRT plans of differing complexity for each of 10 patients following lumpectomy for left breast cancer. A dose of 60 Gy was prescribed to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 52.2 Gy to the breast and supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes. Two plans used inverse-planned beamlet techniques: a 9-field technique, with nine equispaced axial beams, and a tangential beamlet technique, with three to five ipsilateral beams. The third plan (a segmental technique) used a forward-planned multisegment technique, and the fourth plan (a segmental blocked technique) was identical but included a block to limit heart dose. Dose--volume histograms were generated, and metrics chosen for comparison were analyzed using the paired t test. Results: Mean heart and left anterior descending coronary artery doses were similar with the tangential beamlet and segmental blocked techniques but higher with the segmental and 9-field techniques (mean paired difference of 15.1 Gy between segmental and tangential beamlet techniques, p < 0.001). Substantial volumes of contralateral tissue received dose with the 9-field technique (mean right breast V2, 58.9%; mean right lung V2, 75.3%). Minimum dose to {>=}95% of breast PTV was, on average, 45.9 Gy with tangential beamlet, 45.0 Gy with segmental blocked, 51.4 Gy with segmental, and 50.2 Gy with 9-field techniques. Coverage of the internal mammary region was substantially better with the two beamlet techniques than with the segmental blocked technique. Conclusions: Compared to the 9-field beamlet and segmental techniques, a tangential beamlet IMRT technique reduced exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target coverage.

  11. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  12. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-04-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  13. THE REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) THEORY OF ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At this time, there is not a scientific consensus on the mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis. Proposed mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis include but are not limited to clastogenic effects, mutation, oxidative stress (via ROS and other chemic...

  14. THE REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) THEORY OF ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder
    and kidney. At this time, there is not a scientific consensus on the
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis. Proposed
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesi...

  15. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  16. Metal interactions in carcinogenesis: enhancement, inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.; Andersen, Ole

    1981-01-01

    Metals constitute a fundamentally important part of the total human environment. Since human exposure often involves complex mixtures of metal compounds and, possibly, organic compounds which may be carcinogenic per se, interactions between these compounds may add significantly to human cancer risk. Our present knowledge about these kinds of interactions is very limited. The best investigated area is benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-metal oxide particle interactions in respiratory carcinogenesis in the hamster. Metal oxide particles were also shown to modify the carcinogenic effect of nitrosamines. Several reports describe experiments in which selenium compounds exerted a generally anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activity. Inorganic arsenic compounds, which are accepted to be carcinogenic in man, have so far been negative in animal experiments except for one recent suggested report. Several authors have, however, suggested that these compounds may act as cocarcinogens due to their inhibition of DNA repair, although animal experiments to demonstrate a cocarcinogenic effect of arsenic compounds have been negative so far, except for one preliminary report. The concentration of zinc in the diet seemed to influence both transplanted tumor growth and the carcinogenicity of several organic compounds, and the possibility of a correlation between dietary zinc and certain cancer forms in man has been suggested. Protection against development of Leydigiomas usually induced by cadmium injection was afforded by simultaneous injection of zinc salts. Nickel carcinogenesis has been reported to be antagonized by manganese, and synergism between Ni and organic carcinogens, e.g. BP, has been demonstrated. There is no firm evidence that lead may be a cocarcinogen, although some limited experimental evidence is available. Oxidizing agents have been demonstrated to increase, and reducing agents to antagonize, the mutagenic effect of chromium compounds in vitro. The content of carcinogenic and

  17. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Comprehensive progress report, July 1991--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    This comprehensive progress report provides a synopsis of major research accomplishments during the years of 1991-1994, including the technical aspects of the project. The objectives and accomplishments are as follows: 1. Defining the chromosome segments associated with radiation and chemically-induced leukemogenesis (treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, t-AML); A. Continued genetic analysis of chromosomes 5 and 7, B. Correlation of treatment with balanced and unbalanced translocations. 2. Cloning the breakpoints in balanced translocations in t-AML; A. Clone the t(9;11) and t(11;19) breakpoints, B. Clone the t(3,21)(q26,q22) breakpoint, C. Determine the relationship of these translocations to prior exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 3. Compare the breakpoint junctions in patients who have the same translocations in t-AML and AML de novo. 4. Map the scaffold attachment regions in the genes that are involved in balanced translocations in t-AML. Plans for the continuation of present objectives and possible new objectives in consideration of past results are also provided.

  18. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carchman, Evie H.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Meske, Louise; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV–encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1). Materials and Methods HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7) and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N), both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks) were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF) for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62) in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM). To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins. Results Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic

  19. Molecular carcinogenesis of squamous cell carcinomas of the skin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshiaki; Murao, Kazutoshi; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Arase, Seiji

    2002-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin were suggested to develop through a multistep process that involves activation of proto-oncogenes and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in the human skin keratinocytes. Exposure to ultra-violet (UV), especially UV-B, radiation is the most common cause for these genetic abnormalities in cells. We review causation of SCCs and genetic abnormalities in human SCCs with the current work. To elucidate the multistep process, we developed a method for examining the combinatorial function in vivo of plural genes in human keratinocytes. Using high efficiency retroviral transductions, we could express plural genes serially in normal human primary keratinocytes and use these cells to regenerate human skin on SCID mice. A combinatorial transduction of H-RasV12 and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) produced human epidermal neoplasia resembling SCC. These findings were consistent with our previous results of mutation analysis in SCCs, one of which had both mutations of H-Ras gene and the INK4a locus. Therefore, it is suggested that a combination of these genetic abnormalities might be crucial to the carcinogenesis at least in a subset of SCCs. PMID:12322999

  20. Accurate Quantification of Ionospheric State Based on Comprehensive Radiative Transfer Modeling and Optimal Inversion of the OI 135.6-nm Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, J.; Kamalabadi, F.; Makela, J. J.; Meier, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of the nighttime OI 135.6-nm emission represents the primary means of quantifying the F-region ionospheric state from optical measurements. Despite its pervasive use for studying aeronomical processes, the interpretation of these emissions as a proxy for ionospheric state remains ambiguous in that the relative contributions of radiative recombination and mutual neutralization to the production and, especially, the effects of scattering and absorption on the transport of the 135.6-nm emissions have not been fully quantified. Moreover, an inversion algorithm, which is robust to varying ionospheric structures under different geophysical conditions, is yet to be developed for statistically optimal characterization of the ionospheric state. In this work, as part of the NASA ICON mission, we develop a comprehensive radiative transfer model from first principle to investigate the production and transport of the nighttime 135.6-nm emissions. The forward modeling investigation indicates that under certain conditions mutual neutralization can contribute up to ~38% to the 135.6-nm emissions. Moreover, resonant scattering and pure absorption can reduce the brightness observed in the limb direction by ~40% while enhancing the brightness in the nadir direction by ~25%. Further analysis shows that without properly addressing these effects in the inversion process, the peak electron density in the F-region ionosphere (NmF2) can be overestimated by up to ~24%. To address these issues, an inversion algorithm that properly accounts for the above-mentioned effects is proposed for accurate quantification of the ionospheric state using satellite measurements. The ill-posedness due to the intrinsic presence of noise in real data is coped with by incorporating proper regularizations that enforce either global smoothness or piecewise smoothness of the solution. Application to model-generated data with different signal-to-noise ratios show that the algorithm has achieved

  1. Residual-QSAR. Implications for genotoxic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both main types of carcinogenesis, genotoxic and epigenetic, were examined in the context of non-congenericity and similarity, respectively, for the structure of ligand molecules, emphasizing the role of quantitative structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) studies in accordance with OECD (Organization for Economic and Cooperation Development) regulations. The main purpose of this report involves electrophilic theory and the need for meaningful physicochemical parameters to describe genotoxicity by a general mechanism. Residual-QSAR Method The double or looping multiple linear correlation was examined by comparing the direct and residual structural information against the observed activity. A self-consistent equation of observed-computed activity was assumed to give maximum correlation efficiency for those situations in which the direct correlations gave non-significant statistical information. Alternatively, it was also suited to describe slow and apparently non-noticeable cancer phenomenology, with special application to non-congeneric molecules involved in genotoxic carcinogenesis. Application and Discussions The QSAR principles were systematically applied to a given pool of molecules with genotoxic activity in rats to elucidate their carcinogenic mechanisms. Once defined, the endpoint associated with ligand-DNA interaction was used to select variables that retained the main Hansch physicochemical parameters of hydrophobicity, polarizability and stericity, computed by the custom PM3 semiempirical quantum method. The trial and test sets of working molecules were established by implementing the normal Gaussian principle of activities that applies when the applicability domain is not restrained to the congeneric compounds, as in the present study. The application of the residual, self-consistent QSAR method and the factor (or average) method yielded results characterized by extremely high and low correlations, respectively, with the latter resembling

  2. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae): congruent mtDNA and nuclear trees for a cosmopolitan avian radiation.

    PubMed

    Lovette, Irby J; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2007-09-01

    We generated a comprehensive phylogeny for the avian families Sturnidae (starlings, mynas, Rhabdornis, oxpeckers, and allies) and Mimidae (mockingbirds, thrashers, and allies) to explore patterns of morphological and behavioral diversification. Reconstructions were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences from five coding genes (4108 bp), and nuclear intron sequences from four loci (2974 bp), for most taxa, supplemented with NDII gene sequences (1041 bp) derived from museum skin specimens from additional taxa; together the 117 sampled taxa comprise 78% of the 151 species in these families and include representatives of all currently or recently recognized genera. Phylogenetic analyses consistently identified nine major clades. The basal lineage is comprised of the two Buphagus oxpeckers, which are presently confined to Africa where they are obligately associated with large mammals. Some species in nearly all of the other major clades also feed on or around large vertebrates, and this association may be an ancestral trait that fostered the world-wide dispersal of this group. The remaining taxa divide into sister clades representing the New-World Mimidae and Old-World Sturnidae. The Mimidae are divided into two subclades, a group of Central American and West Indian catbirds and thrashers, and a pan-American clade of mockingbirds and thrashers. The Sturnidae are subdivided into six clades. The Phillipine endemic Rhabdornis are the sister lineage to a larger and substantially more recent radiation of South Asian and Pacific island starlings and mynas. A clade of largely migratory or nomadic Eurasian starlings (within which the basal lineage is the model taxon Sturnus vulgaris) is allied to three groups of largely African species. These reconstructions confirm that Buphagus should not be included in the Sturnidae, and identify many genera that are not monophyletic. They also highlight the substantial diversity among the major Sturnidae subclades in rates of species

  3. An Overview of Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Skin Cancer Chemoprevention by Silibinin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer incidences are rising worldwide, and one of the major causative factors is excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Annually, ~5 million skin cancer patients are treated in United States, mostly with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), which is also frequent in other Western countries. As sunscreens do not provide adequate protection against deleterious effects of UVR, additional and alternative chemoprevention strategies are urgently needed to reduce skin cancer burden. Over the last couple of decades, extensive research has been conducted to understand the molecular basis of skin carcinogenesis, and to identifying novel agents which could be useful in the chemoprevention of skin cancer. In this regard, several natural non-toxic compounds have shown promising efficacy in preventing skin carcinogenesis at initiation, promotion and progression stages, and are considered important in better management of skin cancer. Consistent with this, we and others have studied and established the notable efficacy of natural flavonolignan silibinin against UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Extensive pre-clinical animal and cell culture studies report strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, DNA damage repair, immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative properties of silibinin. Molecular studies have identified that silibinin targets pleotropic signaling pathways including mitogenic, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, p53, NF-κB, etc. Overall, the skin cancer chemopreventive potential of silibinin is well supported by comprehensive mechanistic studies, suggesting its greater use against UV-induced cellular damages and photocarcinogenesis. PMID:26097804

  4. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2010-06-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the 'resistant hepatocyte model' (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1-2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann-Whitney and χ(2)) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  5. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  6. Role of RUNX2 in Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz; Pawlowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    RUNX2 is a transcription factor playing the major role in osteogenesis, but it can be involved in DNA damage response, which is crucial for cancer transformation. RUNX2 can interact with cell cycle regulators: cyclin-dependent kinases, pRB and p21Cip1 proteins, as well as the master regulator of the cell cycle, the p53 tumor suppressor. RUNX2 is involved in many signaling pathways, including those important for estrogen signaling, which, in turn, are significant for breast carcinogenesis. RUNX2 can promote breast cancer development through Wnt and Tgfβ signaling pathways, especially in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative cases. ERα interacts directly with RUNX2 and regulates its activity. Moreover, the ERα gene has a RUNX2 binding site within its promoter. RUNX2 stimulates the expression of aromatase, an estrogen producing enzyme, increasing the level of estrogens, which in turn stimulate cell proliferation and replication errors, which can be turned into carcinogenic mutations. Exploring the role of RUNX2 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer can lead to revealing new therapeutic targets. PMID:26404249

  7. Role of human papillomaviruses in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghittoni, Raffaella; Accardi, Rosita; Chiocca, Susanna; Tommasino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) family comprises more than 170 different types that preferentially infect the mucosa of the genitals, upper-respiratory tract, or the skin. The 'high-risk HPV type', a sub-group of mucosal HPVs, is the cause of approximately 5% of all human cancers, which corresponds to one-third of all virus-induced tumours. Within the high-risk group, HPV16 is the most oncogenic type, being responsible for approximatively 50% of all worldwide cervical cancers. Many studies suggest that, in addition to the high-risk mucosal HPV types, certain cutaneous HPVs also have a role in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Functional studies on the HPV early gene products showed that E6 and E7 play a key role in carcinogenesis. These two proteins use multiple mechanisms to evade host immune surveillance, allowing viral persistence, and to deregulate cell cycle and apoptosis control, thus facilitating the accumulation of DNA damage and ultimately cellular transformation. The demonstration that high-risk HPV types are the etiological agents of cervical cancer allowed the implementation in the clinical routine of novel screening strategies for cervical lesions, as well as the development of a very efficient prophylactic vaccine. Because of these remarkable achievements, there is no doubt that in the coming decades we will witness a dramatic reduction of cervical cancer incidence worldwide.

  8. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor) is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer. PMID:22452792

  9. Impaired glucose metabolism treatment and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    MATYSZEWSKI, ARTUR; CZARNECKA, ANNA; KAWECKI, MACIEJ; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; SAFIR, ILAN J.; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorders increase the risk of carcinogenesis. Diabetes mellitus alters numerous physiological processes that may encourage cancer growth. However, treating impaired glucose homeostasis may actually promote neoplasia; maintaining proper glucose plasma concentrations reduces metabolic stresses, however, certain medications may themselves result in oncogenic effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that metformin reduces the cancer risk. However, the use of sulfonylurea derivatives correlates with an increased risk of developing a malignancy. Another form of treatment, insulin therapy, involves using various forms of insulin that differ in pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Previous studies have indicated that certain insulin variants also affect the cancer risk. The results from analyses that address the safety of long-lasting insulin types raise the most concern regarding the increased risk of malignancy. Rapid development of novel diabetic medications and their widespread use carries the risk of potentially increased rates of cancer, unnoticeable in limited, randomized, controlled trials. In the present review, the results of clinical and epidemiological studies are evaluated to assess the safety of anti-hyperglycemic medications and their effect on cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:26622538

  10. Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

  11. [Radiation Anticarcinogenesis by Thiazolidine Pro-drug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, Raymond L.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Fain, Heidi

    1999-01-01

    The original goal of this work was to determine the capacity of selected aminothiols to modulate radiation induced cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The conclusions from this work are that WR-1065 is the "gold standard" for protection against radiation induced cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. While a potent radiation protector, WR-1065 is cytotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Our rationale for a study of the thiazolidine pro-drugs was that these compounds are neither toxic in vitro or in vivo. The results obtained during this funding period indicate that the thiazolidine pro-drugs are as potent as WR-1065 as protectors against radiation induced mutation induction, and thus presumably against radiation induced carcinogenesis. Our results indicate that the thiazolidine prodrugs are excellent candidates to test as non-toxic anticarcinogens for protecting astronauts from cancer induction during space travel.

  12. Heavy Ion Carcinogenesis and Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Durante, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Prior to the human exploration of Mars or long duration stays on the Earth s moon, the risk of cancer and other diseases from space radiation must be accurately estimated and mitigated. Space radiation, comprised of energetic protons and heavy nuclei, has been show to produce distinct biological damage compared to radiation on Earth, leading to large uncertainties in the projection of cancer and other health risks, while obscuring evaluation of the effectiveness of possible countermeasures. Here, we describe how research in cancer radiobiology can support human missions to Mars and other planets.

  13. Heavy ion carcinogenesis and human space exploration.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2008-06-01

    Before the human exploration of Mars or long-duration missions on the Earth's moon, the risk of cancer and other diseases from space radiation must be accurately estimated and mitigated. Space radiation, comprised of energetic protons and heavy nuclei, has been shown to produce distinct biological damage compared with radiation on Earth, leading to large uncertainties in the projection of cancer and other health risks, and obscuring evaluation of the effectiveness of possible countermeasures. Here, we describe how research in cancer radiobiology can support human missions to Mars and other planets. PMID:18451812

  14. Magnesium: its role in nutrition and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Urszula; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) plays a key role in many essential cellular processes such as intermediary metabolism, DNA replication and repair, transporting potassium and calcium ions, cell proliferation together with signalling transduction. Dietary sources rich in magnesium are whole and unrefined grains, seeds, cocoa, nuts, almonds and green leafy vegetables. Hard water is also considered to be an important source of magnesium beneficial to human health. The daily dietary intake of magnesium is however frequently found to be below that recommended in Western countries. Indeed, it is recognised that magnesium deficiency may lead to many disorders of the human body, where for instance magnesium depletion is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of the following; cardiovascular disease (including thrombosis, atherosclerosis, ishaemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, arrhythmias and congestive heart failure in human), as well as diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease, liver cirrhosis and diseases of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. Insufficient dietary intake of magnesium may also significantly affect the development and exacerbation ofADHD (Attention Deficit- Hyperactivity Disorder) symptoms in children. The known links between magnesium and carcinogenesis still remain unclear and complex, with conflicting results being reported from many experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies; further knowledge is thus required. Mg2+ ions are enzyme cofactors involved in DNA repair mechanisms that maintain genomic stability and fidelity. Any magnesium deficiencies could thereby cause a dysfunction of these systems to occur leading to DNA mutations. Magnesium deficiency may also be associated with inflammation and increased levels of free radicals where both inflammatory mediators and free radicals so arising could cause oxidative DNA damage and therefore tumour formation. The presented review article now provides a summary

  15. MUSTARD GAS EXPOSURE AND CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-khalili, Alireza; Haines, David D; Modirian, Ehsan; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Khateri, Shahriar; Joshi, Rashmi; Zendehdel, Kazem; Ghanei, Mostafa; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is an alkylating compound used as a chemical weapon in World War I and by Iraqi forces against Iranians and indigenous Iraqi Kurds during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. Although SM is a proven carcinogen there are conflicting views regarding the carcinogenicity of a single exposure. The present study characterizes lung cancers formed in mustard gas victims from the Iran-Iraq War. Methods and Materials Demographic information and tumor specimens were collected from 20 Iranian male lung cancer patients with single high-dose SM exposures during the Iran-Iraq war. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 protein. In addition, DNA was extracted from the tissues, PCR amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the p53 and KRAS genes associated with SM exposure. Results A relatively early age of lung cancer onset (ranging from 28 to 73 with a mean of 48) in mustard gas victims, particularly those in the non-smoking population (mean age of 40.7), may be an indication of a unique etiology for these cancers. Seven of the 20 patients developed lung cancer before the age of 40. Five of 16 cancers from which DNA sequence data was obtainable provided information on eight p53 mutations (within exons 5–8). These mutations were predominately G to A transitions; a mutation consistent with the DNA lesion caused by SM. Two of the lung cancers had multiple p53 point mutations, similar to results obtained from factory workers chronically exposed to mustard agent. No mutations were detected in the KRAS gene. Discussion The distinguishing characteristics of lung carcinogenesis in these mustard gas victims suggest that a single exposure may increase the risk of lung cancer development in some individuals. PMID:19559099

  16. Pulmonary carcinogenesis from plutonium-containing particles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Anderson, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Plutonium administered as an alpha radiation source to the respiratory tracts of Syrian hamsters has resulted in various incidences of neoplasia. Adenomas are the primary lung tumor observed, but adenocarcinomas are also prevalent.

  17. Magnesium: its role in nutrition and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, Urszula; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) plays a key role in many essential cellular processes such as intermediary metabolism, DNA replication and repair, transporting potassium and calcium ions, cell proliferation together with signalling transduction. Dietary sources rich in magnesium are whole and unrefined grains, seeds, cocoa, nuts, almonds and green leafy vegetables. Hard water is also considered to be an important source of magnesium beneficial to human health. The daily dietary intake of magnesium is however frequently found to be below that recommended in Western countries. Indeed, it is recognised that magnesium deficiency may lead to many disorders of the human body, where for instance magnesium depletion is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of the following; cardiovascular disease (including thrombosis, atherosclerosis, ishaemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, arrhythmias and congestive heart failure in human), as well as diabetes mellitus, gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease, liver cirrhosis and diseases of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. Insufficient dietary intake of magnesium may also significantly affect the development and exacerbation ofADHD (Attention Deficit- Hyperactivity Disorder) symptoms in children. The known links between magnesium and carcinogenesis still remain unclear and complex, with conflicting results being reported from many experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies; further knowledge is thus required. Mg2+ ions are enzyme cofactors involved in DNA repair mechanisms that maintain genomic stability and fidelity. Any magnesium deficiencies could thereby cause a dysfunction of these systems to occur leading to DNA mutations. Magnesium deficiency may also be associated with inflammation and increased levels of free radicals where both inflammatory mediators and free radicals so arising could cause oxidative DNA damage and therefore tumour formation. The presented review article now provides a summary

  18. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Aberrant expression and function of gap junctions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, H

    1991-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a key role in the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Reflecting deranged homeostasis in cancer cells, most transformed or cancerous cells show aberrant gap junctional intercellular communication; they have decreased junctional communication between each other and/or with surrounding normal cells. Studies with in vitro cell transformation and animal carcinogenesis models suggest an involvement of blocked intercellular communication in later stages of carcinogenesis. Analysis of expression of gap junction proteins (connexins) and corresponding mRNA indicates that a number of regulation sites are involved in aberrant function of gap junctions during carcinogenesis. Suppression of transformed phenotypes is often seen when transformed cells are physically in contact with their normal counterparts. Some studies suggest that gap junctional intercellular communication is involved in such tumor suppression. PMID:1663449

  20. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21660266

  2. Comprehensive Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Larger Text Print In this article A complex disease requires a comprehensive approach Today multiple sclerosis ( ... Your Whole Health, Your Whole Team: Managing Your Complex MS Symptoms Webinar/telelearning presented by Roz Kalb, ...

  3. The Hamster Buccal Pouch Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Kowshik, Jaganathan

    2016-01-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well-characterized animal tumor models used as a prelude to investigate multistage oral carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of chemointervention. Hamster buccal pouch carcinomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) show extensive similarities to human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The HBP model offers a number of advantages including a simple and predictable tumor induction procedure, easy accessibility for examination and follow-up of lesions, and reproducibility. This model can be used to test both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27246045

  4. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  5. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  6. Age-Related Differences in Susceptibility to Carcinogenesis: A Quantitative Analysis of Empirical Animal Bioassay Data

    PubMed Central

    Hattis, Dale; Goble, Robert; Russ, Abel; Chu, Margaret; Ericson, Jen

    2004-01-01

    In revising cancer risk assessment guidelines, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analyzed animal cancer bioassay data over different periods of life. In this article, we report an improved analysis of these data (supplemented with some chemical carcinogenesis observations not included in the U.S. EPA’s original analysis) and animal bioassay studies of ionizing radiation. We use likelihood methods to avoid excluding cases where no tumors were observed in specific groups. We express dosage for animals of different weights on a metabolically consistent basis (concentration in air or food, or per unit body weight to the three-quarters power). Finally, we use a system of dummy variables to represent exposures during fetal, preweaning, and weaning–60-day postnatal periods, yielding separate estimates of relative sensitivity per day of dosing in these intervals. Central estimate results indicate a 5- to 60-fold increased carcinogenic sensitivity in the birth–weaning period per dose ÷ (body weight0.75-day) for mutagenic carcinogens and a somewhat smaller increase—centered about 5-fold—for radiation carcinogenesis per gray. Effects were greater in males than in females. We found a similar increased sensitivity in the fetal period for direct-acting nitrosoureas, but no such increased fetal sensitivity was detected for carcinogens requiring metabolic activation. For the birth–weaning period, we found an increased sensitivity for direct administration to the pups similar to that found for indirect exposure via lactation. Radiation experiments indicated that carcinogenic sensitivity is not constant through the “adult” period, but the dosage delivered in 12- to 21-month-old animals appears a few-fold less effective than the comparable dosage delivered in young adults (90–105 days of age). PMID:15289159

  7. ICRP Publication 131: Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge of stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is reviewed regarding haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. The identity of the target cells for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive and mostly quiescent stem cell population (able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy), and, in a few tissues, to daughter progenitor cells. Several biological processes could contribute to the protection of stem cells from mutation accumulation: (1) accurate DNA repair; (2) rapid induced death of injured stem cells; (3) retention of the intact parental strand during divisions in some tissues so that mutations are passed to the daughter differentiating cells; and (4) stem cell competition, whereby undamaged stem cells outcompete damaged stem cells for residence in the vital niche. DNA repair mainly operates within a few days of irradiation, while stem cell replications and competition require weeks or many months depending on the tissue type. This foundation is used to provide a biological insight to protection issues including the linear-non-threshold and relative risk models, differences in cancer risk between tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age.

  8. ICRP Publication 131: Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge of stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is reviewed regarding haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. The identity of the target cells for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive and mostly quiescent stem cell population (able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy), and, in a few tissues, to daughter progenitor cells. Several biological processes could contribute to the protection of stem cells from mutation accumulation: (1) accurate DNA repair; (2) rapid induced death of injured stem cells; (3) retention of the intact parental strand during divisions in some tissues so that mutations are passed to the daughter differentiating cells; and (4) stem cell competition, whereby undamaged stem cells outcompete damaged stem cells for residence in the vital niche. DNA repair mainly operates within a few days of irradiation, while stem cell replications and competition require weeks or many months depending on the tissue type. This foundation is used to provide a biological insight to protection issues including the linear-non-threshold and relative risk models, differences in cancer risk between tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age. PMID:26956677

  9. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  10. PROPICONAZOLE-INDUCED CARCINOGENESIS: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a systemic foliar fungicide with a broad range of activity. Rodents fed with propiconazole at high dose resulted in diminished body weight, increased liver weight of adults and pups, and eventually liver carcinogenesis. In order to unravel the toxic processes inv...

  11. The genetic/metabolic transformation concept of carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.

    2014-01-01

    The carcinogenesis process is poorly understood and subject to varying concepts and views. A rejuvenated interest has arisen regarding the role of altered cellular intermediary metabolism in the development and progression of cancer. As a result, differing views of the implications of altered metabolism in the development of cancer exist. None of the concepts recognize and incorporate the principles of cell metabolism to cell activity, which are applicable to all cells including the carcinogenesis process. This presentation incorporates a novel concept of carcinogenesis that includes a “genetic/metabolic” transformation that encompasses these principles of cell metabolism to cell activity. The intermediary metabolism transformation is essential to provide the bioenergetic/ synthetic, growth/proliferation, and migration/invasive events of malignancy. The concept invokes an “oncogenetic transformation” for the development of neoplastic cells from their precursor normal cells; and a required “genetic/metabolic” transformation for facilitation of the development of the neoplastic cells to malignant cells with the manifestation of the malignant process. Such a concept reveals stages and events of carcinogenesis that provide approaches for the identification of biomarkers and for development of therapeutic agents. The presentation discusses the contemporary application of genetics and proteomics to altered cellular metabolism in cancer; and underscores the importance of proper integration of genetics and proteomics with biochemical and metabolic studies, and the consequences of inappropriate studies. PMID:22109079

  12. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  13. A comprehensive evaluation of different radiation models in a gas turbine combustor under conditions of oxy-fuel combustion with dry recycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kez, V.; Liu, F.; Consalvi, J. L.; Ströhle, J.; Epple, B.

    2016-03-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion is a promising CO2 capture technology from combustion systems. This process is characterized by much higher CO2 concentrations in the combustion system compared to that of the conventional air-fuel combustion. To accurately predict the enhanced thermal radiation in oxy-fuel combustion, it is essential to take into account the non-gray nature of gas radiation. In this study, radiation heat transfer in a 3D model gas turbine combustor under two test cases at 20 atm total pressure was calculated by various non-gray gas radiation models, including the statistical narrow-band (SNB) model, the statistical narrow-band correlated-k (SNBCK) model, the wide-band correlated-k (WBCK) model, the full spectrum correlated-k (FSCK) model, and several weighted sum of gray gases (WSGG) models. Calculations of SNB, SNBCK, and FSCK were conducted using the updated EM2C SNB model parameters. Results of the SNB model are considered as the benchmark solution to evaluate the accuracy of the other models considered. Results of SNBCK and FSCK are in good agreement with the benchmark solution. The WBCK model is less accurate than SNBCK or FSCK. Considering the three formulations of the WBCK model, the multiple gases formulation is the best choice regarding the accuracy and computational cost. The WSGG model with the parameters of Bordbar et al. (2014) [20] is the most accurate of the three investigated WSGG models. Use of the gray WSSG formulation leads to significant deviations from the benchmark data and should not be applied to predict radiation heat transfer in oxy-fuel combustion systems. A best practice to incorporate the state-of-the-art gas radiation models for high accuracy of radiation heat transfer calculations at minimal increase in computational cost in CFD simulation of oxy-fuel combustion systems for pressure path lengths up to about 10 bar m is suggested.

  14. Arsenic toxicity, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis--a health risk assessment and management approach.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Paul B; Centeno, Jose A; Patlolla, Anita K

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of published data indicates that arsenic exposure induces cardiovascular diseases, developmental abnormalities, neurologic and neurobehavioral disorders, diabetes, hearing loss, hematologic disorders, and various types of cancer. Although exposure may occur via the dermal, and parenteral routes, the main pathways of exposure include ingestion, and inhalation. The severity of adverse health effects is related to the chemical form of arsenic, and is also time- and dose-dependent. Recent reports have pointed out that arsenic poisoning appears to be one of the major public health problems of pandemic nature. Acute and chronic exposure to arsenic has been reported in several countries of the world where a large proportion of drinking water (groundwater) is contaminated with high concentrations of arsenic. Research has also pointed significantly higher standardized mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, kidney, skin, liver, and colon in many areas of arsenic pollution. There is therefore a great need for developing a comprehensive health risk assessment (RA) concept that should be used by public health officials and environmental managers for an effective management of the health effects associated with arsenic exposure. With a special emphasis on arsenic toxicity, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, this paper is aimed at using the National Academy of Science's RA framework as a guide, for developing a RA paradigm for arsenic based on a comprehensive analysis of the currently available scientific information on its physical and chemical properties, production and use, fate and transport, toxicokinetics, systemic and carcinogenic health effects, regulatory and health guidelines, analytical guidelines and treatment technologies.

  15. On Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintsch, Walter

    Attempts have been made to develop a model of the process of reading comprehension as a whole that would indicate under what conditions and for what reasons a long sentence might be more effective than several short ones, when repetition is helpful and when distracting, when content is better left implicit in a text, and how overexplicitness might…

  16. Results of a comprehensive atmospheric aerosol-radiation experiment in the southwestern United States. I - Size distribution, extinction optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosols suspended in the atmosphere. II - Radiation flux measurements and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluisi, J. J.; Furukawa, F. M.; Gillette, D. A.; Schuster, B. G.; Charlson, R. J.; Porch, W. M.; Fegley, R. W.; Herman, B. M.; Rabinoff, R. A.; Twitty, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for a field test that was aimed at acquiring a sufficient set of measurements of aerosol properties required as input for radiative-transfer calculations relevant to the earth's radiation balance. These measurements include aerosol extinction and size distributions, vertical profiles of aerosols, and radiation fluxes. Physically consistent, vertically inhomogeneous models of the aerosol characteristics of a turbid atmosphere over a desert and an agricultural region are constructed by using direct and indirect sampling techniques. These results are applied for a theoretical interpretation of airborne radiation-flux measurements. The absorption term of the complex refractive index of aerosols is estimated, a regional variation in the refractive index is noted, and the magnitude of solar-radiation absorption by aerosols and atmospheric molecules is determined.

  17. Calcium role in human carcinogenesis: a comprehensive analysis and critical review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kadio, Bernard; Yaya, Sanni; Basak, Ajoy; Djè, Koffi; Gomes, James; Mesenge, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The central role played by calcium ion in biological systems has generated an interest for its potential implication in human malignancies. Thus, lines of research, on possible association of calcium metabolism regulation with tumorigenesis, implying disruptions and/or alterations of known molecular pathways, have been extensively researched in the recent decades. This paper is a critical synthesis of these findings, based on a functional approach of the calcium signaling toolkit. It provides strong support that this ubiquitous divalent cation is involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression. Different pathways have been outlined, involving equally different molecular and cellular structures. However, if the association between calcium and cancer can be described as constant, it is not always linear. We have identified several influencing factors among which the most relevant are (i) the changes in local or tissular concentrations of free calcium and (ii) the histological and physiological types of tissue involved. Such versatility at the molecular level may probably account for the conflicting findings reported by the epidemiological literature on calcium dietary intake and the risk to develop certain cancers such as the prostatic or mammary neoplasms. However, it also fuels the hypothesis that behind each cancer, a specific calcium pathway can be evidenced. Identifying such molecular interactions is probably a promising approach for further understanding and treatment options for the disease. PMID:27514544

  18. Dysregulation of host cellular genes targeted by human papillomavirus (HPV) integration contributes to HPV‐related cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruiyang; Shen, Congle; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jianliu; McCrae, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral DNA into the human genome has been postulated as an important etiological event during cervical carcinogenesis. Several recent reports suggested a possible role for such integration‐targeted cellular genes (ITGs) in cervical carcinogenesis. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of HPV integration events was undertaken using data collected from 14 publications, with 499 integration loci on human chromosomes included. It revealed that HPV DNA preferred to integrate into intragenic regions and gene‐dense regions of human chromosomes. Intriguingly, the host cellular genes nearby the integration sites were found to be more transcriptionally active compared with control. Furthermore, analysis of the integration sites in the human genome revealed that there were several integration hotspots although all chromosomes were represented. The ITGs identified were found to be enriched in tumor‐related terms and pathways using gene ontology and KEGG analysis. In line with this, three of six ITGs tested were found aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer tissues. Among them, it was demonstrated for the first time that MPPED2 could induce HeLa cell and SiHa cell G1/S transition block and cell proliferation retardation. Moreover, “knocking out” the integrated HPV fragment in HeLa cell line decreased expression of MYC located ∼500 kb downstream of the integration site, which provided the first experimental evidence supporting the hypothesis that integrated HPV fragment influence MYC expression via long distance chromatin interaction. Overall, the results of this comprehensive analysis implicated that dysregulation of ITGs caused by viral integration as possibly having an etiological involvement in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:26417997

  19. Dysregulation of host cellular genes targeted by human papillomavirus (HPV) integration contributes to HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiyang; Shen, Congle; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jianliu; McCrae, Malcolm; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2016-03-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral DNA into the human genome has been postulated as an important etiological event during cervical carcinogenesis. Several recent reports suggested a possible role for such integration-targeted cellular genes (ITGs) in cervical carcinogenesis. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of HPV integration events was undertaken using data collected from 14 publications, with 499 integration loci on human chromosomes included. It revealed that HPV DNA preferred to integrate into intragenic regions and gene-dense regions of human chromosomes. Intriguingly, the host cellular genes nearby the integration sites were found to be more transcriptionally active compared with control. Furthermore, analysis of the integration sites in the human genome revealed that there were several integration hotspots although all chromosomes were represented. The ITGs identified were found to be enriched in tumor-related terms and pathways using gene ontology and KEGG analysis. In line with this, three of six ITGs tested were found aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer tissues. Among them, it was demonstrated for the first time that MPPED2 could induce HeLa cell and SiHa cell G1/S transition block and cell proliferation retardation. Moreover, "knocking out" the integrated HPV fragment in HeLa cell line decreased expression of MYC located ∼500 kb downstream of the integration site, which provided the first experimental evidence supporting the hypothesis that integrated HPV fragment influence MYC expression via long distance chromatin interaction. Overall, the results of this comprehensive analysis implicated that dysregulation of ITGs caused by viral integration as possibly having an etiological involvement in cervical carcinogenesis.

  20. Genetic component in rat mammary carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.J. Jr.; Turner, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    Five genetically defined strains of female rats were exposed to whole-body radiation with a single dose of 50 rad of fission neutrons. After 1 year 56% of the Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawely strains showed at least one mammary tumor; 25-29% of the Buffalo and Fischer-344 strains and only 5% of the Wistar-Lewis strain and palpable mammary tumors. Only one tumor was found among 73 unirradiated controls during the 1-year observation period. Approximately two-thirds of 50 mammary analyzed pathologically were adenofibromas and fibroadenomas; one-third were adenocarcinomas. The Kaplan-Meier method of life table analysis was used to deal with the problem of intercurrent mortality. A genetic factor seems evident in rat mammary tumorigenesis following exposure to fission neutrons.

  1. Vitamin D in cutaneous carcinogenesis: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jean Y.; Fu, Teresa; Lau, Christopher; Oh, Dennis H.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Asgari, Maryam M.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is a known risk factor for skin cancer but is also the principal means by which the body obtains vitamin D. Several studies have suggested that vitamin D plays a protective role in a variety of internal malignancies. With regard to skin cancer, epidemiologic and laboratory studies suggest that vitamin D and its metabolites may have a similar protective effect. These noncalcemic actions of vitamin D have called into question whether the current recommended intake of vitamin D is too low for optimal health and cancer prevention. Part I will review the role of vitamin D in the epidermis; part II will review the role of vitamin D in keratinocyte-derived tumors to help frame the discussion on the possible role of vitamin D in the prevention of skin cancer. PMID:23062903

  2. The comprehensive model system COSMO-ART - radiative impact of aerosol on the state of the atmosphere on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Bäumer, D.; Bangert, M.; Lundgren, K.; Rinke, R.; Stanelle, T.

    2009-07-01

    A new fully online coupled model system developed for the evaluation of the interaction of aerosol particles with the atmosphere on the regional scale is described. The model system is based on the operational weather forecast model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst. Physical processes like transport, turbulent diffusion, and dry and wet deposition are treated together with photochemistry and aerosol dynamics using the modal approach. Based on detailed calculations we have developed parameterizations to examine the impact of aerosol particles on photolysis and on radiation. Currently the model allows feedback between natural and anthropogenic aerosol particles and the atmospheric variables that are initialized by the modification of the radiative fluxes. The model system is applied to two summer episodes, each lasting five days, with a model domain covering Western Europe and adjacent regions. The first episode is characterised by almost cloud free conditions and the second one by cloudy conditions. The simulated aerosol concentrations are compared to observations made at 700 stations distributed over Western Europe. For each episode two model runs are performed; one where the feedback between the aerosol particles and the atmosphere is taken into account and a second one where the feedback is neglected. Comparing these two sets of model runs, the radiative feedback on temperature and other variables is evaluated. In the cloud free case a clear correlation between the aerosol optical depth and changes in global radiation and temperature is found. In the case of cloudy conditions the pure radiative effects are superposed by changes in the liquid water content of the clouds due to changes in the thermodynamics of the atmosphere. In this case the correlation between the aerosol optical depth and its effects on temperature is low. However, on average a decrease in the 2 m temperature is still found. In both cases a reduction in the daily temperature range, due to the

  3. The comprehensive model system COSMO-ART - Radiative impact of aerosol on the state of the atmosphere on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Bäumer, D.; Bangert, M.; Lundgren, K.; Rinke, R.; Stanelle, T.

    2009-11-01

    A new fully online coupled model system developed for the evaluation of the interaction of aerosol particles with the atmosphere on the regional scale is described. The model system is based on the operational weather forecast model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst. Physical processes like transport, turbulent diffusion, and dry and wet deposition are treated together with photochemistry and aerosol dynamics using the modal approach. Based on detailed calculations we have developed parameterisations to examine the impact of aerosol particles on photolysis and on radiation. Currently the model allows feedback between natural and anthropogenic aerosol particles and the atmospheric variables that are initialized by the modification of the radiative fluxes. The model system is applied to two summer episodes, each lasting five days, with a model domain covering Western Europe and adjacent regions. The first episode is characterised by almost cloud free conditions and the second one by cloudy conditions. The simulated aerosol concentrations are compared to observations made at 700 stations distributed over Western Europe. For each episode two model runs are performed; one where the feedback between the aerosol particles and the atmosphere is taken into account and a second one where the feedback is neglected. Comparing these two sets of model runs, the radiative feedback on temperature and other variables is evaluated. In the cloud free case a clear correlation between the aerosol optical depth and changes in global radiation and temperature is found. In the case of cloudy conditions the pure radiative effects are superposed by changes in the liquid water content of the clouds due to changes in the thermodynamics of the atmosphere. In this case the correlation between the aerosol optical depth and its effects on temperature is low. However, on average a decrease in the 2 m temperature is still found. For the area of Germany we found on average for both cases a reduction in

  4. Special issue: space radiation biology.

    PubMed

    2004-12-01

    This special issue about the biological effects of space radiation on human health is concerned with cell death, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, developmental abnormalities, carcinogenesis, and senescence. Articles examine the effects of space radiation consisting of heavy charged particles with a low dose and low dose-rate and their possible dependence on microbeams, clustered DNA damage, bystander effects, and radioadaptive responses, which are important factors in radiation sensitivity. Topics also include the effects of microgravity on the relative biological effectiveness of space radiation and the effects of solar ultraviolet particles. PMID:15887353

  5. Mobile Technology and Social Media in the Clinical Practice of Young Radiation Oncologists: Results of a Comprehensive Nationwide Cross-sectional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Leroy, Thomas; Blanchard, Pierre; Biau, Julian; Cervellera, Mathilde; Diaz, Olivia; Faivre, Jean Christophe; and others

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated. Methods and Materials: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional survey to better assess how young radiation oncologists used these technologies. An online survey was sent out between April 24, 2013, and June 1, 2013. All residents attending the 2013 radiation oncology French summer course were invited to complete the survey. Logistic regressions were performed to assess predictors of use of these tools in the hospital on various clinical endpoints. Results: In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account. Conclusions: Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital.

  6. Comprehensive data on ionising radiation from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the town of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture: The Misho Project.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Suzuki, Y; Genyu, S; Kobayashi, I; Komori, H; Otsu, H; Sakuma, H; Sakuma, K; Sarausad, E M; Shimada, K; Shinozuka, T; Tamura, H; Tsukada, K; Ukai, M; Yamamoto, T O

    2014-09-01

    Data related to radioactivity released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 15 March 2011 gathered by residents of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture, and by Tohoku University are presented. These data sets consist of (1) the earliest radiation monitoring by a Geiger counter in the town, (2) ratios of radioactivity between (132)Te and (137)Cs for a wide area between Fukushima and Tokyo, (3) radiation measurement of soil samples collected from 18 school grounds, and (4) external radiation exposure of 1400 students using OSL badges. By combining and analysing these various data sets, a curve for the cumulative total external exposure as a function of time, with 16 : 00 h on 15 March 2011 being time zero, is obtained. The average cumulative external dosage is estimated to be 10 mSv (σ = 4.2 mSv) over 10 years. In addition, the initiative that the residents of Miharu took in response to the FDNPP accident, which became known as The Misho Project (MP), is documented; in particular, the time at which the municipality instructed the immediate ingestion of iodine tablets by those under the age of 40, 13 : 00 h on 15 March 2011, is assessed.

  7. Comprehensive data on ionising radiation from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the town of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture: The Misho Project.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Suzuki, Y; Genyu, S; Kobayashi, I; Komori, H; Otsu, H; Sakuma, H; Sakuma, K; Sarausad, E M; Shimada, K; Shinozuka, T; Tamura, H; Tsukada, K; Ukai, M; Yamamoto, T O

    2014-09-01

    Data related to radioactivity released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 15 March 2011 gathered by residents of Miharu, Fukushima Prefecture, and by Tohoku University are presented. These data sets consist of (1) the earliest radiation monitoring by a Geiger counter in the town, (2) ratios of radioactivity between (132)Te and (137)Cs for a wide area between Fukushima and Tokyo, (3) radiation measurement of soil samples collected from 18 school grounds, and (4) external radiation exposure of 1400 students using OSL badges. By combining and analysing these various data sets, a curve for the cumulative total external exposure as a function of time, with 16 : 00 h on 15 March 2011 being time zero, is obtained. The average cumulative external dosage is estimated to be 10 mSv (σ = 4.2 mSv) over 10 years. In addition, the initiative that the residents of Miharu took in response to the FDNPP accident, which became known as The Misho Project (MP), is documented; in particular, the time at which the municipality instructed the immediate ingestion of iodine tablets by those under the age of 40, 13 : 00 h on 15 March 2011, is assessed. PMID:25125455

  8. EFFECT OF ARSENICALS ON ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION-INDUCED GROWTH ARREST AND RELATED SIGNALING EVENTS IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular mechanisms mediating arsenic-induced carcinogenesis are not well understood. The role of confounding factors such as ultraviolet radiation (UV), add another level of complexity to the study of arsenic carcinogenesis and the cancer risk assessment to humans. We hypot...

  9. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  10. Epigenetics in metal carcinogenesis: nickel, arsenic, chromium and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Arita, Adriana; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Although carcinogenic metals have been known to disrupt a wide range of cellular processes the precise mechanism by which these exert their carcinogenic effects is not known. Over the last decade or two, studies in the field of metal carcinogenesis suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in metal-induced carcinogenesis. In this review we summarize the evidence demonstrating that exposure to carcinogenic metals such as nickel, arsenic, chromium, and cadmium can perturb DNA methylation levels as well as global and gene specific histone tail posttranslational modification marks. We also wish to emphasize the importance in understanding that gene expression can be regulated by both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms and both these must be considered when studying the mechanism underlying the toxicity and cell-transforming ability of carcinogenic metals and other toxicants, and aberrant changes in gene expression that occur during disease states such as cancer.

  11. Epigenetic targets of arsenic: emphasis on epigenetic modifications during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ram Vinod; Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Hitron, John Andrew; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; D, Rakesh; Kim, Donghern; Yin, Yuanqin; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modification promote opening and closure of chromatin structure, which affects gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetic markers regulate the dynamic nature of chromatin structure at different levels: DNA, histone, noncoding RNAs, as well as the higher-order chromatin structure. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that arsenic-induced carcinogenesis involves frequent changes in the epigenetic marker. However, progress in identifying arsenic-induced epigenetic changes has already been made using genome-wide approaches; the biological significance of these epigenetic changes remains unknown. Moreover, arsenic-induced changes in the chromatin state alter gene expression through the epigenetic mechanism. The current review provides a summary of recent literature regarding epigenetic changes caused by arsenic in carcinogenesis. We highlight the transgenerational studies needed to explicate the biological significance and toxicity of arsenic over a broad spectrum.

  12. Role of traditional and new biomarkers in breast carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macis, D; Cazzaniga, M; De Censi, A; Bonanni, B

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades, several biomarkers have been investigated as predictors of breast cancer risk, development, prognosis and treatment efficacy. The detection of biomarkers strongly associated with breast carcinogenesis has an enormous potential, especially for selecting subjects at high risk of developing breast cancer who could benefit from chemopreventive treatments. Although the number of potential biomarkers continues to increase, a unique biomarker for breast cancer risk prediction has not been identified and it is probable that a panel of biomarkers will prove optimal. Further studies are needed to validate breast cancer biomarkers evaluation for individual risk assessment. This review summarizes the main biomarkers, which are important at different stages of breast carcinogenesis with updates from the recent literature. PMID:22276018

  13. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurushankar, K.; Gohulkumar, M.; Kumar, Piyush; Krishna, C. Murali; Krishnakumar, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800-500 cm-1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  14. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  15. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Compton, P J; Hooper, K; Smith, M T

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutation can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed. PMID:1954924

  16. Does the Measles Virus Contribute to Carcinogenesis? - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob; Ariad, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    An association between the measles virus and classical Hodgkin lymphoma has previously been suggested by us. This has been refuted by two European groups. A reevaluation of the arguments held against our thesis was carried out and further evidence for a relationship between the measles virus and additional solid tumors has been presented. We have suggested a molecular mechanism to support a possible contribution of the virus to carcinogenesis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:24494027

  17. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  18. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  19. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  20. Requirement of TGFβ Signaling for SMO-mediated Carcinogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qipeng; He, Miao; Sheng, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Zhao, Xingbo; Xie, Jingwu

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, via the key signal transducer Smoothened (SMO) and Gli transcription factors, is essential for embryonic development and carcinogenesis. At present, the molecular mechanism of Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis is not completely understood. Using a mouse model (K14cre/R26SmoM2) of SMO-mediated basal cell carcinoma development, we identified TGFβ2 as a major Hh-regulated gene. TGFβ2 expression was high in the keratinocytes, with activated TGFβ signaling (indicated by elevated expression of phosphorylated SMAD2/3) detected in both tumor and stroma. The significance of TGFβ signaling for SMO function was demonstrated in two assays. Down-regulation of TGFβ2 expression prevented Hh signaling-dependent osteoblast differentiation and motor neuron differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of TGFβ signaling by TGFβ receptor I inhibitor SD208 significantly reduced tumor area in K14cre/R26SmoM2 mice. Tumor shrinkage in mice was associated with an increased number of lymphocytes, suggesting an immune suppression role of TGFβ signaling. The relevance of our results to human cancer is reflected by the fact that human basal cell carcinomas, which almost always harbor activated Hh signaling, have activated TGFβ signaling, as indicated by high levels of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD3 in tumor and stroma. Together, our data indicate that TGFβ signaling is critical for Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:20858897

  1. A genetic model for gallbladder carcinogenesis and its dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, S. G.; Dutt, A.; Chaudhary, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer, although regarded as the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, continues to be associated with a dismal overall survival even in the present day. While complete surgical removal of the tumour offers a good chance of cure, only a fraction of the patients are amenable to curative surgery owing to their delayed presentation. Moreover, the current contribution of adjuvant therapies towards prolonging survival is marginal, at best. Thus, understanding the biology of the disease will not only enable a better appreciation of the pathways of progression but also facilitate the development of an accurate genetic model for gallbladder carcinogenesis and dissemination. This review provides an updated, evidence-based model of the pathways of carcinogenesis in gallbladder cancer and its dissemination. The model proposed could serve as the scaffolding for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in gallbladder carcinogenesis. A better understanding of the pathways involved in gallbladder tumorigenesis will serve to identify patients at risk for the cancer (and who thus could be offered prophylactic cholecystectomy) as well as aid oncologists in planning the most suitable treatment for a particular patient, thereby setting us on the vanguard of transforming the current treatment paradigm for gallbladder cancer. PMID:24705974

  2. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  3. Fifty years of tobacco carcinogenesis research: from mechanisms to early detection and prevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Stephen S; Szabo, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The recognition of the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer in the 1964 Surgeon General's Report initiated definitive and comprehensive research on the identification of carcinogens in tobacco products and the relevant mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The resultant comprehensive data clearly illustrate established pathways of cancer induction involving carcinogen exposure, metabolic activation, DNA adduct formation, and consequent mutation of critical genes along with the exacerbating influences of inflammation, cocarcinogenesis, and tumor promotion. This mechanistic understanding has provided a framework for the regulation of tobacco products and for the development of relevant tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers that can be applied in cancer prevention. Simultaneously, the recognition of the link between smoking and lung cancer paved the way for two additional critical approaches to cancer prevention that are discussed here: detection of lung cancer at an early, curable stage, and chemoprevention of lung cancer. Recent successes in more precisely identifying at-risk populations and in decreasing lung cancer mortality with helical computed tomography screening are notable, and progress in chemoprevention continues, although challenges with respect to bringing these approaches to the general population exist. Collectively, research performed since the 1964 Report demonstrates unequivocally that the majority of deaths from lung cancer are preventable.

  4. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Comprehensive progress report, July 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    This project seeks to defining the chromosome segments associated with radiation induced leukemogenesis (treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, or t-AML). Towards these goals genetic analysis of human chromosomes 5 and 7 continues to investigate correlation of treatment with balanced and unbalanced chromosomal translocations. Progress is being made in cloning the breakpoints in balanced translocations in t-AML, that is to clone the t(9;11) and t(11;19) breakpoints, to clone the t(3;21)(q26;q22) breakpoints and to determine the relationship of these translocations to prior exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 11 figs. 3 figs.

  5. Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Brooks, Antone L.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Patton, Kristin M.; McComish, Stacey; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis.

  6. Attribution of different volcano eruptions to injected SO2 from satellite data and implications for radiative forcing calculated by a comprehensive CCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallock, Jennifer; Brühl, Christoph; Lelieveld, Jos; Bingen, Christine; Höpfner, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions have important radiative effects on climate through impacts on the stratospheric aerosol layer. They have been estimated by analyzing satellite data for anomalies in stratospheric SO2 concentration and aerosol extinction. For this work we used the data of different satellites: MIPAS, GOMOS, OMI and TOMS to cover the time period 2002-2012. It is important to use multiple satellite data sources to compensate for data gaps of individual sensors. The result is a list of about 150 volcanic eruptions (small to medium) that reach the stratosphere directly or by transport from the upper troposphere. Some eruptions have only a regional effect while other SO2 plumes are transported globally. This depends on injection height, latitude, season and circulation patterns (e.g. monsoon). Because of dispersion and advection it is difficult to identify single eruptions in a 2D data field with monthly zonal means, therefore, it is important to use 3D data fields. We find that a temporal resolution of about 5 days and a spatial resolution of 60 degrees longitude and 10 degrees latitude is a good compromise to have sufficient coverage. The volcanic SO2 data in different complexity were used in transient simulations with the atmospheric chemistry circulation model EMAC. It is demonstrated that the neglect of smaller eruptions or the application of only the MIPAS data set significantly underestimates volcanic radiative forcing.

  7. Mechanisms of multistep carcinogenesis and carcinogen risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    Many different types of chemical exposures can increase the incidence of tumors in animals and humans, but usually a long period of time is required before the carcinogenic risk of an exposure is manifested. Both of these observations can be explained by a multistep/multigene model of carcinogenesis. In this model, a normal cell evolves into a cancer cell as the result of heritable changes in multiple, independent genes. The two-stage model of initiation and promotion for chemical carcinogenesis has provided a paradigm by which chemicals can act by qualitatively different mechanisms, but the process of carcinogenesis is now recognized as more complex than simply initiation and promotion. Even a three-stage model of initiation, promotion, and progression, which can be operationally defined, is not adequate to describe the carcinogenic process. The number of genes altered in a cancer cell compared to a normal cell is not known; recent evidence suggests that 3-10 genetic events are involved in common adult malignancies in humans. Two distinct classes of genes, protooncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, are involved in the cancer process. Multiple oncogenes may be activated in a tumor, while multiple tumor-suppressor genes may be inactivated. Identification of the genes involved in carcinogenesis and elucidation of the mechanisms of their activation or inactivation allows a better understanding of how chemical carcinogens influence the process of neoplastic evolution. The findings of multiple genetic changes (including point mutations, chromosomal translocations, deletions, gene amplification, and numerical chromosome changes) in activated protooncogenes and inactivated tumor-suppressor genes provide experimental support for Boveri's somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. In addition to mutagenic mechanisms, chemicals may heritably alter cells by epigenetic mechanisms and enhance the clonal expansion of altered cells. Most chemical carcinogens operate via a

  8. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  9. Comprehensive evaluations of cone-beam CT dose in image-guided radiation therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Davide; Scolari, Enrica; Silvestri, Chiara; Jiang Graves, Yan; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2014-03-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are (1) to commission a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and (2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. Twenty-five brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is found that the mean dose value to an organ varies largely among patients. Moreover, dose distribution is highly non-homogeneous inside an organ. The maximum dose is found to be 1-3 times higher than the mean dose depending on the organ, and is up to eight times higher for the entire body due to the very high dose region in bony structures. High computational efficiency has also been observed in our studies, such that MC dose calculation time is less than 5 min for a typical case.

  10. SU-F-18C-01: Minimum Detectability Analysis for Comprehensive Sized Based Optimization of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Across CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, C; Chen, B; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work involved a comprehensive modeling of task-based performance of CT across a wide range of protocols. The approach was used for optimization and consistency of dose and image quality within a large multi-vendor clinical facility. Methods: 150 adult protocols from the Duke University Medical Center were grouped into sub-protocols with similar acquisition characteristics. A size based image quality phantom (Duke Mercury Phantom) was imaged using these sub-protocols for a range of clinically relevant doses on two CT manufacturer platforms (Siemens, GE). The images were analyzed to extract task-based image quality metrics such as the Task Transfer Function (TTF), Noise Power Spectrum, and Az based on designer nodule task functions. The data were analyzed in terms of the detectability of a lesion size/contrast as a function of dose, patient size, and protocol. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed to predict image quality and dose to achieve a minimum level of detectability. Results: Image quality trends with variations in dose, patient size, and lesion contrast/size were evaluated and calculated data behaved as predicted. The GUI proved effective to predict the Az values representing radiologist confidence for a targeted lesion, patient size, and dose. As an example, an abdomen pelvis exam for the GE scanner, with a task size/contrast of 5-mm/50-HU, and an Az of 0.9 requires a dose of 4.0, 8.9, and 16.9 mGy for patient diameters of 25, 30, and 35 cm, respectively. For a constant patient diameter of 30 cm, the minimum detected lesion size at those dose levels would be 8.4, 5, and 3.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The designed CT protocol optimization platform can be used to evaluate minimum detectability across dose levels and patient diameters. The method can be used to improve individual protocols as well as to improve protocol consistency across CT scanners.

  11. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    R Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  12. The evolution of the cancer niche during multistage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Lyden, David; Wang, Timothy C

    2013-07-01

    The concept of the tumour microenvironment recognizes that the interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells is a crucial determinant of cancer growth. In this Perspectives article, we propose the novel concept that the tumour microenvironment is built through rate-limiting steps during multistage carcinogenesis. Construction of a 'precancer niche' is a necessary and early step that is required for initiated cells to survive and evolve; subsequent niche expansion and maturation accompany tumour promotion and progression, respectively. As such, cancer niches represent an emergent property of a tumour that could be a robust target for cancer prevention and therapy.

  13. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  14. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  15. Small non-coding RNA deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravo, Maria; Cordella, Angela; Rinaldi, Antonio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Alexandrova, Elena; Saggese, Pasquale; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Tarallo, Roberta; Marchese, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Biancardi, Rossella; Troisi, Jacopo; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Zullo, Fulvio; Weisz, Alessandro; Guida, Maurizio

    2015-03-10

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of <200nt-long transcripts comprising microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and small-nucleolar-RNAs (snoRNAs) involved in physiological and pathological processes such as carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Aberrant sncRNA expression in cancer has been associated with specific clinical phenotypes, grading, staging, metastases development and resistance to therapy.Aim of the present work is to study the role of sncRNAs in endometrial carcinogenesis. Changes in sncRNA expression were identified by high-throughput genomic analysis of paired normal, hyperplastic and cancerous endometrial tissues obtained by endometrial biopsies (n = 10). Using smallRNA sequencing and microarrays we identified significant differences in sncRNA expression pattern between normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium. This led to the definition of a sncRNA signature (129 microRNAs, 2 of which not previously described, 10 piRNAs and 3 snoRNAs) of neoplastic transformation. Functional bioinformatics analysis identified as downstream targets multiple signaling pathways potentially involved in the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue responses, including Wnt/β-catenin, and ERK/MAPK and TGF-β-Signaling.Considering the regulatory role of sncRNAs, this newly identified sncRNA signature is likely to reflect the events leading to endometrial cancer, which can be exploited to dissect the carcinogenic process including novel biomarkers for early and non-invasive diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25686835

  16. Small non-coding RNA deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ravo, Maria; Cordella, Angela; Rinaldi, Antonio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Alexandrova, Elena; Saggese, Pasquale; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Tarallo, Roberta; Marchese, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Biancardi, Rossella; Troisi, Jacopo; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Zullo, Fulvio; Weisz, Alessandro; Guida, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of <200nt-long transcripts comprising microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and small-nucleolar-RNAs (snoRNAs) involved in physiological and pathological processes such as carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Aberrant sncRNA expression in cancer has been associated with specific clinical phenotypes, grading, staging, metastases development and resistance to therapy. Aim of the present work is to study the role of sncRNAs in endometrial carcinogenesis. Changes in sncRNA expression were identified by high-throughput genomic analysis of paired normal, hyperplastic and cancerous endometrial tissues obtained by endometrial biopsies (n = 10). Using smallRNA sequencing and microarrays we identified significant differences in sncRNA expression pattern between normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium. This led to the definition of a sncRNA signature (129 microRNAs, 2 of which not previously described, 10 piRNAs and 3 snoRNAs) of neoplastic transformation. Functional bioinformatics analysis identified as downstream targets multiple signaling pathways potentially involved in the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue responses, including Wnt/β-catenin, and ERK/MAPK and TGF-β-Signaling. Considering the regulatory role of sncRNAs, this newly identified sncRNA signature is likely to reflect the events leading to endometrial cancer, which can be exploited to dissect the carcinogenic process including novel biomarkers for early and non-invasive diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25686835

  17. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  18. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  19. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  20. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  1. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  2. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  3. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  4. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate. PMID:25339587

  5. Biological parameters for lung cancer in mathematical models of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Jacob, V

    2003-01-01

    Applications of the two-step model of carcinogenesis with clonal expansion (TSCE) to lung cancer data are reviewed, including those on atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. British doctors, Colorado Plateau miners and Chinese tin miners. Different sets of identifiable model parameters are used in the literature. The parameter set which could be determined with the lowest uncertainty consists of the net proliferation rate gamma of intermediate cells, the hazard h55 at an intermediate age and the hazard h(infinity) at an asymptotically large age. Also, the values of these three parameters obtained in the various studies are more consistent than other identifiable combinations of the biological parameters. Based on representative results for these three parameters, implications for the biological parameters in the TSCE model are derived. PMID:14579892

  6. Multi-step pancreatic carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, G H; Tsiotou, A G

    1999-12-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer relates mainly to its delayed diagnosis. It has been repeatedly shown that earlier diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is associated with a better outcome. Molecular diagnostic methods (mainly detection of K-ras mutations in pure pancreatic or duodenal juice, on specimens obtained by percutaneous fine-needle aspirations or in stool specimens) can achieve earlier diagnosis in selected subgroups of patients, such as patients with chronic pancreatitis (especially hereditary), adults with recent onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and patients with some inherited disorders that predispose to the development of pancreatic cancer. There is increasing evidence that pancreatic carcinogenesis is a multi-step phenomenon. Screening procedures for precursor lesions in these selected subgroups of patients may reduce the incidence and mortality from pancreatic cancer.

  7. The transient receptor potential type vanilloid 1 suppresses skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Zheng, Duo; Zhu, Feng; Ericson, Marna E; Ma, Wei-Ya; Yao, Ke; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Blockade of the transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) is suggested as a therapeutic approach to pain relief. However, TRPV1 is a widely expressed protein whose function might be critical in various non-neuronal physiological conditions. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed in many human epithelial cancers and is a potential target for anticancer drugs. Here we show that TRPV1 interacts with the EGFR leading to EGFR degradation. Notably, the absence of TRPV1 in mice results in a striking increase in skin carcinogenesis. The TRPV1 is the first membrane receptor shown to have a tumor-suppressing effect associated with the downregulation of another membrane receptor. The data suggest that even though a great deal of interest has focused on the TRPV1 as a target for pain relief, the chronic blockade of this pain receptor might increase the risk for cancer development. PMID:19155296

  8. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  9. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Henrique O.; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A.

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients’ response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  10. Effect of DMSO and DMBA hamster pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Hidalgo, F.; Miller, E.G.; Binnie, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of mucosal surfaces by chemical carcinogens is required for tumor induction. The effectiveness of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a carrier for carcinogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine what effect DMSO would have on the 9,10-dimethyl- 1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenesis in the hamster cheek pouch. Thirty Syrian golden hamsters were divided into two groups: the control group received a topical application of 0.5% DMBA in mineral oil three times per week for 16 weeks, while the experimental group received a topical application of DMSO previous to each DMBA application. At autopsy, both groups had developed tumors, the tumor ratio of control to experimental was 3.5:1.9 and the average size of tumors was 2.2 to 1.9 mm sq. The results suggest that DMSO interfered with the usual DMBA induction mechanism.

  11. Key Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms in Chemical Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Sammarini, Gulia; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    DNA sequence and genetic factors alone cannot fully explain the many processes implicated in diseases initiation and development. It is now well understood that additional factors are involved in a final resulting phenotype. Epigenetic modifications, heritable changes not affecting the DNA sequence, are a key phenomenon at the basis of normal growth and differentiation. However, these can be defective leading to diseases, such as cancer. An increasing body of literature reports the environmental and occupational exposure to a mixture of natural and man-produced substances leading to epigenetic alterations. The identification of key genetic and/or epigenetic events involved in chemical carcinogenesis is an important step towards the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to evaluate the exposure, predict biological effects, and prevent adverse health consequences. Here, we focus on epidemiological studies to review the most recent advances in understanding genetic and epigenetic factors in relation to particulate matter, benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure. PMID:26500287

  12. Metal carcinogenesis in total joint arthroplasty. Animal models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C G; Sunderman, F W

    1996-08-01

    As early as 1956, laboratory investigations into the carcinogenicity of modern dental and orthopaedic alloys were undertaken. Such studies were prompted by the observation that workers, particularly in nickel and chromate refining, had increased risks of nasal and lung tumors. For the past 25 years, sporadic case reports have documented the development of malignant neoplasms proximate to an orthopaedic implant. Although the results of epidemiologic studies have not shown an excessive number of tumors in patients receiving stainless steel or superalloy implants, the possibility of carcinogenesis, given the corrosive environment in which metal implants exist, has prompted ongoing laboratory studies. Leaching of metal ions from implants, the synovial processing of metallic wear debris, and the effects of exposure to intraarticular metal particles have been the subjects of numerous laboratory studies. The results of these studies are summarized and recommended parameters for future laboratory investigations are given. PMID:8769340

  13. Establishing the Role of PPARβ/δ in Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeffrey M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Müller, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    The role of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) in carcinogenesis is controversial because conflicting studies indicate that it both inhibits and promotes tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on recent studies on PPARβ/δ including the significance of increased or decreased PPARβ/δ expression in cancers; a range of opposing mechanisms describing how PPARβ/δ agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists regulate tumorigenesis and/or whether there may be cell context-specific mechanisms; and whether activating or inhibiting PPARβ/δ is feasible for cancer chemoprevention and/or therapy. Research questions that need to be addressed are highlighted to establish whether PPARβ/δ can be effectively targeted for cancer chemoprevention.

  14. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate.

  15. Evidence for the multistep nature of in vitro human epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rhim, J.S.; Yoo, J.H.; Park, J.H.; Thraves, P.; Salehi, Z.; Dritschilo, A. )

    1990-09-01

    In keeping with the multistep development of human cancer in vivo, a stepwise approach to neoplastic transformation in vitro presents a reasonable strategy. We have recently developed an in vitro multistep model suitable for the study of human epithelial cell carcinogenesis. Upon infection with the adenovirus 12-simian virus 40 hybrid virus, primary human epidermal keratinocytes acquired an indefinite life span in culture but did not undergo malignant conversion. Subsequent addition of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus and human ras oncogene or chemical carcinogens (N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide) to these cells induced morphological alterations and the acquisition of neoplastic properties. Subsequently it was found that this line could be transformed neoplastically by a variety of retrovirus-containing H-ras, bas, fes, fms, erbB, and src oncogenes. In addition, we found that the immortalized human epidermal keratinocyte (RHEK-1) line can be transformed neoplastically by exposure to ionizing radiation. Thus, this in vitro system may be useful in studying the interaction of a variety of carcinogenic agents and human epithelial cells. These findings demonstrate the malignant transformation of human primary epithelial cells in culture by the combined action of viruses, oncogenes, chemical carcinogens, or X-ray irradiation and support a multistep process for neoplastic conversion.

  16. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Yeo Jin; Weon, Jong-Il; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hai Won; Seo, Young Rok

    2014-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual's genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction) is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke) and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk. PMID:25243052

  17. Animal models of chemical carcinogenesis: driving breakthroughs in cancer research for 100 years

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical carcinogenesis studies in animals have directly contributed to a reduction of cancer burden in the human population through their ability to identify carcinogens from the workplace, diet, and environment. Reduced exposure to these carcinogens through lifestyle changes, government regulation, or change in industry practices has reduced cancer incidence in exposed populations. In addition to providing the first experimental evidence for the link between chemical and radiation exposure and cancer, animal models of environmentally induced cancer have and will continue to provide important insight into the causes, mechanisms, and conceptual frameworks of cancer. More recently, combining chemical carcinogens with genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) has emerged as an invaluable approach to study the complex interaction between genotype and environment that contributes to cancer development. In the future, animal models of environmentally induced cancer are likely to provide insight into areas such as the epigenetic basis of cancer, genetic modifiers of cancer susceptibility, the systems biology of cancer, inflammation and cancer, and cancer prevention. PMID:26430259

  18. Uncovering the role of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nys, Kris; Maes, Hannelore; Dudek, Aleksandra Maria; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2011-08-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a pleiotropic transcription factor typically activated in response to low oxygen tension as well as other stress factors in normoxic conditions. Upon activation HIF-1α mediates the transcriptional activation of target genes involved in a variety of processes comprising stress adaptation, metabolism, growth and invasion, but also apoptotic cell death. The molecular mechanisms, signaling pathways and downstream targets evoked by the activation of HIF-1α in epidermal cells are becoming increasingly understood and underscore the participation of HIF-1α in crucial processes including malignant transformation and cancer progression. Recent studies have implicated HIF-1α as an integral part of the multifaceted signal transduction initiated by the exposure of keratinocytes to ultraviolet radiation B (UVB), which represents the most ubiquitous hazard for human skin and the principal risk factor for skin cancer. HIF-1α activation by UVB exposure contributes to either repair or the removal of UVB-damaged keratinocytes by inducing apoptosis, thus revealing a tumor suppressor role for HIF-1α in these cells. On the other hand, the constitutive expression of HIF-1α evoked by the mild hypoxic state of the skin has been implicated as a positive factor in the transformation of normal melanocytes into malignant melanoma, one of the most aggressive types of human cancers. Here we review the uncovered and complex role of HIF-1α in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:21338656

  19. The Anticancer Role of Capsaicin in Experimentallyinduced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anandakumar, Pandi; Kamaraj, Sattu; Jagan, Sundaram; Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandhakumar, Subramanian; Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Capsaicin (CAP) is the chief pungent principle found in the hot red peppers and the chili peppers that have long been used as spices, food additives and drugs. This study investigated the anticancer potential of CAP through its ability to modify extracellular matrix components and proteases during mice lung carcinogenesis. Methods: Swiss albino mice were treated with benzo(a) pyrene (50 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) orally twice a week for four successive weeks to induce lung cancer at the end of 14th week. CAP was administrated (10 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) intraperitoneally. Extracellular matrix components were assayed; Masson’s trichome staining of lung tissues was performed. Western blot analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 were also carried out. Results: In comparison with the control animals, animals in which benzo(a)pyrene had induced lung cancer showed significant increases in extracellular matrix components such as collagen (hydroxy proline), elastin, uronic acid and hexosamine and in glycosaminoglycans such as hyaluronate, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. The above alterations in extracellular matrix components were effectively counteracted in benzo(a)pyrene along with CAP supplemented animals when compared to benzo(a) pyrene alone supplemented animals. The results of Masson’s trichome staining for collagen and of, immunoblotting analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 further supported the biochemical findings. Conclusion: The apparent potential of CAP in modulating extracellular matrix components and proteases suggests that CAP plays a chemomodulatory and anti- cancer role working against experimentally induced lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26120484

  20. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie Qu Wei; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  1. Mechanisms of Caffeine-Induced Inhibition of UVB Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Sunlight-induced non-melanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than two million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect. Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345) and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine) inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis support the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine's inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23785666

  2. MicroRNA expression profiling in human Barrett's carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fassan, Matteo; Volinia, Stefano; Palatini, Jeff; Pizzi, Marco; Baffa, Raffaele; De Bernard, Marina; Battaglia, Giorgio; Parente, Paola; Croce, Carlo M.; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Ancona, Ermanno; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is characterized by the native stratified squamous epithelium (N) lining the esophagus being replaced by a columnar epithelium with intestinal differentiation (Barrett's mucosa; BM). BM is considered as the main risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (Barrett's adenocarcinoma; BAc). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by targeting messenger RNAs and they are reportedly dysregulated in BM. To test the hypothesis that a specific miRNA expression signature characterizes BM development and progression, we performed miRNA microarray analysis comparing native esophageal mucosa with all the phenotypic lesions seen in the Barrett's carcinogenic process. Specimens were collected from 14 BE patients who had undergone esophagectomy, including: 14 with N, 14 with BM, 7 with low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 5 with high-grade intra-epithelial neoplasia and 11 with BAc. Microarray findings were further validated by quantitive real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization analyses using a different series of consecutive cases (162 biopsy samples and 5 esophagectomies) of histologically proven, long-segment BE. We identified a miRNA signature of Barrett's carcinogenesis consisting of an increased expression of 6 miRNAs and a reduced expression of 7 miRNAs. To further support these results, we investigated target gene expression using the Oncomine database and/or immunohistochemical analysis. We found that target gene expression correlated significantly with miRNA dysregulation. Specific miRNAs are directly involved in BE progression to cancer. miRNA profiling significantly expands current knowledge on the molecular history of Barrett's carcinogenesis, also identifying molecular markers of cancer progression. PMID:21128279

  3. One-hit models of carcinogenesis: conservative or not

    SciTech Connect

    Bailar, J.C. III; Crouch, E.A.C.; Shaikh, R.; Spiegelman, D.

    1988-12-01

    One-hit formulas are widely believed to be conservative when used to analyze carcinogenesis bioassays, in the sense that they will rarely underestimate risks of cancer at low exposures. Such formulas are generally applied to the lifetime incidence of cancer at a specific site, with risks estimated from animal data at zero dose (control), and two or more additional doses that are appreciable fractions of a maximum tolerated dose. No empirical study has demonstrated that the one-hit formula is conservative in the sense described. The Carcinogenesis Bioassay Database System contains data on 1212 separate bioassays of 308 chemical substances tested at exactly three evaluable doses. These provided sufficient data to examine 8432 specific combination of cancer site with sex, species, and chemical. For each of these they fitted a one-hit formula to the zero and maximum dose data points, then examined the relation of the fitted curve to the incidence rate observed at the mid-dose, with and without adjustment for intercurrent mortality. Both underestimates and overestimates of risk at mid-dose occurred substantially more often than expected by chance. They cannot tell whether such underestimates would occur at lower doses, but offer six biological reasons why underestimates might be expected. In a high percentage of animal bioassays, the one-hit formula is not conservative when applied in the usual way to animal data. It remains possible that the one-hit formula may indeed be conservative at sufficiently low doses (below the observational range), but the usual procedure, applied to the usual dose range, can be nonconservative in estimating the slope of the formula at such low doses. Risk assessments for regulation of carcinogens should incorporate some measure of additional uncertainty.

  4. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  6. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  7. Comprehensibility maximization and humanly comprehensible representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new information-theoretic method to measure the comprehensibility of network configurations in competitive learning. Comprehensibility is supposed to be measured by information contained in components in competitive networks. Thus, the increase in information corresponds to the increase in comprehensibility of network configurations. One of the most important characteristics of the method is that parameters can be explicitly determined so as to produce a state where the different types of comprehensibility can be mutually increased. We applied the method to two problems, namely an artificial data set and the ionosphere data from the well-known machine learning database. In both problems, we showed that improved performance could be obtained in terms of all types of comprehensibility and quantization errors. For the topographic errors, we found that updating connection weights prevented them from increasing. Then, the optimal values of comprehensibility could be explicitly determined, and clearer class boundaries were generated.

  8. Use of Proteins as Biomarkers and Their Role in Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzou, Chrisanthi; Lampaki, Sofia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Huang, Haidong; Kesisis, George; Karapantzos, Ilias; Chlapoutakis, Serafeim; Korantzis, Ippokratis; Mpakas, Andreas; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Li, Qiang; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Improved diagnostic methods and medical therapies are necessary for early detection and treatment and an improved prognosis. It is thus vital to both examine and evaluate the role of the various existing proteins as biomarkers in carcinogenesis and to assess the contribution of these proteins in anti-cancer activity, for consideration in therapeutic strategies. It is essential to both examine and evaluate the role of the various existing proteins as biomarkers in carcinogenesis and to assess the contribution of these proteins in anti-cancer activity, for consideration in therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this review is twofold. Firstly, it is to evaluate recent data about which proteins can be utilized as biomarkers in carcinogenesis. The proteins reviewed include: CPTP, IL-6, CCN, and S100. Secondly, it is to evaluate the contribution of dietary proteins in cancer activity. Specifically, how whey protein, soy proteins and lectin, a phytochemical could be useful in cancer prevention and treatment. Recent Findings: Whey protein, present in dairy products, is an excellent source of the sulphur amino acid cysteine, the rate limiting substrate in glutathione synthesis. Notably, this protein survives digestion and has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic properties in animal studies. Lectins are phytochemicals present in plant foods, and have active components which alters cancer initiation, promotion and progression. Lectins have been characterized as a useful tool in biochemistry, cell biology, immunology and in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in cancer research. Soy proteins contain various compounds, including isoflavones, protease inhibitors and protein kinase inhibitors, which have been proven effective in tumor growth inhibition. They have therefore, been greatly emphasized in cancer prevention and treatment. It has been proved that soy food consumption was associated with decreased risk of death and recurrence of breast cancer. CPTP is a

  9. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  10. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Snelten, Courtney S; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women's health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  11. Comprehension of Discourse Markers and Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatib, Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    According to many research findings, the presence of discourse markers (DMs) enhances readers' comprehension of the texts they read. However, there is a paucity of research on the relationship between knowledge of DMs and reading comprehension (RC) and the present study explores the relationship between them. Knowledge of DMs is measured through…

  12. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  13. Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J.; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L.; Anderson, Charlotte L.; Carvalho, Benilton; O’Donovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J.; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from pre-malignant Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently-mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon-resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from two key transition points in the development of malignancy; benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE, n=66), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 were stage-specific, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barrett’s esophagus in a novel non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24952744

  14. Influence of caloric intake on experimental carcinogenesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Kritchevsky, D; Klurfeld, D M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of caloric intake on tumor growth has been recognized for over 70 years. Inhibition of tumor growth depends primarily on the extent of caloric restriction, but tumor type, animal strain, and dietary composition all exert some influence. Caloric restriction is most effective when maintained during both initiation and promotion, but if limited to one of these phases, restriction during promotion appears to be the more effective modality. The types of tumor that have been studied include spontaneous mammary and lung tumors as well as tumors induced by organ-specific carcinogens or irradiation with ultraviolet light. Numerous investigators have studied the effects of fat, and a diet low in calories but high in fat is generally significantly more effective in inhibiting carcinogenesis than is a diet high in calories but low in fat. Mice fed high fat, low calorie diets exhibited 48% fewer chemically induced skin tumors and 61% fewer tumors induced by ultraviolet irradiation than did mice fed low fat, high calorie diets. Mice fed a diet containing 2% fat exhibited a 66% incidence of skin tumors, whereas mice fed an isocaloric diet containing 61% fat showed a 78% incidence. Rats whose diet was restricted in calories by 40% exhibited no mammary tumors (coconut oil as primary dietary fat) or 75% fewer tumors (corn oil as dietary fat) compared to ad libitum-fed controls; they also exhibited 47% fewer colonic tumors. The mechanism by which caloric restriction exerts its tumor-inhibiting effects remains to be elucidated.

  15. Role of PTCH1 gene methylation in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yun; Song, Yu; Zhang, Min; Xu, Zhen; Qian, Xiaolan

    2014-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of PTCH1 methylation in gastric carcinogenesis and the therapeutic effect of the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), in the treatment of gastric cancer. Total RNA was extracted from 20 gastric cancer tissues, their corresponding adjacent normal tissues and a gastric cancer AGS cell line. PTCH1 mRNA expression was detected by quantitative PCR, and the PTCH1 methylation of the promoter was examined by methylation-specific PCR. The AGS cells were treated with 5-Aza-dC; apoptosis and the cell cycle were examined by flow cytometry, and the PTCH1 methylation level was observed. PTCH1 expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation in the gastric cancer tissues, their corresponding adjacent normal tissues and the gastric cancer AGS cell line (r=-0.591, P=0.006). 5-Aza-dC treatment caused apoptosis and the G0/G1 phase arrest of the AGS cells, and also induced the demethylation and increased expression of PTCH1. In conclusion, the study found that the hypermethylation of the PTCH1 gene promoter region is one of the main causes of low PTCH1 expression in AGS cells. Demethylation agent 5-Aza-dC can reverse the methylation status of PTCH1 and regulate the expression of PTCH1, indicating its potential role in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:25013484

  16. Alert-QSAR. Implications for Electrophilic Theory of Chemical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Ionaşcu, Cosmin; Putz, Ana-Maria; Ostafe, Vasile

    2011-01-01

    Given the modeling and predictive abilities of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) for genotoxic carcinogens or mutagens that directly affect DNA, the present research investigates structural alert (SA) intermediate-predicted correlations ASA of electrophilic molecular structures with observed carcinogenic potencies in rats (observed activity, A = Log[1/TD50], i.e., ASA=f(X1SA,X2SA,…)). The present method includes calculation of the recently developed residual correlation of the structural alert models, i.e., ARASA=f(A−ASA,X1SA,X2SA,…). We propose a specific electrophilic ligand-receptor mechanism that combines electronegativity with chemical hardness-associated frontier principles, equality of ligand-reagent electronegativities and ligand maximum chemical hardness for highly diverse toxic molecules against specific receptors in rats. The observed carcinogenic activity is influenced by the induced SA-mutagenic intermediate effect, alongside Hansch indices such as hydrophobicity (LogP), polarizability (POL) and total energy (Etot), which account for molecular membrane diffusion, ionic deformation, and stericity, respectively. A possible QSAR mechanistic interpretation of mutagenicity as the first step in genotoxic carcinogenesis development is discussed using the structural alert chemoinformation and in full accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development QSAR guidance principles. PMID:21954348

  17. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

  18. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer.

  19. Estrogen Receptors and Their Implications in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Francesco; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; Doherty, Glen; Winter, Desmond C.; Sheahan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding their cognate receptors, ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2), estrogens activate intracellular signaling cascades that have important consequences for cellular behavior. Historically linked to carcinogenesis in reproductive organs, estrogens have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of different cancer types of non-reproductive tissues including the colon. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor expressed in both normal and malignant colonic epithelium. However, during colon cancer progression, ERβ expression is lost, suggesting that estrogen signaling may play a role in disease progression. Estrogens may in fact exert an anti-tumor effect through selective activation of pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by ERβ, inhibition of inflammatory signals and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we analyze the estrogen pathway as a possible therapeutic avenue in colorectal cancer, we report the most recent experimental evidence to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of estrogen-mediated protection against colorectal tumorigenesis, and we discuss future challenges and potential avenues for targeted therapy. PMID:25699240

  20. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis.

  1. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor system and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Kopchick, John J

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In terms of cell cycle regulation, the GH-IGF system induces signalling pathways for cell growth that compete with other signalling systems that result in cell death; thus the final effect of these opposed forces is critical for normal and abnormal cell growth. The association of the GH-IGF system with carcinogenesis has long been hypothesised, mainly based on in vitro studies and the use of a variety of animal models of human cancer, and also on epidemiological and clinical evidence in humans. While ample experimental evidence supports a role of the GH-IGF system in tumour promotion and progression, with several of its components being currently tested as central targets for cancer therapy, the strength of evidence from patients with acromegaly, GH deficiency, or treated with GH is much weaker. In this review, we will attempt to consolidate this data. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 414-426). PMID:27387246

  2. Lineage fate of ductular reactions in liver injury and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jörs, Simone; Jeliazkova, Petia; Ringelhan, Marc; Thalhammer, Julian; Dürl, Stephanie; Ferrer, Jorge; Sander, Maike; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schmid, Roland M.; Siveke, Jens T.; Geisler, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ductular reactions (DRs) are observed in virtually all forms of human liver disease; however, the histogenesis and function of DRs in liver injury are not entirely understood. It is widely believed that DRs contain bipotential liver progenitor cells (LPCs) that serve as an emergency cell pool to regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes and may eventually give rise to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we used a murine model that allows highly efficient and specific lineage labeling of the biliary compartment to analyze the histogenesis of DRs and their potential contribution to liver regeneration and carcinogenesis. In multiple experimental and genetic liver injury models, biliary cells were the predominant precursors of DRs but lacked substantial capacity to produce new hepatocytes, even when liver injuries were prolonged up to 12 months. Genetic modulation of NOTCH and/or WNT/β-catenin signaling within lineage-tagged DRs impaired DR expansion but failed to redirect DRs from biliary differentiation toward the hepatocyte lineage. Further, lineage-labeled DRs did not produce tumors in genetic and chemical HCC mouse models. In summary, we found no evidence in our system to support mouse biliary-derived DRs as an LPC pool to replenish hepatocytes in a quantitatively relevant way in injury or evidence that DRs give rise to HCCs. PMID:25915586

  3. Expression of TFF3 during multistep colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    John, R; El-Rouby, N M; Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C; Karam, S M

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is not well understood. This common type of cancer is generally believed to occur in a multistep process which involves alterations of various tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes during the progression through benign lesions towards carcinoma. TFF3 is a product of the colonic epithelium and has been implicated in colonic mucosal protection and also in the aggressiveness of colon cancer cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of TFF3 during propagation towards cancer development in the human colon. Colonic tissues representing colitis, adenomatous polyposis, tubulovillous adenoma, and mucoid/adeno-carcinomas were processed for immunohistochemistry using an antibody specific for human TFF3. The results were correlated with those of PCNA-labeling, quantified, and compared with those of control tissues obtained from the safe margin of macroscopically normal colonic mucosa of patients with colon cancer. The data showed marked down-regulation of TFF3 expression in adenomatous polyposis, then TFF3 expression returns to about control level during adenoma and remains high during mucoid- and adeno-carcinomas. Colonic tissues with highly invasive cancer cells were characterized by statistically significant down-regulation of TFF3 expression. The changes observed in expression of TFF3 showed an inverse correlation with cell proliferation and suggest that it might play a protective role against colon carcinogenesis.

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers of Molecular Alterations in Oral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Puiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, oral cancers represent the 6th most common type of cancer. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is the most common type of oral cancer, is present in about 90% of the patients with this malignancy. OSCC presents a survival rate up to 80%, if it is detected in an early stage (T1), but if detected at later stages (T3 - T4) the survival rate decreases to 20 - 30%. Due to these survival rates, it is obvious that there is an urgent need to introduce new molecular biomarkers for the early, noninvasive diagnosis of oral cancers from saliva. These biomarkers will aid in increasing the survival rate of the patients for the long-term. MicroRNAs are part of a class of small, non-coding RNAs that contain 19 - 23 nucleotides. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of biochemical mechanisms, cell proliferation, and other cellular mechanisms in the human body. Recently, due to the developments in the field of molecular genetics, salivary microRNAs became important biomarkers in early detection and monitoring of oral cancers by noninvasive methods. We want to present in this review the most important genetic and epigenetic biomarkers involved in oral carcinogenesis, focusing especially on the salivary microRNAs as biomarkers in early diagnosis of OSCC. PMID:26642697

  5. Warburg Effect - a Consequence or the Cause of Carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Devic, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Ever since its discovery (1924) the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis) remains an unresolved puzzle: why the aggressive cancer cells "prefer" to use the energetically highly inefficient method of burning the glucose at the cellular level? While in the course of the last 90 years several hypotheses have been suggested, to this date there is no clear explanation of this rather unusual effect. Even though it is commonly assumed that Warburg effect is a consequence of carcinogenesis, yet another hypothesis could be brought up that the cellular switch to aerobic glycolysis may represent the very point in time when a normal cell becomes cancerous. Furthermore, this switch may happen at the point where the fate of pyruvic acid is determined, caused by the inadequate supply of enzymes that promote citric as opposed to lactic acid cycle. Currently, few clinical observations, like low cancer incidence in Type 1 diabetes mellitus and increased cancer incidence in people on high carbohydrate diets might be called upon to support such hypothesis.

  6. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  7. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  8. Unique database study linking gingival inflammation and smoking in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Söder, Birgitta; Andersson, Leif C; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-02-01

    We investigated statistical association between gingival inflammation and cancer in a group of patients followed up for 26 years with the hypothesis that gingival inflammation affects carcinogenesis. Altogether, 1676 30- to 40-year-old subjects from Stockholm were clinically examined in 1985. In 2011, we compared the baseline oral examination and follow-up data with cancer diagnoses sourced from the Swedish national hospital register databases. Of 1676 individuals, 89 (55 women, 34 men) had got cancer by the year 2011. Women were found to be at higher risk for cancer than men. Smoking (expressed in pack-years) had been more prevalent in the cancer group than in those with no cancer diagnosis. Gingival index, marker of gingival inflammation, was higher in the cancer group than in subjects with no cancer. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, education, dental plaque and calculus index scores, or in the number of missing teeth. In multiple logistic regression analysis with cancer as the dependent variable and several independent variables, pack-years of smoking appeared to be a principal independent predictor with odds ratio (OR) 1.32 while gingival inflammation showed OR 1.29. Hence, our present findings showed that together with smoking, gingival inflammation indeed associated with the incidence of cancer in this cohort. PMID:25533098

  9. Warburg Effect - a Consequence or the Cause of Carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Devic, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Ever since its discovery (1924) the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis) remains an unresolved puzzle: why the aggressive cancer cells “prefer” to use the energetically highly inefficient method of burning the glucose at the cellular level? While in the course of the last 90 years several hypotheses have been suggested, to this date there is no clear explanation of this rather unusual effect. Even though it is commonly assumed that Warburg effect is a consequence of carcinogenesis, yet another hypothesis could be brought up that the cellular switch to aerobic glycolysis may represent the very point in time when a normal cell becomes cancerous. Furthermore, this switch may happen at the point where the fate of pyruvic acid is determined, caused by the inadequate supply of enzymes that promote citric as opposed to lactic acid cycle. Currently, few clinical observations, like low cancer incidence in Type 1 diabetes mellitus and increased cancer incidence in people on high carbohydrate diets might be called upon to support such hypothesis. PMID:27162540

  10. Increases in Mitochondrial Biogenesis Impair Carcinogenesis at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2011-01-01

    Although mitochondrial respiration is decreased in most cancer cells, the role of this decrease in carcinogenesis and cancer progression is still unclear. To better understand this phenomenon, instead of further inhibiting mitochondrial function, we induced mitochondrial biogenesis in transformed cells by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)/ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) pathways. This was achieved by treating the cells with bezafibrate, a PPARs panagonist that also enhances PGC-1α expression. We confirmed that bezafibrate treatment led to increased mitochondrial proteins and enzyme functions. We found that cells with increased mitochondrial biogenesis had decreased growth rates in glucose-containing medium. In addition, they became less invasive, which was directly linked to the reduced lactate levels. Surprisingly, even though bezafibrate-treated cells had higher levels of mitochondrial markers, total respiration was not significantly altered. However, respiratory coupling, and ATP levels were. Our data show that by increasing the efficiency of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, cancer progression is hampered by decreases in cell proliferation and invasiveness. PMID:21855427

  11. [Influences of polychlorinated dibenzofuran on experimental carcinogenesis in mice].

    PubMed

    Hirose, R; Hori, M; Toyoshima, H; Shukuwa, T; Udono, M; Yoshida, H

    1989-05-01

    To ascertain whether 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF) has the possibility of cocarcinogen, three different concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 5 ppm PCDF was evaluated in the course of experimental carcinogenesis in mice. Concerning the difference of total number of tumors occurred among the groups of mice with various treatments, the mice treated with 0.5 ppm PCDF and 20-methylcholanthrene (MC) have produced twice as many tumors as those of the other groups. Then the adequate concentration of PCDF to be a promoter was supposed to be 0.5 ppm. Two kinds of tumors were seen in mice which were treated by MC with or without PCDF, and there was no difference of tumors between the groups by appearance and pathologically. One is a benign papilloma, and the other is a squamous cell carcinoma which tends to keratinize and looks like a keratoacanthoma. The latter had a tendency to arise much more four weeks after the treatments had been done, even though the number of the former increased gradually. There was no evidence that PCDF of these concentrations could permeate through the skin and could be toxic. Furthermore PCDF seemed to neither stay nor act directly on the follicular epithelium, since there was no acne formation on the back skin of mice. One of the possible factors to cause malignant changes of epidermal cells was supposed to be a prolonged inflammation of the skin. PMID:2744687

  12. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  13. Aberrant GLI1 Activation in DNA Damage Response, Carcinogenesis and Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Palle, Komaraiah; Mani, Chinnadurai; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Athar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The canonical hedgehog (HH) pathway is a multicomponent signaling cascade (HH, protein patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), smoothened (SMO)) that plays a pivotal role during embryonic development through activation of downstream effector molecules, namely glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), GLI2 and GLI3. Activation of GLIs must be tightly regulated as they modulate target genes which control tissue patterning, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation during development. However, dysregulation or mutations in HH signaling leads to genomic instability (GI) and various cancers, for example, germline mutation in PTCH1 lead to Gorlin syndrome, a condition where patients develop numerous basal cell carcinomas and rarely rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Activating mutations in SMO have also been recognized in sporadic cases of medulloblastoma and SMO is overexpressed in many other cancers. Recently, studies in several human cancers have shown that GLI1 expression is independent from HH ligand and canonical intracellular signaling through PTCH and SMO. In fact, this aberrantly regulated GLI1 has been linked to several non-canonical oncogenic growth signals such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), avian myelocytomatosis virus oncogene cellular homolog (C-MYC), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and β-catenin. Recent studies from our lab and other independent studies demonstrate that aberrantly expressed GLI1 influences the integrity of several DNA damage response and repair signals, and if altered, these networks can contribute to GI and impact tumor response to chemo- and radiation therapies. Furthermore, the ineffectiveness of SMO inhibitors in clinical studies argues for the development of GLI1-specific inhibitors in order to develop effective therapeutic modalities to treat these tumors. In this review, we focus on summarizing current understanding of the molecular, biochemical and cellular basis for

  14. Field cancerization in mammary carcinogenesis - Implications for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of breast cancer unfolds with the development of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in normal breast tissue, and evolution of this pre-invasive neoplasm into invasive cancer. The mechanisms that drive these processes are poorly understood, but evidence from the literature suggests that mammary carcinogenesis may occur through the process of field cancerization. Clinical observations are consistent with the idea that (i) DCIS may arise in a field of altered breast epithelium, (ii) narrow surgical margins do not remove the entire altered field (contributing to recurrence and/or disease progression), and (iii) whole-breast radiation therapy is effective in elimination of the residual field of altered cells adjacent to the resected DCIS. Molecular studies suggest that the field of altered breast epithelial cells may carry cancer-promoting genetic mutations (or other molecular alterations) or cancer promoting epimutations (oncogenic alterations in the epigenome). In fact, most breast cancers develop through a succession of molecular events involving both genetic mutations and epimutations. Hence, in hereditary forms of breast cancer, the altered field reflects the entire breast tissue which is composed of cells with a predisposing molecular lesion (such as a BRCA1 mutation). In the example of a BRCA1-mutant patient, it is evident that local resection of a DCIS lesion or localized but invasive cancer will not result in elimination of the altered field. In sporadic breast cancer patients, the mechanistic basis for the altered field may not be so easily recognized. Nonetheless, identification of the nature of field cancerization in a given patient may guide clinical intervention. Thus, patients with DCIS that develops in response to an epigenetic lesion (such as a hypermethylation defect affecting the expression of tumor suppressor genes) might be treated with epigenetic therapy to normalize the altered field and reduce the risk of secondary occurrence of

  15. Aberrant GLI1 Activation in DNA Damage Response, Carcinogenesis and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Palle, Komaraiah; Mani, Chinnadurai; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Athar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The canonical hedgehog (HH) pathway is a multicomponent signaling cascade (HH, protein patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), smoothened (SMO)) that plays a pivotal role during embryonic development through activation of downstream effector molecules, namely glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), GLI2 and GLI3. Activation of GLIs must be tightly regulated as they modulate target genes which control tissue patterning, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation during development. However, dysregulation or mutations in HH signaling leads to genomic instability (GI) and various cancers, for example, germline mutation in PTCH1 lead to Gorlin syndrome, a condition where patients develop numerous basal cell carcinomas and rarely rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Activating mutations in SMO have also been recognized in sporadic cases of medulloblastoma and SMO is overexpressed in many other cancers. Recently, studies in several human cancers have shown that GLI1 expression is independent from HH ligand and canonical intracellular signaling through PTCH and SMO. In fact, this aberrantly regulated GLI1 has been linked to several non-canonical oncogenic growth signals such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), avian myelocytomatosis virus oncogene cellular homolog (C-MYC), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and β-catenin. Recent studies from our lab and other independent studies demonstrate that aberrantly expressed GLI1 influences the integrity of several DNA damage response and repair signals, and if altered, these networks can contribute to GI and impact tumor response to chemo- and radiation therapies. Furthermore, the ineffectiveness of SMO inhibitors in clinical studies argues for the development of GLI1-specific inhibitors in order to develop effective therapeutic modalities to treat these tumors. In this review, we focus on summarizing current understanding of the molecular, biochemical and cellular basis for

  16. Comprehension of Connected Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosberg, Ludwig; Shima, Fred

    A rationale was developed for researching reading comprehension based on information gain. Previous definitions of comprehension which were reviewed included operational vs. nonoperational and skills vs. processes. Comprehension was viewed as an informational processing event which includes a constellation of cognitive and learning processes. Two…

  17. Comprehension for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Teaching and learning about comprehension is of paramount importance, from the beginning of reading instruction right through all years of school, in all curriculum areas. Research has shown that comprehension instruction can improve the reading comprehension of all readers, even beginning readers and struggling older readers. This article offers…

  18. Teaching Comprehension Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Association of School Superintendents.

    Materials used in a one-day conference on teaching reading comprehension skills are summarized in this publication. Contents consist of three articles on teaching the comprehension skills, informal reading inventories in science and in geography, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address with comprehension questions, a checklist for the evaluation of teaching…

  19. Somatic stem cells and the kinetics of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, John

    2002-01-01

    There is now strong experimental evidence that epithelial stem cells arrange their sister chromatids at mitosis such that the same template DNA strands stay together through successive divisions; DNA labeled with tritiated thymidine in infancy is still present in the stem cells of adult mice even though these cells are incorporating (and later losing) bromodeoxyuridine [Potten, C. S., Owen, G., Booth, D. & Booth, C. (2002) J. Cell Sci.115, 2381–2388]. But a cell that preserves “immortal strands” will avoid the accumulation of replication errors only if it inhibits those pathways for DNA repair that involve potentially error-prone resynthesis of damaged strands, and this appears to be a property of intestinal stem cells because they are extremely sensitive to the lethal effects of agents that damage DNA. It seems that the combination, in the stem cell, of immortal strands and the choice of death rather than error-prone repair makes epithelial stem cell systems resistant to short exposures to DNA-damaging agents, because the stem cell accumulates few if any errors, and any errors made by the daughters are destined to be discarded. This paper discusses these issues and shows that they lead to a model that explains the strange kinetics of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in adult mammalian tissues. Coincidentally, the model also can explain why cancers arise even though the spontaneous mutation rate of differentiated mammalian cells is not high enough to generate the multiple mutations needed to form a cancer and why loss of nucleotide-excision repair does not significantly increase the frequency of the common internal cancers. PMID:12149477

  20. Carbohydrate digestibility predicts colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Helene; Poulsen, Morten; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Meyer, Otto; Lindecrona, Rikke Hvid

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of carbohydrate structure and digestibility on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Five groups of male Fischer 344 rats each comprising 30 animals were injected with AOM and fed a high-fat diet with 15% of various carbohydrates. The carbohydrate sources used were sucrose, cornstarch (a linear starch, reference group), potato starch (a branched starch), a short-chained oligofructose (Raftilose), and a long-chained inulin-type fructan (Raftiline). An interim sacrifice was performed after 9 wk to investigate markers of carbohydrate digestibility, including caecal fermentation (caecum weight and pH) and glucose and lipid metabolism [glucose, fructoseamine, HbA1c, triglycerides, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1]. In addition potential early predictors of carcinogenicity [cell proliferation and aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] at 9 wk and their correlation to colon cancer risk after 32 wk were investigated. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in animals fed oligofructose, and the number of tumors per animal was significantly reduced in animals fed inulin and oligofructose at 32 wk after AOM induction compared to the reference group fed sucrose. Increased caecum weight and decreased caecal pH were seen in groups fed oligofructose, inulin, and potato starch. Plasma triglyceride was decreased in rats fed oligofructose and inulin. Cell proliferation was increased in the proximal colon of rats fed sucrose, oligofructose, and inulin, and the number of cells per crypt decreased in rats fed oligofructose and inulin. The total number of ACF's was unaffected by treatment, and the size and multiplicity of ACF was unrelated to tumor development. It was concluded that less digestible carbohydrates with an early effect on caecum fermentation and plasma triglyceride decreased subsequent tumor incidence and multiplicity. This was unrelated to ACF, cell proliferation, and other markers of glucose and lipid metabolism.

  1. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  2. Carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an alternate hypothetical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sharon Shuxian; Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Wee, Joseph T S

    2016-01-06

    Current proposed mechanisms implicate both early and latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the carcinogenic cascade, whereas epidemiological studies have always associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with early childhood EBV infection and with chronic ear, nose, and sinus conditions. Moreover, most patients with NPC present with IgA antibody titers to EBV capsid antigen (VCA-IgA), which can precede actual tumor presentation by several years. If early childhood EBV infection indeed constitutes a key event in NPC carcinogenesis, one would have to explain the inability to detect the virus in normal nasopharyngeal epithelium of patients at a high risk for EBV infection. It is perhaps possible that EBV resides within the salivary glands, instead of the epithelium, during latency. This claim is indirectly supported by observations that the East Asian phenotype shares the characteristics of an increased susceptibility to NPC and immature salivary gland morphogenesis, the latter of which is influenced by the association of salivary gland morphogenesis with an evolutionary variant of the human ectodysplasin receptor gene (EDAR), EDARV370A. Whether the immature salivary gland represents a more favorable nidus for EBV is uncertain, but in patients with infectious mononucleosis, EBV has been isolated in this anatomical organ. The presence of EBV-induced lymphoepitheliomas in the salivary glands and lungs further addresses the possibility of submucosal spread of the virus. Adding to the fact that the fossa of Rosen Müller contains a transformative zone active only in the first decade of life, one might be tempted to speculate the possibility of an alternative carcinogenic cascade for NPC that is perhaps not dissimilar to the model of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

  3. Initiation, promotion, and inhibition of carcinogenesis in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, G.; Selivonchick, D.; Hendricks, J.

    1987-04-01

    The identification of etiological agents in feral fish neoplasia epizootics has been hampered in part by the lack of suitable fish models, and complicated by the likely existence of environmental agents which can act to stimulate or reduce population responses to genotoxin insult. The response of fish to tumor inhibitors and promoters, and the underlying mechanisms of modulation, have been studied in the rainbow trout model. Dietary treatment of trout with the compounds indole-3-carbinol (I3C), ..beta..-napthroflavone (BNF), or the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) complex Aroclor 1254, before and during exposure to aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1), was shown to reduce the final incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after 12 months, compared to fish receiving AFB1 only. By contrast, treatment of trout with BNF or I3C following AFB1 initiation led to a significant enhancement of ultimate tumor response, Similarly, simultaneous treatment of trout with PCB and the carcinogen N-nitrosodiethylamine led to syncarcinogenic enhancement, rather than inhibition, of tumor response. Mechanisms of inhibition of AFB1 carcinogenesis by PCB, BNF, and I3C were investigated. PCB and BNF, but not I3C, are known to be strong inducers of trout cytochrome P448 and associated activities. Dietary induction by BNF or PCB was shown to be accompanied in solvated hepatocytes by considerably altered AFB1 metabolism, and by significantly reduced rates of DNA adduct formation for all three agents. All agents differentially altered in vivo AFB1 pharmacokinetics, enhanced bile elimination of AFB1 as the aflatoxicol-M1 glucuronide, and significantly reduced peak levels of liver DNA adduct formation.

  4. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. Progress is described in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; (3) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. 59 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  6. The preventive effect of linalool on acute and chronic UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Gunaseelan, Srithar; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindasamy, Kanimozhi; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of linalool in acute ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation-induced inflammation and chronic UVB-mediated photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin. Acute UVB-irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2)) causes hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant depletion, and overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in mouse skin. Topical or intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of linalool prevented acute UVB-induced hyperplasia, edema formation, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant depletion in mouse skin. Further, linalool treatment prevented UVB-induced overexpression of COX-2 and ODC in mouse skin. In the chronic study, mice were subjected to UVB-exposure thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Chronic UVB-exposure induced tumor incidence and expression of proliferative markers such as NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, VEGF, TGF-β1, Bcl-2 and mutated p53 in mouse skin. Treatment with linalool before each UVB-exposure significantly prevented the expression of these proliferative markers and subsequently decreased the tumor incidence in mice skin. Histopathological studies confirmed the development of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the chronic UVB-exposed mouse skin; and this was prevented by both topical and i.p. linalool treatment. Therefore, linalool may be considered as a photochemopreventive agent against UVB radiation induced skin carcinogenesis.

  7. Modulation of IL-1β reprogrammes the tumor microenvironment to interrupt oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tong; Hong, Yun; Jia, Lihua; Wu, Jie; Xia, Juan; Wang, Juan; Hu, Qinchao; Cheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development is a multistage process includes the normal, dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stages. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that the tumor microenvironment (TME) is an integral part of malignant transformation. Exploring certain key node genes in TME for future intervention in dysplasia to interrupt oral carcinogenesis was the primary goal of this research. To achieve this goal, systems biology approaches were first applied to the epithelia and fibroblasts collected at sequential stages in a 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) - induced rat oral carcinogenesis model. Through bioinformatics network construction, IL-1β was identified as one of the key node genes in TME during carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining of human and rat samples demonstrated that IL-1β expression patterns were parallel to the stages of malignant transformation. Silencing IL-1β with lentivirus-delivered shRNA significantly inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that IL-1β may be a chemoprevention target in TME during oral carcinogenesis. Therefore, we targeted IL-1 in the TME by oral mucosal injection of an IL-1 receptor antagonist in 4NQO rats. The results demonstrated that targeting IL-1 could interrupt oral carcinogenesis by reprogramming the TME. PMID:26831400

  8. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Kurata, Ayumi; Watanabe, Naoki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs) have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days) to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit) for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist) and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist) significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist) did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented. PMID:26907350

  9. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuji; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Kurata, Ayumi; Watanabe, Naoki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-02-20

    Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs) have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days) to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit) for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist) and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist) significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist) did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented.

  10. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  11. Carcinogenesis Studies of Cresols in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J.M.; Bucher, J.R.; Peckham, J.C.; Kissling, G.E.; Hejtmancik, M.R.; Chhabra, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cresols, monomethyl derivatives of phenol, are high production chemicals with potential for human exposure. The three isomeric forms of cresol are used individually or in mixtures as disinfectants, preservatives, and solvents or as intermediates in the production of antioxidants, fragrances, herbicides, insecticides, dyes, and explosives. Carcinogenesis studies were conducted in groups of 50 male F344/N rats and 50 female B6C3F1 mice exposed to a 60:40 mixture of m and p cresols (m-/p-cresol) in feed. Rats and mice were fed diets containing 0, 1500, 5000, or 15,000 ppm and 0, 1000, 3000, or 10,000 ppm, respectively. Survival of each exposed group was similar to that of their respective control group. Mean body weight gains were depressed in rats exposed to 15,000 ppm and in mice exposed to 3000 ppm and higher. A decrease of 25% over that of controls for the final mean body weight in mice exposed to 10,000 ppm appeared to be associated with lack of palatability of the feed. A marginally increased incidence of renal tubule adenoma was observed in the 15,000 ppm-exposed rats. The increased incidence was not statistically significant, but did exceed the range of historical controls. No increased incidence of hyperplasia of the renal tubules was observed; however, a significantly increased incidence of hyperplasia of the transitional epithelium associated with an increased incidence of nephropathy was observed at the high exposure concentration. The only significantly increased incidence of a neoplastic lesion related to cresol exposure observed in these studies was that of squamous cell papilloma in the forestomach of 10,000 ppm-exposed mice. A definitive association with irritation at the site-of-contact could not be made because of limited evidence of injury to the gastric mucosa at the time of necropsy. However, given the minimal chemical-related neoplastic response in these studies, it was concluded that there was no clear evidence of carcinogenicity in male rats

  12. Animal Models to Study the Role of Long-Term Hypergastrinemia in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fossmark, Reidar; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Martinsen, Tom Chr.; Hauso, Øyvind; Waldum, Helge L.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic hypergastrinemia due to chronic atrophic gastritis or gastrinomas have an increased risk of developing gastric malignancy, and it has been questioned whether also patients with hypergastrinemia caused by long-term use of acid inhibiting drugs are at risk. Gastric carcinogenesis in humans is affected by numerous factors and progresses slowly over years. When using animal models with the possibility of intervention, a complex process can be dissected by studying the role of hypergastrinemia in carcinogenesis within a relatively short period of time. We have reviewed findings from relevant models where gastric changes in animal models of long-term hypergastrinemia have been investigated. In all species where long-term hypergastrinemia has been induced, there is an increased risk of gastric malignancy. There is evidence that hypergastrinemia is a common causative factor in carcinogenesis in the oxyntic mucosa, while other cofactors may vary in the different models. PMID:21127707

  13. A review of dietary factors and its influence on DNA methylation in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arasaradnam, R P; Commane, D M; Bradburn, D; Mathers, J C

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer in non-smokers posing a significant health burden in the UK. Observational studies lend support to the impact of environmental factors especially diet on colorectal carcinogenesis. Significant advances have been made in understanding the biology of CRC carcinogenesis in particular epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to occur at least as commonly as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In fact compared with other human cancers, promoter gene methylation occurs most commonly within the gastrointestinal tract. Emerging data suggest the direct influence of certain micronutrients for example folic acid, selenium as well as interaction with toxins such as alcohol on DNA methylation. Such interactions are likely to have a mechanistic impact on CRC carcinogenesis through the methylation pathway but also, may offer possible therapeutic potential as nutraceuticals.

  14. Tissue normalizing capacity as a key determinant of carcinogenesis: an in silico simulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhu

    2015-03-01

    A perturbed microenvironment is at the core of carcinogenesis. Here, we used a 2D cellular automata model to simulate how cancers are generated in epithelial tissue. We applied several mathematical rules to simulate tissue renewal and surrounding cell control. Under the simulation, we showed that the average value of surrounding normal cells could be an indicator for the tissue normalizing capacity (TNC). Further, we found the incidence of carcinogenesis correlated inversely with the TNC. Interestingly, we also found that multi-round mutagenesis could gradually disturb the TNC when compared to one-round mutagenesis: cancer incidence increased significantly compared to one-round mutagenesis. Our model suggests that the genetic alterations (mutations) by themselves were not sufficient to initiate cancer. The perturbation of TNC could be a key process leading to carcinogenesis.

  15. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, M. J.; Meijers, M.; Van Garderen-Hoetmer, A.; Lamers, C. B.; Rovati, L. C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J. B.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturated fat, increased pancreatic weight. Rats treated with cholecystokinin developed more acidophilic atypical acinar cell nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas than control animals. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet developed significantly more adenomas and adenocarcinomas than controls given a diet low in unsaturated fat. Lorglumide largely inhibited the enhancing effect of cholecystokinin, but not of dietary fat, on pancreatic carcinogenesis indicating that it is unlikely that the promoting effect of dietary unsaturated fat on pancreatic carcinogenesis is mediated via cholecystokinin. PMID:1637675

  16. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linxin; Li, Hong; Guo, Zhenzhen; Ma, Xiaofang; Cao, Ning; Zheng, Yaqiu; Geng, Shengnan; Duan, Yongjian; Han, Guang; Du, Gangjun

    2015-01-01

    The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine) from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  17. Green tea catechin extract in intervention of chronic breast cell carcinogenesis induced by environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Kusum; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2012-03-01

    Sporadic breast cancers are mainly attributable to long-term exposure to environmental factors, via a multi-year, multi-step, and multi-path process of tumorigenesis involving cumulative genetic and epigenetic alterations in the chronic carcinogenesis of breast cells from a non-cancerous stage to precancerous and cancerous stages. Epidemiologic and experimental studies have suggested that green tea components may be used as preventive agents for breast cancer control. In our research, we have developed a cellular model that mimics breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by cumulative exposures to low doses of environmental carcinogens. In this study, we used our chronic carcinogenesis model as a target system to investigate the activity of green tea catechin extract (GTC) at non-cytotoxic levels in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by cumulative exposures to pico-molar 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). We identified that GTC, at a non-cytotoxic, physiologically achievable concentration of 2.5 µg/mL, was effective in suppressing NNK- and B[a]P-induced cellular carcinogenesis, as measured by reduction of the acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth, increased cell mobility, and acinar-conformational disruption. We also detected that intervention of carcinogen-induced elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase of cell proliferation, activation of the ERK pathway, DNA damage, and changes in gene expression may account for the mechanisms of GTC's preventive activity. Thus, GTC may be used in dietary and chemoprevention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to low doses of environmental carcinogens.

  18. Some perspectives on dietary inhibition of carcinogenesis: studies with curcumin and tea.

    PubMed

    Conney, A H; Lou, Y R; Xie, J G; Osawa, T; Newmark, H L; Liu, Y; Chang, R L; Huang, M T

    1997-11-01

    Topical application of curcumin inhibits chemically induced carcinogenesis on mouse skin, and oral administration of curcumin inhibits chemically induced oral, forestomach, duodenal, and colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin and other inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase are thought to inhibit carcinogenesis by preventing the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites. In contrast to our expectation of a tumorigenic effect of arachidonic acid, we found that treatment of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-initiated mouse skin with very high doses of arachidonic acid twice daily, 5 days a week for 26 weeks, failed to result in tumors. We considered the possibility that some of the cancer chemopreventive effects of curcumin may be related to an effect of this compound on cellular differentiation, and we investigated the effect of curcumin on differentiation in the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell model system. Although curcumin alone had little or no effect on cellular differentiation, when it was combined with all-trans retinoic acid or 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 a synergistic effect was observed. It is possible that many dietary chemicals in fruits, vegetables, and other edible plants can prevent cancer by synergizing with endogenously produced stimulators of differentiation such as all-trans retinoic acid, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and butyrate. More research is needed to test this hypothesis. Administration of green or black tea inhibits carcinogenesis in several animal models, and tumor growth is also inhibited. Several examples were presented of chemopreventive agents that inhibit carcinogenesis in one animal model but enhance carcinogenesis in a different animal model. Greater efforts should be made to understand mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention and to determine whether a potential chemopreventive agent is useful in many experimental settings or whether it is useful in only a limited number of experimental settings.

  19. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Helicobacter pylori-Induced Signaling Pathways Contribute to Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sue, Soichiro; Shibata, Wataru; Maeda, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces chronic gastric inflammation, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and cancer. Although the risk of gastric cancer increases exponentially with the extent of atrophic gastritis, the precise mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated. H. pylori induces genetic and epigenetic changes in gastric epithelial cells through activating intracellular signaling pathways in a cagPAI-dependent manner. H. pylori eventually induces gastric cancer with chromosomal instability (CIN) or microsatellite instability (MSI), which are classified as two major subtypes of gastric cancer. Elucidation of the precise mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis will also be important for cancer therapy. PMID:26064948

  1. Estrogen receptor beta, a possible tumor suppressor involved in ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lazennec, Gwendal

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading cause of death from gynecological tumors in women. Several lines of evidence suggest that estrogens may play an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis, through their receptors, ERα and ERβ. Interestingly, malignant ovarian tumors originating from epithelial surface constitute about 90% of ovarian cancers and expressed low levels of ERβ, compared to normal tissues. In addition, restoration of ERβ in ovarian cancer cells, leads to strong inhibition of their proliferation and invasion, while apoptosis is enhanced. In this manuscript, recent data suggesting a possible tumor-suppressor role for ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis are discussed. PMID:16399219

  2. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. Comprehensive Writing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Harvey, Ed.; Maimon, Elaine, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Descriptions of comprehensive writing programs at nine colleges and universities and an essay on the topic are presented. Comprehensive writing programs transcend a single department or discipline and are designed to enhance liberal learning. Such programs not only teach students to write in the appropriate modes of various disciplines, but also…

  4. Teaching Main Idea Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F., Ed.

    Intended to help classroom teachers, curriculum developers, and researchers, this book provides current information on theoretical and instructional aspects of main idea comprehension. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Confused World of Main Idea" (James W. Cunningham and David W. Moore); "The Comprehension of Important Information in…

  5. Paraphrasing for Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisk, Candace; Hurst, Beth

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that paraphrasing can be useful to promote reading comprehension skills. Finds paraphrasing for comprehension to be an excellent tool for reinforcing reading skills, such as identifying the main ideas, finding supporting details, and identifying the author's voice. Discusses how helping students see practical applications of accurately…

  6. Disentangling Accent from Comprehensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trofimovich, Pavel; Isaacs, Talia

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which linguistic aspects of second language speech are related to accent and which to comprehensibility. To address this goal, 19 different speech measures in the oral productions of 40 native French speakers of English were examined in relation to accent and comprehensibility, as rated by 60 novice raters…

  7. Comprehension Processes in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balota, D. A., Ed.; And Others

    Focusing on the process of reading comprehension, this book contains chapters on some central topics relevant to understanding the processes associated with comprehending text. The articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Comprehension Processes: Introduction" (K. Rayner); (2) "The Role of Meaning in Word Recognition" (D. A. Balota); (3)…

  8. Teaching Comprehension and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdgrafer, Gary

    1982-01-01

    The uniform principle assuming that comprehension precedes production in language acquisition was examined using Down's Syndrome children taught to comprehend singular/plural nouns and produce such forms for another noun. Three subjects reached criterion production first and one reached comprehension first, suggesting the modes can develop…

  9. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  10. Cell and tissue interactions in carcinogenesis and metastasis and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Tarin, David

    2011-04-01

    This review describes a new vision for future directions in the study of metastatic cancer biology and pathology. It is based upon clinical and experimental observations on the constituent cell lineages within a neoplasm and on tumour-host interactions. The vision incorporates information from studies in population biology, developmental biology and experimental pathology as well as investigations upon human malignant disease. The assembled information reveals that invasion and metastasis are supra-cellular manifestations of "emergent behavior" among combinations of normal and malignant cell lineages in vivo. Emergent behavior is a combinatorial interactive process in which a population displays new traits which cannot be achieved by individuals acting separately and which subside when the specific population mix disaggregates. Disruption of such pathological interactions in the field of a developing primary or secondary tumour is, therefore, required to disable the malignant population and arrest progression without tissue destruction. These conclusions originate, in part, from principles which govern the sociobiology and group behavior of bees, ants, fish, birds and human societies. In all these social organisms, external factors can disrupt signaling mechanisms and induce expanding self-perpetuating rogue behavior, leading to social disintegration. These principles also apply to cellular societies composing higher animals, which likewise need intrinsic rules to maintain social order and avoid anarchy, and recognition of this is essential for advancing future research on the mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and metastasis. Summarised evidence is presented here to support the conclusion that miscommunications between cells and tissues in the region of the developing tumour and its metastases are the main direct perpetrators of malignant disease. Genetic lesions (mutations, deletions, translocations, reduplications, etc.), commonly seen in cancers, can

  11. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis in human skin against the background of papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Reva, I V; Reva, G V; Yamamoto, T; Tolmachyov, V E

    2014-09-01

    The cells in the skin tumor developing under conditions of persisting papillomavirus infection are morphologically identical to blast cells in a blood smear from a leukemia patient. The cells filling the lesion focus are morphologically and immunohistochemically related to blood stem cells. A mechanism of epithelial layer modification under conditions of papillomavirus infection leading to carcinogenesis is proposed. The dynamics of structural changes in the skin is characterized by disturbed interactions between the epithelium and adjacent connective tissue, destruction of the basal membrane, disorders in the cambial keratinocyte differentiation, and absence of the spinous and granular layers. We conclude that detection of blast leukocytes in the human skin lesion can be explained by disorders in the cell-cell interactions in the epithelium-mesenchymal tissue system. High proliferative activity followed by death of cambial keratinocytes, migration of effector antigen-presenting CD68 cells to the adjacent connective tissue are the factors inducing migration of blast leukocytic forms to the focus. Not only keratinocyte restitution capacity, but also epithelium-dependent differentiation of young leukocytes disappeared. Undifferentiated cells are migrated from the blood to the epithelium alteration zone, but not in the reverse direction. The insufficiency or the absence of blood blast cell differentiation of the in the focus of epidermal injury and adjacent tissue triggers carcinogenesis. The authors suggest their model of carcinogenesis. The conclusions offer a new concept of cancer pathogenesis and suggest a new strategy in the search for methods for early diagnosis of carcinogenesis.

  12. Role of bacteria in carcinogenesis, with special reference to carcinoma of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Gopal; Gulati, Anil K; Shukla, Vijay K

    2010-01-01

    Carcinoma of the gallbladder (CaGB) is the fifth commonest gastrointestinal tract cancer and is endemic in several countries. The interplay of genetic susceptibility, infections, and life style factors has been proposed to be responsible for carcinogenesis of gallbladder. Persistence of infection leading to chronic inflammation, and production of certain toxins and metabolites with carcinogenic potentials, by certain bacteria has been speculated to be involved in the transformation of the gallbladder epithelium. Therefore, any bacteria that have evolved to acquire both of the above carcinogenic mechanisms can cause cancer. Salmonella typhi has been found to be prominently associated with CaGB. Chronic typhoid carriage (persistence) and production of mediators of chronic inflammation and a genotoxic toxin (cytotoxic distending toxin, CdtB) are also known for this bacterium. Furthermore, the natural concentrating function of the gallbladder might amplify the carcinogenic effect of the mediators of carcinogenesis. In addition to S. typhi, certain species of Helicobacter (H. bilis and H. hepaticus) and Escherichia coli have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. As the isolation rate is very poor with the presently available culture techniques, the existence of bacteria in a viable but non-cultivable state is quite likely; therefore, sensitive and specific molecular techniques might reveal the etiological role of bacterial infection in gallbladder carcinogenesis. If bacteria are found to be causing cancers, then eradication of such infections might help in reducing the incidence of some cancers. PMID:21086555

  13. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  14. Chemopreventive properties of indole-3-carbinol, diindolylmethane and other constituents of cardamom against carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Das, Ila; Singh, Sushmita; Saha, Tapas

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell's own antioxidant defenses that in part lead to numerous carcinogenesis. Several phytochemicals, derived from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices, have demonstrated excellent chemopreventive properties against carcinogenesis by regulating the redox status of the cells during oxidative stress. I3C (indole-3-carbinol) and DIM (diindolylmethane) are the phytochemicals that are found in all types of cruciferous vegetables and demonstrated exceptional anti-cancer effects against hormone responsive cancers like breast, prostate and ovarian cancers. Novel analogs of I3C were designed to enhance the overall efficacy, particularly with respect to the therapeutic activity and oral bioavailability and that results in several patent applications on symptoms associated with endometriosis, vaginal neoplasia, cervical dysplasia and mastalgia. Likewise, DIM and its derivatives are patented for treatment and prevention of leiomyomas, HPV infection, respiratory syncytial virus, angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and anti-proliferative actions. On the other hand, phytochemicals in cardamom have not been explored in great details but limonene and cineole demonstrate promising effects against carcinogenesis. Thus studies with selected phytochemicals of cardamom and bioavailability research might lead to many patent applications. This review is focused on the patents generated on the effects of I3C, DIM and selected phytochemicals of cardamom on carcinogenesis. PMID:20653562

  15. Fetal cell carcinogenesis of the thyroid: a modified theory based on recent evidence.

    PubMed

    Takano, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer cells were believed to be generated by multi-step carcinogenesis, in which cancer cells are derived from thyrocytes, via multiple incidences of damage to their genome, especially in oncogenes or anti-oncogenes that accelerate proliferation or foster malignant phenotypes, such as the ability to invade the surrounding tissue or metastasize to distant organs, until a new hypothesis, fetal cell carcinogenesis, was presented. In fetal cell carcinogenesis, thyroid tumor cells are assumed to be derived from three types of fetal thyroid cell which only exist in fetuses or young children, namely, thyroid stem cells (TSCs), thyroblasts and prothyrocytes, by proliferation without differentiation. Genomic alternations, such as RET/PTC and PAX8-PPARγ1 rearrangements and a mutation in the BRAF gene, play an oncogenic role by preventing thyroid fetal cells from differentiating. Fetal cell carcinogenesis effectively explains recent molecular and clinical evidence regarding thyroid cancer, including thyroid cancer initiating cells (TCICs), and it underscores the importance of identifying a stem cells and clarifying the molecular mechanism of organ development in cancer research. It introduces three important concepts, the reverse approach, stem cell crisis and mature and immature cancers. Further, it implies that analysis of a small population of cells in a cancer tissue will be a key technique in establishing future laboratory tests. In the contrary, mass analysis such as gene expression profiling, whole genomic scan, and proteomics analysis may have definite limitations since they can only provide information based on many cells.

  16. RECENT ADVANCES IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS: MODES OF ACTION, ANIMAL MODEL SYSTEMS AND METHYLATED ARSENIC METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract:

    Recent advances in our knowledge of arsenic carcinogenesis include the development of rat or mouse models for all human organs in which inorganic arsenic is known to cause cancer -skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver and kidney. Tumors can be produced from eit...

  17. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  18. CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    The current understanding of cancer as a genetic disease, requiring a specific set of genomic alterations for a normal cell to form a metastatic tumor, has provided the oppor...

  19. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shuhui; Wang Yiwen; Hsu Jueliang; Chang Hongyi; Wang Chiyun; Shen Potsun; Chiang Chiwu; Chuang Jingjing; Tsai Hungwen; Gu Powen; Chang Fangchih; Liu Hsiaosheng; Chow Nanhaw

    2010-01-15

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  20. Chemopreventive properties of indole-3-carbinol, diindolylmethane and other constituents of cardamom against carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Das, Ila; Singh, Sushmita; Saha, Tapas

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell's own antioxidant defenses that in part lead to numerous carcinogenesis. Several phytochemicals, derived from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices, have demonstrated excellent chemopreventive properties against carcinogenesis by regulating the redox status of the cells during oxidative stress. I3C (indole-3-carbinol) and DIM (diindolylmethane) are the phytochemicals that are found in all types of cruciferous vegetables and demonstrated exceptional anti-cancer effects against hormone responsive cancers like breast, prostate and ovarian cancers. Novel analogs of I3C were designed to enhance the overall efficacy, particularly with respect to the therapeutic activity and oral bioavailability and that results in several patent applications on symptoms associated with endometriosis, vaginal neoplasia, cervical dysplasia and mastalgia. Likewise, DIM and its derivatives are patented for treatment and prevention of leiomyomas, HPV infection, respiratory syncytial virus, angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and anti-proliferative actions. On the other hand, phytochemicals in cardamom have not been explored in great details but limonene and cineole demonstrate promising effects against carcinogenesis. Thus studies with selected phytochemicals of cardamom and bioavailability research might lead to many patent applications. This review is focused on the patents generated on the effects of I3C, DIM and selected phytochemicals of cardamom on carcinogenesis.

  1. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  2. Enzymes of the central carbon metabolism: are they linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Aleksandra; Szczepańska, Aneta; Sawiuk, Karolina; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Dependence of carcinogenesis on disruption of DNA replication regulation is a well-known fact. There are also many reports demonstrating the interplay between transcription and DNA replication processes, particularly underlying the importance of promoter activities in the control of replication initiation. Recent findings have shown direct links between central carbon metabolism and DNA replication regulation. Here, we summarize previously published reports which indicated that enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, particularly those involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, may contribute to regulation of transcription and DNA transactions (replication and repair). In this light, we propose a hypothesis that some of these enzymes might be linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis. If true, it may have a consequence in our understanding of causes and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Particularly, certain metabolic perturbations might directly (through central carbon metabolism enzymes) influence regulation of DNA transactions (replication control and fidelity), and thus facilitate carcinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, further studies will be necessary, which is discussed in the final part of this article.

  3. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory.

  4. Mechanism of autophagic regulation in carcinogenesis and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Das, Durgesh Nandini; Sinha, Niharika; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Bhutia, Sujit K

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy in cancer is an intensely debated concept in the field of translational research. The dual nature of autophagy implies that it can potentially modulate the pro-survival and pro-death mechanisms in tumor initiation and progression. There is a prospective molecular relationship between defective autophagy and tumorigenesis that involves the accumulation of damaged mitochondria and protein aggregates, which leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultimately causes DNA damage that can lead to genomic instability. Moreover, autophagy regulates necrosis and is followed by inflammation, which limits tumor metastasis. On the other hand, autophagy provides a survival advantage to detached, dormant metastatic cells through nutrient fueling by tumor-associated stromal cells. Manipulating autophagy for induction of cell death, inhibition of protective autophagy at tissue-and context-dependent for apoptosis modulation has therapeutic implications. This review presents a comprehensive overview of the present state of knowledge regarding autophagy as a new approach to treat cancer.

  5. Disruption of the circadian clock due to the Clock mutation has discrete effects on aging and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoch, Marina P.; Gorbacheva, Victoria Y.; Vykhovanets, Olena; Toshkov, Illia A.; Kondratov, Roman V.; Kondratova, Anna A.; Lee, Choogon; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system has been implicated in the regulation of various biological processes including those involved in genotoxic stress responses and tumor suppression. Here we report that mice with the functional deficiency in circadian transcription factor CLOCK (Clock/Clock mutant mice) do not display predisposition to tumor formation both during their normal lifespan or when challenged by γ-radiation. This phenotype is consistent with high apoptotic and low proliferation rate in lymphoid tissues of Clock mutant mice and is supported by the gene expression profiling of a number of apoptosis and cell cycle-related genes, as well as by growth inhibition of cells with CLOCK downregulation. At the same time, Clock mutant mice respond to low-dose irradiation by accelerating their aging program, and develop phenotypes that are reminiscent of those in Bmal1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the dichotomy in biological consequences of the disruption of the circadian clock with respect to ageing and cancer. They also highlight the existence of a complex interconnection between ageing, carcinogenesis and individual components of the circadian clock machinery. PMID:18418054

  6. Targeted Foxe1 Overexpression in Mouse Thyroid Causes the Development of Multinodular Goiter But Does Not Promote Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nikitski, Alyaksandr; Saenko, Vladimir; Shimamura, Mika; Nakashima, Masahiro; Matsuse, Michiko; Suzuki, Keiji; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanobu; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the forkhead box E1 gene (FOXE1) locus, which are strongly associated with the risk for thyroid cancer. In addition, our recent work has demonstrated FOXE1 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinomas. To assess possible contribution of Foxe1 to thyroid carcinogenesis, transgenic mice overexpressing Foxe1 in their thyroids under thyroglobulin promoter (Tg-Foxe1) were generated. Additionally, Tg-Foxe1 mice were exposed to x-rays at the age of 5 weeks or crossed with Pten(+/-) mice to examine the combined effect of Foxe1 overexpression with radiation or activated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway, respectively. In 5- to 8-week-old Tg-Foxe1 mice, severe hypothyroidism was observed, and mouse thyroids exhibited hypoplasia of the parenchyma. Adult 48-week-old mice were almost recovered from hypothyroidism, their thyroids were enlarged, and featured colloid microcysts and multiple benign nodules of macrofollicular-papilloid growth pattern, but no malignancy was found. Exposure of transgenic mice to 1 or 8 Gy of x-rays and Pten haploinsufficiency promoted hyperplastic nodule formation also without carcinogenic effect. These results indicate that Foxe1 overexpression is not directly involved in the development of thyroid cancer and that proper Foxe1 dosage is essential for achieving normal structure and function of the thyroid.

  7. Targeted Foxe1 Overexpression in Mouse Thyroid Causes the Development of Multinodular Goiter But Does Not Promote Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nikitski, Alyaksandr; Saenko, Vladimir; Shimamura, Mika; Nakashima, Masahiro; Matsuse, Michiko; Suzuki, Keiji; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanobu; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the forkhead box E1 gene (FOXE1) locus, which are strongly associated with the risk for thyroid cancer. In addition, our recent work has demonstrated FOXE1 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinomas. To assess possible contribution of Foxe1 to thyroid carcinogenesis, transgenic mice overexpressing Foxe1 in their thyroids under thyroglobulin promoter (Tg-Foxe1) were generated. Additionally, Tg-Foxe1 mice were exposed to x-rays at the age of 5 weeks or crossed with Pten(+/-) mice to examine the combined effect of Foxe1 overexpression with radiation or activated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway, respectively. In 5- to 8-week-old Tg-Foxe1 mice, severe hypothyroidism was observed, and mouse thyroids exhibited hypoplasia of the parenchyma. Adult 48-week-old mice were almost recovered from hypothyroidism, their thyroids were enlarged, and featured colloid microcysts and multiple benign nodules of macrofollicular-papilloid growth pattern, but no malignancy was found. Exposure of transgenic mice to 1 or 8 Gy of x-rays and Pten haploinsufficiency promoted hyperplastic nodule formation also without carcinogenic effect. These results indicate that Foxe1 overexpression is not directly involved in the development of thyroid cancer and that proper Foxe1 dosage is essential for achieving normal structure and function of the thyroid. PMID:26982637

  8. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  9. Ampelopsin suppresses breast carcinogenesis by inhibiting the mTOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui; Peng, Xiaoli; Bai, Qian; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qianyong; Zhu, Jundong; Mi, Mantian

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is a master regulator of cellular catabolism and anabolism, plays an important role in tumourigenesis and progression. In this study, we report the chemopreventive effect of the dietary compound ampelopsin (AMP) on breast carcinogenesis in vivo and in vitro, which acts by inhibiting the mTOR signalling pathway. Our study indicates that AMP treatment effectively suppresses 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced breast carcinogenesis in rats and inhibits 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced cellular carcinogenesis. Additionally, AMP inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The activity of mTOR kinase was found to be significantly increased in a time-dependent manner during chronic breast carcinogenesis, and this increase can be suppressed by AMP co-treatment. AMP also effectively suppresses mTOR activity in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. We also demonstrated that AMP is an effective mTOR inhibitor that binds to one site on the mTOR target in two ways. Further studies confirmed that AMP inhibits the activation of Akt, suppresses the formation of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 by dissociating regulatory-associated protein of mTOR and rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR and, consequently, decreases the activation of the downstream targets of mTOR, including ribosomal p70-S6 kinase, ribosomal protein S6, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1. These finding suggest that AMP is a bioactive natural chemopreventive agent against breast carcinogenesis and is an effective mTOR inhibitor that may be developed as a useful chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24861637

  10. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  11. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  12. Comprehensive Faculty Flow Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Stefan D.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive faculty flow model developed to forecast a "committed resources index" analyzes the future flexibility of a university. The model's construction, implementation, and assessment are described. (Editor/LBH)

  13. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  15. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  16. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  17. Radiation safety standards: space hazards vs. terrestrial hazards.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, W K

    1983-01-01

    The standards currently recommended for use in space travel were perhaps the first risk derived recommendations for dose limitations developed for quasi-occupational circumstances. They were based on data, considerations, and philosophy existing prior to 1970 and considered carcinogenesis primarily. In the intervening twelve years, not only has radiation risk information improved markedly but considerations relating to risk in general have become better known. The earlier recommendations have been examined with respect to changes in risk estimation and it is noted that the same philosophy used today, would probably lead to different dose limitations. However, other philosophies might be used; in particular a comparison of risks between terrestrial occupational radiation circumstances and also with fatal accident rates in a range of industries can be made and might be used in a modified philosophy with respect to risks from carcinogenesis. Developments have also taken place with respect to the knowledge of the biological effects of HZE particles but whether these effects are limiting as compared with radiation induced carcinogenesis is not yet clear. More studies on the effects of HZE particles, now becoming available, are needed. It is recommended that an in depth reexamination be undertaken of the biological effectiveness of space radiations and the philosophy of dose limitations in comparison with other risks.

  18. Radiation effects in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Coggle, J.E.; Lambert, B.E.; Moores, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    This article outlines the principles of radiobiology that can explain the time of onset, duration, and severity of the complex reactions of the lung to ionizing radiation. These reactions have been assayed biochemically, cell kinetically, physiologically, and pathologically. Clinical and experimental data are used to describe the acute and late reactions of the lung to both external and internal radiation including pneumonitis, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Acute radiation pneumonitis, which can be fatal, develops in both humans and animals within 6 months of exposure to doses greater than or equal to 8 Gy of low LET radiation. It is divisible into a latent period lasting up to 4 weeks; an exudative phase (3-8 weeks) and with an acute pneumonitic phase between 2 and 6 months. There is much evidence to suggest that pneumonitis is an epithelial reaction and some evidence to suggest that this early damage may not be predictive of late fibrosis. However, despite detailed work on collagen metabolism, the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis remains unknown. The data on radiation-induced pulmonary cancer, both in man and experimental animals from both external and internal irradiation following the inhalation of both soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are reviewed. 312 references. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. [Basis of radiation protection].

    PubMed

    Roth, J; Schweizer, P; Gückel, C

    1996-06-29

    stochastic effects respectively. The various histopathological reactions of tissues and organs following localized tissue irradiation, and the radiation syndromes following total body irradiation, constitute the deterministic effects. There will be a threshold below which deterministic effects do not appear and spontaneous incidences are not known. For low dose risk considerations deterministic effects are of no significance. Genetic effects and carcinogenesis are said to be stochastic effects. Characteristically the probability of stochastic effects increases with dose but the severity of the effects is independent of the dose. The shape of the dose-response relationship at intermediate to high dose levels is linear-quadratic. For exposure to low doses the response becomes linear, as is to be expected for a linear-quadratic function at low dose. No threshold is assumed for stochastic effects. The estimate of probability of fatal cancer by the ICRP is 4 x 10(-2) per Sv for the working population and 5 x 10(-2) per Sv for the total population. Their estimate of probability of serious hereditary disorders within the first two generations is 1 x 10(-2) per Sv. The highest probability coefficient is attributed to mental retardation following exposure in utero. Within the sensitive period at 8-15 weeks of gestation, a risk probability of 40 x 10(-2) per Sv is assumed but a threshold at 0.1 Sv is not excluded. Conclusions drawn from experiments, clinical observations and epidemiological studies following intermediate to high radiation exposures attribute a mutagenic and carcinogenic competence to all radiation doses. Microdosimetric considerations support this assumption. This conclusion cannot be confirmed experimentally nor by epidemiological studies of populations living under different conditions from natural sources of radiation. Nevertheless, a change in the present restrictive radiation protection policy does not yet appear appropriate.

  20. Molecular signaling cascades involved in nonmelanoma skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Robert P; Shantz, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer worldwide and the incidence continues to rise, in part due to increasing numbers in high-risk groups such as organ transplant recipients and those taking photosensitizing medications. The most significant risk factor for NMSC is ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight, specifically UVB, which is the leading cause of DNA damage, photoaging, and malignant transformation in the skin. Activation of apoptosis following UVR exposure allows the elimination of irreversibly damaged cells that may harbor oncogenic mutations. However, UVR also activates signaling cascades that promote the survival of these potentially cancerous cells, resulting in tumor initiation. Thus, the UVR-induced stress response in the skin is multifaceted and requires coordinated activation of numerous pathways controlling DNA damage repair, inflammation, and kinase-mediated signal transduction that lead to either cell survival or cell death. This review focuses on the central signaling mechanisms that respond to UVR and the subsequent cellular changes. Given the prevalence of NMSC and the resulting health care burden, many of these pathways provide promising targets for continued study aimed at both chemoprevention and chemotherapy. PMID:27679857

  1. Support for comprehensive reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Rombach, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Reuse of products, processes, and other knowledge will be the key to enable the software industry to achieve the dramatic improvement in productivity and quality required to satisfy the anticipated growing demands. Although experience shows that certain kinds of reuse can be successful, general success has been elusive. A software life-cycle technology which allows comprehensive reuse of all kinds of software-related experience could provide the means to achieving the desired order-of-magnitude improvements. A comprehensive framework of models, model-based characterization schemes, and support mechanisms for better understanding, evaluating, planning, and supporting all aspects of reuse are introduced.

  2. The senile epidermis: environmental influences on skin ageing and cutaneous carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G S; Gilchrest, B A

    1990-04-01

    There is a wealth of new knowledge regarding mechanisms of carcinogenesis and their interaction with senescence and environmental insults, particularly on the effects of UV irradiation on the skin. Innovations and advances in tissue culture techniques now permit in vitro studies of keratinocytes and other benign and malignant skin-derived cells. The ageing processes and cutaneous neoplasia, therefore, can now be studied at the cellular level. New insights regarding the interrelationship of ageing, environment and cutaneous neoplasia are close at hand. Depletion in the number of Langerhans cells and suppression of their function in ageing and UV-exposed skin may allow tumour cells to overcome the host's defence system. The potential increase in UV irradiation due to depletion of the ozone layer may increase the incidence of skin tumours. Carcinogenesis involves three distinct steps: initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion. The mechanism has been studied in mice, where it is suggested the c-ras oncogene may play an important role.

  3. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Links Ovulation-Induced Inflammation and Serous Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sapoznik, Stav; Bahar-Shany, Keren; Brand, Hadar; Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Glick-Saar, Efrat; Dor, Chen; Zadok, Oranit; Barshack, Iris; Zundelevich, Adi; Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Yung, Yuval; Hourvitz, Ariel; Korach, Jacob; Beiner, Mario; Jacob, Jasmine; Levanon, Erez Y; Barak, Michal; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Levanon, Keren

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the notion that ovarian carcinoma results from ovulation-induced inflammation of the fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs) has gained evidence. However, the mechanistic pathway for this process has not been revealed yet. In the current study, we propose the mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) as a link between ovulation-induced inflammation in FTECs and genotoxic damage leading to ovarian carcinogenesis. We show that AID, previously shown to be functional only in B lymphocytes, is expressed in FTECs under physiological conditions, and is induced in vitro upon ovulatory-like stimulation and in vivo in carcinoma-associated FTECs. We also report that AID activity results in epigenetic, genetic and genomic damage in FTECs. Overall, our data provides new insights into the etiology of ovarian carcinogenesis and may set the ground for innovative approaches aimed at prevention and early detection. PMID:26936395

  4. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  5. Role of hemoglobin and transferrin in multi-wall carbon nanotube-induced mesothelial injury and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Shi, Lei; Kohda, Hiro; Tanaka, Minoru; Taki, Kentaro; Nishioka, Tomoki; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Yamashita, Yoriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-03-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are a form of flexible fibrous nanomaterial with high electrical and thermal conductivity. However, 50-nm MWCNT in diameter causes malignant mesothelioma (MM) in rodents and, thus, the International Agency of Research on Cancer has designated them as a possible human carcinogen. Little is known about the molecular mechanism through which MWCNT causes MM. To elucidate the carcinogenic mechanisms of MWCNT in mesothelial cells, we used a variety of lysates to comprehensively identify proteins specifically adsorbed on pristine MWCNT of different diameters (50 nm, NT50; 100 nm, NT100; 150 nm, NT150; and 15 nm/tangled, NTtngl) using mass spectrometry. We identified >400 proteins, which included hemoglobin, histone, transferrin and various proteins associated with oxidative stress, among which we selected hemoglobin and transferrin for coating MWCNT to further evaluate cytotoxicity, wound healing, intracellular catalytic ferrous iron and oxidative stress in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells (RPMC). Cytotoxicity to RPMC was observed with pristine NT50 but not with NTtngl. Coating NT50 with hemoglobin or transferrin significantly aggravated cytotoxicity to RPMC, with an increase in cellular catalytic ferrous iron and DNA damage also observed. Knockdown of transferrin receptor with ferristatin II decreased not only NT50 uptake but also cellular catalytic ferrous iron. Our results suggest that adsorption of hemoglobin and transferrin on the surface of NT50 play a role in causing mesothelial iron overload, contributing to oxidative damage and possibly subsequent carcinogenesis in mesothelial cells. Uptake of NT50 at least partially depends on transferrin receptor 1. Modifications of NT50 surface may decrease this human risk.

  6. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

  7. Overexpression of CRM1: A Characteristic Feature in a Transformed Phenotype of Lung Carcinogenesis and a Molecular Target for Lung Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weimin; Lu, Chuanwen; Chen, Lixia; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study showed that chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), a nuclear export receptor for various cancer-associated "cargo" proteins, was important in regulating lung carcinogenesis in response to a tobacco carcinogen, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The objectives of this study are to comprehensively evaluate the significance of CRM1 in lung cancer development and investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting CRM1 for lung cancer treatment using both in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that CRM1 was overexpressed not only in lung tumor tissues from both lung cancer patients and mice treated with NNK but also in NNK-transformed BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Furthermore, stable overexpression of CRM1 in BEAS-2B cells by plasmid vector transfection led to malignant cellular transformation. Moreover, a decreased CRM1 expression level in A549 cells by short hairpin siRNA transfection led to a decreased tumorigenic activity both in vitro and in nude mice, suggesting the potential to target CRM1 for lung cancer treatment. Indeed, we showed that the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on A549 cells with CRM1 down-regulated by short hairpin siRNA were significantly increased, compared with A549 cells, and the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin became further enhanced when the drug was used in combination with leptomycin B, a CRM1 inhibitor, in both in vitro and in vivo models. Cancer target genes were significantly involved in these processes. These data suggest that CRM1 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis and provides a novel target for lung cancer adjuvant therapy.

  8. Murine susceptibility to two-stage skin carcinogenesis is influenced by the agent used for promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, J.J. Jr.; Nesnow, S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Several approaches were employed to investigate whether murine stock and strain differences in susceptibility to two-stage skin carcinogenesis are due to differences in the metabolism of the initiating aromatic hydrocarbons, or the consequences of the agents used for promotion. A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was used to quantitatively compare the abilities of cultured newborn SENCAR, DBA/2, C57BL/6 and BALB/c keratinocytes to metabolize dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to mutagenic and cytotoxic metabolites. At equivalent concentrations of DMBA, throughout a 25-fold range in promutagen concentration, C57BL/6, BALB/c and SENCAR keratinocyte-dependent mutant frequencies were very similar and approximately twice DBA/2 keratinocyte-dependent mutant frequencies. In in vivo tumor studies, C57BL/6 mice were more sensitive than SENCAR mice to complete skin carcinogenesis protocols employing repetitive weekly treatments with DMBA and benzo(a)pyrene (BP). At equivalent concentrations of either DMBA or BP, C57BL/6 mice developed carcinomas sooner, and had a greater number of carcinomas per animal. SENCAR mice were very sensitive to two-stage skin carcinogenesis protocols employing BP and DMBA as initiators and benzoyl peroxide and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as promoters. C57BL/6 mice were relatively refractory to TPA promotion but sensitive to promotion with benzoyl peroxide. These findings suggest that murine stock and strain-dependent differences in sensitivity to two-stage skin carcinogenesis may not be due to major differences in the metabolism of the initiating hydrocarbons, but are partially the consequences of the agents for promotion. 24 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  9. ERBB3 is required for tumor promotion in a mouse model of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Schäfer, Matthias; Muzumdar, Sukalp; Rose, Christian; Schneider, Marlon R

    2015-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in skin inflammation, wound healing, and carcinogenesis. Less is known about the functions of the structurally related receptor ERBB3 (HER3) in the skin. We assessed the requirement of ERBB3 for skin homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis by crossing mice carrying a conditional Erbb3 allele with animals expressing cre under the control of the keratin 5 promoter. Erbb3(del) mice, lacking ERBB3 specifically in keratinocytes, showed no obvious abnormalities. The EGFR was upregulated in Erbb3(del) skin, possibly compensating the loss of ERBB3. Nonetheless, healing of full-thickness excisional wounds was negatively affected by ERBB3 deficiency. To analyze the function of ERBB3 during tumorigenesis, we employed the established DMBA/TPA multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Erbb3(del) mice remained free of papillomas for a longer time and had significantly reduced tumor burden compared to control littermates. Tumor cell proliferation was considerably reduced in Erbb3(del) mice, and loss of ERBB3 also impaired keratinocyte proliferation after a single application of TPA. In human skin tumor samples, upregulated ERBB3 expression was observed in squamous cell carcinoma, condyloma, and malignant melanoma. Thus, we conclude that ERBB3, while dispensable for the development and the homeostasis of the epidermis and its appendages, is required for proper wound healing and for the progression of skin tumors during multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mice. ERBB3 may also be important for human skin cancer progression. The latter effects most probably reflect a key role for ERBB3 in increasing cell proliferation after stimuli as wounding or carcinogenesis.

  10. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  11. [Molecular basis of carcinogenesis in lung cancer induced by cigarette smoking].

    PubMed

    Damps, I; Jassem, E; Siemińska, A

    2001-06-01

    An association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer carcinogenesis is reviewed. It is highly possible, that "individual susceptibility" for tumor development exists and is related to polymorphic variants of genes encoding for enzymes, which are employed in metabolism of xenobiotic substances. The gathering of highly reactive molecules due to modified metabolic processes results in DNA adducts forming and increased tendency for mutations. Group of genes, responsible for proliferation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage repair are frequently altered. PMID:11503248

  12. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  13. Epithelial to Stromal Re-Distribution of Primary Cilia during Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmack, Simon; Kneller, Sarah; Dadabaeva, Nigora; Bergmann, Frank; Taylor, Andrew; Hackert, Thilo; Werner, Jens; Strobel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (HH) pathway is a mediator in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Surprisingly, previous studies suggested that primary cilia (PC), the essential organelles for HH signal transduction, were lost in PDAC. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of PC in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and during carcinogenesis to PDAC with focus on both epithelia and stroma. Methods PC were analyzed in paraffin sections from normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, and PDAC, as well as in primary human pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) and pancreatic cancer cell lines by double immunofluorescence staining for acetylated α-tubuline and γ-tubuline. Co-staining for the HH receptors PTCH1, PTCH2 and SMO was also performed. Results PC are gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis in the epithelium: the fraction of cells with PC gradually and significantly decreased from 32% in ducts of normal pancreas, to 21% in ducts of chronic pancreatitis, to 18% in PanIN1a, 6% in PanIN2, 3% in PanIN3 and to 1.2% in invasive PDAC. However, this loss of PC in the neoplastic epithelium is accompanied by a gain of PC in the surrounding stroma. The fraction of stromal cells with PC significantly increased from 13% around normal ducts to about 30% around PanIN and PDAC. HH-receptors were detected in tumor stroma but not in epithelial cells. PC are also present in PSC and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conclusion PC are not lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis but re-distributed from the epithelium to the stroma. This redistribution may explain the re-direction of HH signaling towards the stroma during pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27783689

  14. Chronic Exposure to Combined Carcinogens Enhances Breast Cell Carcinogenesis with Mesenchymal and Stem-Like Cell Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens. PMID:25372613

  15. Review: the Contribution of both Nature and Nurture to Carcinogenesis and Progression in Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, Iain Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cancer arises due to a series of somatic mutations that accumulate within the nucleus of a cell which enable the cell to proliferate in an unregulated manner. These mutations arise as a result of both endogenous and exogenous factors. Genes that are commonly mutated in cancer cells are involved in cell cycle regulation, growth and proliferation. It is known that both nature and nurture play important roles in cancer development through complex gene-environment interactions; however, the exact mechanism of these interactions in carcinogenesis is presently unclear. Key environmental factors that play a role in carcinogenesis include smoking, UV light and oncoviruses. Angiogenesis, inflammation and altered cell metabolism are important factors in carcinogenesis and are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although the exact mechanism of nature-nurture interactions in solid tumour formation are not yet fully understood, it is evident that neither nature nor nurture can be considered in isolation. By understanding more about gene-environment interactions, it is possible that cancer mortality could be reduced. PMID:27066794

  16. Effects of inhaled ammonium sulfate on benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenesis. [Hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Godleski, J.J.; Melnicoff, M.J.; Sadri, S.; Garbeil, P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of inhaled ammonium sulfate on benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenesis in the lungs of Syrian golden hamsters was studied. Exposure to ammonium sulfate at an airborne concentration 20 times average United States ambient levels resulted in a significant depression of benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenesis in the first 6 mo of the study. However, at 2 yr, the termination of the study, there were no differences in cancer incidence between groups receiving benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene plus ammonium sulfate. In addition, at the concentration studied, inhaled ammonium sulfate did not significantly increase the incidence or severity of pneumonitis or pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster. However, this inhalation did increase the incidence of emphysema but not the severity. The decreased incidence of cancer during the first 6 mo of this study in animals receiving both benzo(a)pyrene and ammonium sulfate suggests that interaction between sulfate and benzo(a)pyrene does occur, but is insufficient to afford long-term protection against the development of cancer. No enhancement of carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene occurs in the presence of inhaled sulfate. 31 references, 5 tables, 2 figures.

  17. Role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of Barrett’s-associated carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kusaka, Gen; Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE), a premalignant condition to Barrett’s adenocarcinoma (BAC), is closely associated with chronic inflammation due to gastro-esophageal reflux. Caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), a representative marker of BE, is increased during the metaplastic and neoplastic transformation of BE. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to be a crucial mediator of Barrett’s carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that CDX2 might be induced directly under stimulation of large amounts of NO generated around the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) by activating epithelial growth factor receptor in a ligand-independent manner. Thus, we reviewed recent developments on the role of NO in Barrett’s carcinogenesis. Notably, recent studies have reported that microbial communities in the distal esophagus are significantly different among groups with a normal esophagus, reflux esophagitis, BE or BAC, despite there being no difference in the bacterial quantity. Considering that microorganism components can be one of the major sources of large amounts of NO, these studies suggest that the bacterial composition in the distal esophagus might play an important role in regulating NO production during the carcinogenic process. Controlling an inflammatory reaction due to gastro-esophageal reflux or bacterial composition around the GEJ might help prevent the progression of Barrett’s carcinogenesis by inhibiting NO production. PMID:26909236

  18. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Claire M; Crowley-Skillicorn, Cheray; Bernstein, Carol; Holubec, Hana; Bernstein, Harris

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds) might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss. PMID:21753893

  19. β-Arrestin1 enhances hepatocellular carcinogenesis through inflammation-mediated Akt signalling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Guo, Yunwei; Tan, Siwei; Ke, Bilun; Tao, Jin; Liu, Huiling; Jiang, Jie; Chen, Jianning; Chen, Guihua; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute the largest known superfamily for signal transduction and transmission, and they control a variety of physiological and pathological processes. GPCR adaptor β-arrestins (ARRBs) play a role in cancerous proliferation. However, the effect of ARRBs in inflammation-mediated hepatocellular carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we show that ARRB1, but not ARRB2, is upregulated in inflammation-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and paracancerous tissues in humans. A genotoxic carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN), significantly induces hepatic inflammation, TNF-α production and ARRB1 expression. Although ARRB1 deficiency does not affect hepatic inflammation and TNF-α production, it markedly represses hepatocellular carcinogenesis by suppressing malignant proliferation in DEN-treated mice. Furthermore, TNF-α directly induces hepatic ARRB1 expression and enhances ARRB1 interaction with Akt by binding to boost Akt phosphorylation, resulting in malignant proliferation of liver cells. Our data suggest that ARRB1 enhances hepatocellular carcinogenesis by inflammation-mediated Akt signalling and that ARRB1 may be a potential therapeutic target for HCC.

  20. ATP-Dependent Lon Protease Contributes to Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Wang, Minggang; Hou, Nengyi; Hu, Xiao; Jia, Guiqing; Qin, Xianpeng; Zuo, Xiaofei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Kun; Song, Wei; Wang, Kang; Pang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Host cellular stress responses, including inflammatory and immune responses, have been reported highly linked to H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. However, whether mitochondrial regulation and metabolic reprogramming, which are potently associated with various cancers, play a role in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Here we revealed that Lon protease (Lonp1), which is a key inductive of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and is required to maintain the mitochondrial quality, was greatly induced in H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, we uncovered that knockdown of Lonp1 expression significantly diminished the metabolic switch to glycolysis and gastric cell proliferation associated with low multiplicity of H. pylori infection. In addition, Lonp1 overexpression in gastric epithelial cells also promoted glycolytic switch and cell overgrowth, suggesting H. pylori effect is Lonp1 dependent. We further demonstrated that H. pylori induced Lonp1 expression and cell overgrowth, at least partially, via HIF-1α regulation. Collectively, our results concluded the relevance of Lonp1 for cell proliferation and identified Lonp1 as a key regulator of metabolic reprogramming in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27108387

  1. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  2. Multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin: Fundamentals and applications

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Erika L.; Angel, Joe M; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-01-01

    For more than 60 years, the chemical induction of tumors in mouse skin has been used to study mechanisms of epithelial carcinogenesis and evaluate modifying factors. In the traditional two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, initiation is accomplished by the application of a subcarcinogenic dose of a carcinogen. Subsequently, tumor development is elicited by repeated treatment with a tumor promoting agent. The initiation protocol can be completed within 1–3 hours depending on the number of mice used, while the promotion phase requires twice weekly treatments (1–2 hours) and once weekly tumor palpation (1–2 hours) for the duration of the study. A highly reproducible papilloma burden is expected within 10–20 weeks with progression of a portion of the tumors to squamous cell carcinomas within 20–50 weeks. In contrast to complete skin carcinogenesis, the two-stage model allows for greater yield of premalignant lesions as well as separation of the initiation and promotion phases. PMID:19713956

  3. Effect of Cu supplementation on genomic instability in chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Backround The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation (copper or copper and resveratrol) on the intensity of carcinogenesis and the frequency of microsatellite instability in a widely used model of mammary carcinogenesis induced in the rat by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Methods DNA was extracted from rat mammary cancers and normal tisues, amplified by PCR, using different polymorphic DNA markers and the reaction products were analyzed for microsatellite instability. Results It was found that irrespectively of the applied diet there was no inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in the rats due to DMBA. Besides, in the groups supplemented with Cu (II) or Cu (II) and resveratrol the tumor formation was clearly accelerated. Unlike the animals that were fed with standard diet, the supplemented rats were characterized by the loss of heterozygosity of microsatellite D3Mgh9 in cancer tumors (by respectively 50 and 40%). When the animals received Cu (II) and resveratrol supplemented diet the occurrence of genomic instability was additionally found in their livers in the case of microsatellite D1Mgh6 (which was stable in the animals without dietary supplementation). Conclusions Identification of the underlying mechanisms by which dietary factors affect genomic stability might prove useful in the treatment of mammary cancer as well as in the incorporation of dietary factors into mammary cancer prevention strategies. PMID:22192448

  4. IL-13 from intraepithelial lymphocytes regulates tissue homeostasis and protects against carcinogenesis in the skin.

    PubMed

    Dalessandri, Tim; Crawford, Greg; Hayes, Mark; Castro Seoane, Rocio; Strid, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The skin is under constant renewal and exposure to environmental challenges. How homeostasis is maintained alongside protective mechanisms against damage is unclear. Among the basal epithelial cells (ECs) is a population of resident intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that provide host-protective immune surveillance. Here we show that IELs cross-communicate with ECs via the production of IL-13. Skin ECs are activated by IEL-derived IL-13, enabling a canonical EC stress response. In the absence of IL-13, or canonical IEL, the skin has decreased ability to repair its barrier and increased susceptibility to cutaneous carcinogenesis. IL-13 controls the rate of EC movement through the epidermis, which might explain the importance of IL-13 for epidermal integrity and its suppressive effect on skin carcinogenesis. These findings show that IL-13 acts as a molecular bridge between IELs and ECs, and reveal a critical host-defensive role for type-2 immunity in regulating EC tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:27357235

  5. Immunomodulation of the lymphoresponsive phases of carcinogenesis: mechanisms of natural immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.H.; DiPaolo, J.A.; Heinbaugh, J.A.; DeMarinis, A.J.

    1982-09-01

    Biphasic modulation of the frequency of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced tumors in relation to increasing immunocompetence of tumor-bearing mice is indicative of lymphoresponsive stimulatory and inhibitory phases of carcinogenesis; components and mechanisms contributing to the paradoxical ability of the native or natural immune system to stimulate as well as to inhibit the development of cancer were identified with the use of an in vitro model of carcinogenesis. Normal NIH/N Syrian golden hamster spleen leukocytes caused a biphasic modulation of UV-irradiated hamster cell morphologic transformation that was dependent on the leukocyte-to-target cell (L:TC) ratio. Whereas low (less than 50:1) and high (greater than 200:1) L:TC ratios inhibited the transformation frequency, intermediate ratios were less inhibitory and seemingly immunostimulatory. Inhibition alone occurred with antigen- or mitogen-activated leukocytes or with macrophages. An anticarcinogenic lymphocyte hormone, lymphotoxin, eliminated the leukocyte-mediated stimulatory phase; galactose, a lymphotoxin inhibitor, blocked the leukocyte-mediated inhibitory phases. Thus immunoinhibition was mediated through lymphotoxin, and the apparent immunostimulation possibly resulted from immune cell regulation of lymphotoxin activity during the early stages of carcinogenesis.

  6. IL-13 from intraepithelial lymphocytes regulates tissue homeostasis and protects against carcinogenesis in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Dalessandri, Tim; Crawford, Greg; Hayes, Mark; Castro Seoane, Rocio; Strid, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The skin is under constant renewal and exposure to environmental challenges. How homeostasis is maintained alongside protective mechanisms against damage is unclear. Among the basal epithelial cells (ECs) is a population of resident intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that provide host-protective immune surveillance. Here we show that IELs cross-communicate with ECs via the production of IL-13. Skin ECs are activated by IEL-derived IL-13, enabling a canonical EC stress response. In the absence of IL-13, or canonical IEL, the skin has decreased ability to repair its barrier and increased susceptibility to cutaneous carcinogenesis. IL-13 controls the rate of EC movement through the epidermis, which might explain the importance of IL-13 for epidermal integrity and its suppressive effect on skin carcinogenesis. These findings show that IL-13 acts as a molecular bridge between IELs and ECs, and reveal a critical host-defensive role for type-2 immunity in regulating EC tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:27357235

  7. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in aberrant DNA methylation along multistep gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Jung, Younmu; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung

    2010-06-01

    CpG island hypermethylation is frequently found during gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated methylation profiles of p16, LOX, HAND1, THBD, p41ARC, and APC along multistep gastric carcinogenesis and determined their association with Helicobacter pylori infection. Methylation levels in these six genes were evaluated in noncancerous gastric biopsy specimens using quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 459 patients with gastric cancer (GC), 137 with dysplasia, and 248 controls. Controls were divided into four subgroups sorted by current H. pylori infection status (active vs past or negative infection) and the presence of intestinal metaplasia (IM). In controls, active H. pylori infection significantly increased methylation levels in THBD, LOX, and HAND1 (all P < 0.001), and hypermethylation of THBD, HAND1, and APC was associated with IM. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation was correlated well with activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis. However, methylation levels in LOX, HAND1, THBD, and p41ARC remained increased in cases with past H. pylori infection compared to those that were H. pylori negative (all P < 0.05). Hypermethylation of THBD, and possibly p16, was significantly associated with GC, regardless of the status of current H. pylori infection (all P < 0.05). These results suggest that aberrant DNA hypermethylation caused by H. pylori-associated gastritis occurs in a gene-specific manner along gastric carcinogenesis, which can be persistent even after the disappearance of H. pylori. Aberrant methylation of THBD might provide a link between H. pylori infection and development of GC.

  8. Loss of tumor suppressor NF1 activates HSF1 to promote carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chengkai; Santagata, Sandro; Tang, Zijian; Shi, Jiayuan; Cao, Junxia; Kwon, Hyoungtae; Bronson, Roderick T.; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic stress response pathways are frequently mobilized within tumor cells. The mediators of these adaptive mechanisms and how they contribute to carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. A striking example is heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), master transcriptional regulator of the heat shock response. Surprisingly, we found that loss of the tumor suppressor gene neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1) increased HSF1 levels and triggered its activation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. As a consequence, Nf1–/– cells acquired tolerance to proteotoxic stress. This activation of HSF1 depended on dysregulated MAPK signaling. HSF1, in turn, supported MAPK signaling. In mice, Hsf1 deficiency impeded NF1-associated carcinogenesis by attenuating oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling. In cell lines from human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) driven by NF1 loss, HSF1 was overexpressed and activated, which was required for tumor cell viability. In surgical resections of human MPNSTs, HSF1 was overexpressed, translocated to the nucleus, and phosphorylated. These findings reveal a surprising biological consequence of NF1 deficiency: activation of HSF1 and ensuing addiction to this master regulator of the heat shock response. The loss of NF1 function engages an evolutionarily conserved cellular survival mechanism that ultimately impairs survival of the whole organism by facilitating carcinogenesis. PMID:22945628

  9. Modification of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea initiated bladder carcinogenesis in Wistar rats by terephthalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Lunbiao; Shi Yuan; Dai Guidong; Pan Hongxin; Chen Jianfeng; Song Ling; Wang Shouling; Chang, Hebron C.; Sheng Hongbing; Wang Xinru . E-mail: xrwang@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-01-15

    The effect of terephthalic acid (TPA) on urinary bladder carcinogenesis was examined. Male Wistar rats were initiated by injection of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU) (20 mg/kg b.w. ip) twice a week for 4 weeks, then given basal diet containing 5% TPA, 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) or 1% TPA for the next 22 weeks, and then euthanized. 5% TPA treatment induced a high incidence of urinary bladder calculi and a large amount of precipitate. Though 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and 1% TPA treatment did not induce urinary bladder calculi formation, they resulted in a moderate increase in urinary precipitate. Histological examination of urinary bladder revealed that MNU-5% TPA treatment resulted in a higher incidence of simple hyperplasia, papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia), papilloma and cancer than MNU control. MNU-5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and 1% TPA treatment increased slightly the incidence of simple hyperplasia and PN hyperplasia (not statistically significant). The major elements of the precipitate are phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, chloride, calcium and TPA. The present study indicated that the calculi induced by TPA had a strong promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis and the precipitate containing calcium terephthalate (CaTPA) may also have weak promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

  10. Chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability paves the way for human esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Dongping; Lei, Zhijin; Chen, Donglin; Xu, Zexin; Su, Min

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with increased risk of cancer development, whereas the link between chronic inflammation and esophageal carcinogenesis is still obscure heretofore. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and DNA damage, as well as the possible role of DNA damage in esophageal carcinogenic process. Endoscopic esophageal biopsies from 109 individuals from Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), were examined to evaluate the association between chronic inflammation and histological severity, while additional 204 esophageal non-tumor samples from patients with ESCC were collected. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the oxidative DNA damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly positive correlation was observed between degree of chronic inflammation and esophageal precursor lesions (rs = 0.37, P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that oxidative DNA damage level was positively correlated with the degree of chronic inflammation (rs = 0.21, P < 0.05). Moreover, the level of oxidative DNA damage positively correlated with histological severity (rs = 0.49, P < 0.01). We found that the extent of DSBs was progressively increased with inflammation degree (P < 0.01) and the progression of precancerous lesions (P < 0.001). Collectively, these findings provide evidence linking chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability with esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest possibilities for early detection and intervention of esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:27028857

  11. Review: the Contribution of both Nature and Nurture to Carcinogenesis and Progression in Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, Iain Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cancer arises due to a series of somatic mutations that accumulate within the nucleus of a cell which enable the cell to proliferate in an unregulated manner. These mutations arise as a result of both endogenous and exogenous factors. Genes that are commonly mutated in cancer cells are involved in cell cycle regulation, growth and proliferation. It is known that both nature and nurture play important roles in cancer development through complex gene-environment interactions; however, the exact mechanism of these interactions in carcinogenesis is presently unclear. Key environmental factors that play a role in carcinogenesis include smoking, UV light and oncoviruses. Angiogenesis, inflammation and altered cell metabolism are important factors in carcinogenesis and are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although the exact mechanism of nature-nurture interactions in solid tumour formation are not yet fully understood, it is evident that neither nature nor nurture can be considered in isolation. By understanding more about gene-environment interactions, it is possible that cancer mortality could be reduced.

  12. Caffeic acid directly targets ERK1/2 to attenuate solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ge; Fu, Yang; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Zhu, Feng; Yao, Ke; Li, Haitao; Chen, Hanyong; Li, Wei; Lim, Do Young; Sheng, Yuqiao; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is a well-known phenolic phytochemical present in coffee and reportedly has anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and targeted proteins involved in the suppression of carcinogenesis by caffeic acid are not fully understood. In this study, we report that caffeic acid significantly inhibits colony formation of human skin cancer cells and EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of HaCaT cells dose-dependently. Caffeic acid topically applied to dorsal mouse skin significantly suppressed tumor incidence and volume in a solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis mouse model. A substantial reduction of phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was observed in mice treated with caffeic acid either before or after solar UV exposure. Caffeic acid directly interacted with ERK1/2 and inhibited ERK1/2 activities in vitro. Importantly, we resolved the co-crystal structure of ERK2 complexed with caffeic acid. Caffeic acid interacted directly with ERK2 at amino acid residues Q105, D106 and M108. Moreover, A431 cells expressing knockdown of ERK2 lost sensitivity to caffeic acid in a skin cancer xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that caffeic acid exerts chemopreventive activity against solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting ERK1 and 2. PMID:25104643

  13. Graphics and Listening Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of graphics as lecture comprehension supports for low-proficiency English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) listeners. The study compared the performance of Asian students in Canada listening to an audiotape while viewing an organizational graphic with that of a control group. Findings indicate that the graphics enhanced…

  14. The Comprehension Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephanie; Goudvis, Anne

    2005-01-01

    "The Comprehension Toolkit" focuses on reading, writing, talking, listening, and investigating, to deepen understanding of nonfiction texts. With a focus on strategic thinking, this toolkit's lessons provide a foundation for developing independent readers and learners. It also provides an alternative to the traditional assign and correct…

  15. Comprehensive Trail Making Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT) is designed to be used in neuropsychological assessment for the purposes of detecting effects of brain defects and deficits and in tracking progress in rehabilitation. More specific purposes include the detection of frontal lobe deficits, problems with psychomotor speed, visual search and sequencing,…

  16. Comprehensive stormwater management study

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T. ); Alter, M. ); Wassum, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    This article examines Tucson, Arizona's approach to stormwater management. The topics of the article include the quantity and quality of stormwater, developing the stormwater master plan, meeting environmental and regulatory constraints. Tucson's comprehensive, watershed by watershed approach to public works planning and stormwater program development is described.

  17. Cognition, Curriculum, and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    The papers in this volume were initially presented at a seminar on the development of reading comprehension, which explored basic research and the teaching of reading comprehenison. Researchers in cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics and experts in curriculum design in reading gave presentations and reacted to one another's ideas. Each…

  18. The Comprehensive Health Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

    This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

  19. Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, T. L.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive rural "agribusiness industry" curriculum might include: (1) The World of Work (Grade 7 or 8), (2) Vocational Orientation (Grade 9), (3) Basic Agriculture and Industry (Grade 10), (4) Specialized Agribusiness Industry (Grade 11), and (5) Advanced Agribusiness Industry (Grade 12). (DM)

  20. Math Sense: Comprehensive Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Cathy Fillmore

    This book features a comprehensive review of the Math Sense series and is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include whole numbers;…

  1. Comprehensive care in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Hemophilia is a chronic and inherited X-linked bleeding disorder that requires life-long medical care. Hemophilia treatment is costly and complex partly because of the cost of the factor concentrates used in replacement therapy. However, the management of hemophilia is not based solely on achieving access to better treatment with safe factor concentrates; it also includes accurately diagnosing the disorder and providing specialized comprehensive care by a multidisciplinary team of specialists trained in hemophilia management. Comprehensive care for the person with hemophilia is defined as the continuous supervision of all medical and psychological aspects affecting the patient and his family and it demands the establishment of specialized centers, called Hemophilia Treatment Centers. The services that should be offered by a comprehensive hemophilia healthcare center are diverse and the multidisciplinary team should be coordinated preferably by a hematologist with the participation of other health professionals. It has been demonstrated that the benefits of establishing hemophilia centers are observed even in developing countries and that changes can be achieved when resources are re-organized, especially when education and training are provided at all levels. To reach these objectives, it is essential to have the participation of the patient and family members, and to strive to obtain the financial and legislative support from the State or Government in order to achieve a national comprehensive care program contemplating all the aspects needed for improving the quality of life for the community of patients with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders.

  2. Comprehensive School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertling, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide school leaders with guidance in determining how to choose and implement the schoolwide program that is best for their school. American Institutes for Research's "An Educator's Guide to Schoolwide Reform" provides educators with comprehensive profiles and evaluations of 24 of the leading schoolwide…

  3. Cognitive Correlates of Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk; Phillips, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand cognitive foundations of oral language comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension), we examined how inhibitory control, theory of mind, and comprehension monitoring are uniquely related to listening comprehension over and above vocabulary and age. A total of 156 children in kindergarten and first grade from…

  4. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1991-10-01

    This lecture will provide a bridge from the physical energy or LET spectra as might be calculated in an organ to the risk of carcinogenesis, a particular concern for extended missions to the moon or beyond to Mars. Topics covered will include (1) LET spectra expected from galactic cosmic rays, (2) probabilities that individual cell nuclei in the body will be hit by heavy galactic cosmic ray particles, (3) the conventional methods of calculating risks from a mixed environment of high and low LET radiation, (4) an alternate method which provides certain advantages using fluence-related risk coefficients (risk cross sections), and (5) directions for future research and development of these ideas.

  5. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  6. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme. (ERB)

  7. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  8. Dose-response relationships in chemical carcinogenesis: superposition of different mechanisms of action, resulting in linear-nonlinear curves, practical thresholds, J-shapes.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1998-09-20

    The shape of a carcinogen dose-cancer incidence curve is discussed as the result of a superposition of dose-response relationships for various effects of the carcinogen on the process of carcinogenesis. Effects include direct DNA damage, e.g., by covalent binding, indirect DNA damage, e.g., by increased formation of reactive oxygen species or interaction with DNA replication or chromosome integrity. The 'fixation' of a DNA adduct as a heritable mutation depends on its pro-mutagenic potency and on the rates of DNA repair and DNA replication. Endogenous and unavoidable DNA damage is responsible for a background rate of the process of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and forms the basis of spontaneous cancer incidence. For DNA-reactive carcinogens, linearity of the dose response at the low-dose end is expected. With increasing dose, saturation of DNA repair can introduce a sublinearity (example: dimethylnitrosamine). Stimulation of cell division as a result of high-dose toxicity and regenerative proliferation also results in a sublinear deviation from low-dose linearity. If the DNA-damaging potency of the carcinogen is low in comparison with the high-dose effects, the linear part of the low dose-cancer incidence curve might be hidden within the background variability. Under such conditions, 'practical thresholds' could be discussed (formaldehyde). If a carcinogen increases the rate of cell division or the level of oxidative stress at high dose but has an antimitogenic or antioxidative effect at low dose, a J-shaped (or: U-shaped) curve with a decrease of the spontaneous tumor incidence at low dose could result (caffeic acid; TCDD). This phenomenon has been observed even under conditions of a genotoxic contribution (ionizing radiation; diesel exhaust particles). For a mechanism-based assessment of a low-dose cancer risk, information on the various modes of action and modulations should be available over the full dose range, and models should be refined to incorporate the

  9. Cinnarizine: Comprehensive Profile.

    PubMed

    Haress, Nadia G

    2015-01-01

    Cinnarizine is a piperazine derivative with antihistaminic, antiserotonergic, antidopaminergic, and calcium channel-blocking activities. A comprehensive profile was performed on cinnarizine including its description and the different methods of analysis. The 1H NMR and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR methods were used. In addition, infrared and mass spectral analyses were performed which all confirmed the structure of cinnarizine. PMID:26051684

  10. CEDR: Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have a long history of epidemiologic research programs. The main focus of these programs has been the Health and Mortality Study of the DOE work force. This epidemiologic study began in 1964 with a feasibility study of workers at the Hanford facility. Studies of other populations exposed to radiation have also been supported, including the classic epidemiologic study of radium dial painters and studies of atomic bomb survivors. From a scientific perspective, these epidemiologic research program have been productive, highly credible, and formed the bases for many radiological protection standards. Recently, there has been concern that, although research results were available, the data on which these results were based were not easily obtained by interested investigators outside DOE. Therefore, as part of an effort to integrate and broaden access to its epidemiologic information, the DOE has developed the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) Program. Included in this effort is the development of a computer information system for accessing the collection of CEDR data and its related descriptive information. The epidemiologic data currently available through the CEDAR Program consist of analytic data sets, working data sets, and their associated documentation files. In general, data sets are the result of epidemiologic studies that have been conducted on various groups of workers at different DOE facilities during the past 30 years.

  11. [History of the radiation damage in occupations].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-03-01

    In the year following Röntgen`s discovery of X-rays in 1895, approximately 60 cases of hand dermatitis and hair loss induced by radiation were reported. People using X-rays in their occupation, including X-ray tube manufacturers, physicians, and engineers, experienced chronic radiation dermatitis and were the first to be diagnosed with occupational radiation exposure. Reports of later appearing disorders, including skin cancer, suffered by doctors and engineers, were regarded as serious occupational diseases. In the 1910's, blood disorders, including leukemia, in people with occupational exposure to radiation came into focus. Dial painters applying radium to watches with a luminous dial clock face suffered osteomyelitis from about 1914. Other radiation damage reports include radiation death and carcinogenesis in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, and radiation death in the Tokai-mura JCO accident in 1999. The details of radiation damage in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 have not yet been reported, but must be followed in the future.

  12. Radiation: What determines the risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Trivedi, A. ||

    1993-12-31

    Radiation, like other DNA damaging agents, can initiate a series of cellular events responsible for cancer development. However, in any individual the risk of cancer arising from a carcinogen exposure is variable, and is not a fixed value dependent only on the dose of carcinogen. This variability in overall risk arises from variability in the probabilities of the intermediate steps of the multistep processes of carcinogenesis. Using cellular and animal model systems, we have shown that deliberate manipulation of these biological processes is possible, and that the risk of cancer from a fixed exposure to a carcinogen can be made to increase or decrease. We have also shown that such changes in risk can result from intervention at times long before or after that carcinogen exposure. These results indicate that the principles of radiation protection can be expanded. We suggest that in addition to offering protection against exposure, radiation protection can include the development of strategies for protection against the ultimate biological consequences of an exposure. Improved understanding of the biology of radiation responses may lead to techniques for deliberate intervention that could be particularly useful in long duration manned space flight.

  13. Comprehension Monitoring and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolic-Vehovec, Svjetlana; Bajsanski, Igor

    2007-01-01

    This study explored comprehension monitoring, use of reading strategies and reading comprehension of bilingual students at different levels of perceived proficiency in Italian. The participants were bilingual fifth to eighth-grade elementary school students from four Italian schools in Rijeka, Croatia. Students' reading comprehension was assessed.…

  14. Emergent Comprehension: Understanding Comprehension Development among Young Literacy Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMunn Dooley, Caitlin; Matthews, Mona W.

    2009-01-01

    This article hones what is meant by "emergent comprehension". The authors define emergent comprehension as the period when young children, prior to conventional reading, engage in meaningful experiences that stimulate the development and use of meaning-making strategies with potential to affect later reading comprehension. The construct "emergent…

  15. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  16. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  17. A Multi-stage Carcinogenesis Model to Investigate Caloric Restriction as a Potential Tool for Post-irradiation Mitigation of Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Shusuke; Blyth, Benjamin John; Shang, Yi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    The risk of radiation-induced cancer adds to anxiety in low-dose exposed populations. Safe and effective lifestyle changes which can help mitigate excess cancer risk might provide exposed individuals the opportunity to pro-actively reduce their cancer risk, and improve mental health and well-being. Here, we applied a mathematical multi-stage carcinogenesis model to the mouse lifespan data using adult-onset caloric restriction following irradiation in early life. We re-evaluated autopsy records with a veterinary pathologist to determine which tumors were the probable causes of death in order to calculate age-specific mortality. The model revealed that in both irradiated and unirradiated mice, caloric restriction reduced the age-specific mortality of all solid tumors and hepatocellular carcinomas across most of the lifespan, with the mortality rate dependent more on age owing to an increase in the number of predicted rate-limiting steps. Conversely, irradiation did not significantly alter the number of steps, but did increase the overall transition rate between the steps. We show that the extent of the protective effect of caloric restriction is independent of the induction of cancer from radiation exposure, and discuss future avenues of research to explore the utility of caloric restriction as an example of a potential post-irradiation mitigation strategy. PMID:27390741

  18. PHLPP2 Downregulation Contributes to Lung Carcinogenesis Following B[a]P/B[a]PDE Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haishan; Pan, Xiaofu; Jin, Honglei; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Caili; Liu, Pei; Liu, Ya; Chen, Lili; Li, Jingxia; Zhu, Junlan; Zeng, Xingruo; Fu, Kai; Chen, Guorong; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The carcinogenic capacity of B[a]P/B[a]PDE is supported by epidemiologic studies. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for B[a]P/B[a]PDE-caused lung cancer have not been well investigated. We evaluated here the role of novel target PHLPP2 in lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Experimental Design We used the Western blotting, RT-PCR, [35S]methionine pulse and immunohistochemistry staining to determine PHLPP2 downregulation following B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Both B[a]PDE-induced Beas-2B cell transformation model and B[a]P-caused mouse lung cancer model were used to elucidate the mechanisms leading to PHLPP2 downregulation and lung carcinogenesis. The important findings were also extended to in vivo human studies. Results We found that B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure downregulated PHLPP2 expression in human lung epithelial cells in vitro and in mouse lung tissues in vivo. The ectopic expression of PHLPP2 dramatically inhibited cell transformation upon B[a]PDE exposure. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-205 induction was crucial for inhibition of PHLPP2 protein translation by targeting PHLPP2-3′-UTR. Interestingly, PHLPP2 expression was inversely associated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) expression, with low PHLPP2 and high TNFα expression in lung cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal lung tissues. Additional studies revealed that PHLPP2 exhibited its antitumorigenic effect of B[a]P/B[a]PDE through the repression of inflammatory TNFα transcription. Conclusions Our studies not only first time identify PHLPP2 downregulation by lung carcinogen B[a]P/B[a]PDE, but also elucidate a novel molecular mechanisms underlying lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. PMID:25977341

  19. Wnt5a Is Associated with Cigarette Smoke-Related Lung Carcinogenesis via Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jae Sook; Ju, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Kyong Hwa; Lee, Jong Won; Koh, In Song; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I) at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Abnormal up-regulation of Wnt5a mRNA and proteins was detected in CSC-exposed transformed 1198 and tumorigenic 1170I cells as compared with other non-CSC exposed HBE cells. Tumor tissues obtained from smokers showed higher Wnt5a expressions than matched normal tissues. In non-CSC exposed 1799 cells, treatment of recombinant Wnt5a caused the activations of PKC and Akt, and the blockage of Wnt5a and PKC significantly decreased the viabilities of CSC-transformed 1198 cells expressing high levels of Wnt5a. This reduced cell survival rate was associated with increased apoptosis via the down-regulation of Bcl2 and the induction of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, CSC-treated 1799 cells showed induction of Wnt5a expression and enhanced colony-forming capacity. The CSC-induced colony forming efficiency was suppressed by the co-incubation with a PKC inhibitor. In conclusion, these results suggest that cigarette smoke induces Wnt5a-coupled PKC activity during lung carcinogenesis, which causes Akt activity and anti-apoptosis in lung cancer. Therefore, current study provides novel clues for the crucial role of Wnt5a in the smoking-related lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23349696

  20. Kimchi protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young

    2014-08-01

    The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  1. Kimchi Protects Against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  2. Metabolic reprogramming and dysregulated metabolism: cause, consequence and/or enabler of environmental carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Robey, R.Brooks; Weisz, Judith; Kuemmerle, Nancy; Salzberg, Anna C.; Berg, Arthur; Brown, Dustin G.; Kubik, Laura; Palorini, Roberta; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Colacci, Annamaria; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Hamid, Roslida A.; Williams, Graeme P.; Lowe, Leroy; Meyer, Joel; Martin, Francis L.; Bisson, William H.; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contributions to cancer development are widely accepted, but only a fraction of all pertinent exposures have probably been identified. Traditional toxicological approaches to the problem have largely focused on the effects of individual agents at singular endpoints. As such, they have incompletely addressed both the pro-carcinogenic contributions of environmentally relevant low-dose chemical mixtures and the fact that exposures can influence multiple cancer-associated endpoints over varying timescales. Of these endpoints, dysregulated metabolism is one of the most common and recognizable features of cancer, but its specific roles in exposure-associated cancer development remain poorly understood. Most studies have focused on discrete aspects of cancer metabolism and have incompletely considered both its dynamic integrated nature and the complex controlling influences of substrate availability, external trophic signals and environmental conditions. Emerging high throughput approaches to environmental risk assessment also do not directly address the metabolic causes or consequences of changes in gene expression. As such, there is a compelling need to establish common or complementary frameworks for further exploration that experimentally and conceptually consider the gestalt of cancer metabolism and its causal relationships to both carcinogenesis and the development of other cancer hallmarks. A literature review to identify environmentally relevant exposures unambiguously linked to both cancer development and dysregulated metabolism suggests major gaps in our understanding of exposure-associated carcinogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. Although limited evidence exists to support primary causal roles for metabolism in carcinogenesis, the universality of altered cancer metabolism underscores its fundamental biological importance, and multiple pleiomorphic, even dichotomous, roles for metabolism in promoting, antagonizing or otherwise enabling the

  3. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence imaging in rat model of ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P; Liebmann, Erica R; Marion, Samuel L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Davis, John R; Brewer, Molly A

    2010-01-01

    Determining if an ovarian mass is benign or malignant is an ongoing clinical challenge. The development of reliable animal models provides means to evaluate new diagnostic tools to more accurately determine if an ovary has benign or malignant features. Although sex cord-stromal tumors (SCST) account for 0.1–0.5% of ovarian malignancies, they have similar appearances to more aggressive epithelial cancers and can serve as a prototype for developing better diagnostic methods for ovarian cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy are non-destructive optical imaging modalities. OCT provides architectural cross-sectional images at near histological resolutions and LIF provides biochemical information. We utilize combined OCT-LIF to image ovaries in post-menopausal ovarian carcinogenesis rat models, evaluating normal cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries. Eighty-three female Fisher rats were exposed to combinations of control sesame oil, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) to induce ovarian failure, and/or 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce carcinogenesis. Three or five months post-treatment, 162 ovaries were harvested and imaged with OCT-LIF: 40 cyclic, 105 acyclic and 17 SCST. OCT identified various follicle stages, corpora lutea (CL), CL remnants, epithelial invaginations/inclusions and allowed for characterization of both cystic and solid SCST. Signal attenuation comparisons between CL and solid SCST revealed statistically significant increases in attenuation among CL. LIF characterized spectral differences in cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries attributed to collagen, NADH/FAD and hemoglobin absorption. We present combined OCT-LIF imaging in a rat ovarian carcinogenesis model, providing preliminary criteria for normal cyclic, acyclic and SCST ovaries which support the potential of OCT-LIF for ovarian imaging. PMID:21108515

  4. Metabolic reprogramming and dysregulated metabolism: cause, consequence and/or enabler of environmental carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Robey, R Brooks; Weisz, Judith; Kuemmerle, Nancy B; Salzberg, Anna C; Berg, Arthur; Brown, Dustin G; Kubik, Laura; Palorini, Roberta; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Colacci, Annamaria; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K; Amedei, Amedeo; Hamid, Roslida A; Williams, Graeme P; Lowe, Leroy; Meyer, Joel; Martin, Francis L; Bisson, William H; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2015-06-01

    Environmental contributions to cancer development are widely accepted, but only a fraction of all pertinent exposures have probably been identified. Traditional toxicological approaches to the problem have largely focused on the effects of individual agents at singular endpoints. As such, they have incompletely addressed both the pro-carcinogenic contributions of environmentally relevant low-dose chemical mixtures and the fact that exposures can influence multiple cancer-associated endpoints over varying timescales. Of these endpoints, dysregulated metabolism is one of the most common and recognizable features of cancer, but its specific roles in exposure-associated cancer development remain poorly understood. Most studies have focused on discrete aspects of cancer metabolism and have incompletely considered both its dynamic integrated nature and the complex controlling influences of substrate availability, external trophic signals and environmental conditions. Emerging high throughput approaches to environmental risk assessment also do not directly address the metabolic causes or consequences of changes in gene expression. As such, there is a compelling need to establish common or complementary frameworks for further exploration that experimentally and conceptually consider the gestalt of cancer metabolism and its causal relationships to both carcinogenesis and the development of other cancer hallmarks. A literature review to identify environmentally relevant exposures unambiguously linked to both cancer development and dysregulated metabolism suggests major gaps in our understanding of exposure-associated carcinogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. Although limited evidence exists to support primary causal roles for metabolism in carcinogenesis, the universality of altered cancer metabolism underscores its fundamental biological importance, and multiple pleiomorphic, even dichotomous, roles for metabolism in promoting, antagonizing or otherwise enabling the

  5. Iron and thiols as two major players in carcinogenesis: friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant metal in the human body and mainly works as a cofactor for proteins such as hemoglobin and various enzymes. No independent life forms on earth can survive without iron. However, excess iron is intimately associated with carcinogenesis by increasing oxidative stress via its catalytic activity to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biomolecules with redox-active sulfhydryl function(s) (thiol compounds) are necessary for the maintenance of mildly reductive cellular environments to counteract oxidative stress, and for the execution of redox reactions for metabolism and detoxification. Involvement of glutathione S-transferase and thioredoxin has long attracted the attention of cancer researchers. Here, I update recent findings on the involvement of iron and thiol compounds during carcinogenesis and in cancer cells. It is now recognized that the cystine/glutamate transporter (antiporter) is intimately associated with ferroptosis, an iron-dependent, non-apoptotic form of cell death, observed in cancer cells, and also with cancer stem cells; the former with transporter blockage but the latter with its stabilization. Excess iron in the presence of oxygen appears the most common known mutagen. Ironically, the persistent activation of antioxidant systems via genetic alterations in Nrf2 and Keap1 also contributes to carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is difficult to conclude the role of iron and thiol compounds as friends or foes, which depends on the quantity/distribution and induction/flexibility, respectively. Avoiding further mutation would be the most helpful strategy for cancer prevention, and myriad of efforts are being made to sort out the weaknesses of cancer cells. PMID:25221514

  6. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  7. Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) as a public-use data base with the goal of broadening independent access to data collected during studies of the health effects of exposure to radiation and other physical or chemical agents associated with the production of nuclear materials. This catalog is intended for use by any individual interested in obtaining information about, or access to, CEDR data. This catalog provides information that will help users identify and request data file sets of interest.

  8. CPMs: A Kinesthetic Comprehension Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Parris, Sheri R.; Whiteley, Cinnamon S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a study to determine whether primary grade students can learn comprehension processes via hand motions to portray these mental processes. Comprehension Process Motions (CPMs) were designed to provide students with a way to make abstract comprehension processes more consciously accessible and also to give teachers a way to…

  9. Idiom Comprehension in Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Costanza; Tabossi, Patrizia; Colombo, Maria Rosa; Zampetti, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Idiom comprehension was assessed in 10 aphasic patients with semantic deficits by means of a string-to-picture matching task. Patients were also submitted to an oral explanation of the same idioms, and to a word comprehension task. The stimuli of this last task were the words following the verb in the idioms. Idiom comprehension was severely…

  10. Understanding and Teaching Cohesion Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Judith W., Ed.

    Concerned with improving student comprehension of text, this book focuses particularly on teaching students how sentences tie together. Articles in the three sections are grouped as follows: Part 1, What Is Cohesion Comprehension? contains "Cohesion, Coherence, and Comprehension" (Alden J. Moe and Judith W. Irwin); "Identifying Types of Anaphoric…

  11. Environmental pollution and DNA methylation: carcinogenesis, clinical significance, and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the main causes of human cancer. Exposures to environmental carcinogens result in genetic and epigenetic alterations which induce cell transformation. Epigenetic changes caused by environmental pollution play important roles in the development and progression of environmental pollution-related cancers. Studies on DNA methylation are among the earliest and most conducted epigenetic research linked to cancer. In this review, the roles of DNA methylation in carcinogenesis and their significance in clinical medicine were summarized, and the effects of environmental pollutants, particularly air pollutants, on DNA methylation were introduced. Furthermore, prospective applications of DNA methylation to environmental pollution detection and cancer prevention were discussed.

  12. Bacteria flying under the radar: linking a bacterial infection to colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a link between Helicobacter pylori infection and an increased risk of gastric cancer has raised an awareness of a possible link between colonic microbiota and colorectal cancer. Pertubation of the colonic epithelium by toxin-producing strains of Bacteroides fragilis may increase the risk of premalignant transdifferentiation. However, like H. pylori, B. fragilis exhibit an ability to modulate the normal host response to infection. We speculate this may be an underappreciated risk factor in the genesis of colon carcinogenesis in individuals colonised with toxin-producing strains of B. fragilis. PMID:25225573

  13. Of mice and men: a critical reappraisal of the two-stage theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iversen, O H

    1995-01-01

    The two-stage theory of carcinogenesis attempts to reduce a very complex set of data to simple terms: it defines a carcinogen as "an agent that causes a neoplasm by a two-step process involving initiation and promotion". The theory has achieved the status of a paradigm, and all new experiments carried out by two-stage supporters are designed according to its premises and therefore will eo ipso tend to confirm it. Popper's dictum that any scientific hypothesis should be put to the strongest test, namely, by trying to refute it, has rarely (or never) been observed. The two-stage theory was originally based on standard mouse skin-painting experiments. All the original work is grounded on classic skin carcinogenesis, and only later was it extended to also comprise carcinogenesis in other organs, thereby becoming a general theory. On the basis of the same standard skin painting experiments and in accordance with Popper's dictum, the present review shows how the following generally accepted corollaries of the two-stage theory have been refuted: initiation must come first in time; in previously initiated mouse skin promotion always leads to a synergistic increase in tumor crop, whereas complete carcinogens at subthreshold does (regarded as merely initiating) have only an additive effect; the reverse experiment is innocuous; there is a qualitative difference between the effect of initiators and that of promoters; initiators only initiate at low dose levels, but abruptly become rather complete carcinogens at higher doses, promotion must take place over a long period, and repeated exposure without prolonged intervals is essential; pure initiators exist, for example, urethane for the epidermis; pure promoters exist, e.g., TPA; skin inflammation and persistent hyperplasia are essential parts of promotion; increased levels of the enzyme ODC followed by increasing levels of polyamines are casually involved in promotion; the appearance of many dark epidermal cells is a sign of

  14. The impact of neural stem cell biology on CNS carcinogenesis and tumor types.

    PubMed

    Kurian, K M

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of gliomas is on the increase, according to epidemiological data. This increase is a conundrum because the brain is in a privileged protected site behind the blood-brain barrier, and therefore partially buffered from environmental factors. In addition the brain also has a very low proliferative potential compared with other parts of the body. Recent advances in neural stem cell biology have impacted on our understanding of CNS carcinogenesis and tumor types. This article considers the cancer stem cell theory with regard to CNS cancers, whether CNS tumors arise from human neural stem cells and whether glioma stem cells can be reprogrammed.

  15. Neoplasms in domestic animals: a review of experimental and spontaneous carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Madewell, B. R.

    1981-01-01

    Clues to environmental and host factors in human oncogenesis are derived from clinical or epidemiologic studies; additional evidence is provided by animal experimentation. Induced tumors in animals are useful because of their reproducibility and predictability, allowing detailed study of specific carcinogens or carcinogenic influences. Spontaneously or naturally occurring tumors in domestic animals are of particular interest for comparative studies - these tumors occur in heterogenous outbred populations of animal closely sharing man's environment; their cause is generally unknown; many tumors occur in numbers suitable for detailed investigations; and tumors generally occur in aged animals, thus facilitating study of chronic processes associated with carcinogenesis in nature. PMID:7269640

  16. Inhibition of ultraviolet-induced carcinogenesis by all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.H.; Grekin, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.005% concentrations on ultraviolet (UV) induced carcinogenesis was investigated in the skin of Uscd strain hairless mice. A carcinogenic amount of UV energy was delivered over the 12-mo period of the study. The 0.025% and 0.005% RA solutions did not alter the development of cutaneous cancers. However, the 0.05% RA concentration significantly inhibited the tumor formation in this study.

  17. Conference summary & recent advances: The 8th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xixi; Burchiel, Scott W.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diseases caused by occupational and environmental exposure to metals are a public health concern. The underlying molecular mechanisms of metal toxicity and carcinogenicity remain largely unknown. Over 130 scientists attended the 8th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis, presenting their various research concerns and recent findings to stimulate interactions and collaborations among scientists in the field. Several major areas were emphasized, including human & population studies, molecular & cellular mechanisms, biological targets, epigenetic effects, metabolism, and metal mixtures. Here we summarize presentations at the conference sessions and highlight the attendees’ latest work published in this special issue of Biological Trace Element Research. PMID:25975949

  18. THE ROLE OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORS IN CARCINOGENESIS AND CHEMOPREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jeffrey M.; Shah, Yatrik M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that are involved in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, inflammation, proliferation and differentiation. Although all of these functions might contribute to the influence of PPARs in carcinogenesis, there is a distinct need for a balanced review of the literature and additional experimentation to determine the potential for targeting PPARs for cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention. As PPAR agonists include drugs used for the treatment of metabolic diseases, a more complete understanding of the roles of PPARs in cancer will aid in determining any increased cancer risk for patients undergoing therapy with PPAR agonists. PMID:22318237

  19. Hypothetical Two-Step Initiation of Experimental Carcinogenesis by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Aminoazo Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Contag, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    A new hypothesis is discussed, which describes the initiation of the carcinogenesis through polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aminoazo dyes (AZOs) as a two-step process: the oncogenic proteins of the ras or ras-like on-cogenes activated by mutation (“initiation A ”) co-operate with the complexes in the plasma membrane formed during the "initiation B " stage from the parent compounds of the PAHs or AZOs with cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I. The final result of this co-operation, or the "complete initiation", is an irreversibly modified membrane architecture with negative consequences for growth control. PMID:22582097

  20. Thermal radiative properties: Coatings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    This volume consists, for the most part, of a presentation of numerical data compiled over the years in a most comprehensive manner on coatings for all applications, in particular, thermal control. After a moderately detailed discussion of the theoretical nature of the thermal radiative properties of coatings, together with an overview of predictive procedures and recognized experimental techniques, extensive numerical data on the thermal radiative properties of pigmented, contact, and conversion coatings are presented. These data cover metallic and nonmetallic pigmented coatings, enamels, metallic and nonmetallic contact coatings, antireflection coatings, resin coatings, metallic black coatings, and anodized and oxidized conversion coatings.

  1. Low-dose radiation: a cause of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.

    1980-08-15

    It is likely that the breast is the organ most sensitive to radiation carcinogenesis in postpubertal women. Studies of different exposed populations have yielded remarkably consistent results, in spite of wide differences in underlying breast cancer rates and conditions of exposure. Excess risk is approximately proportional to dose, and is relatively independent of ionization density and fractionization of dose. This implies that the risk associated with low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation can be estimated with some confidence from higher-dose data. Excess risk is heavily dependent on age at exposure but relatively independent of population differences in normal risk. The temporal patterns after exposure of both radiation-induced and naturally occurring breast cancer are similar, suggesting a strong influence of factors other than radiation on radiation-induced breast cancer. Uncertainties remain about risks from exposures before puberty and after menopause.

  2. Comprehensive national energy strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Comprehensive National Energy Strategy sets forth a set of five common sense goals for national energy policy: (1) improve the efficiency of the energy system, (2) ensure against energy disruptions, (3) promote energy production and use in ways that respect health and environmental values, (4) expand future energy choices, and (5) cooperate internationally on global issues. These goals are further elaborated by a series of objectives and strategies to illustrate how the goals will be achieved. Taken together, the goals, objectives, and strategies form a blueprint for the specific programs, projects, initiatives, investments, and other actions that will be developed and undertaken by the Federal Government, with significant emphasis on the importance of the scientific and technological advancements that will allow implementation of this Comprehensive National Energy Strategy. Moreover, the statutory requirement of regular submissions of national energy policy plans ensures that this framework can be modified to reflect evolving conditions, such as better knowledge of our surroundings, changes in energy markets, and advances in technology. This Strategy, then, should be thought of as a living document. Finally, this plan benefited from the comments and suggestions of numerous individuals and organizations, both inside and outside of government. The Summary of Public Comments, located at the end of this document, describes the public participation process and summarizes the comments that were received. 8 figs.

  3. The comprehensive peptaibiotics database.

    PubMed

    Stoppacher, Norbert; Neumann, Nora K N; Burgstaller, Lukas; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Peptaibiotics are nonribosomally biosynthesized peptides, which - according to definition - contain the marker amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and possess antibiotic properties. Being known since 1958, a constantly increasing number of peptaibiotics have been described and investigated with a particular emphasis on hypocrealean fungi. Starting from the existing online 'Peptaibol Database', first published in 1997, an exhaustive literature survey of all known peptaibiotics was carried out and resulted in a list of 1043 peptaibiotics. The gathered information was compiled and used to create the new 'The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database', which is presented here. The database was devised as a software tool based on Microsoft (MS) Access. It is freely available from the internet at http://peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at and can easily be installed and operated on any computer offering a Windows XP/7 environment. It provides useful information on characteristic properties of the peptaibiotics included such as peptide category, group name of the microheterogeneous mixture to which the peptide belongs, amino acid sequence, sequence length, producing fungus, peptide subfamily, molecular formula, and monoisotopic mass. All these characteristics can be used and combined for automated search within the database, which makes The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database a versatile tool for the retrieval of valuable information about peptaibiotics. Sequence data have been considered as to December 14, 2012. PMID:23681723

  4. 2014 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Radiation Program Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), and NASA Headquarters on November 21, 2014 (list of participants is in Section XI of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated Research Plan for the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure (Degen Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS Risk), the Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (ARS Risk), and the Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis (Cancer Risk). The SRP thought the teleconference was very informative and that the Space Radiation Program Element did a great job of outlining where the Element is with respect to our state of knowledge on the risks of carcinogenesis, central nervous system effects, and the risk of cardiovascular disease and other degenerative tissue effects from exposure to space radiation. The SRP was impressed with the quality of research that is being conducted and the progress the Space Radiation Program Element has made in the past year. While much work has been done, the SRP had a few remaining questions regarding the broad applicability of these findings to a manned deep space mission (in terms of cognitive function, the paradigms were still hippocampal based and also using Alzheimer disease models). The SRP believes that NASA should consider developing an approach to follow astronauts long-term (beyond retirement) for potential side-effects/risks of space exposure that may be unknown. Radiation toxicities often occur decades after exposure, and potential consequences would be missed if intensified exams stop after retirement of the astronauts. In addition, while cancer is one

  5. Space radiation health research, 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jablin, M. H. (Compiler); Brooks, C. (Compiler); Ferraro, G. (Compiler); Dickson, K. J. (Compiler); Powers, J. V. (Compiler); Wallace-Robinson, J. (Compiler); Zafren, B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The present volume is a collection of 227 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program for the period 1991-1992. Each abstract has been categorized within one of three discipline areas: Physics, Biology and Risk Assessment. Topic areas within each discipline have been assigned as follows: Physics - Atomic Physics, Theory, Cosmic Ray and Astrophysics, Experimental, Environments and Environmental Models, Solar Activity and Prediction, Experiments, Radiation Transport and Shielding, Theory and Model Development, Experimental Studies, and Instrumentation. Biology - Biology, Molecular Biology, Cellular Radiation Biology, Transformation, Mutation, Lethality, Survival, DNA Damage and Repair, Tissue, Organs, and Organisms, In Vivo/In Vitro Systems, Carcinogenesis and Life Shortening, Cataractogenesis, Genetics/Developmental, Radioprotectants, Plants, and Other Effects. Risk Assessment - Risk Assessment, Radiation Health and Epidemiology, Space Flight Radiation Health Physics, Inter- and Intraspecies Extrapolation and Radiation Limits and Standards. Section I contains refereed journals; Section II contains reports/meetings. Keywords and author indices are provided. A collection of abstracts spanning the period 1986-1990 was previously issued as NASA Technical Memorandum 4270.

  6. Overview of the NASA Space Radiation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Nelson, Greg; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation environment in space poses significant challenges to human health and is a major concern for long-duration, manned space missions. Outside the Earth’s protective magnetosphere, astronauts are exposed to galactic cosmic rays, whose physical characteristics are distinct from terrestrial sources of radiation such as x-rays and gamma-rays. Galactic cosmic rays consist of high-energy, high-charge (HZE) particles as well as high-energy protons; they impart unique biological damage as they traverse through tissue with impacts on human health that are largely unknown. Understanding the quantitative and qualitative differences in biological responses produced by galactic cosmic radiation compared to Earth-based radiation is imperative for accurate risk mitigation and is a major focus of the NASA Space Radiation Program’s research strategy. The main health risks of concern are epithelial carcinogenesis and leukemias, central nervous system effects that may result in acute (in-flight) cognitive impairment and/or late neurological disorders, degenerative tissue effects including circulatory and heart disease, and the possibility of acute radiation syndromes resulting from an unshielded exposure to a large solar particle event. The NASA Space Radiation Program is focused on the characterization and mitigation of these health risks and understanding possible interactions with other biological stressors found in the space environment. In this presentation, evidence for health risks associated with heavy ion exposure will be presented.

  7. Estrogen Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Aft, Rebecca L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to estrogens correlates with increased risk for breast cancer. One explanation is that estrogen metabolites cause mutations by reacting with DNA, leading to depurination. We describe an extraction procedure and a liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) assay to detect estrone-metabolite-modified adenine (Ade) in 100-200 mg samples of human breast tissue. To insure reliable analyses, we used a synthetic estrone-metabolite-modified, U-15N labeled Ade as an internal standard (IS). Appropriate high pressure liquid chromatography gives sharp (∼ 5 s at half height) with identical retention times for the analyte and the IS. In breast tissue from women with and without cancer, we found a co-eluting material with similar MS/MS fragmentation as the IS, providing high specificity in the identification of the modified Ade; the recovery was approximately 50%. For women with and without breast cancer, the levels of the modified Ade are in the range of 20-70 fmol/g of breast tissue from five women and not detectable in tissue from another women. The sample size and detection limits are not yet sufficient to permit distinctions between cancer and noncancer patients. PMID:18672910

  8. The Validity of Reading Comprehension Rate: Reading Speed, Comprehension, and Comprehension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Williams, Jacqueline L.; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Hale, Andre D.; Neddenriep, Christine E.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a secondary analysis of a brief reading comprehension rate measure, percent comprehension questions correct per minute spent reading (%C/M). This measure includes reading speed (seconds to read) in the denominator and percentage of comprehension questions answered correctly in the numerator. Participants were 22 4th-, 29…

  9. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-08-14

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. Immunological profile of arsenic toxicity: a hint towards arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sagar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Kumar, Pankaj; Begum, Zarina; Dasgupta, Shyamal; Flora, S J S; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (a Group I carcinogen in humans) contamination and poisoning of human populations in different parts of Southeast and Eastern Asia, including West Bengal and Bangladesh, has become a major environmental concern. Arsenic intoxication affects diverse human organs including the lungs, liver, skin, bladder and kidney. This metalloid acts as a promoter of carcinogenesis, exerting toxic effects on the immune system. The present study was aimed at investigating arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and effects on the immune system in an animal model. Tumors were induced using ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and arsenic was used as a promoter. To investigate specific effects on the immune system, cytokine (TNF-α, IFNγ, IL4, IL6, IL10, IL12) production of lymphocytes was evaluated by FACS. The damaging consequences of treatment were assessed by evaluating the specific programmed cell death cascade in lymphocytes, assessed by FACS readings. The results revealed that under arsenic influence, and more so with arsenic+ENU, marked neoplastic changes were noted, which were corroborated with histological changes, cytokine modulation and apoptosis hinted at marked neoplastic changes.

  11. Candidate mechanisms accounting for effects of physical activity on breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; Jiang, Weiqin; Zhu, Zongjian

    2009-09-01

    Evidence is strong that a reduction in risk for breast cancer is associated with moderate to vigorous physical activity (PA); however, there is limited understanding of the role of type, intensity, duration, and frequency of PA and their mechanisms in accounting for this health benefit. The objective of this review is to stimulate investigations of candidate mechanisms that may account for the effects of the intensity and duration of aerobic PA on breast cancer risk and tumor burden. Three hypotheses are considered: 1) the mTOR network hypothesis: PA inhibits carcinogenesis by suppressing the activation of the mTOR signaling network in mammary carcinomas; 2) the hormesis hypothesis: the carcinogenic response to PA is nonlinear and accounted for by a physiological cellular stress response; and 3) the metabolic reprogramming hypothesis: PA limits the amount of glucose and glutamine available to mammary carcinomas thereby inducing apoptosis because tumor-associated metabolic programming is reversed. To link these hypotheses to systemic effects of PA, it is recommended that consideration be given to determining: 1) what contracting muscle releases into circulation or removes from circulation that would directly modulate the carcinogenic process in epithelial cells; 2) whether the effects of muscle contraction on epithelial cell carcinogenesis are exerted in an endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, or intracrine manner; and 3) if the effects of muscle contraction on malignant cells differ from effects on normal or premalignant cells that do not manifest the hallmarks of malignancy. PMID:19588523

  12. Latest insights into the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kazunari; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    There appears to be the strong association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and gastric cancer. We reviewed the latest evidences about the effects of H pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis, classified into epidemiology, dynamics of gastric mucosal changes, DNA damages, virulence factors, host factors, and source of gastric malignancy. Through the considerable progress made in research into virulence factors resulting from differences between H pylori strains, such as cagA positivity, as well as into host factors, such as gene polymorphisms, a diverse spectrum of H pylori-associated diseases, including gastric cancer, is beginning to lend itself to elucidation. The impact of the novel hypothesis advanced by Houghton et al proposing bone-marrow derived stem cells (BMDC) as a potential source of gastric malignancy on evolving research remains to be seen with interest. Further progress in research into H pylori eradication as a viable prophylaxis of gastric cancer, as well as into the mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis, is to be eagerly awaited for the current year and beyond. PMID:16718758

  13. Apple polysaccharide reduces NF-Kb mediated colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dian; Mi, Man; Jiang, Fengliang; Sun, Yang; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Libin; Fan, Lei; Li, Qian; Meng, Jin; Yue, Zhenggang; Liu, Li; Mei, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is an important molecule in mediating inflammatory colitis, which can lead to colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive efficacy of apple polysaccharide extract (AP) in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated inflammation pathways in CRC. We evaluated AP in vitro in HT-29 and SW620 human CRC cells. We also used the azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulphate (AOM/DSS) model to induce colon carcinogenesis in vivo. The chemoprotective effects of AP were assessed using Western blot, immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and flow cytometry. AP reduced AOM/DSS-associated toxicities, prevented carcinogenesis, and decreased the expression of TLR4, MD2, MyD88, TRAM, TRIF-related adapter molecule, interferon-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. The protective effects of AP may be related to the inhibition of TLR4/MD2-mediated signaling, including MyD88 and TRIF, as well as the inhibition of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways. Therefore, AP could be used in combination therapy for the prevention of colitis-associated colon cancer. PMID:25412264

  14. Preventive Effects of Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran against Prostate Carcinogenesis in TRAP Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiya; Nagano, Aya; Mori, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nagayasu, Yuko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Hideki; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA) is considered to have the potential to prevent chemically-induced carcinogenesis in multiple organs of rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the possible chemopreventive effects of FBRA against prostate tumorigenesis. Six-week-old male rats of the transgenic rat for adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP) strain were fed diets containing 5% or 10% FBRA for 15 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 21 weeks of age, and the ventral and lateral prostate were removed for histopathological evaluation and immunoblot analyses. FBRA decreased the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the lateral prostate and suppressed the progression of prostate carcinogenesis. Treatment with FBRA induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in histologically high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias. Phospho-AMP-activated kinase α (Thr172) was up-regulated in the prostate of rats fed the diet supplemented with FBRA. These results indicate that FBRA controls tumor growth by activating pathways responsive to energy deprivation and suggest that FBRA has translational potential for the prevention of human prostate cancer. PMID:27409632

  15. Hepatoma-derived growth factor/nucleolin axis as a novel oncogenic pathway in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Cher; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chu, Tian-Huei; Yi, Li-Na; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Liu, Li-Feng; Wu, Han-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chang, Min-Chi; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2015-06-30

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) overexpression is involved in liver fibrosis and carcinogenesis. However, the receptor(s) and signaling for HDGF remain unclear. By using affinity chromatography and proteomic techniques, nucleolin (NCL) was identified and validated as a HDGF-interacting membrane protein in hepatoma cells. Exogenous HDGF elicited the membrane NCL accumulation within 0.5 hour by protein stabilization and transcriptional NCL upregulation within 24 hours. Blockade of surface NCL by antibodies neutralization potently suppressed HDGF uptake and HDGF-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in hepatoma cells. By using rescectd hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCL overexpression was correlated with tumour grades, vascular invasion, serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and the poor survival in HCC patients. Multivariate analysis showed NCL was an independent prognostic factor for survival outcome of HCC patients after surgery. To delineate the role of NCL in liver carcinogenesis, ectopic NCL overexpression promoted the oncogenic behaviours and induced PI3K/Akt activation in hepatoma cells. Conversely, NCL knockdown by RNA interference attenuated the oncogenic behaviours and PI3K/Akt signaling, which could be partially rescued by exogenous HDGF supply. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that surface NCL transmits the oncogenic signaling of HDGF and facilitates a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25938538

  16. CtBP1 associates metabolic syndrome and breast carcinogenesis targeting multiple miRNAs.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Paola; Dalton, Guillermo N; Scalise, Georgina D; Moiola, Cristian P; Porretti, Juliana; Massillo, Cintia; Kordon, Edith; Gardner, Kevin; Zalazar, Florencia; Flumian, Carolina; Todaro, Laura; Vazquez, Elba S; Meiss, Roberto; De Siervi, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS) has been identified as a risk factor for breast cancer. C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) is a co-repressor of tumor suppressor genes that is activated by low NAD+/NADH ratio. High fat diet (HFD) increases intracellular NADH. We investigated the effect of CtBP1 hyperactivation by HFD intake on mouse breast carcinogenesis. We generated a MeS-like disease in female mice by chronically feeding animals with HFD. MeS increased postnatal mammary gland development and generated prominent duct patterns with markedly increased CtBP1 and Cyclin D1 expression. CtBP1 induced breast cancer cells proliferation. Serum from animals with MeS enriched the stem-like/progenitor cell population from breast cancer cells. CtBP1 increased breast tumor growth in MeS mice modulating multiple genes and miRNA expression implicated in cell proliferation, progenitor cells phenotype, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, mammary development and cell communication in the xenografts. These results define a novel function for CtBP1 in breast carcinogenesis.

  17. Effects of nobiletin on PhIP-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming Xi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Asamoto, Makoto; Chewonarin, Teera; Suzuki, Shugo; Tanaka, Takuji; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effects of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxy flavone) on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis. PhIP was administered to 6-wk-old F344 male rats intragastrically (100 mg/kg) twice a wk for 10 wk. The animals were given 0.05% nobiletin or the basal diet for 50 wk. At the end of the experiment, serum testosterone, estrogen, and leptin did not differ between the 2 groups. The body weights of nobiletin-treated rats were significantly higher than controls (P<0.05), and feeding of nobiletin significantly reduced the relative prostate (P<0.05) and testes (P<0.05) weights as well as the Ki67 labeling index in the normal epithelium in the ventral prostate (P<0.01). The incidence and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas in nobiletin-treated ventral prostate were 50% and 36%, respectively, of controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, nobiletin did significantly reduce the total number of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) compared to the control value (P<0.05). Nobiletin, therefore, may have potential for chemoprevention of early changes associated with carcinogenesis in both the prostate and colon.

  18. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P < .05). Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (n = 99) were randomized into three diet groups at 5-7 weeks of age: AIN-93G control, 10% standard broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies.

  19. Downregulation of Keratin 76 Expression during Oral Carcinogenesis of Human, Hamster and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Emma; Pandey, Manishkumar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kane, Shubhada; Patil, Asawari; Maru, Girish B.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Watt, Fiona M.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development. Methods We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO) mice. Results We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue. Conclusion The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted. PMID:23936238

  20. Are the Somatic Mutation and Tissue Organization Field Theories of Carcinogenesis Incompatible?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Two drastically different approaches to understanding the forces driving carcinogenesis have crystallized through years of research. These are the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and the tissue organization field theory (TOFT). The essence of SMT is that cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has successively accumulated multiple DNA mutations, and that those mutations occur on genes which control cell proliferation and cell cycle. Thus, according to SMT, neoplastic lesions are the results of DNA-level events. Conversely, according to TOFT, carcinogenesis is primarily a problem of tissue organization: carcinogenic agents destroy the normal tissue architecture thus disrupting cell-to-cell signaling and compromising genomic integrity. Hence, in TOFT the DNA mutations are the effect, and not the cause, of the tissue-level events. Cardinal importance of successful resolution of the TOFT versus SMT controversy dwells in the fact that, according to SMT, cancer is a unidirectional and mostly irreversible disease; whereas, according to TOFT, it is curable and reversible. In this paper, our goal is to outline a plausible scenario in which TOFT and SMT can be reconciled using the framework and concepts of the self-organized criticality (SOC), the principle proven to be extremely fruitful in a wide range of disciplines pertaining to natural phenomena, to biological communities, to large-scale social developments, to technological networks, and to many other subjects of research. PMID:24324325

  1. Possible contribution of rubiadin, a metabolite of madder color, to renal carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kaoru; Yoshida, Midori; Takahashi, Miwa; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Kuniyoshi; Nakashima, Koichi; Shibutani, Makoto; Hirose, Masao; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    Madder color (MC) has been shown to exert carcinogenic potential in the rat kidney in association with degeneration, karyomegaly, increased cell proliferation of renal tubule cells and increased renal 8-OHdG levels. To clarify the causal relationship of components and metabolites of MC to renal carcinogenesis, male F344 rats were fed lucidin-3-O-primeveroside (LuP) or alizarin (Alz), and the genotoxic LuP metabolites lucidin (Luc) or rubiadin (Rub) for up to 26 weeks. After one week and four weeks, Luc did not induce any renal changes. In contrast, after one week, cortical tubule degeneration was apparent in the Alz and LuP groups, and cytoplasmic swelling with basophilic change and karyomegaly in the outer medulla was observed only in the Rub group. LuP and Rub increased the proliferative activity of tubule cells in the outer medulla, and Alz and LuP increased renal 8-OHdG levels. After 26 weeks, Rub but not Alz induced atypical tubules, a putative preneoplastic lesion, and karyomegaly in the outer medulla. These results indicate that Rub may be a potent carcinogenic metabolite of MC, targeting proximal tubule cells in the outer medulla, although oxidative stress increased by Alz or LuP might also be involved in renal carcinogenesis by MC.

  2. Investigating evolutionary perspective of carcinogenesis with single-cell transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Zhongjun; Zhong, Jiangjian; Weiner, Leslie P.; Zhong, Jiang F.

    2013-01-01

    We developed phase-switch microfluidic devices for molecular profiling of a large number of single cells. Whole genome microarrays and RNA-sequencing are commonly used to determine the expression levels of genes in cell lysates (a physical mix of millions of cells) for inferring gene functions. However, cellular heterogeneity becomes an inherent noise in the measurement of gene expression. The unique molecular characteristics of individual cells, as well as the temporal and quantitative information of gene expression in cells, are lost when averaged among all cells in cell lysates. Our single-cell technology overcomes this limitation and enables us to obtain a large number of single-cell transcriptomes from a population of cells. A collection of single-cell molecular profiles allows us to study carcinogenesis from an evolutionary perspective by treating cancer as a diverse population of cells with abnormal molecular characteristics. Because a cancer cell population contains cells at various stages of development toward drug resistance, clustering similar single-cell molecular profiles could reveal how drug-resistant sub-clones evolve during cancer treatment. Here, we discuss how single-cell transcriptome analysis technology could enable the study of carcinogenesis from an evolutionary perspective and the development of drug-resistance in leukemia. The single-cell transcriptome analysis reported here could have a direct and significant impact on current cancer treatments and future personalized cancer therapies. PMID:23706768

  3. MicroRNAs as targets for dietary and pharmacological inhibitors of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in many biological processes, cancer, and other diseases. In addition, miRNAs are dysregulated following exposure to toxic and genotoxic agents. Here we review studies evaluating modulation of miRNAs by dietary and pharmacological agents, which could potentially be exploited for inhibition of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. This review covers natural agents, including vitamins, oligoelements, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, isothiocyanates, phospholipids, saponins, anthraquinones and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and synthetic agents, including thiols, nuclear receptor agonists, histone deacetylase inhibitors, antiinflammatory drugs, and selective estrogen receptor modulators. As many as 145 miRNAs, involved in the control of a variety of carcinogenesis mechanisms, were modulated by these agents, either individually or in combination. Most studies used cancer cells in vitro with the goal of modifying their phenotype by changing miRNA expression profiles. In vivo studies evaluated regulation of miRNAs by chemopreventive agents in organs of mice and rats, either untreated or exposed to carcinogens, with the objective of evaluating their safety and efficacy. The tissue specificity of miRNAs could be exploited for the chemoprevention of site-specific cancers, and the study of polymorphic miRNAs is expected to predict the individual response to chemopreventive agents as a tool for developing new prevention strategies. PMID:22683846

  4. Are the somatic mutation and tissue organization field theories of carcinogenesis incompatible?

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Two drastically different approaches to understanding the forces driving carcinogenesis have crystallized through years of research. These are the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and the tissue organization field theory (TOFT). The essence of SMT is that cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has successively accumulated multiple DNA mutations, and that those mutations occur on genes which control cell proliferation and cell cycle. Thus, according to SMT, neoplastic lesions are the results of DNA-level events. Conversely, according to TOFT, carcinogenesis is primarily a problem of tissue organization: carcinogenic agents destroy the normal tissue architecture thus disrupting cell-to-cell signaling and compromising genomic integrity. Hence, in TOFT the DNA mutations are the effect, and not the cause, of the tissue-level events. Cardinal importance of successful resolution of the TOFT versus SMT controversy dwells in the fact that, according to SMT, cancer is a unidirectional and mostly irreversible disease; whereas, according to TOFT, it is curable and reversible. In this paper, our goal is to outline a plausible scenario in which TOFT and SMT can be reconciled using the framework and concepts of the self-organized criticality (SOC), the principle proven to be extremely fruitful in a wide range of disciplines pertaining to natural phenomena, to biological communities, to large-scale social developments, to technological networks, and to many other subjects of research. PMID:24324325

  5. Paradoxes in Carcinogenesis: There Is Light at the End of That Tunnel!

    PubMed

    Soto, Ana M; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The exchange of opinions motivated by Dr. Baker's article "Paradoxes in carcinogenesis should spur new avenues of research: An historical perspective" illustrates the reasons why the field of cancer research is stuck in a dead end. This paralysis presents a rich opportunity for philosophers, historians and sociologists of science to decipher the whys of this impasse. On the strictly biological front, we suggest to reinstate in cancer research the time proven practice so productive in the physical sciences of discarding wrong hypotheses and theories. We share the suggestion by Dr. Baker to stop trying to unify the two main theories of carcinogenesis, i.e., the Somatic Mutation Theory (SMT) and the Tissue Organization Field Theory (TOFT) because they are incompatible. Dr. Baker suggests breaching the impasse by investing in paradox-driven research. We discuss the barriers to the implementation of this novel strategy, and the significant impact that this strategy will have on knowledge at large and its application for the prevention and cure of cancer. PMID:24587978

  6. St. John's Wort Attenuates Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice through Suppression of Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumen K; Golla, Srujana; Golla, Jaya Prakash; Tanaka, Naoki; Cai, Yan; Takahashi, Shogo; Krausz, Kristopher W; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Korboukh, Ilia; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-01

    Despite widespread use as well as epidemiologic indications, there have been no investigations into the effect of St. John's wort (SJW) extract on colorectal carcinogenesis in vivo. This study reports a systematic evaluation of the impact of dietary supplementation of SJW extract on azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. Mice were fed with either AIN-93G (control) diet or SJW extract-supplemented diet (SJW diet) prior to azoxymethane treatment. SJW diet was found to significantly improve the overall survival of azoxymethane-treated mice. Pretreatment with the SJW diet significantly reduced body weight loss as well as decrease of serum albumin and cholesterol levels associated with azoxymethane-induced colorectal tumorigenesis. SJW diet-fed mice showed a significant decrease in tumor multiplicity along with a decrease in incidence of large tumors and a trend toward decreased total tumor volume in a dose-dependent manner. A short-term study, which examined the effect of SJW prior to rectal bleeding, also showed decrease in colorectal polyps in SJW diet-fed mice. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathways were attenuated by SJW administration. SJW extract resulted in early and continuous attenuation of these pathways in the colon epithelium of SJW diet-fed mice under both short-term and long-term treatment regimens. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the chemopreventive potential of SJW extract against colorectal cancer through attenuation of proinflammatory processes.

  7. A role for novel adipose tissue-secreted factors in obesity-related carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cabia, B; Andrade, S; Carreira, M C; Casanueva, F F; Crujeiras, A B

    2016-04-01

    Obesity, a pandemic disease, is caused by an excessive accumulation of fat that can have detrimental effects on health. Adipose tissue plays a very important endocrine role, secreting different molecules that affect body physiology. In obesity, this function is altered, leading to a dysfunctional production of several factors, known as adipocytokines. This process has been linked to various comorbidities associated with obesity, such as carcinogenesis. In fact, several classical adipocytokines with increased levels in obesity have been demonstrated to exert a pro-carcinogenic role, including leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 and resistin, whereas others like adiponectin, with decreased levels in obesity, might have an anti-carcinogenic function. In this expanding field, new proteomic techniques and approaches have allowed the identification of novel adipocytokines, a number of which exhibit an altered production in obesity and type 2 diabetes and thus are related to adiposity. Many of these novel adipocytokines have also been identified in various tumour types, such as that of the breast, liver or endometrium, thereby increasing the list of potential contributors to carcinogenesis. This review is focused on the regulation of these novel adipocytokines by obesity, including apelin, endotrophin, FABP4, lipocalin 2, omentin-1, visfatin, chemerin, ANGPTL2 or osteopontin, emphasizing its involvement in tumorigenesis. PMID:26914773

  8. Linking DNA adduct formation and human cancer risk in chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Over two centuries ago, Sir Percival Pott, a London surgeon, published a pioneering treatise showing that soot exposure was the cause of high incidences of scrotal cancers occurring in young men who worked as chimney sweeps. Practicing at a time when cellular pathology was not yet recognized, Sir Percival nonetheless observed that the high incidence and short latency of the chimney sweep cancers, was fundamentally different from the rare scrotal cancers typically found in elderly men. Furthermore, his diagnosis that the etiology of these cancers was related to chimney soot exposure, was absolutely accurate, conceptually novel, and initiated the field of "occupational cancer epidemiology." After many intervening years of research focused on mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, briefly described here, it is clear that DNA damage, or DNA adduct formation, is "necessary but not sufficient" for tumor induction, and that many additional factors contribute to carcinogenesis. This review includes a synopsis of carcinogen-induced DNA adduct formation in experimental models and in the human population, with particular attention paid to molecular dosimetry and molecular cancer epidemiology. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:499-507, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27346877

  9. Low-fidelity compensatory backup alternative DNA repair pathways may unify current carcinogenesis theories.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaxi; Starr, Shane

    2014-05-01

    The somatic mutation carcinogenesis theory has dominated for decades. The alternative theory, tissue organization field theory, argues that the development of cancer is determined by the surrounding microenvironment. However, neither theory can explain all features of cancer. As cancers share the features of uncontrolled proliferation and genomic instability, they are likely to have the same pathogenesis. It has been found that various DNA repair pathways within a cell crosstalk with one another, forming a DNA repair network. When one DNA repair pathways is defective, the others may work as compensatory backups. The latter pathways are explored for synthetic lethal anticancer therapy. In this article, we extend the concept of compensatory alternative DNA repair to unify the theories. We propose that the microenvironmental stress can activate low-fidelity compensatory alternative DNA repair, causing mutations. If the mutation occurs to a DNA repair gene, this secondarily mutated gene can lead to even more mutated genes, including those related to other DNA repair pathways, eventually destabilizing the genome. Therefore, the low-fidelity compensatory alternative DNA repair may mediate microenvironment-dependent carcinogenesis. The proposal seems consistent with the view of evolution: the environmental stress causes mutations to adapt to the changing environment.

  10. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis. PMID:27699096

  11. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-01-01

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26290630

  12. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  13. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation. PMID:25796713

  14. Persisting and Increasing Neutrophil Infiltration Associates with Gastric Carcinogenesis and E-cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hualin; Ma, Yue; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Chunlei; Huang, Hai; Xia, Ying; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation is considered the most important cause of gastric cancer. The actual process how chronic inflammation triggers gastric carcinogenesis is still not clear. In this study, neutrophils and relative markers in gastric cancer development were examined with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence RNA in situ hybridization methods. On average, 24 times more neutrophils were found in gastric cancer tissues and about 9 times more neutrophils were found in gastric intestinal metaplasia tissues comparing to normal gastric tissue controls. CagA+ H. pylori infection in cancer adjacent tissues or EBV infection in cancer tissues did not increase neutrophil infiltration into gastric cancer tissues significantly. Neutrophil density was positively correlated with cell proliferation while negatively correlated with E-cadherin intensity. E-cadherin is also transcriptionally downregulated in gastric cancer tissues comparing to adjacent tissue controls. The increased neutrophils in the gastric cancer tissues appear to be related to increased chemoattractant IL-8 levels. In gastric cancers, neutrophil numbers were higher comparing to cancer adjacent tissues and not associated with patient ages, tumor invasion depth, tumor staging, metastasis or cancer types. The conclusion is that persisting and increasing neutrophil infiltration is associated with E-cadherin downregulation, cell proliferation and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27412620

  15. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  16. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis.

  17. Molecular carcinogenesis of canine mammary tumors: news from an old disease.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; von Euler, H; Sarli, G; Pinho, S S; Gärtner, F; Gruber, A D

    2011-01-01

    Studies focusing on the molecular basis of canine mammary tumors (CMT) have long been hampered by limited numbers of molecular tools specific to the canine species. The lack of molecular information for CMT has impeded the identification of clinically relevant tumor markers beyond histopathology and the introduction of new therapeutic concepts. Additionally, the potential use for the dog as a model for human breast cancer is debatable until questions are answered regarding cellular origin, mechanisms, and cellular pathways. During the past years, increasing numbers of canine molecular tools have been developed on the genomic, RNA, and protein levels, and an increasing number of studies have shed light on specific aspects of canine carcinogenesis, particularly of the mammary gland. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular carcinogenesis of CMT, including the role of specific oncogenes, tumor suppressors, regulators of apoptosis and DNA repair, proliferation indices, adhesion molecules, circulating tumor cells, and mediators of angiogenesis in CMT progression and clinical behavior. Whereas the data available are far from complete, knowledge of molecular pathways has a significant potential to complement and refine the current diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this tumor type. Furthermore, current data show that significant similarities and differences exist between canine and human mammary tumors at the molecular level. Clearly, this is only the beginning of an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of CMT and their application in clinical patient management. PMID:21149845

  18. Cell cycle gene expression networks discovered using systems biology: Significance in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert E; Ghule, Prachi N; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2015-10-01

    The early stages of carcinogenesis are linked to defects in the cell cycle. A series of cell cycle checkpoints are involved in this process. The G1/S checkpoint that serves to integrate the control of cell proliferation and differentiation is linked to carcinogenesis and the mitotic spindle checkpoint is associated with the development of chromosomal instability. This paper presents the outcome of