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Sample records for radiation damage genomic

  1. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  2. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  3. Mitochondria regulate DNA damage and genomic instability induced by high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation including α particles and heavy ions is the major type of radiation found in space and is considered a potential health risk for astronauts. Even though the chance that these high LET particles traversing through the cytoplasm of cells is higher than that through the nuclei, the contribution of targeted cytoplasmic irradiation to the induction of genomic instability and other chromosomal damages induced by high LET radiation is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondria are the potential cytoplasmic target of high LET radiation in mediating cellular damage using a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted (ρ0) human small airway epithelial (SAE) cell model and a precision charged particle microbeam with a beam width of merely one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation by high LET α particles induced DNA oxidative damage and double strand breaks in wild type ρ+ SAE cells. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in autophagy and micronuclei, which is an indication of genomic instability, together with the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathways in ρ+ SAE cells. In contrast, ρ0 SAE cells exhibited a significantly lower response to these same endpoints examined after cytoplasmic irradiation with high LET α particles. The results indicate that mitochondria are essential in mediating cytoplasmic radiation induced genotoxic damage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the findings may shed some light in the design of countermeasures for space radiation.

  4. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mavragani, Ifigeneia V; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Souli, Maria P; Aziz, Asef; Nowsheen, Somaira; Aziz, Khaled; Rogakou, Emmy; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2017-07-18

    Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15-20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1) repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI) and malignant transformation and (2) can be considered as persistent "danger" signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity). Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  5. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Ifigeneia V.; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Souli, Maria P.; Aziz, Asef; Nowsheen, Somaira; Aziz, Khaled; Rogakou, Emmy

    2017-01-01

    Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1) repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI) and malignant transformation and (2) can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity). Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair. PMID:28718816

  6. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  7. Protection of the genome and central protein-coding sequences by non-coding DNA against DNA damage from radiation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding DNA comprises a very large proportion of the total genomic content in higher organisms, but its function remains largely unclear. Non-coding DNA sequences constitute the majority of peripheral heterochromatin, which has been hypothesized to be the genome's 'bodyguard' against DNA damage from chemicals and radiation for almost four decades. The bodyguard protective function of peripheral heterochromatin in genome defense has been strengthened by the results from numerous recent studies, which are summarized in this review. These data have suggested that cells and/or organisms with a higher level of heterochromatin and more non-coding DNA sequences, including longer telomeric DNA and rDNAs, exhibit a lower frequency of DNA damage, higher radioresistance and longer lifespan after IR exposure. In addition, the majority of heterochromatin is peripherally located in the three-dimensional structure of genome organization. Therefore, the peripheral heterochromatin with non-coding DNA could play a protective role in genome defense against DNA damage from ionizing radiation by both absorbing the radicals from water radiolysis in the cytosol and reducing the energy of IR. However, the bodyguard protection by heterochromatin has been challenged by the observation that DNA damage is less frequently detected in peripheral heterochromatin than in euchromatin, which is inconsistent with the expectation and simulation results. Previous studies have also shown that the DNA damage in peripheral heterochromatin is rarely repaired and moves more quickly, broadly and outwardly to approach the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Additionally, it has been shown that extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are formed in the nucleus, highly detectable in the cytoplasm (particularly under stress conditions) and shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Based on these studies, this review speculates that the sites of DNA damage in peripheral heterochromatin could occur more

  8. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  9. Detection of Genomic DNA Damage from Radiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS).

    PubMed

    Ou, Lin; Chen, Yang; Su, Ying; Zou, Changyan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Structural changes and chemical modifications in DNA during interactions with X-ray radiation are still not clear within 48 h of incubation. We investigate genomic DNA from the radiated CNE2 cell line within 48 h of incubation using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Multivariate methods including principal component analysis (PCA) and random forest are proposed to explore the statistical significance before and after radiation. Our results show that intensities of several bands change after radiation, which indicates backbone damage and base-unstacking. Biological effects from DNA damage repairing process may be simultaneously stimulated and different from incubation time. Under doses of 10 Gy (with 24 and 48 h of incubation) and 20 Gy (with 48 h of incubation), the relative contents of C against T and A against G deviate obviously from the control level. Statistical results strengthen significantly the idea that modification in DNA bases is associated with the disruption of base-stacking in the DNA duplex. Our findings provide vital information for radiation-induced the DNA damage at the molecular level, which may provide insight into the effect and mechanism of anticarcinogens in tumor therapy.

  10. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  11. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  12. Protein damage, radiation sensitivity and aging.

    PubMed

    Radman, Miroslav

    2016-08-01

    This paper promotes a concept that protein damage determines radiation resistance and underlies aging and age-related diseases. The first bottleneck in cell recovery from radiation damage is functional (proteome) rather than informational (DNA), since prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell death correlates with incurred protein, but not DNA, damage. Proteome protection against oxidative damage determines survival after ionizing or UV irradiation, since sufficient residual proteome activity is required to turn on the DNA damage response activating DNA repair and protein renewal processes. Extreme radiation and desiccation resistance of rare bacterial and animal species is accounted for by exceptional constitutive proteome protection against oxidative damage. After excessive radiation their well-protected proteome faithfully reconstitutes a transcription-competent genome from hundreds of DNA fragments. The observation that oxidative damage targeted selectively to cellular proteins results in aging-like phenotypes suggests that aging and age-related diseases could be phenotypic consequences of proteome damage patterns progressing with age.

  13. No DNA damage response and negligible genome-wide transcriptional changes in human embryonic stem cells exposed to terahertz radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bogomazova, A. N.; Vassina, E. M.; Goryachkovskaya, T. N.; Popik, V. M.; Sokolov, A. S.; Kolchanov, N. A.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Kiselev, S. L.; Peltek, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was proposed recently for use in various applications, including medical imaging and security scanners. However, there are concerns regarding the possible biological effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation in the THz range on cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are extremely sensitive to environmental stimuli, and we therefore utilised this cell model to investigate the non-thermal effects of THz irradiation. We studied DNA damage and transcriptome responses in hESCs exposed to narrow-band THz radiation (2.3 THz) under strict temperature control. The transcription of approximately 1% of genes was subtly increased following THz irradiation. Functional annotation enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed 15 functional classes, which were mostly related to mitochondria. Terahertz irradiation did not induce the formation of γH2AX foci or structural chromosomal aberrations in hESCs. We did not observe any effect on the mitotic index or morphology of the hESCs following THz exposure. PMID:25582954

  14. No DNA damage response and negligible genome-wide transcriptional changes in human embryonic stem cells exposed to terahertz radiation.

    PubMed

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Goryachkovskaya, T N; Popik, V M; Sokolov, A S; Kolchanov, N A; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L; Peltek, S E

    2015-01-13

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was proposed recently for use in various applications, including medical imaging and security scanners. However, there are concerns regarding the possible biological effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation in the THz range on cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are extremely sensitive to environmental stimuli, and we therefore utilised this cell model to investigate the non-thermal effects of THz irradiation. We studied DNA damage and transcriptome responses in hESCs exposed to narrow-band THz radiation (2.3 THz) under strict temperature control. The transcription of approximately 1% of genes was subtly increased following THz irradiation. Functional annotation enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed 15 functional classes, which were mostly related to mitochondria. Terahertz irradiation did not induce the formation of γH2AX foci or structural chromosomal aberrations in hESCs. We did not observe any effect on the mitotic index or morphology of the hESCs following THz exposure.

  15. Radiation damage in macromolecular cryocrystallography.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Raimond B G; Garman, Elspeth F

    2006-10-01

    X-ray radiation damage to cryocooled ( approximately 100 K) macromolecular crystals has emerged as a general problem, especially since the advent of third generation synchrotron undulator sources. Interest in understanding the physical and chemical phenomena behind the observed effects is growing rapidly. The specific structural damage seen in electron density maps has to be accounted for when studying intermediates, and can sometimes be related to biological function. Radiation damage induces non-isomorphism, thus hampering traditional phasing methods. However, specific damage can also be used to obtain phases. With an increased knowledge of expected crystal lifetime, beamline characteristics and types of damage, macromolecular crystallographers might soon be able to account for radiation damage in data collection, processing and phasing.

  16. Novel synthetic (S,S) and (R,R)-secoisolariciresinol diglucosides (SDGs) protect naked plasmid and genomic DNA From gamma radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Om P; Pietrofesa, Ralph; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2014-07-01

    Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) is the major lignan in wholegrain flaxseed. However, extraction methods are complex and are associated with low yield and high costs. Using a novel synthetic pathway, our group succeeded in chemically synthesizing SDG (S,S and R,R enantiomers), which faithfully recapitulates the properties of their natural counterparts, possessing strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. This study further extends initial findings by now investigating the DNA-radioprotective properties of the synthetic SDG enantiomers compared to the commercial SDG. DNA radioprotection was assessed by cell-free systems such as: (a) plasmid relaxation assay to determine the extent of the supercoiled (SC) converted to open-circular (OC) plasmid DNA (pBR322) after exposure of the plasmid to gamma radiation; and (b) determining the extent of genomic DNA fragmentation. Exposure of plasmid DNA to 25 Gy of γ radiation resulted in decreased supercoiled form and increased open-circular form, indicating radiation-induced DNA damage. Synthetic SDG (S,S) and SDG (R,R), and commercial SDG at concentrations of 25-250 μM significantly and equipotently reduced the radiation-induced supercoiled to open-circular plasmid DNA in a dose-dependent conversion. In addition, exposure of calf thymus DNA to 50 Gy of gamma radiation resulted in DNA fragments of low-molecular weight (<6,000 bps), which was prevented in a dose-dependence manner by all synthetic and natural SDG enantomers, at concentrations as low as 0.5 μM. These novel results demonstrated that synthetic SDG (S,S) and SDG (R,R) isomers and commercial SDG possess DNA-radioprotective properties. Such properties along with their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, reported earlier, suggest that SDGs are promising candidates for radioprotection for normal tissue damage as a result of accidental exposure during radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

  17. Radiation damage annealing kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Various spectral response studies are reported that assess lithium doping effects on the recovery process of electron damaged silicon solar cells. Measurements of both the minority carrier lifetimes and the energy level spectrum of the defects are used to predict lifetime damage constants and carrier removal rates relevant to the operation of the solar lithium-doped cell and its annealing kinetics.

  18. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  19. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on…

  20. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on…

  1. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2009-09-15

    A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect accumulation and dynamic annealing in a number of ceramics, such as silicon carbide, zircon and zirconia. Under energetic particle irradiation, ceramics can undergo amorphization by the accumulation of point defects and defect clusters (silicon carbide) or direct impact amorphization (zircon). Ceramics that resist radiation-induced amorphization have mechanisms to dissipate the primary knock-on atom energy, such as replacement collision sequences that leave the lattice undisturbed and low-energy cation site exchange. The presence of engineered mobile defects, such as structural vacancies in stabilized zirconia, can dynamically anneal radiation damage. Thus, defect engineering is a promising strategy to design radiation tolerance for applications such as nuclear waste disposal.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. STS-118 Radiator Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, Dana M.; Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Herrin, J.; Lyons, F.

    2008-01-01

    During the August 2007 STS-118 mission to the International Space Station, a micro-meteoroid or orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacted and completely penetrated one of shuttle Endeavour s radiator panels and the underlying thermal control system (TCS) blanket, leaving deposits on (but no damage to) the payload bay door. While it is not unusual for shuttle orbiters to be impacted by small MMOD particles, the damage from this impact is larger than any previously seen on the shuttle radiator panels. A close-up photograph of the radiator impact entry hole is shown in Figure 1, and the location of the impact on Endeavour s left-side aft-most radiator panel is shown in Figure 2. The aft radiator panel is 0.5-inches thick and consists of 0.011 inch thick aluminum facesheets on the front and back of an aluminum honeycomb core. The front facesheet is additionally covered by a 0.005 inch thick layer of silver-Teflon thermal tape. The entry hole in the silver-Teflon tape measured 8.1 mm by 6.4 mm (0.32 inches by 0.25 inches). The entry hole in the outer facesheet measured 7.4 mm by 5.3 mm (0.29 inches by 0.21 inches) (0.23 inches). The impactor also perforated an existing 0.012 inch doubler that had been bonded over the facesheet to repair previous impact damage (an example that lightning can strike the same place twice, even for MMOD impact). The peeled-back edge around the entry hole, or lip , is a characteristic of many hypervelocity impacts. High velocity impact with the front facesheet fragmented the impacting particle and caused it to spread out into a debris cloud. The debris cloud caused considerable damage to the internal honeycomb core with 23 honeycomb cells over a region of 28 mm by 26 mm (1.1 inches by 1.0 inches) having either been completely destroyed or partially damaged. Figure 3 is a view of the exit hole in the rear facesheet, and partially shows the extent of the honeycomb core damage and clearly shows the jagged petaled exit hole through the backside

  4. Radiation damage and point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullough, R.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan Cottrell has made huge seminal contributions to our basic understanding of radiation damage processes in both fissile and non-fissile materials. Much of this ground-breaking work was accomplished in the mid-1950s when Cottrell was working at Birmingham University and later at Harwell Laboratory. It is interesting to relate the earlier progress in the 1950s to our present understanding of the phenomenon.

  5. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-01-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. PMID:28188144

  6. DNA damage by various radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt to shed light on the influence of tritiated water on DNA we have investigated the post-irradiation damage with a simple plasmid DNA, pBR322 and pUC18. The survival of covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA form was directly followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The survival percentage of DNA in tritiated water was almost the same as with the irradiation with X-rays at the same absorbed dose. For irradiation with γ-rays, on the other hand, the decay rate was larger than those observed with both tritiated water and X-rays. The percentages of breakage for DNA in tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays were found to be 34, 38 and 33% at 100 Gy of absorbed dose. The effect of dose rate was not observed for irradiation with tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays. In order to study protection of DNA against radiation, we investigated the protecting effect of tea catechin which is the main component of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). The protection mechanism for DNA against radiation-induced scission has been studied using ESR spin-trapping method.

  7. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  9. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    PubMed

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  10. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  11. Radiation damage in semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    A survey is presented of the important damage-producing interactions in semiconductor detectors and estimates of defect numbers are made for MeV protons, neutrons and electrons. Damage effects of fast neutrons in germanium gamma ray spectrometers are given in some detail. General effects in silicon detectors are discussed and damage constants and their relationship to leakage current is introduced.

  12. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF/sub 2/, both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF/sub 2/ they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with /sup 60/C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10/sup 6/ rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF/sub 2/ develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials.

  13. Investigating DNA Radiation Damage Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Szlachetko, Jakub; Milne, Christopher J.; Lipiec, Ewelina; Sá, Jacinto; Penfold, Thomas J.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Borca, Camelia; Abela, Rafael; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2016-01-01

    The biological influence of radiation on living matter has been studied for years; however, several questions about the detailed mechanism of radiation damage formation remain largely unanswered. Among all biomolecules exposed to radiation, DNA plays an important role because any damage to its molecular structure can affect the whole cell and may lead to chromosomal rearrangements resulting in genomic instability or cell death. To identify and characterize damage induced in the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, in this work we performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the P K-edge on DNA irradiated with either UVA light or protons. By combining the experimental results with theoretical calculations, we were able to establish the types and relative ratio of lesions produced by both UVA and protons around the phosphorus atoms in DNA. PMID:27028640

  14. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  15. Radiation damage in rat kidney microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Shah-Yukich, A; Babayan, R

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a specialized polymer injection casting technique permits the analysis of radiation induced damage in rat kidney glomeruli. A lead shielding device is constructed to enable the irradiation of the living rat left kidney, while the remainder of the animal is shielded from the dose, the right kidney serves as a control. The source of radiation is 137Cs which produces 0.66 MeV gamma-rays to achieve a kidney dose of 100 rad and 5000 rad in these experiments. Radiation damage to kidney glomeruli is assessed at intervals of 0, 1, 3 and 7 days post-irradiation at the two dose levels. It is found that radiation damage to kidney glomeruli is expressed morphologically at 7 days post-irradiation at the 100 rad dose level, while glomerular damage is apparent as early as 3 days post-irradiation at the 5000 rad dose level. Moreover, by 7 days post-irradiation with a 5000 rad dose, the kidney glomerulus thoroughly degenerates to a leaky fused mass of vessels. From a morphological viewpoint, kidney glomeruli are significantly more sensitive to radiation than surrounding vasculature. The methods developed here for assessment of radiation damage are highly repeatable and could serve as a standard technique in radiobiology.

  16. Backgrounds, radiation damage, and spacecraft orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Mark W.

    2017-08-01

    The scientific utility of any space-based observatory can be limited by the on-orbit charged particle background and the radiation-induced damage. All existing and proposed missions have had to make choices about orbit selection, trading off the radiation environment against other factors. We present simulations from ESA’s SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) of the radiation environment for spacecraft in a variety of orbits, from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at multiple inclinations to High Earth Orbit (HEO) to Earth-Sun L2 orbit. We summarize how different orbits change the charged particle background and the radiation damage to the instrument. We also discuss the limitations of SPENVIS simulations, particularly outside the Earth’s trapped radiation and point to new resources attempting to address those limitations.

  17. Membrane structure and radiation and hyperthermic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatvin, Milton B.; Grummer, Mary A.

    The general structure of the biological membrane and its involvement in cell damage from radiation and hyperthermic insults are discussed using bacterial cells as an example. Bacterial cells are useful models for these types of studies because they possess a simple membrane system whose composition can be readily altered. Also, various strains exist having different sensitivities to radiation and heat. For example, the response of Escherichia coli cells to ionizing radiation is found to be related to the degree of association between its DNA and membrane. Likewise, membrane lipids reportedly are important components in the cellular response to radiation. For example, radiation-induced lipid peroxidation leads to both structural and functional alterations in the membranes which must be considered to fully comprehend the biological effects of radiation. The physical state of the membrane during radiation exposure also is involved in the cellular response to radiation. Functional changes during radiation have been ascribed to changes in the protein component of the membrane. Other alterations which may play a role in radiation-induced cell damage include electrophoretic mobility of cells, membrane transport mechanisms, and membrane polysaccharide content. The cell membrane, particularly the lipid component, is an important target in hyperthermic cell killing. The composition and organization of the membrane lipids can influence a cell's response to heat. Heat-induced changes in membrane lipids lead to altered distribution of E. coli proteins, particularly their translocation to the outer membrane. These and other aspects are discussed in this review.

  18. The expected radiation damage of CSNS target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Yu, Q. Z.; Lu, Y. L.; Wang, S. L.; Tong, J. F.; Liang, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The radiation damage to the tungsten target and its SS316 vessel for Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has been estimated with a Monte-Carlo simulation code MCNPX2.5.0. We compare the effects on the radiation damage due to two different proton beam profiles: a uniform distribution and a Gaussian distribution. We also discuss the dependence of the radiation damage estimation on different physics models. The results show the peak displacement productions in vessel and the fourth target plate are 2.5 and 5.5 dpa/y, respectively, under a Gaussian proton beam. The peak helium productions in the vessel and the fourth target are 305 and 353 appm/y, respectively, under the same proton beam. Based on these results and the allowable dpa values we have estimated the lifetime of the tungsten target and its vessel.

  19. Paths from DNA damage and signaling to genome rearrangements via homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Jac A

    2017-07-24

    DNA damage is a constant threat to genome integrity. DNA repair and damage signaling networks play a central role maintaining genome stability, suppressing tumorigenesis, and determining tumor response to common cancer chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are critical lesions induced by ionizing radiation and when replication forks encounter damage. DSBs can result in mutations and large-scale genome rearrangements reflecting mis-repair by non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination. Ionizing radiation induces genetic change immediately, and it also triggers delayed events weeks or even years after exposure, long after the initial damage has been repaired or diluted through cell division. This review covers DNA damage signaling and repair pathways and cell fate following genotoxic insult, including immediate and delayed genome instability and cell survival/cell death pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Radiation damage due to electromagnetic showers

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Mokhov, Nikolai; Striganov, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Radiation-induced damage due to atomic displacements is essential to correctly predict the behavior of materials in nuclear reactors and at charged-particle accelerators. Traditionally the damage due to hadrons was of major interest. The recent increased interest in high-energy lepton colliders gave rise to the problem of prediction of radiation damage due to electromagnetic showers in a wide energy range--from a few hundred keV and up to a few hundred GeV. The report describes results of an electron- and positron-induced displacement cross section evaluation. It is based on detailed lepton-nucleus cross sections, realistic nuclear form-factors and a modified Kinchin-Pease damage model. Numerical data on displacement cross sections for various target nuclei is presented.

  1. Elastic softening of zircon by radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2006-09-25

    The bulk modulus and the shear modulus of zircon soften by ca. 50% when zircon is amorphized by radiation damage. A theoretical description of the experimental findings is presented which shows that the elastic response on a zircon ceramics with radiation damage follows Hashin-Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 11, 127 (1963)] behavior with very narrow bounds. The elastic response depends, in good approximation, on the square of the volume fraction f{sub a} of the amorphized regions. In a slightly coarser approximation one finds an almost linear interpolation of the bulk and the shear modulus between those of the crystalline state and those of the fully amorphous state.

  2. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Engang; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Wang, Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Caro, Jose A.

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  3. [History of the radiation damage in occupations].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-03-01

    In the year following Röntgen`s discovery of X-rays in 1895, approximately 60 cases of hand dermatitis and hair loss induced by radiation were reported. People using X-rays in their occupation, including X-ray tube manufacturers, physicians, and engineers, experienced chronic radiation dermatitis and were the first to be diagnosed with occupational radiation exposure. Reports of later appearing disorders, including skin cancer, suffered by doctors and engineers, were regarded as serious occupational diseases. In the 1910's, blood disorders, including leukemia, in people with occupational exposure to radiation came into focus. Dial painters applying radium to watches with a luminous dial clock face suffered osteomyelitis from about 1914. Other radiation damage reports include radiation death and carcinogenesis in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, and radiation death in the Tokai-mura JCO accident in 1999. The details of radiation damage in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 have not yet been reported, but must be followed in the future.

  4. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  5. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-11-20

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

  6. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  7. Radiation damages in TRISTAN vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Momose, T.; Ishimaru, H. )

    1991-07-01

    The TRISTAN {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} collider, the all aluminum (Al) alloy vacuum system, has been operated for 4 years at a beam energy between 27.5 and 32 GeV, with a characteristic energy of the synchrotron radiation between 187 and 295 keV. The radiation in the TRISTAN tunnel was measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. Radiation damage in the aluminum vacuum system is mainly from HNO{sub 3} produced from NO{sub {ital x}}. N{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in atmosphere are oxidized, combined with H{sub 2}O, and turned to HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in TRISTAN tunnel. Freon also turned to HCl and HF. Corroded materials on aluminum surface is amorphous Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center dot}9H{sub 2}O. To decrease corrosion due to the radiation, one or two of the components in the atmosphere must be removed. This can be realized by pumping with a rotary pump (RP) or a RP together with a turbomolecular pump, or supplying N{sub 2} or He with low dew point, to protect beryllium (Be) windows for internal targets and beam injection and extraction, and race track type bellows. SiO{sub 2} coating superior to almite coating is applied to protect bellows from radiation damage. Most organic materials are decomposed with the radiation. Halogens in the materials are decomposed and turned to acids combining with H{sub 2}O. Connectors of distributed ion pumps and cables of beam position monitors were damaged by fluorine gas, resulting from the decomposition of Teflon insulators in cables and connectors. Polyimide and polystyrene are durable under radiation of about 10{sup 10} rad. They however turned fragile and caused insulation failure in connectors. Rubbers and oils also received radiation damage. Organic materials must be exchanged to inorganic or metallic materials to avoid radiation damage. Mineral insulation cable is developed and is under test.

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  9. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  10. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  11. Evaluation of radiation damage using nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, K. H.; Wall, J. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.; Viehrig, H.-W.

    2012-03-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound was used to monitor radiation damage in two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The microstructural changes associated with radiation damage include changes in dislocation density and the formation of precipitates, and nonlinear ultrasonic waves are known to be sensitive to such changes. Six samples each of two different RPV steels were previously irradiated in the Rheinsberg power reactor to two fluence levels, up to 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Longitudinal waves were used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity in these samples, and the results show a clear increase in the measured acoustic nonlinearity from the unirradiated state to the medium dose, and then a decrease from medium dose to high dose.

  12. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  13. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  14. Radiation track, DNA damage and response—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Liamsuwan, T.; Taleei, R.; Liljequist, D.; Uehara, S.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper has been to review the current status and progress of the field of radiation biophysics, and draw attention to the fact that physics, in general, and radiation physics in particular, with the aid of mathematical modeling, can help elucidate biological mechanisms and cancer therapies. We hypothesize that concepts of condensed-matter physics along with the new genomic knowledge and technologies and mechanistic mathematical modeling in conjunction with advances in experimental DNA (Deoxyrinonucleic acid molecule) repair and cell signaling have now provided us with unprecedented opportunities in radiation biophysics to address problems in targeted cancer therapy, and genetic risk estimation in humans. Obviously, one is not dealing with ‘low-hanging fruit’, but it will be a major scientific achievement if it becomes possible to state, in another decade or so, that we can link mechanistically the stages between the initial radiation-induced DNA damage; in particular, at doses of radiation less than 2 Gy and with structural changes in genomic DNA as a precursor to cell inactivation and/or mutations leading to genetic diseases. The paper presents recent development in the physics of radiation track structure contained in the computer code system KURBUC, in particular for low-energy electrons in the condensed phase of water for which we provide a comprehensive discussion of the dielectric response function approach. The state-of-the-art in the simulation of proton and carbon ion tracks in the Bragg peak region is also presented. The paper presents a critical discussion of the models used for elastic scattering, and the validity of the trajectory approach in low-electron transport. Brief discussions of mechanistic and quantitative aspects of microdosimetry, DNA damage and DNA repair are also included as developed by the authors’ work.

  15. Control of radiation damage in the TEM.

    PubMed

    Egerton, R F

    2013-04-01

    The problem of electron-beam damage in the transmission electron microscope is reviewed, with an emphasis on radiolysis processes in soft materials and organic specimens. Factors that determine the dose-limited resolution are identified for three different operational modes: bright-field scattering-contrast, phase-contrast and dark-field microscopy. Methods of reducing radiation damage are discussed, including low-dose techniques, cooling or encapsulating the specimen, and the choice of imaging mode, incident-beam diameter and incident-electron energy. Further experiments are suggested as a means of obtaining a better understanding and control of electron-beam damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation of ion induced radiation damage in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, W.; Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H. G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.; Dingfelder, M.

    The biophysical simulation code PARTRAC has been used in several studies of DNA damage induced by various radiation qualities including photons electrons protons alphas and ions heavier than alpha particles Ion-electron interaction cross sections are taken from isotachic protons scaled by Z eff 2 with the effective charge calculated according to the Barkas formula Recently ion type dependent angular distributions were introduced for intermediate secondary electron energies taking into account the different kinematic scaling of the constituents of the electron spectra Calculated stopping powers radial dose distributions and secondary electron spectra were found in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical results Radiation damage to DNA is determined in PARTRAC by superposition of the calculated track structures with a DNA target model taking into account direct effects from coincidences of ionisations and atoms within the DNA helix as well as indirect effects due to interactions of OH radicals produced in water surrounding the DNA For a simulation of radiation effects in human cells this target model comprises several genomic structure levels from the DNA double-helix up to chromosomes Calculated DNA damage due to irradiation of human fibroblast cells by ions of boron nitrogen and neon was compared to corresponding experimental data The calculated total yield of DSB per dose showed saturation behaviour with an RBE of about 2 whereas experimental data had a decreasing tendency with increasing LET to RBE values

  17. Magnetic Properties of Radiation Damage in Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; McElfresh, M; Chapline, G; Jackson, D

    2004-10-27

    First, we review earlier studies reporting possible magnetic characteristics for radiation defects in Pu. We then report, for {alpha}-Pu, two studies of the excess magnetic susceptibility (EMS) due to radiation damage, as a function of time and temperature. We have observed several annealing stages associated with the EMS of the accumulated self-damage and we report that annealing begins at {approx}31K, while below that temperature the displacement damage from self-irradiation of the Pu alpha particle emission and the U recoil are immobile. A detailed investigation was made of this EMS well below the first annealing stage as a function of temperature (2K < T < 15K) and time in a magnetic field of 2T. A linear increase in magnetic susceptibility is seen as a function of time for all isotherms. The excess susceptibility per alpha decay, determined from a linear fit of the slope of the time dependent EMS, is reasonably described with a Curie-Weiss law exhibiting a small negative Weiss temperature. We conclude by describing some future experiments in light of the present results.

  18. Localized defects in radiation-damaged zircon

    PubMed

    Rios; Malcherek; Salje; Domeneghetti

    2000-12-01

    The crystal structure of a radiation-damaged natural zircon, ZrSiO(4) (alpha-decay radiation dose is ca 1.8 x 10(18) alpha-decay events g(-1)), has been determined. The anisotropic unit-cell swelling observed in the early stages of the amorphization process (0.17% along the a axis and 0.62% along the c axis compared with the undamaged material) is a consequence of the anisotropy of the expansion of ZrO(8) polyhedra. Larger anisotropic displacement parameters were found for Zr and O atoms, indicating that the distortion produced by alpha particle-induced localized defects mainly affects the ZrO(8) unit. The overall shape of SiO(4) tetrahedra remains essentially undistorted, while Si-O bonds are found to lengthen by 0.43%.

  19. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  20. Impact of Genomic Methylation on Radiation Sensitivity of Colorectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Barbara; Niemierko, Andrzej; Forrer, Christian; Benhattar, Jean; Albertini, Veronica; Pruschy, Martn; Bosman, Fred T.; Catapano, Carlo V.; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of demethylation with 5-aza-cytidine (AZA) on radiation sensitivity and to define the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of methylation deficient colorectal carcinoma cells. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitizing effects of AZA were investigated in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines (HCT116, SW480, L174 T, Co115), defining influence of AZA on proliferation, clonogenic survival, and cell cycling with or without ionizing radiation. The methylation status for cancer or DNA damage response-related genes silenced by promoter methylation was determined. The effect of deletion of the potential target genes (DNMT1, DNMT3b, and double mutants) on radiation sensitivity was analyzed. Results: AZA showed radiation sensitizing properties at >=1 {mu}mol/l, a concentration that does not interfere with the cell cycle by itself, in all four tested cell lines with a sensitivity-enhancing ratio (SER) of 1.6 to 2.1 (confidence interval [CI] 0.9-3.3). AZA successfully demethylated promoters of p16 and hMLH1, genes associated with ionizing radiation response. Prolonged exposure to low-dose AZA resulted in sustained radiosensitivity if associated with persistent genomic hypomethylation after recovery from AZA. Compared with maternal HCT116 cells, DNMT3b-defcient deficient cells were more sensitive to radiation with a SER of 2.0 (CI 0.9-2.1; p = 0.03), and DNMT3b/DNMT1-/- double-deficient cells showed a SER of 1.6 (CI 0.5-2.7; p = 0.09). Conclusions: AZA-induced genomic hypomethylation results in enhanced radiation sensitivity in colorectal carcinoma. The mediators leading to sensitization remain unknown. Defining the specific factors associated with radiation sensitization after genomic demethylation may open the way to better targeting for the purpose of radiation sensitization.

  1. Correlation between thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C.L.

    1985-02-01

    Thermoluminescence properties of bismuth germanate and their relationship to radiation damage characteristics have been investigated. Thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate display several similar properties including similar responses as a function of radiation dose, similar saturation levels, and similar decay times. Also a correlation was found between the thermoluminescence sensitivities and radiation damage sensitivities of four different crystals. The traps responsible for the radiation damage and those which store the thermoluminescence signal appear to be either closely related or actually the same traps. Four trapping centers can be seen in the thermoluminescence glow curves. The depth of the dominant trap is 1.1 eV. 10 references.

  2. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, François; Weber, William J.

    2013-09-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacement cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  3. Radiation damage in zircon and monazite

    SciTech Connect

    Meldrum, A.; Boatner, L.A.; Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    Monazite and zircon respond differently to ion irradiation and to thermal and irradiation-enhanced annealing. The damage process (i.e., elastic interactions leading to amorphization) in radioactive minerals (metamictization) is basically the same as for the ion-beam-irradiated samples with the exception of the dose rate which is much lower in the case of natural samples. The crystalline-to-metamict transition in natural samples with different degrees of damage, from almost fully crystalline to completely metamict, is compared to the sequence of microstructures observed for ion-beam-irradiated monazite and zircon. The damage accumulation process, representing the competing effects of radiation-induced structural disorder and subsequent annealing mechanisms (irradiation-enhanced and thermal) occurs at much higher temperatures for zircon than for monazite. The amorphization dose, expressed as displacements per atom, is considerably higher in the natural samples, and the atomic-scale process leading to metamictization appears to develop differently. Ion-beam-induced amorphization data were used to calculate the {alpha}-decay-event dose required for amorphization in terms of a critical radionuclide concentration, i.e., the concentration above which a sample of a given age will become metamict at a specific temperature. This equation was applied to estimate the reliability of U-Pb ages, to provide a qualitative estimate of the thermal history of high-U natural zircons, and to predict whether actinide-bearing zircon or monazite nuclear waste forms will become amorphous (metamict) over long timescales.

  4. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  5. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    J Abrefah GS Klinger

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  6. Overview Of Nuclear Radiation Damage Processes: Phenomenological Features Of Radiation Damage In Crystals And Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Paul W.

    1985-12-01

    The principle radiation damage effects occurring in optical materials, particularly those produced by energetic particles and gamma rays, are described phenomenologically. Included is a description of the basic processes whereby radiation interacts with non-metals. Emphasized are: 1) ionization induced electron and hole formation and migration processes and, 2) the displacement and ionization damage effects that are responsible for atoms being displaced from their normal lattice positions. In nonmetals, the principal radiation damage effect produced by these processes is the creation of color centers. In turn, it is shown that the radiation induced color center formation, as well as the changes that occurs after an irradiation is terminated, are described by a particularly simple theory. Radiation damage in transparent crystals and glasses is illustrated by measurements made with unique equipment fn making optical measurements during and after irradiation. One arrangement utilizes a 60 Co gamma-ray source and the other a 3.0 MeV electron accelerator. The illustrations include: 1) Measurements on F-center formation during irradiation--and the changes that occur after irradiation--on LiF, NaC1, and KC1 synthetic crystals. 2) Studies on the radiation induced F-center and Na metal colloid formation occurring in natural rock salt (NaCl) from potential radioactive waste repository sites. 3) The growth during irradiation and decay after irradiation of color centers in glasses irradiated at different temperatures. Lastly, the radioluminescence emitted during irradiation, as well as the absorption spectrum changes and the thermoluminescence emission that is observed when irradiated samples are heated, is illustrated by studies on natural quartz.

  7. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  8. Refurbishment of radiation-damaged undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tischer, M. Neumann, P.; Schöps, A.; Vagin, P.

    2016-07-27

    Partial radiation damage has been observed over the previous five years of operation for a few of the PETRA III permanent magnet undulators at DESY. The degradation of the affected devices has been observed by a change in the energy tuning curves and the spectral properties of the undulator harmonics, and also by direct measurements of the peak field distribution of the magnet structure in the storage ring tunnel [1]. During the recent shutdown of the machine, two undulators were removed from the tunnel for repair. One of the devices (U29) has been retuned after flipping of all magnets of the hybrid structure. In addition to this temporary repair, one further magnet structure (U23) has been completely disassembled and refurbished by application of a rare earth diffusion process and a coating to the permanent magnets. We will report on the details of the refurbishment of these undulators which were both fully brought back to specifications and are meanwhile back in operation.

  9. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

  10. Radiation damage limits to XPCS studies of protein dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vodnala, Preeti Karunaratne, Nuwan; Lurio, Laurence; Bera, Sambhunath; Thurston, George M.; Karonis, Nick; Winans, John; Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh; Yasui, Linda; Gaillard, Elizabeth; Karumanchi, Kalyan

    2016-07-27

    The limitations to x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) imposed by radiation damage have been evaluated for suspensions of alpha crystallin. We find that the threshold for radiation damage to the measured protein diffusion rate is significantly lower than the threshold for damage to the protein structure. We provide damage thresholds beyond which the measured diffusion coeffcients have been modified using both XPCS and dynamic light scattering (DLS).

  11. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  12. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review here the advances in understanding the effects of ionizing radiations on DNA, proteins and their complexes, resulting from the collaboration of the authors' teams. It concerns the preponderant indirect effect of low LET ionizing radiations, thus the attack of the macromolecules in aqueous solution by the most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl radical. A model of simulation of the reaction of these radicals with the macromolecules (called RADACK) was developed and was used for calculating the probabilities of damage of each constituent of DNA or proteins (nucleotide or amino-acid). The calculations allowed to draw conclusions from electrophoresis, mutagenesis, spectroscopic (fluorescence, circular dichroïsm) and mass spectrometry experiments. Thus we have shown that the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the 3D structure of the macromolecules, which in turns is modulated by their sequence and by the binding of some ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation completed our studies in showing the consequences of each lesion on the stability and structure of the proteins and their complexes with DNA.

  13. [Radiation-induced genomic instability: phenomenon, molecular mechanisms, pathogenetic significance].

    PubMed

    Mazurik, V K; Mikhaĭlov, V F

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the radiation-induced genome instability as a special state of progeny of cells irradiated in vitro as well as after a whole body exposure to ionizing radiation, that make these cells considerably different from normal, unirradiated cells, were considered. This state presents a number of cytogenetical, molecular-biological, cytological and biochemical manifestations untypical for normal cells. The state is controlled by the mechanisms of regulation of checkpoints of cell cycle, and apoptosis, that is under gene p53 control. The proof has been found that this state transfers from irradiated maternal cells to their surviving progeny by the epigenetical mechanisms and would exist until the cells restore the original state of response on the DNA damage. From the point of view of the genome instability conception, that considers the chromatine rearrangement as the adaptive-evolution mechanism of adaptation of the species to changeable environmental conditions, the radiation-induced genome instability may be considered as transition of irradiated progeny to the state of read these to adaptation changes with two alternative pathways. The first leads to adaptation to enviromental conditions and restoring of normal cell functions. The second presents the cell transition into the transformed state with remain genome instability and with increase of tumour growth probability.

  14. Gossypetin, a naturally occurring hexahydroxy flavone, ameliorates gamma radiation-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Bose, Chinchu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-mediated DNA damage. Increasing concentrations (10-150 μM) of GTIN were incubated with supercoiled DNA 1 h prior exposure to γ-radiation in the range of 5-Gy absorbed dose from Co(60) γ source. To establish the effective protective concentration of GTIN, supercoiled DNA was pre-incubated with 50 μM of GTIN for 1 h followed by exposure of 5, 10 and 20 Gy doses of γ-radiation. Moreover, 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical, nitric oxide (NO) scavenging, metal chelating activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of GTIN were measured and compared with standards. The flowcytometric analysis and radiation-induced genomic DNA damage by comet assay were employed to estimate the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) using isolated murine hepatocytes. GTIN was able to effectively scavenge different free radicals in in vitro situations. It could significantly prevent radiation induced supercoiled and genomic DNA damage with reduced comet parameters. It also acted as a potent scavenger of the radiation induced ROS. GTIN ameliorated radiation-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by its free-radical scavenging activity.

  15. Space solar cells: High efficiency and radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H., Jr.; Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    The progress and status of efforts to increase the end-of-life efficiency of solar cells for space use is assessed. High efficiency silicon solar cells, silicon solar cell radiation damage, GaAs solar cell performance and radiation damage and 30 percent devices are discussed.

  16. Radiation induced genomic instability in bystander cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Gu, S.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hei, T.

    There is considerable evidence that exposure to ionizing radiation may induce a heritable genomic instability that leads to a persisting increased frequency of genetic and functional changes in the non-irradiated progeny of a wide variety of irradiated cells Genomic instability is measured as delayed expressions in chromosomal alterations micronucleus formation gene mutations and decreased plating efficiency During the last decade numerous studies have shown that radiation could induce bystander effect in non-irradiated neighboring cells similar endpoints have also been used in genomic instability studies Both genomic instability and the bystander effect are phenomena that result in a paradigm shift in our understanding of radiation biology In the past it seemed reasonable to assume that the production of single- and double-strand DNA breaks are due to direct energy deposition of energy by a charged particle to the nucleus It turns out that biology is not quite that simple Using the Columbia University charged particle microbeam and the highly sensitive human hamster hybrid AL cell mutagenic assay we irradiated 10 of the cells with a lethal dose of 30 alpha particles through the nucleus After overnight incubation the remaining viable bystander cells were replated in dishes for colony formation Clonal isolates were expanded and cultured for 6 consecutive weeks to assess plating efficiency and mutation frequency Preliminary results indicated that there was no significant decrease in plating efficiency among the bystander colonies when compared with

  17. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  18. Genomic damage in chronic renal failure--potential therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Helga; Schupp, Nicole; Klassen, André; Sebekova, Katarina; Heidland, August

    2005-01-01

    In end-stage renal failure, genomic damage is enhanced. This has been shown both in the predialysis and dialysis phase by various biomarkers, such as micronuclei frequency and single cell gel electrophoresis in lymphocytes as well as with 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in leukocytes. There are also data about mitochondrial DNA deletions and chromosomal abnormalities. Genomic damage may be induced by a multitude of toxic factors and mutagens, in particular via enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species. In in vitro studies, incubation of tubular cells with various AGEs (carboxymethyllysine-BSA, AGE-BSA, and methylglyoxal-BSA) and angiotensin II resulted in a marked DNA damage. Coincubation with various antioxidants as well as the angiotensin II receptor blocker, candesartan, suppressed the toxic action. Moreover, an improved uremic state by daily hemodialysis ameliorated the genomic damage in lymphocytes, as compared to patients on conventional hemodialysis.

  19. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  20. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  1. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  2. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  3. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A. |; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G. |; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-12-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10{sup 10} p/cm{sup 2} and significant bulk leakage after 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2}. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}, although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 10} {alpha}/cm{sup 2} produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 {times} 10{sup 9} {alpha}/cm{sup 2}. CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}. Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2} and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} p/cm{sup 2}. Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions.

  4. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  5. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  6. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Jonathan

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF4/iC4H10 gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF4-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF4, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF4/iC4H10 gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C2H6. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl3F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  7. Follow-up studies on genome damage in children after Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Aghajanyan, Anna; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Minina, Varvara; Neronova, Elizaveta

    2016-09-01

    As children are more susceptible to ionizing radiation than adults, each nuclear accident demands special attention and care of this vulnerable population. The Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred in a region populated with a large number of children, but despite all efforts and expertise of nuclear specialists, it was not possible to avoid casualties. As vast regions of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation, which are known to be related with different diseases, shortly after the accident medical surveillance was launched, which also included analysis of genome damage. Child population affected by internal and external radiation consisted of subjects exposed prenatally, postnatally (both evacuated and non-evacuated), born by irradiated fathers who worked as liquidators, and parents exposed environmentally. In all groups of children during the last 30 years who were exposed to doses which were significantly higher than that recommended for general population of 1 mSv per year, increased genome damage was detected. Increased genome damage includes statistically higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes, chromated and chromosome breaks, acentric fragments, translocations, and micronuclei. The presence of rogue cells confirmed internal contamination. Genome instability and radiosensitivity in children was detected both in evacuated and continuously exposed children. Today the population exposed to ionizing radiation in 1986 is in reproductive period of life and follow-up of this population and their offspring is of great importance. This review aims to give insight in results of studies, which reported genome damage in children in journals without language restrictions.

  8. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  9. Chemical studies on DNA damage by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagiya, V. Tsutomu; Sakano, Koichi; Nishimoto, Sei-Ici

    The radiation chemical characteristics of DNA-related compounds, especially thymine, as the most radiosensitivity DNA base in aqueous solution, are shown to obtain correlations with the radiation inactivations of bacterial and mammalian cultured cells. Recent development of chemical sensitizers for modification of the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells, which is closely associated with the radiation therapy of cancer, is also reviewed.

  10. [Influence of Detector Radiation Damage on CR Mammography Quality Control].

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsumi; Ishii, Mie; Terazono, Shiho; Arao, Keiko; Ishii, Rie; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Recently, radiation damage to the detector apparatus employed in computed radiography (CR) mammography has become problematic. The CR system and the imaging plate (IP) applied to quality control (QC) program were also used in clinical mammography in our hospital, and the IP to which radiation damage has occurred was used for approximately 5 years (approximately 13,000 exposures). We considered using previously acquired QC image data, which is stored in a server, to investigate the influence of radiation damage to an IP. The mammography unit employed in this study was a phase contrast mammography (PCM) Mermaid (KONICA MINOLTA) system. The QC image was made newly, and it was output in the film, and thereafter the optical density of the step-phantom image was measured. An input (digital value)-output (optical density) conversion curve was plotted using the obtained data. The digital values were then converted to optical density values using a reference optical density vs. digital value curve. When a high radiation dose was applied directly, radiation damage occurred at a position on the IP where no object was present. Daily QC for mammography is conducted using an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and acrylic disc, and an environmental background density measurement is performed as one of the management indexes. In this study, the radiation damage sustained by the acrylic disc was shown to differ from that of the background. Thus, it was revealed that QC results are influenced by radiation damage.

  11. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity.

  12. Non-randomized mtDNA damage after ionizing radiation via charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Rong; He, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that there are mutation hot spots in mtDNA, whether there are damage hot spots remain elusive. In this study, the regional DNA damage of mitochondrial genome after ionizing radiation was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mtDNA damage level was found to be dose-dependent and regional unequal. The control region was the most susceptible region to oxidative damage. GGG, as an typical hole trap during charge transport, was found to be disproportionally enriched in the control region. A total of 107 vertebrate mitochondrial genomes were then analyzed to testify whether the GGG enrichment in control region was evolutionary conserved. Surprisingly, the triple G enrichment can be observed in most of the homeothermal animals, while the majority of heterothermic animals showed no triple G enrichment. These results indicated that the triple G enrichment in control region was related to the mitochondrial metabolism during evolution.

  13. How to Cope with DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation and Anti-Cancer Drugs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, A.; Miyagawa, K.

    Ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents induce many types of DNA lesions, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are assumed to be the most deleterious. DNA damage response mechanisms encompass pathways of DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint arrest, and apoptosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these pathways function co-operatively to maintain genomic stability in the face of exogenous and endogenous DNA damage. The relative impact of one mechanism over another probably depends on the kinds of lesions, the cell cycle phase, and the cell or tissue type. The inability to respond properly to or to repair DSBs may lead to hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and genomic instability including chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal instability, a state of continuous accumulation of chromosomal change, is a common feature of many human cancers and of chromosome instability syndromes with increased cancer susceptibility. Here, we review the DNA da mage response and the links between deficiencies in response to DSBs and chromosomal instability.

  14. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  15. Radiation damage to the brain: neuropsychiatric aspects

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.; Vahora, S.

    1986-11-01

    Although radiation necrosis of the brain is a recognized complication of irradiation of the central nervous system, the psychiatric aspects of this phenomenon are less well defined. Two cases of radiation necrosis in which psychiatric symptoms were a prominent part of the clinical picture are presented. Factors that determine the evolution and clinical presentation of radiation necrosis are reviewed. In particular, the role of the consultation psychiatrist in the diagnosis and management of such patients is discussed.

  16. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  17. Enhanced annealing of GaAs solar cell radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Knechtli, R. C.; Kamath, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    Solar cells are degraded by radiation damage in space. Investigations have been conducted concerning possibilities for annealing this radiation damage in GaAs solar cells, taking into account the conditions favoring such annealing. It has been found that continuous annealing as well as the combination of injection annealing with thermal annealing can lead to recovery from radiation damage under particularly favorable conditions in GaAs solar cells. The damage caused by both electrons and protons in GaAs solar cells can be substantially reduced by annealing at temperatures as low as 150 C, under appropriate conditions. This possibility makes the GaAs solar cells especially attractive for long space missions, or for missions in severe radiation environments. Attention is given to results concerning periodic thermal annealing, continuous annealing, and injection annealing combined with thermal annealing.

  18. Chironomus ramosus larvae exhibit DNA damage control in response to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Datkhile, Kailas D; Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2015-01-01

    Chironomus ramosus is one of the recently reported radiotolerant insects. Salivary gland cells of fourth instar larvae respond to ionizing radiations with increases in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and chaperone proteins. Here we made an attempt to study the state of nuclear DNA after exposure of larvae to a lethal dose for 20% of the population (LD(20)) of gamma radiation (2200 Gy, at a dose rate 5.5 Gy/min). Genomic DNA preparations were subjected to competitive ELISA (Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) for detection of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to monitor any radiation-induced damage. Single salivary gland cells were subjected to alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (ASCGE), comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to check for DNA double-strand breaks. Results from all four experimental procedures confirmed damage of nucleobases and fragmentation of nuclear DNA immediately after radiation. Some 48 h after radiation exposure, modified 8-oxodG residues returned to basal level, homodispersity of genomic DNA reappeared, the length of comet tail regressed significantly (ASCGE) and PFGE pattern matched with that of high molecular weight unirradiated DNA. Chironomus ramosus larvae showed control of DNA damage as observed over 48 h in post irradiation recovery which could be attributed to their ability to tolerate gamma radiation stress.

  19. Molecular dynamics investigation of radiation damage in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a molecular dynamics investigation of the effects of radiation damage on the crystallographic structure of semiconductors are reported. Particular cosiderastion is given to the formation of point defects and small defect complexes in silicon at the end of a radiation-damage cascade. The calculations described make use of the equivalent crystal theory of Smith and Banerjea (1988). Results on the existence of an atomic displacement threshold, the defect formation energy, and some crystallographic information on the defects observed are reported.

  20. Pacemaker failure resulting from radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Quertermous, T.; Megahy, M.S.; Das Gupta, D.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The authors present a case of radiation-induced pacemaker failure. After 2000 rad (20 Gy) of photon irradiation for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, the pulse generator circuitry failed, producing a runaway rhythm. This suggests that present pacemaker circuitry may be more susceptible to irradiation than previously believed, and that even modest radiation doses can induce life-threatening arrhythmias.

  1. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  2. Effects Of Dose Rates On Radiation Damage In CMOS Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Coss, James R.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes measurements of effects of ionizing-radiation dose rate on consequent damage to complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic devices. Depending on irradiation time and degree of annealing, survivability of devices in outer space, or after explosion of nuclear weapons, enhanced. Annealing involving recovery beyond pre-irradiation conditions (rebound) detrimental. Damage more severe at lower dose rates.

  3. Animal Models of Ionizing Radiation Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Beagles Continuously Exposed to 90Sr, Blood, 34(5):610-632, 1969. 129. Duplan, J.F., and R. Latarjet , Studies on the Mechanism of Radiation- induced...Radiat. Res., 5:404-432, 1956. A-120 249. Latarjet , R., and J.F. Duplan, Experiment and Discussion on Leukaemogenesis by Cell-Free Extracts of Radiation...Primates Treated with Total-body or Lymphoid Irradiation and Preoperative Blood Transfusions, Nature, 37(3):325-326, 1984. 72. Duplan, J.F., and R. Latarjet

  4. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  5. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  6. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  7. Radiation damage in charge-coupled devices.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels

    2010-08-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have been the preferred optical photon detectors of astronomers for several decades. CCDs are flown in space as the main detection instrument on several well-known missions, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, XMM-Newton or the Cassini Probe. Also, CCDs are frequently used in satellite star trackers which provide attitude information to the satellite orientation system. However, one major drawback is their extreme vulnerability to radiation, which is readily abundant in space. Here, we shall give a brief overview of the radiation effects on CCDs, and mention ways how to mitigate the effects in other ways than merely increase shielding, such as cooling and annealing. As an example, we have investigated the radiation hardness of a particular CCD, the so-called CCD47-20 from Marconi Applied Technologies (now E2V), by exposing it to radiation fields representing the radiation environment found in a highly elliptic orbit crossing the Van-Allen radiation belts. Two engineering-grade CCDs were irradiated with proton beams and photons, and effects of increased bulk dark current, surface dark current and inversion threshold voltage shifts were observed and are quantified.

  8. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  9. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  10. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abby M.; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C.; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors. PMID:26918916

  11. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  12. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  13. Radiation damage in high-resistivity silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Goradia, C.

    High-resistivity silicon solar cells exhibit reduced radiation damage when light is incident on the gridded back surface. Under back illumination, radiation damage decreases as cell resistivity increases; under front illumination, radiation damage increases as cell resistivity increases. Thin back-illuminated cells outperform conventional 10 omega cm 50 and 200 micron cells at low 1-MeV electron fluences. However, at higher fluences, the conventional cells exhibit superior radiation resistance. This is attributed to the low BOL diffusion lengths observed in the thin, sack-illuminated cell. These results are discussed in terms of injected charge distributions, electric fields in the cell base, and the effects of a dominant boron-oxygen defect.

  14. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  15. Radiation damage in high-resistivity silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Goradia, C.

    1985-01-01

    High-resistivity silicon solar cells exhibit reduced radiation damage when light is incident on the gridded back surface. Under back illumination, radiation damage decreases as cell resistivity increases; under front illumination, radiation damage increases as cell resistivity increases. Thin back-illuminated cells outperform conventional 10 omega cm 50 and 200 micron cells at low 1-MeV electron fluences. However, at higher fluences, the conventional cells exhibit superior radiation resistance. This is attributed to the low BOL diffusion lengths observed in the thin, sack-illuminated cell. These results are discussed in terms of injected charge distributions, electric fields in the cell base, and the effects of a dominant boron-oxygen defect.

  16. Adaptive radiations: From field to genomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Scott A.; Derieg, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  17. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; ...

    2015-01-30

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. Despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under themore » same controlled conditions. A model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. We observed the protein at low doses and found that they were susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.« less

  18. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses. PMID:25723923

  19. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-30

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. Despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. A model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. We observed the protein at low doses and found that they were susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.

  20. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Weber, William J.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in the molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.

  1. Endothelial perturbations and therapeutic strategies in normal tissue radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Korpela, Elina; Liu, Stanley K

    2014-12-18

    Most cancer patients are treated with radiotherapy, but the treatment can also damage the surrounding normal tissue. Radiotherapy side-effects diminish patients' quality of life, yet effective biological interventions for normal tissue damage are lacking. Protecting microvascular endothelial cells from the effects of irradiation is emerging as a targeted damage-reduction strategy. We illustrate the concept of the microvasculature as a mediator of overall normal tissue radiation toxicity through cell death, vascular inflammation (hemodynamic and molecular changes) and a change in functional capacity. Endothelial cell targeted therapies that protect against such endothelial cell perturbations and the development of acute normal tissue damage are mostly under preclinical development. Since acute radiation toxicity is a common clinical problem in cutaneous, gastrointestinal and mucosal tissues, we also focus on damage in these tissues.

  2. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; ...

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in themore » molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.« less

  3. Radiation-damaged tyrosinase molecules are inactive

    SciTech Connect

    Kempner, E.S.; Miller, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Target analysis of radiation inactivation of mushroom tyrosinase yields different target sizes for diphenoloxidase and monophenoloxidase activities, which correspond to the subunits H and HL2 (or HL), respectively. After gel electrophoresis of irradiated samples, all diphenoloxidase activity is observed at the same position as seen in the original material. Radiolytic fragments contain no detectable activity, consistent with a fundamental assumption of target theory.

  4. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  5. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  6. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; ...

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  7. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  8. Radiation-damaged tyrosinase molecules are inactive.

    PubMed Central

    Kempner, E S; Miller, J H

    1989-01-01

    Target analysis of radiation inactivation of mushroom tyrosinase yields different target sizes for diphenoloxidase and monophenoloxidase activities, which correspond to the subunits H and HL2 (or HL), respectively. After gel electrophoresis of irradiated samples, all diphenoloxidase activity is observed at the same position as seen in the original material. Radiolytic fragments contain no detectable activity, consistent with a fundamental assumption of target theory. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:2495032

  9. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  10. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  11. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R

    2002-10-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  12. Interplay of space radiation and microgravity in DNA damage and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Wong, Michael; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    In space, multiple unique environmental factors, particularly microgravity and space radiation, pose constant threat to the DNA integrity of living organisms. Specifically, space radiation can cause damage to DNA directly, through the interaction of charged particles with the DNA molecules themselves, or indirectly through the production of free radicals. Although organisms have evolved strategies on Earth to confront such damage, space environmental conditions, especially microgravity, can impact DNA repair resulting in accumulation of severe DNA lesions. Ultimately these lesions, namely double strand breaks, chromosome aberrations, micronucleus formation, or mutations, can increase the risk for adverse health effects, such as cancer. How spaceflight factors affect DNA damage and the DNA damage response has been investigated since the early days of the human space program. Over the years, these experiments have been conducted either in space or using ground-based analogs. This review summarizes the evidence for DNA damage induction by space radiation and/or microgravity as well as spaceflight-related impacts on the DNA damage response. The review also discusses the conflicting results from studies aimed at addressing the question of potential synergies between microgravity and radiation with regard to DNA damage and cellular repair processes. We conclude that further experiments need to be performed in the true space environment in order to address this critical question.

  13. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in iron.

    PubMed

    Zarkadoula, E; Daraszewicz, S L; Duffy, D M; Seaton, M A; Todorov, I T; Nordlund, K; Dove, M T; Trachenko, K

    2014-02-26

    Electronic effects have been shown to be important in high-energy radiation damage processes where a high electronic temperature is expected, yet their effects are not currently understood. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in α-iron using a coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon interaction. We subsequently compare it with the model employing electronic stopping only, and find several interesting novel insights. The 2T-MD results in both decreased damage production in the thermal spike and faster relaxation of the damage at short times. Notably, the 2T-MD model gives a similar amount of final damage at longer times, which we interpret to be the result of two competing effects: a smaller amount of short-time damage and a shorter time available for damage recovery.

  14. Heat induced damage detection in composite materials by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, Maciej; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-03-01

    In recent years electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) radiation or T-ray has been increasingly used for nondestructive evaluation of various materials such as polymer composites and porous foam tiles in which ultrasonic waves cannot penetrate but T-ray can. Most of these investigations have been limited to mechanical damage detection like inclusions, cracks, delaminations etc. So far only a few investigations have been reported on heat induced damage detection. Unlike mechanical damage the heat induced damage does not have a clear interface between the damaged part and the surrounding intact material from which electromagnetic waves can be reflected back. Difficulties associated with the heat induced damage detection in composite materials using T-ray are discussed in detail in this paper. T-ray measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure of composite specimens.

  15. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  16. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  17. (Radiation damage correlation for fusion conditions)

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1989-10-16

    The workshop consisted of formal presentations and discussions by 39 invited participants from 11 countries. The theme of the workshop was the status of techniques for correlating fusion reactor and accelerator-generated data with those expected of a fusion reactor neutron spectrum. Several papers addressed the nature of cascades induced by 14 MeV neutrons. Still others supported such studies by theoretical investigations of high-energy neutron damage. Other presentations, such as the traveler's presentation, addressed the macroscopic aspects of neutron irradiation effects, such as swelling, irradiation creep, and mechanical properties. Additional presentations addressed theoretical aspects of helium embrittlement and transmutation products in general.

  18. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1–0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  19. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Evangelia; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Seaton, M; Todorov, I T; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  20. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  1. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  2. Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dynan, William S.

    2016-11-14

    The goal of this study was to examine long-term effects of low-dose radiation exposure. One of the hypotheses was that radiation exposure would accelerate the normal aging process. The study was jointly funded by NASA and examined both low-LET radiation (γ-rays) and high-LET radiation (1000 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions) at doses of 0.1 Gy and up. The work used the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), as a vertebrate model organism that can be maintained in large numbers at low cost for lifetime studies. Like other small laboratory fish, Japanese medaka share many anatomical and histological characteristics with other vertebrates, and a variety of genetic and genomic resources are available. Some work also used the zebrafish (Danio rerio), another widely used laboratory model organism.

  3. Radiation Damage Theory: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Barashev, Aleksandr; Golubov, Stanislav I

    2009-01-01

    Efforts of many scientists for more than a half of a century have resulted in substantial understanding of the response of various materials to irradiation. The theory has contributed significantly to this process but has not acquired a status allowing it to play a decisive role in creating radiation-resistant materials. Moreover, some theoretical predictions are in contradiction with observations, which indicates that something important has escaped attention. In the present paper, the current theoretical framework and experimental data are analyzed to elucidate the reasons for such a situation. A way of developing a predictive theory is proposed.

  4. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  5. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  6. ARTICLES: High-power laser radiation damage to transparent insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Kulikov, V. I.; Pedanov, V. V.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the kinetics of the post-breakdown phenomena accompanying the focusing of high-power laser radiation inside transparent insulators (using the example of single-crystal potassium alum). Measurements were made of the rate of growth of the damage region and of the propagation velocity of the elastic wave, its amplitude and wavelength. The dimensions of the breakdown region were compared with those of the damage zone in the insulator. An analysis was made of the laser radiation energy distribution in the observed phenomenon.

  7. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-04-19

    We review a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We briefly overview its history and present the current stage of its development. The differences of the multiscale approach from other methods of understanding and assessment of radiation damage are discussed as well as its relationship to other branches of physics, chemistry and biology.

  8. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  9. Radiation Combined Injury: DNA Damage, Apoptosis, and Autophagy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the course of their disease (5) represents another significant source of exposure as normal tissues are subjected to radiation injury. Those charged...that luminal microbiota com- position may influence the host’s intestinal response to radiation and may change in those developing postirradiation... disease . Annu. Rev. Pathol. Mecha. Dis. 3: 247-255, 2008. 41. Kurz, E.U. and Lees-Miller, S.P. DNA damage-induced activation of ATM and ATM

  10. Proton-radiation damage in Gunn oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Fales, C. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation effects of 22 MeV protons on the electrical characteristics of GaAs continuous-wave Gunn oscillators was studied. The radio frequency power output was reduced by 3 decibels at proton fluences in the neighborhood of 1.5 x 10 to the 12th power protons/sq cm. Conductance measurements indicate that the carrier removal rate at high electric fields remained roughly 40 percent less than at low fields. Diode efficiencies of two device groups were found to be monotonically descreasing functions of fluence. Frequency modulation noise was generally unaffected by radiation, but the magnitude of the noise in the noise power spectrum increased significantly. These effects are partially accounted for, in a qualitative fashion, by a model of electron traps having field-dependent net-carrier capture rates and various response times.

  11. Computer simulation radiation damages in condensed matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.; Gyngazov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    As part of the cascade-probability method were calculated the energy spectra of primary knocked-out atoms and the concentration of radiation-induced defects in a number of metals irradiated by electrons. As follows from the formulas, the number of Frenkel pairs at a given depth depends on three variables having certain physical meaning: firstly, Cd (Ea h) is proportional to the average energy of the considered depth of the PKA (if it is higher, than the greater number of atoms it will displace); secondly is inversely proportional to the path length λ2 for the formation of the PKA (if λ1 is higher than is the smaller the probability of interaction) and thirdly is inversely proportional to Ed. In this case calculations are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data (for example, copper and aluminum).

  12. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  13. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Radiation-induced Damages

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Marzia; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Buffa, Vitaliano; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The long-term sequelae of mantle therapy include, especially lung and cardiac disease but also involve the vessels and the organs in the neck and thorax (such as thyroid, aorta, and esophagus). We presented the case of 66-year-old female admitted for congestive heart failure in radiation-induced heart disease. The patient had undergone to massive radiotherapy 42 years ago for Hodgkin's disease (type 1A). Transesophageal echocardiography was performed unsuccessfully with difficulty because of the rigidity and impedance of esophageal walls. Our case is an extraordinary report of radiotherapy's latency effect as a result of dramatic changes in the structure of mediastinum, in particular in the esophagus, causing unavailability of a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27867461

  14. Future Radiation Damage in Space due to South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Predictions of radiation damage for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites now use semi-empirical models developed from prior satellite data. From these models it is clear that the low field strength of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) controls where the maximum radiation damage occurs. One may make an estimate of future radiation damage to LEO spacecraft if one can predict the future of the SAA. Although reliable maps of the geomagnetic field strength and its secular change have only been made in the last few decades, certain geomagnetic observatories in South America and Africa have recorded the geomagnetic field for a much longer time. These observatories show that the present geomagnetic field change has persisted for more than 100 years. In spite of the fact that a few observatories have shown sudden changes in secular variation, those around the SAA have shown a stable secular variation. Assuming that this will continue for the next 50 to 100 years one can show that the SAA will expand to cover most of the South Atlantic Ocean and will become much weaker. This will greatly intensify the radiation hazard in LEO, put significant new limitations on radiation-hardened hardware, severely restrict the length of time that humans can remain in orbit, and materially change the configuration of the radiation belts.

  15. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. )

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  16. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; ...

    2016-04-26

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. We developed a methodology whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98more » Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the largetrpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. In addition, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.« less

  17. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-04-26

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. We developed a methodology whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the largetrpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. In addition, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.

  18. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Bury, Charles S; McGeehan, John E; Antson, Alfred A; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B; Garman, Elspeth F

    2016-05-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3-25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein-DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.

  19. Radiation damage aspects of the chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J. C.

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power station, about 150km north of Kiev, in the Ukraine. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 × 10 4 man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  20. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  1. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-12-08

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of {gamma}--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD{sub 50} values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  2. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  3. On the Use of SRIM for Computing Radiation Damage Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Was, Gary S.; Certain, Alicia G.; Dwaraknath, S.; Garner, Frank A.

    2013-09-01

    The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons have been made with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made. In particular, it is recommended that when direct comparisons between ion and neutron data are intended, the Kinchin-Pease option of SRIM should be selected.

  4. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  5. Simulation of radiation damage in minerals by sequential ion irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasuga, W. M.; Li, W.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Radiation effects due to α-decay of U and Th and spontaneous fission of 238U control the production and recovery of the radiation-induced structure of minerals, as well as the diffusion of elements through the mineral host. However, details of how the damage microstructure is produced and annealed remain unknown. Our recent ion beam experiments demonstrate that ionizing radiation from the α-particle recovers the damage structure. Thus, the damage structure is not only the result of the thermal hisotry of the sample, but also of the complex interaction between ionizing and ballistic damage mechanisms. By combining ion irradiations with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have simulated the damage produced by α-decay and fission. The α-particle induced annealing has been simulated by in situ TEM observation of consecutive ion-irradiations: i.) 1 MeV Kr2+ (simulating 70 keV α-recoils induced damage), ii.) followed by 400 keV He+ (simulating 4.5 MeV α-particle induced annealing). Thus, in addition to the well-established effects of thermal annealing, the α-particle annealing effects, as evidenced by partical recrystallization of the originally, fully-amorphous apatite upon the α-particle irriadations, should also be considered when evaluating diffusion and release of elements, such as He. In addition, the fission track annealing has been simulated by a new sample preparation method that allows for direct observation of radiation damage recovery at each point along the length of latent tracks created by 80 MeV Xe ions (a typical fission fragment). The initial, rapid reduction in etched track length during isothermal annealing is explained by the rapid annealing of those sections of the track with smaller diameters, as observed directly by in situ TEM. In summary, the atomic-scale investigation of radiation damage in minerals is critical to understanding of the influence of raidation damage on diffusion and kinetics that are fundamental to geochronology.

  6. Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M; Scheele, Randall D; Buck, Edgar C; Icenhower, Jonathan P; Kozelisky, Anne E; Sell, Rachel L; Elovich, Robert J; Buchmiller, William C

    2005-10-15

    Laboratory experiments on titanate ceramics were performed to verify whether certain assumptions are valid regarding the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur as 239Pu decays. Titanate ceramics are the material of choice for the immobilization of surplus weapons-grade Pu. The short-lived isotope, 238Pu, was incorporated into the ceramic formulation to accelerate the effects of radiation induced damage. We report on the effects of this damage on the density (volumetric swelling <6%), crystal structure of pyrochlore-bearing specimens (amorphous after about 21018 α/g), and dissolution (no change from fully the crystalline specimen). Even though the specimens became amorphous during the tests, there was no evidence for microcracking in the photomicrographs from the scanning electron microscope. Thus, although pyrochlore is susceptible to radiation-induced damage, the material remains chemically and physically viable as a material for immobilizing surplus weapons-grade Pu.

  7. Proton radiation damage in vertical junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. H.; Statler, R. L.

    A comparative experimental study of proton radiation damage in silicon vertical junction (VJ) and silicon planar solar cells was performed at three energies, 1-MeV, 2-MeV, and 3.5-MeV, for a normal incidence monoenergetic proton beam. Proton fluence levels up to 3 x 10 to the 12th protons/sq cm were achieved, with solar cell I-V characterization measurements performed at incremental fluences, using a recently calibrated Spectrolab X-25L Solar Simulator. The VJ cells were made from 0.4 ohm-cm silicon, while the planar cells were made from 10 ohm-cm silicon and had a back surface reflector. The VJ cells proved to be more radiation resistant than the baseline planar cells, and the damage data from various proton energies indicate that the vertical junction concept does work effectively for maintaining high collection efficiency despite heavy radiation exposure.

  8. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, F.; /Zurich U.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling.

  9. GUI to Facilitate Research on Biological Damage from Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Frances A.; Ponomarev, Artem Lvovich

    2010-01-01

    A graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer program has been developed to facilitate research on the damage caused by highly energetic particles and photons impinging on living organisms. The program brings together, into one computational workspace, computer codes that have been developed over the years, plus codes that will be developed during the foreseeable future, to address diverse aspects of radiation damage. These include codes that implement radiation-track models, codes for biophysical models of breakage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by radiation, pattern-recognition programs for extracting quantitative information from biological assays, and image-processing programs that aid visualization of DNA breaks. The radiation-track models are based on transport models of interactions of radiation with matter and solution of the Boltzmann transport equation by use of both theoretical and numerical models. The biophysical models of breakage of DNA by radiation include biopolymer coarse-grained and atomistic models of DNA, stochastic- process models of deposition of energy, and Markov-based probabilistic models of placement of double-strand breaks in DNA. The program is designed for use in the NT, 95, 98, 2000, ME, and XP variants of the Windows operating system.

  10. Common Fragile Sites: Genomic Hotspots of DNA Damage and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Qiu, Li; Mrasek, Kristin; Zhang, Jun; Liehr, Thomas; Quintana, Luciana Gonçalves; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, occurs preferentially at specific genomic regions known as common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are evolutionarily conserved and late replicating regions with AT-rich sequences, and CFS instability is correlated with cancer. In the last decade, much progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal instability at CFSs. However, despite tremendous efforts, identifying a cancer-associated CFS gene (CACG) remains a challenge and little is known about the function of CACGs at most CFS loci. Recent studies of FATS (for Fragile-site Associated Tumor Suppressor), a new CACG at FRA10F, reveal an active role of this CACG in regulating DNA damage checkpoints and suppressing tumorigenesis. The identification of FATS may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized CACGs. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of CACGs may be exploited for cancer biomarkers and therapeutic benefits. PMID:23109895

  11. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  12. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  13. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  14. Defective repair of ionizing radiation damage in Cockayne`s syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum group G

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.K.; Leadon, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Damage produced by ultraviolet light (UV) or certain chemical carcinogens is repaired more rapidly in transcriptionally active DNA than in the genome as a whole by an evolutionarily conserved process coupled to transcription and involving preferential repair of transcribed strands. The generality of strand-specific repair for damage other than UV has not been well-established, but it has generally been assumed to involve the nucleotide excision repair pathway for bulky lesions. There is little overlap in the spectrum of lesions induced by ionizing radiation and UV; consistent with the idea that to a large extent, the repair processes for these two types of damage are separable, there are very few mammalian cell mutants that are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of both.

  15. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  16. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  17. Contribution of radiation hybrids to genome mapping in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Faraut, T; de Givry, S; Hitte, C; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Morisson, M; Milan, D; Schiex, T; Servin, B; Vignal, A; Galibert, F; Yerle, M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation hybrid mapping has emerged in the end of the 1990 s as a successful and complementary approach to map genomes, essentially because of its ability to bridge the gaps between genetic and clone-based physical maps, but also using comparative mapping approaches, between 'gene-rich' and 'gene-poor' maps. Since its early development in human, radiation hybrid mapping played a pivotal role in the process of mapping animal genomes, especially mammalian ones. We review here all the different steps involved in radiation hybrid mapping from the constitution of panels to the construction of maps. A description of its contribution to whole genome maps with a special emphasis on domestic animals will also be presented. Finally, current applications of radiation hybrid mapping in the context of whole genome assemblies will be described.

  18. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  19. Radiation damage to 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, A. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Spangler, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    The fluorescent organic compound 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) has been modified by substitution at various positions of the phenyl ring in order to increase its quantum yield. Each derivative has been tested as a dopant in a polystyrene matrix for plastic scintillator applications. The transmittance, fluorescence, scintillation light yield, and radiation damage characteristics of these compounds in polystyrene have been determined. In addition, a comparative study of the HBT derivatives and 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) has been performed. Only samples doped with the 4CNHBT derivative exhibit light yield and radiation resistance similar to those doped with 3HF.

  20. DNA Damage and Repair in Plants under Ultraviolet and Ionizing Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315–400 nm; UV-B, 280–315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm) is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context. PMID:25729769

  1. DNA damage and repair in plants under ultraviolet and ionizing radiations.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sarvajeet S; Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315-400 nm; UV-B, 280-315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm) is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context.

  2. Genome damage in testicular seminoma patients seven years after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Gamulin, Marija; Katic, Jelena; Milic, Mirta; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Grgić, Mislav

    2013-11-01

    Testicular seminoma cancer incidence has significantly increased over the last few decades, and although it is successfully treated by radiotherapy, long-term health risks are still unclear. The aim of the study was to show long-term genome damage in patients with seminoma after radiotherapy. Chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assays seven years after radiotherapy with a total dose of 25 Gy were conducted in 10 testicular seminoma patients aged 23-49 years and results were compared with 10 healthy control subjects matched for age and smoking status. Although mean CA frequency did not deviate from control values, significantly increased frequencies of dicentrics, double minutes, and ring chromosomes were detected in seminoma patients. MN frequency in binuclear lymphocytes of patients was similar to controls (4.60/1000 vs. 5.82/1000, respectively). Significantly higher MN frequency was detected in mononuclear lymphocytes of patients than in controls (2.55/1000 vs. 0.73/1000, respectively). Average percentage of centromere-positive MN was 62.6% in seminoma patients. This study shows the persistence of unstable CA in seminoma patients seven years after radiotherapy and the relevance of long-term follow up. MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes was shown to be relevant biomarker of long-term genome damage.

  3. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  4. DNMTs are required for delayed genome instability caused by radiation

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christine A.; Jones, George D.; Anderson, Rhona; Iyer, Pooja; Narayanan, Deepan; Sandhu, Jatinderpal; Singh, Rajinder; Talbot, Christopher J.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to initiate genomic instability has been harnessed in the clinic where the localized delivery of controlled doses of radiation is used to induce cell death in tumor cells. Though very effective as a therapy, tumor relapse can occur in vivo and its appearance has been attributed to the radio-resistance of cells with stem cell-like features. The molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are unclear but there is evidence suggesting an inverse correlation between radiation-induced genomic instability and global hypomethylation. To further investigate the relationship between DNA hypomethylation, radiosensitivity and genomic stability in stem-like cells we have studied mouse embryonic stem cells containing differing levels of DNA methylation due to the presence or absence of DNA methyltransferases. Unexpectedly, we found that global levels of methylation do not determine radiosensitivity. In particular, radiation-induced delayed genomic instability was observed at the Hprt gene locus only in wild-type cells. Furthermore, absence of Dnmt1 resulted in a 10-fold increase in de novo Hprt mutation rate, which was unaltered by radiation. Our data indicate that functional DNMTs are required for radiation-induced genomic instability, and that individual DNMTs play distinct roles in genome stability. We propose that DNMTS may contribute to the acquirement of radio-resistance in stem-like cells. PMID:22722331

  5. Non-Thermal Electromagnetic Radiation Damage to Lens Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bormusov, Elvira; P.Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-01-01

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5ºC for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat. PMID

  6. Non-thermal electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-05-21

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat.

  7. Radiation damage and radioprotectants: new concepts in the era of molecular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, M I

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation results in mutagenesis and cell death, and the clinical manifestations depend on the dose and the involved body area. Reducing carcinogenesis in patients treated with radiotherapy, exposed to diagnostic radiation or who are in certain professional groups is mandatory. The prevention or treatment of early and late radiotherapy effects would improve quality of life and increase cancer curability by intensifying therapies. Experimental and clinical data have given rise to new concepts and a large pool of chemical and molecular agents that could be effective in the protection and treatment of radiation damage. To date, amifostine is the only drug recommended as an effective radioprotectant. This review identifies five distinct types of radiation damage (I, cellular depletion; II, reactive gene activation; III, tissue disorganisation; IV, stochastic effects; V, bystander effects) and classifies the radioprotective agents into five relevant categories (A, protectants against all types of radiation effects; B, death pathway modulators; C, blockers of inflammation, chemotaxis and autocrine/paracrine pathways; D, antimutagenic keepers of genomic integrity; E, agents that block bystander effects). The necessity of establishing and funding central committees that guide systematic clinical research into evaluating the novel agents revealed in the era of molecular medicine is stressed. PMID:22294702

  8. Radiation-induced thymine base damage in replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Childers, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    The efficiency of radiation-induced production of 5',6'-dihydroxydihydrothymine (t/sup ..gamma../)-type damage was determined in nascent and mature chromatin DNA for the dose range of 50 to 150 krad. These large doses affected neither the total fraction of nuclear DNA in chromatin subunits nor the nucleosome subunit repeat length. The DNA in nascent chromatin, however, was found to be 3.3 times more sensitive than mature chromatin DNA to ..gamma..-ray (/sup 137/Cs)-induced t/sup ..gamma../-type damage, while thymine damage of this type was uniformly distributed in the nucleosomal DNA of mature chromatin (i.e., in the nucleosome core and spacer DNA). The half-time for the transition of nascent DNA sensitivity to mature chromatin DNA sensitivity levels was the same as the half-time at 37/sup 0/C for the maturation of nascent into mature chromatin structure. The rate at which nascent chromatin matured was unaffected by radiation doses as large as 150 krad. The most logical explanation for the greater sensitivity of nascent DNA to radiation is the decreased concentration of histone chromosomal proteins in nascent chromatin.

  9. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  10. Radiation damage in zircon by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Spence, John C. H.

    2009-06-15

    Radiation damage induced by high-energy (200 keV) electron irradiation in zircon has been studied thoroughly using imaging, diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Both structural and compositional changes during the damage were measured using the above techniques in real time. It was found that the damage was mainly caused by the preferential sputtering of O. The loss of O occurred initially within small sporadic regions with dimension of several nanometers, resulting in the direct transformation of zircon into Zr{sub x}Si{sub y}. These isolated patches gradually connect each other and eventually cover the whole area of the electron beam. These differ from the previous observations either in the self-irradiated natural and synthetic zircon or in ion-beam irradiated thin zircon specimen.

  11. Heat Induced Damage Detection by Terahertz (THz) Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Wu, Ziran; Xin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) and sub-terahertz imaging and spectroscopy are becoming increasingly popular nondestructive evaluation techniques for damage detection and characterization of materials. THz radiation is being used for inspecting ceramic foam tiles used in TPS (Thermal Protection System), thick polymer composites and polymer tiles that are not good conductors of ultrasonic waves. Capability of THz electromagnetic waves in detecting heat induced damage in porous materials is investigated in this paper. Porous pumice stone blocks are subjected to long time heat exposures to produce heat induced damage in the block. The dielectric properties extracted from THz TDS (Time Domain Spectroscopy) measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure. Experimental results show noticeable and consistent change in dielectric properties with increasing levels of heat exposure, well before its melting point.

  12. Deoxyribonucleoprotein structure and radiation injury - Cellular radiosensitivity is determined by LET-infinity-dependent DNA damage in hydrated deoxyribonucleoproteins and the extent of its repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.; Peters, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, OH radicals formed in bulk nuclear water were believed to be the major causes of DNA damage that results in cell death, especially for sparsely ionizing radiations. That hypothesis has now been challenged, if not refuted. Lethal genomic DNA damage is determined mainly by energy deposition in deoxyribonucleoproteins, and their hydration shells, and charge (energy) transfer processes within those structures.

  13. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-11-01

    The multiscale approach to the assessment of biodamage resulting upon irradiation of biological media with ions is reviewed, explained and compared to other approaches. The processes of ion propagation in the medium concurrent with ionization and excitation of molecules, transport of secondary products, dynamics of the medium, and biological damage take place on a number of different temporal, spatial and energy scales. The multiscale approach, a physical phenomenon-based analysis of the scenario that leads to radiation damage, has been designed to consider all relevant effects on a variety of scales and develop an approach to the quantitative assessment of biological damage as a result of irradiation with ions. Presently, physical and chemical effects are included in the scenario while the biological effects such as DNA repair are only mentioned. This paper explains the scenario of radiation damage with ions, overviews its major parts, and applies the multiscale approach to different experimental conditions. On the basis of this experience, the recipe for application of the multiscale approach is formulated. The recipe leads to the calculation of relative biological effectiveness.

  14. Radiation damage in BaF[sub 2] crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage and recovery have been studied in BaF[sub 2] crystals exposed to [sup 60]Co radiation. The change in optical transmission and scintillation light output have been measured as a function of dose up to 4.7 [times] 10[sup 6] rad. Although some crystals exhibit a small change in transmission, a greater change in scintillation light output is observed. Several 25 cm long crystals whichhave been irradiated show large changes in both transmission and light output. Recovery from radiation damage has been studied as a function of time and exposure to UV light. A long lived radiation induced phosphorescence has been observed in all irradiated samples which is distinct from the standard fast and slow scintillation emissions. The emission spectrum of the phosphorescence has been measured and shown a peakat [approximately]330 nm, near the region of the slow scintillation component. Results are given on the dependence of the decay time of the phosphorescence with dose.

  15. Radiation damage in BaF{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of radiation damage and recovery have been studied in BaF{sub 2} crystals exposed to {sup 60}Co radiation. The change in optical transmission and scintillation light output have been measured as a function of dose up to 4.7 {times} 10{sup 6} rad. Although some crystals exhibit a small change in transmission, a greater change in scintillation light output is observed. Several 25 cm long crystals whichhave been irradiated show large changes in both transmission and light output. Recovery from radiation damage has been studied as a function of time and exposure to UV light. A long lived radiation induced phosphorescence has been observed in all irradiated samples which is distinct from the standard fast and slow scintillation emissions. The emission spectrum of the phosphorescence has been measured and shown a peakat {approximately}330 nm, near the region of the slow scintillation component. Results are given on the dependence of the decay time of the phosphorescence with dose.

  16. NMR evidence for asymmetric radiation damage of bilayer liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinz, H.; Franck, U.; Schäfer, H.; Hübner, G.

    In aqueous solutions of irradiated sonicated egg yolk lecithin vesicles the 1H relaxation times T1 and T2 were determined for the outer and inner (CH 3) 3N +-groups at 250 MHz and at room temperature. After a γ irradiation up to a dose of 13.5 kGy, T1 remains constant T1=(0.33±0.01)s, T2 is a sensitive parameter in detecting radiation induced changes of slow reorientations for the lipid molecules. While T2=0.10 s for the outer head group signal decreases by 25% after irradiation, the effect is significantly smaller for the inner head group. This preferred radiation damage of the outer lipid layer may be a consequence of the indirect radiation action and/or due to the geometric packing constraints in small vesicles. The spectroscopic results were derived from partially relaxed NMR spectra. This method seems to be useful for the detection of the effects of different agents on the radiation damage of the liposome, as demonstrated with the partially relaxed head group spectra in the presence of NaCl.

  17. Basic aspects of spallation radiation damage to materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C.; Sommer, W.F.

    1995-10-01

    The nature of radiation effects, as learned from investigations using reactor neutron irradiations, is reviewed, and its relevance to spallation radiation damage to materials in accelerator-driven neutron sources is discussed. Property changes upon irradiation are due to (1) displaced atoms, producing vacancy and interstitial defect clusters, which cause radiation hardening and embrittlement; (2) helium production, the helium then forming bubbles, which engenders high-temperature grain-boundary fracture; and (3) transmutations, which means that impurity concentrations are introduced. Methods for analyzing displacement production are related, and recent calculations of displacement cross sections using SPECTER and LAHET are described, with special reference to tungsten, a major candidate for a target material in accelerator-driven neutron systems.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations as a tool for radiation damage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligori, Sebastiano; Riva, Alberto; Mauri, Marco; Corcione, Leonardo; Bortoletto, Favio; Bonoli, Carlotta; Giro, Enrico

    2010-07-01

    One critical aspect in designing a space mission is the assessment of the level of radiation damage to the equipment that one can expect during the course of the mission. The radiation environment in L2 orbit, however, has not been studied as extensively as in the Low Earth Orbit case. Fluka is a Montecarlo software developed by CERN and INFN and extensively used in high energy experimental physics and engineering, shielding, detector and telescope design, and cosmic ray studies. In this paper, we make use of FLUKA to model the geometry of the structures surrounding the detector, in order to analyze the mitigation strategy (i.e.: shielding of the detector assembly) in a well defined case (the Euclid-NIS instrument, which is in its early design phase). By using a realistic cosmic ray spectrum and composition, we analyze the resulting dose of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the Euclid-NIS detectors, and other effects.

  19. Longitudinal information and radiation damage in EM calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1993-02-05

    The SCC radiation field is higher than that encountered by previous hadron collider detectors. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter compartment sees the highest radiation dose. Since an EM calorimeter also makes the most precise energy measurement, special care must be lavished on this part of a calorimeter. Previous studies have concentrated on Monte Carlo examinations of 2 longitudinal compartments within the EM which can alleviate radiation damage. Recently, it was realized that a ``shower maximum`` detector, such as exists in CDF, also contains information of the conversion point of an electromagnetic shower. As such, it can potentially be used in a fashion analogous to the longitudinal compartments, although it is not designed to be optimized for this role.

  20. A computational atomistic model of radiation damage to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Bulent

    A review of past and current biophysical models of DNA damage reveals that current DNA damage models have become increasingly complex in their attempts to model the full 3D structure of the nucleosome and chromatin fiber. As such, many of the finer details of direct, quasi-direct, and indirect action on DNA become difficult to study in isolation. Also, experimental comparisons that seek to validate these models become increasingly difficult to make. A better approach may be to perform the atomistic modeling of direct, indirect, and quasi-direct effects in total isolation from considerations of the macroscopic conformation of the DNA target. This would permit the highly detailed atomistic modeling to be performed only once in order to produce a database of outcome probabilities that can then be used in radiation chemistry modeling of different and more complex conformations of double-stranded DNA. This work is performed to establish the groundwork to accomplish this goal. A system of Monte Carlo computer codes that model radiation damage to DNA at the atomistic level is developed and used to predict the radiation damage to a 167-bp DNA molecule. A database of the OOH attack outcomes is generated for a 167-bp DNA molecule and used in the prediction of radiation-induced damage to DNA. Do (the dose required to create, on average, one single strand break per 167-bp DNA molecule) is calculated to be 69.9 Gy. There are no experimental study found in the literature that studied small DNA molecules like the one used in this study. Nevertheless, the results from this computational study can be compared to experimental studies preformed with larger DNA molecules such as plasmids when DNA concentrations are scaled. The `concentration scaled D0 (ssb)' values from Klimczak et al. [1993] and Tomita et al. [1998] were approximately 65 and 80 Gy, respectively. These experimental results compare favorably with the computational value of 69.9 Gy calculated in this study. With the

  1. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  2. Differential protection by nitroxides and hydroxylamines to radiation-induced and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Sandhya; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Samuni, Ayelet M; Samuni, Amram; DeGraff, William; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B

    2002-11-14

    Modulation of radiation- and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative-induced damage using plasmid DNA, genomic DNA, and cell survival, by three nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines, were examined. The antioxidant property of each compound was independently determined by reacting supercoiled DNA with copper II/1,10-phenanthroline complex fueled by the products of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) and noting the protective effect as assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines protected approximately to the same degree (33-47% relaxed form) when compared to 76.7% relaxed form in the absence of protectors. Likewise, protection by both the nitroxide and corresponding hydroxylamine were observed for Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, when plasmid DNA damage was induced by ionizing radiation (100 Gy), only nitroxides (10 mM) provide protection (32.4-38.5% relaxed form) when compared to radiation alone or in the presence of hydroxylamines (10 mM) (79.8% relaxed form). Nitroxide protection was concentration dependent. Radiation cell survival studies and DNA double-strand break (DBS) assessment (pulse field electrophoresis) showed that only the nitroxide protected or prevented damage, respectively. Collectively, the results show that nitroxides and hydroxylamines protect equally against the damage mediated by oxidants generated by the metal ion-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, but only nitroxides protect against radiation damage, suggesting that nitroxides may more readily react with intermediate radical species produced by radiation than hydroxylamines.

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  4. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gianoncelli, A; Vaccari, L; Kourousias, G; Cassese, D; Bedolla, D E; Kenig, S; Storici, P; Lazzarino, M; Kiskinova, M

    2015-05-14

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies.

  5. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating α-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  6. Accumulation of DNA damage in complex normal tissues after protracted low-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Stefanie; Schuler, Nadine; Lorat, Yvonne; Fan, Li; Kaestner, Lars; Wennemuth, Gunther; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E

    2012-10-01

    The biological consequences of low levels of radiation exposure and their effects on human health are unclear. Ionizing radiation induces a variety of lesions of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most biologically significant, because unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs can lead to genomic instability and cell death. Using repair-proficient mice as an in vivo system we monitored the accumulation of DNA damage in normal tissues exposed to daily low-dose radiation of 100mGy or 10mGy. Radiation-induced foci in differentiated and tissue-specific stem cells were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose radiation and DNA lesions were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with immunogold-labeling. In brain, long-living cortical neurons had a significant accumulation of foci with increasing cumulative doses. In intestine and skin, characterized by constant cell renewal of their epithelial lining, differentiated enterocytes and keratinocytes had either unchanged or only slightly increased foci levels during protracted low-dose radiation. Significantly, analysis of epidermal stem cells in skin revealed a constant increase of 53BP1 foci during the first weeks of low-dose radiation even with 10mGy, suggesting substantial accumulations of DSBs. However, TEM analysis suggests that these remaining 53BP1 foci, which are predominantly located in compact heterochromatin, do not co-localize with phosphorylated Ku70 or DNA-PKcs, core components of non-homologous end-joining. The biological relevance of these persistent 53BP1 foci, particularly their contribution to genomic instability by genetic and epigenetic alterations, has to be defined in future studies.

  7. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Damage in Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Remec, Igor; Giorla, Alain B; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has resulted in a renewed focus on long-term aging of materials at nuclear power plants (NPPs) including concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete (Graves et al., (2014)). Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete (Hilsdorf et al., (1978)) does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure (Kontani et al., (2011)). To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, the Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are working to better understand radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines recent progress toward: 1) assessing the radiation environment in concrete biological shields and defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield for extended operation, and estimating adsorbed dose, 2) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, 3) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete and its components under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish conservative bounds and inform damage models, 4) developing improved models to enhance the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete and 5) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge including developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in data obtained from various concretes and from accelerated irradiation experiments.

  8. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  9. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties.

  10. Electron Radiation Damage of (alga) As-gaas Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R.

    1979-01-01

    Solar cells (2 cm by 2 cm (AlGa) As-GaAs cells) were fabricated and then subjected to irradiation at normal incidence by electrons. The influence of junction depth and n-type buffer layer doping level on the cell's resistance to radiation damage was investigated. The study shows that (1) a 0.3 micrometer deep junction results in lower damage to the cells than does a 0.5 micrometer junction, and (2) lowering the n buffer layer doping density does not improve the radiation resistance of the cell. Rather, lowering the doping density decreases the solar cell's open circuit voltage. Some preliminary thermal annealing experiments in vacuum were performed on the (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells damaged by 1-MeV electron irradiation. The results show that cell performance can be expected to partially recover at 200 C with more rapid and complete recovery occurring at higher temperature. For a 0.5hr anneal at 400 C, 90% of the initial power is recovered. The characteristics of the (AlGa)As-GaAs cells both before and after irradiation are described.

  11. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  12. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  13. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  14. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  15. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; ...

    2014-11-26

    According to modern theory, damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensional glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, are absorbed mainly by grain boundaries and dislocations, creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that the addition of certain alloying elements influences many radiation effects, including swelling; however, the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this study, we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling study of SIA clusters mobility in body-centered cubic Fe–Ni alloys. We have foundmore » that Ni interacts strongly with the periphery of clusters, affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by the number of Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant, even in low-Ni alloys. Thus a 1 nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500 K in the Fe–0.8 at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhances cluster immobilization. Finally, this effect should have quite broad consequences in void swelling, matrix damage accumulation and radiation induced hardening and the results obtained help to better understand and predict the effects of radiation in Fe–Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  16. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  17. Radiation damage and derivatization in macromolecular crystallography: a structure factor’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Sherrell, Darren A.

    2016-01-01

    During, or even after, data collection the presence and effects of radiation damage in macromolecular crystallography may not always be immediately obvious. Despite this, radiation damage is almost always present, with site-specific damage occurring on very short time (dose) scales well before global damage becomes apparent. A result of both site-specific radiation damage and derivatization is a change in the relative intensity of reflections. The size and approximate rate of onset of X-ray-induced transformations is compared with the changes expected from derivatization, and strategies for minimizing radiation damage are discussed. PMID:26960125

  18. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  19. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  20. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

  1. Absolute Measurements of Radiation Damage in Nanometer Thick Films

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of absolute measurements of radiation damage in films of nanometer thicknesses. Thin films of DNA (~ 2–160nm) are deposited onto glass substrates and irradiated with varying doses of 1.5 keV X-rays under dry N2 at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For each different thickness, the damage is assessed by measuring the loss of the supercoiled configuration as a function of incident photon fluence. From the exposure curves, the G-values are deduced, assuming that X-ray photons interacting with DNA, deposit all of their energy in the film. The results show that the G-value (i.e., damage per unit of deposited energy) increases with film thickness and reaches a plateau at 30±5 nm. This thickness dependence provides a correction factor to estimate the actual G-value for films with thicknesses below 30nm thickness. Thus, the absolute values of damage can be compared with that of films of any thickness under different experimental conditions. PMID:22562941

  2. Influence of radiation damage on ruby as a pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, B.; Weikusat, C.; Miletich, R.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R.; Fujara, F.

    2010-11-01

    This study tackles the question if ruby crystals, irradiated with energetic heavy ions, can still be used as reliable pressure sensors. The problem is linked to novel irradiation experiments, exposing pressurized samples to swift heavy-ion beams. In order to test and quantify a possible influence of radiation damage on the laser-induced fluorescence lines of ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}), small crystals were exposed to different heavy ions (Xe, Au, and U) with kinetic energies of several giga-electron volt at ambient as well as high-pressure conditions. With increasing fluence (ions/cm{sup 2}), the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines shift both to lower wavelengths which leads to an underestimation of the pressure. An empirical correction term {epsilon} is proposed to include the irradiation damage effect into the commonly employed ruby calibration scale.

  3. A Mathematical Model for Estimating Biological Damage Caused by Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Ichikawa, Kento; Bando, Masako

    2012-10-01

    We propose a mathematical model for estimating biological damage caused by low-dose irradiation. We understand that the linear non threshold (LNT) hypothesis is realized only in the case of no recovery effects. In order to treat the realistic living objects, our model takes into account various types of recovery as well as proliferation mechanism, which may change the resultant damage, especially for the case of lower dose rate irradiation. It turns out that the lower the radiation dose rate, the safer the irradiated system of living object (which is called symbolically ``tissue'' hereafter) can have chances to survive, which can reproduce the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF).

  4. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival.

  5. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  6. Regrowth of radiation-damaged layers in natural diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Sandhu, G. S.; Parikh, N. R.; Swanson, M. L.; Chu, W.-K.

    1990-01-01

    The regrowth of radiation-damaged layers created by carbon ion implantation in natural diamond was investigated by the Rutherford backscattering/channeling technique and by optical absorption. We present the first results of rapid thermal annealing of the implanted samples directly from the 77 K implantation temperature to 1100° C as well as data for isochronal annealing. We found that isochronal annealing up to 900° C was more effective than rapid thermal annealing for amorphized samples. The critical dose for amorphization of diamond was between 1.65 × 10 15 and 3 × 10 15 cm -2 for 200 keV carbon ion implantation at 77 K.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  8. Readout techniques and radiation damage of undoped cesium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.L.; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Skwarnicki, T.; Sobolewski, Z.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Souder, P.; Anderson, D.F.; Syracuse Univ., NY . Dept. of Physics; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-01-01

    Several readout techniques for undoped CsI have been studied which utilize the fast scintillation component for speed, and the high photon yield for good energy resolution. Quantum yields have been measured for samples up to 30 cm in length using photomultiplier tubes, wavelength shifters, and silicon photodiodes. A study has also been made of the scintillation properties of undoped CsI. It is found that the light output and decay time of the 310 nm fast component increases and the emission spectrum shifts to longer wavelengths at lower temperatures. The effects on the optical transmission and scintillation light output due to radiation damage from {sup 60}Co gamma rays has been measured for doses up to {approximately}10{sup 6} rad. It is found that the radiation resistance of undoped CsI is substantially higher than has been reported for thallium doped CsI. 16 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2008-01-15

    Specimens of titanate ceramics containing approximately 10 mass% 238Pu were tested to determine the long-term effects of radiation-induced damage from the α decay of 239Pu that would have been disposed of in the nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. These tests provided information on the changes in bulk properties such as dimensions, densities, and chemical durability. Although these materials become amorphous at low doses, the specimens remained physically strong. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, in combination with results reported previously on similar materials, the material remains a physically viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

  10. Medicinal protection with Chinese herb-compound against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.J.; Qian, J.K.; Yang, G.H.; Wang, B.Z.; Wen, X.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Experiments were carried out on mice and the subjects irradiated for cancer therapy to evaluate the protective efficacy of a Chinese medicinal herb-compound (CMHC). The lethality and the degree of leucopenia caused by radiation in mice medicated with CMHC were significantly less in comparison with control mice (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). CMHC significantly improved the WBC and the thrombocytes in irradiated workers (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). The WBC count of 40 patients under radiotherapy while treated with CMHC recovered from 3450 +/- 77/c.mm to 5425 +/- 264/c.mm (p less than 0.001); whereas, in the control group, without any medication, the WBC count dropped significantly (p less than 0.001). Our results revealed the applicabilities of CMHC in protection against radiation damage in spaceflight and in other fields.

  11. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC{sub 0.88} in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V{sub 8}C{sub 7} superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  12. Radiation Damage Effects in Far Ultraviolet Filters and Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keffer, Charles E.; Torr, Marsha R.; Zukic, Muamer; Spann, James F.; Torr, Douglas G.; Kim, Jongmin

    1993-01-01

    New advances in VUV thin film filter technology have been made using filter designs with multilayers of materials such as Al2O3, BaF2, CaF2, HfO2, LaF3, MgF2, and SiO2. Our immediate application for these filters will be in an imaging system to be flown on a satellite where a 2 X 9 R(sub E) orbit will expose the instrument to approximately 275 krads of radiation. In view of the fact that no previous studies have been made on potential radiation damage of these materials in the thin film format, we report on such an assessment here. Transmittances and reflectances of BaF2, CaF2, HfO2, LaF3, MgF2, and SiO2 thin films on MgF2 substrates, Al2O3 thin films on fused silica substrates, uncoated fused silica and MgF2, and four multilayer filters made from these materials were measured from 120 nm to 180 nm before and after irradiation by 250 krads from a Co-60 gamma radiation source. No radiation-induced losses in transmittance or reflectance occurred in this wavelength range. Additional postradiation measurements from 160 nm to 300 nm indicated a 3 - 5% radiation-induced absorption near 260 nm in some of the samples with MgF2 substrates. From these measurements it is concluded that far ultraviolet filters made from the materials tested should experience less that 5% change from exposure to up to 250 krads of high energy radiation in space applications.

  13. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  14. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage. PMID:26698068

  15. Genetic damage in subjects exposed to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Despite many research efforts and public debate there is still great concern about the possible adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on human health. This is especially due to the enormous increase of wireless mobile telephones and other telecommunication devices throughout the world. The possible genetic effects of mobile phone radiation and other sources of radiofrequencies constitute one of the major points of concern. In the past several review papers were published on laboratory investigations that were devoted to in vitro and in vivo animal (cyto)genetic studies. However, it may be assumed that some of the most important observations are those obtained from studies with individuals that were exposed to relatively high levels of radiofrequency radiation, either as a result of their occupational activity or as frequent users of radiofrequency emitting tools. In this paper the cytogenetic biomonitoring studies of RF-exposed humans are reviewed. A majority of these studies do show that RF-exposed individuals have increased frequencies of genetic damage (e.g., chromosomal aberrations) in their lymphocytes or exfoliated buccal cells. However, most of the studies, if not all, have a number of shortcomings that actually prevents any firm conclusion. Radiation dosimetry was lacking in all papers, but some of the investigations were flawed by much more severe imperfections. Large well-coordinated multidisciplinary investigations are needed in order to reach any robust conclusion.

  16. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  17. Genomic Instability Induced by High and Low Let Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Kaplan, M. I.; Hartmann, A.; Morgan, W. F.

    Genomic instability is the increased rate of acquisition of alterations in the mammalian genome, and includes such diverse biological endpoints as chromosomal destabilization, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, sister chromatid exchange, gene mutation and amplification, variations in colony size, reduced plating efficiency, and cellular transformation. Because these multiple endpoints persist long after initial radiation exposure, genomic instability has been proposed to operate as a driving force contributing to genetic plasticity and carcinogenic potential. Many of these radiation-induced endpoints depend qualitatively and quantitatively on genetic background, dose and LET. Differences in the frequency and temporal expression of chromosomal instability depend on all three of the foregoing factors. On the other hand, many of these endpoints appear independent of dose and show bystander effects, implicating non-nuclear targets and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. The present work will survey results concerning the LET dependence of genomic instability and the role of epigenetic mechanisms, with a particular emphasis on the endpoint of chromosomal in tability

  18. Melanocortin 1 receptor genotype: an important determinant of the damage response of melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Leachman, Sancy; Kavanagh, Renny J.; Swope, Viki; Cassidy, Pamela; Supp, Dorothy; Sartor, Maureen; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Koshoffer, Amy; Boissy, Raymond E.; Manga, Prashiela; Sturm, Richard A.; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A.

    2010-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene is a main determinant of human pigmentation, and a melanoma susceptibility gene, because its variants that are strongly associated with red hair color increase melanoma risk. To test experimentally the association between melanocortin 1 receptor genotype and melanoma susceptibility, we compared the responses of primary human melanocyte cultures naturally expressing different melanocortin 1 receptor variants to α-melanocortin and ultraviolet radiation. We found that expression of 2 red hair variants abolished the response to α-melanocortin and its photoprotective effects, evidenced by lack of functional coupling of the receptor, and absence of reduction in ultraviolet radiation-induced hydrogen peroxide generation or enhancement of repair of DNA photoproducts, respectively. These variants had different heterozygous effects on receptor function. Microarray data confirmed the observed differences in responses of melanocytes with functional vs. nonfunctional receptor to α-melanocortin and ultraviolet radiation, and identified DNA repair and antioxidant genes that are modulated by α-melanocortin. Our findings highlight the molecular mechanisms by which the melanocortin 1 receptor genotype controls genomic stability of and the mutagenic effect of ultraviolet radiation on human melanocytes.—Kadekaro, A. L., Leachman, S., Kavanagh, R. J., Swope, V., Cassidy, P., Supp, D., Sartor, M., Schwemberger, S., Babcock, G., Wakamatsu, K., Ito, S., Koshoffer, A., Boissy, R. E., Manga, P., Sturm, R. A., Abdel-Malek, Z. A. Melanocortin 1 receptor genotype: an important determinant of the damage response of melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:20519635

  19. Biomolecular damage induced by ionizing radiation: the direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons on DNA.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  20. Biomolecular Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Low-Energy Electrons on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  1. Metals Far From Equilibrium: From Shocks to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Wirth, B D; Caturla, M J; Stolken, J; Kalantar, D

    2002-06-22

    Shock waves and high-energy particle radiation can each drive materials far from thermodynamic equilibrium and enable novel scenarios in the processing of materials. A large number of theoretical and experimental studies of shock deformation have been performed on polycrystalline materials, but shock deformation in single crystals has only recently been studied in some detail. We present Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the shock response of single crystal copper, modeled using an embedded atom potential that reproduces both defect formation and high pressure behavior. Shock-induced plasticity will also be discussed. Predicting the in-service response of ferritic alloys in future fusion energy environments requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution in harsh radiation environments, which include a high level of He generation concurrent with primary damage production. The second half of this paper describes results of atomistic MD and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the role of He on point defect cluster behavior and damage accumulation in bcc Fe. The goal of these simulations is to study the mechanisms responsible for the formation of vacancy-He clusters which serve as He bubble and void nuclei in fusion reactor materials.

  2. Grad-Level Radiation Damage of SIO2 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Atoian, G.; Ludewig, H; White, S; O'Conor, J; Mokhov, N.V.

    2009-05-04

    Radiation effects and levels to detectors. SiO{sub 2} quartz fibers of the LHC ATLAS Zero-degree Calorimeter (ZDC) anticipated to experience integrated doses of a few Grad at their closest position were exposed to 200 MeV protons and neutrons at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Linac. Specifically, 1 mm- and 2mm-diameter quartz (GE 124) rods were exposed to direct 200 MeV protons during the first phase of exposure leading to peak integrated dose of {approx}28 Grad. Exposure to a primarily neutron flux of 1mm-diameter SiO{sub 2} fibers was also achieved with a special neutron source arrangement. In a post-irradiation analysis the quartz fiber transmittance was evaluated as a function of the absorbed dose. Dramatic degradation of the transmittance property was observed with increased radiation damage. In addition, detailed evaluation of the fibers under the microscope revealed interesting micro-structural damage features and irradiation-induced defects.

  3. Radiation damage of biomolecules (RADAM) database development: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denifl, S.; Garcia, G.; Huber, B. A.; Marinković, B. P.; Mason, N.; Postler, J.; Rabus, H.; Rixon, G.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Suraud, E.; Yakubovich, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. However, as the underlying dependent physical, chemical and biological processes are too complex to treat them on a purely analytical level, most of our current and future understanding will rely on computer simulations, based on mathematical equations, algorithms and last, but not least, on the available atomic and molecular data. The viability of the simulated output and the success of any computer simulation will be determined by these data, which are treated as the input variables in each computer simulation performed. The radiation research community lacks a complete database for the cross sections of all the different processes involved in ion beam induced damage: ionization and excitation cross sections for ions with liquid water and biological molecules, all the possible electron - medium interactions, dielectric response data, electron attachment to biomolecules etc. In this paper we discuss current progress in the creation of such a database, outline the roadmap of the project and review plans for the exploitation of such a database in future simulations.

  4. Prognostic value of genomic damage in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Juan, C; Iniesta, P; Vega, F J; Peinado, M A; Fernandez, C; Caldés, T; Massa, M J; López, J A; Sánchez, A; Torres, A J; Balibrea, J L; Benito, M

    1998-06-01

    Genomic alterations have been analysed in 65 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue samples by using the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR), which is a PCR-based genomic fingerprinting. We have shown that AP-PCR may be applied as a useful and feasible practical method for detection of the genomic alterations that accompany malignancy in NSCLC. Genomic changes detected by us consisted of: allelic losses or gains in anonymous DNA sequences, homozygously deleted DNA sequences and polymorphic DNA sequences. According to these genomic changes, lung tumours evaluated in the present study have been scored into three groups: low, moderate and high genomic damage tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genomic damage on patient survival. Survival analysis was carried out in 51 NSCLC patients. Our results revealed that high genomic damage patients showed a poorer prognosis than those with low or moderate genomic damage (P = 0.038). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that patients with higher genomic alterations displayed an adjusted-by-stage risk ratio 4.26 times higher than the remaining patients (95% CI = 1.03-17.54). We can conclude that genomic damage has an independent prognostic value of poor clinical evolution in NSCLC.

  5. Radiation-Induced Damage to Nucleic Acid Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heasook

    The objective of this research was to identify the primary free radical species produced by ionizing radiation in DNA. The ultimate goal would be to use these data obtained from model compounds to analyze radiation-induced damage in DNA itself. The different single crystals were studied in detail. The first was the sodium salt of guanosine-3 ^':5^' -cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP). The results of studies on crystals irradiated at 4.2^ circK distinguished two species. One of these species exhibited a non-exchangeable proton coupling that was characterized by ENDOR spectroscopy and shown to be sigma proton. The spin density on C8 was deduced from the ENDOR hyperfine coupling tensor and found to be 0.15. The second species also exhibited a non-exchangeable sigma proton coupling and a beta proton coupling. The spin densities on C8 and N9 were deduced from ENDOR measurements to be 0.09 and 0.36. The former is attributed to the oxidation product and the latter to the primary reduction product. These products are respectively the guanine cation and anion. The second single crystal studied was a sodium salt of 2^'-deoxyguanosine -5^'-monophosphate tetrahydrate. The ESR and ENDOR spectra obtained from this crystal after x-irradiation at 4.2^circK were complex and the paramagnetic species were tentatively identified as ionic species. The third DNA model compound studied was thymidine. Single crystal of thymidine were irradiated at 1.6^ circK and at 4.2^circ K. The lower temperature preserved a more primitive stage of the radiation damage process. ENDOR measurements distinguished three paramagnetic species. The most interesting component of the paramagnetic absorption in crystals irradiated at 1.6^circK is attributed to trapped electron. These electrons are stabilized by the electrostatic fields generated by hydroxy dipoles. The hyperfine couplings between the trapped electron and the proton of these polar groups were deduced from ENDOR measurements. The ESR and ENDOR

  6. Mapping the human genome by using {open_quotes}whole genome{close_quotes} radiation hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    An important goal of the Human Genome Project is to construct a map of the human genome at an average resolution of 100 kilobases (kb), which should provide the scientific community with a valuable resource for the localization an isolation of any human DNA sequence of interest. In an effort to complete this map by the projected date of 1998, we have constructed two sets of {open_quotes}whole genome{close_quotes} radiation hybrids. The first set of 83 hamster-human somatic cell hybrids contains human DNA fragments approximately 5 million base pairs in length. Each individual hybrid cell line contains approximately one fifth of the entire human genome. Our mapping results indicate that these whole genome radiation hybrids represent an important resource for constructing the 100 kb map in a timely and cost-effective fashion.

  7. Radiation Damage in Indium-Antimonide by Alpha Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tonder, Barend Johannes Ernst

    The development and annealing of radiation damage in InSb, caused by helium ions, were examined using mainly Rutherford backscattering analysis with channeling. Transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy were also done on some samples after implantation. Damage caused by the analysing beam in InSb--about an order of magnitude more than in GaAs--complicates ion beam analysis. InSb was implanted with 50 keV He^ {+} up to a dose of 10^ {17} ions/cm^2, at temperatures from 77 K to 525 K and rates varying from 2,2 times 10^{13 } to 2,6 times 10 ^{14} ions.cm^{ -2}.s^{-1}. Three different temperature regimes in the development of radiation damage in InSb, can be distinguished after implantation of helium ions: (i) Complete amorphization after high dose, low temperature implantations. (ii) The development of extensive defect complexes, mainly dislocation loops, at intermediate temperatures. (iii) The absence of defect complexes at higher implantation temperatures and low dose rates. No bubbles or large voids--often found after heavier ion implantations--could be observed near the surface. The presence of helium in InSb--in contrast to GaP and metals --does not seem to be an important factor in the development of damage structures. Amorphous InSb started to anneal from the inside of the material, beyond the damage range. The thickness of the regrown crystalline layer increased, while the amount of dechanneling in the layer decreased, at higher temperatures. Only incomplete annealing of the crystal, implanted near room temperature, could be accomplished by isochronous heating up to the melting temperature. Roughly equivalent annealing is found after the crystal is subjected to a pulsed electron beam with a relatively low energy density (~ 0,08 J/cm^2). The results can be explained by considering the density of vacancies after the initial recombination of close Frenkel pairs. While the development of dislocation loops is prevented at low dose rates

  8. Radiation damage of hollandite in multiphase ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Braeden M.; Tumurgoti, Priyatham; Sundaram, S. K.; Amoroso, Jake W.; Marra, James C.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Tang, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Radiation damage was simulated in multiphase titanate-based ceramic waste forms using an ion accelerator to generate high energy alpha particles (He+) and an ion implanter to generate 7 MeV gold (Au3+) particles. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the damaged surfaces and nearby regions. Simulated multiphase ceramic waste forms were prepared using two processing methods: spark plasma sintering and melt-processing. Both processing methods produced ceramics with similar phase assemblages consisting of hollandite-, zirconolite/pyrochlore-, and perovskite-type phases. The measured heavy ion (Au3+) penetration depth was less in spark plasma sintered samples than in melt-processed samples. Structural breakdown of the hollandite phase occurred under He+ irradiation indicated by the presence of x-ray diffraction peaks belonging to TiO2, BaTiO5, and other hollandite related phases (Ba2Ti9O20). The composition of the constituent hollandite phase affected the extent of damage induced by Au3+ ions.

  9. Radiation damage in biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter L; Johnson, Phillip S; Liu, Xiaosong; Chin, An-Li; Himpsel, F J

    2009-12-07

    A significant obstacle to organic photovoltaics is radiation damage, either directly by photochemical reactions or indirectly via hot electrons. Such effects are investigated for biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells (phthalocyanines) and for a biological analog (the charge transfer protein cytochrome c). Both feature a central transition metal atom (or H(2)) surrounded by nitrogen atoms. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy are used to identify three types of radiation-induced changes in the electronic structure of these molecules. (1) The peptide bonds along the backbone of the protein are readily broken, while the nitrogen cage remains rather stable in phthalocyanines. This finding suggests minimizing peptide attachments to biologically inspired molecules for photovoltaic applications. (2) The metal atom in the protein changes its 3d electron configuration under irradiation. (3) The Fermi level E(F) shifts relative to the band gap in phthalocyanine films due to radiation-induced gap states. This effect has little influence on the optical absorption, but it changes the lineup between the energy levels of the absorbing dye and the acceptor/donor electrodes that collect the charge carriers in a solar cell.

  10. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  12. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sangyong; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-11-29

    The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans IMPORTANCE: Although there are no natural environments under intense radiation, some living organisms

  13. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the Tilapia genome as a reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), short insertions and deletions (indels), inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0, and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4, and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710, and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra, respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. PMID:24917883

  14. Genome of the Extremely Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans Viewed from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Aravind, L.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Tatusov, Roman L.; Minton, Kenneth W.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans shows remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, desiccation, UV radiation, oxidizing agents, and electrophilic mutagens. D. radiodurans is best known for its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation; not only can it grow continuously in the presence of chronic radiation (6 kilorads/h), but also it can survive acute exposures to gamma radiation exceeding 1,500 kilorads without dying or undergoing induced mutation. These characteristics were the impetus for sequencing the genome of D. radiodurans and the ongoing development of its use for bioremediation of radioactive wastes. Although it is known that these multiple resistance phenotypes stem from efficient DNA repair processes, the mechanisms underlying these extraordinary repair capabilities remain poorly understood. In this work we present an extensive comparative sequence analysis of the Deinococcus genome. Deinococcus is the first representative with a completely sequenced genome from a distinct bacterial lineage of extremophiles, the Thermus-Deinococcus group. Phylogenetic tree analysis, combined with the identification of several synapomorphies between Thermus and Deinococcus, supports the hypothesis that it is an ancient group with no clear affinities to any of the other known bacterial lineages. Distinctive features of the Deinococcus genome as well as features shared with other free-living bacteria were revealed by comparison of its proteome to the collection of clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. Analysis of paralogs in Deinococcus has revealed several unique protein families. In addition, specific expansions of several other families including phosphatases, proteases, acyltransferases, and Nudix family pyrophosphohydrolases were detected. Genes that potentially affect DNA repair and recombination and stress responses were investigated in detail. Some proteins appear to have been horizontally transferred from eukaryotes and are

  15. XAFS studies of radiation damage in nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, Daniel Thomas

    The growing demand for nuclear energy places a high importance on the development of new materials capable of withstanding higher temperatures and harsher irradiation conditions than those used in existing reactors. By supporting the development of next generation reactors it also becomes possible to close the nuclear fuel cycle, greatly reducing the amount of waste sent for disposal in deep geologic repositories, where its interaction with the environment is also a matter of interest. In this thesis, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is used to investigate the local atomic structure of systems of interest to nuclear energy. First, two XAFS studies on environmental materials are presented. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was treated with iron to improve its water remediation properties, specifically with respect to arsenic. XAFS was used to determine the nature of iron coating on the GAC surface, and the method of arsenic bonding to the treated surface. Next, a neodymium precipitate from solubility studies carried out for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was analyzed. Neodymium was used as an analog for plutonium in brine solutions. XAFS fitting indicated that the neodymium substituted for calcium in a gypsum lattice, providing information useful for future geochemical modeling. XAFS was also used to study radiation damage in materials. A candidate material for advanced reactor structural materials, modified 9Cr--1Mo, was irradiated to 1, 4, and 10 displacements per atom (dpa). XAFS analyses were performed on the Fe, Mo, and Nb K-edges. Irradiation caused a reduction in coordination for all three elements, but the exact behavior was element specific. Damage around Fe atoms was linear with dose, while damage around Mo atoms saturated at or before 1 dpa. XAFS was shown to provide a useful atomic level description of radiation damage for a complex alloy system. Finally, zirconium carbide and zirconium nitride, candidate materials for advanced

  16. Recovery of microorganisms from potentially lethal radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, Joseph; Lucht, Lisa; Blank, Greg

    1995-02-01

    Dose response curves for inactivation of microorganisms are central in the design of any process intending to use irradiation for the improvement of the microbiological quality of any treated materials, be it food or medical supplies. Under some conditions a fraction of irradiated microorganisms is able to recover from a potentially lethal dose. This recovery phenomenon must be considered in determining the efficacy of irradiation in microbial inactivation. In this work the recovery phenomenon was examined in eleven species of microorganisms. Variables examined included dose, radiation type, post-irradiation holding temperature, and nutritient medium used to culture the organism. Kinetics of damage repair and fixation were also examined. Results indicate that, for certain species of microorganisms, recovery can significantly lower the killing efficacy of irradiation.

  17. Radiation damage/activity calculation for CSNS target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Liang, T. J.; Yu, Q. Z.; Jia, X. J.

    2010-03-01

    The radiation damages have been performed for Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) target center components that relies on Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX. During the calculation, Bertini intranuclear cascade model, three level-density formulation GCCI, and multistage pre-equilibrium model MPM on which are provided within MCNPX are employed. We calculate the displacement per atom (DPA) and afterheat of the tungsten target, the stainless steel target vessel window and the aluminum alloy moderator vessel. As a hundred kW-level source, these spallation center components have the lifetime more than 5 year. We also give the activity for the T0 chopper of the beam line HIPD to get the primary data for making out a maintenance scenario.

  18. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN TUNGSTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-04-16

    We used our recently developed lattice-based object kinetic Monte Carlo code; KSOME [1] to carryout simulations of radiation damage in bulk tungsten at temperatures of 300, and 2050 K for various dose rates. Displacement cascades generated from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for PKA energies at 60, 75 and 100 keV provided residual point defect distributions. It was found that the number density of vacancies in the simulation box does not change with dose rate while the number density of vacancy clusters slightly decreases with dose rate indicating that bigger clusters are formed at larger dose rates. At 300 K, although the average vacancy cluster size increases slightly, the vast majority of vacancies exist as mono-vacancies. At 2050 K no accumulation of defects was observed during irradiation over a wide range of dose rates for all PKA energies studied in this work.

  19. Radiation Damage Studies for Silicon Sensors for the XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrey, H.

    2012-12-01

    For the study of radiation damage of silicon sensors by 12 keV X-rays for doses up to 1 GGy an irradiation facility has been set up at HASYLAB at DESY. Test structures (gate-controlled diodes) have been irradiated and the properties of the Si-SiO2 interface under high irradiation have been studied using I/V, C/V, and TDRC measurements. In addition to a strong increase of the interface current and a large shift of the flat-band voltage, strong hysteresis effects have been found. The data can be qualitatively described by a model which includes interface traps, fixed and mobile oxide charges. It is found that above doses of several MGy the density of interface traps decreases, whereas the density of fixed and mobile oxide charges appears to saturate. The origin of these effects is not understood so far.

  20. Radiation Damage Studies for Silicon Sensors for the XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrey, H.

    For the study of radiation damage of silicon sensors by 12 keV X-rays for doses up to 1 GGy an irradiation facility has been set up at HASYLAB at DESY. Test structures (gate-controlled diodes) have been irradiated and the properties of the Si-SiO2 interface under high irradiation have been studied using I/V, C/V, and TDRC measurements. In addition to a strong increase of the interface current and a large shift of the flat-band voltage, strong hysteresis effects have been found. The data can be qualitatively described by a model which includes interface traps, fixed and mobile oxide charges. It is found that above doses of several MGy the density of interface traps decreases, whereas the density of fixed and mobile oxide charges appears to saturate. The origin of these effects is not understood so far.

  1. Development of resistant materials to beam impact and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Akira; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hara, Nobuyoshi; Akao, Noboru; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Materials that have strong resistance to both beam impact (or shock-wave) and radiation damage are required for the beam target of an intense accelerator and space applications. Recently, Futakawa et al. found in their experiments that Kolsterising specimens have a stronger resistance to pitting than SS316 CW. A similar effect can be expected for other hardening treatments, and new material development is hopeful. Accordingly, we have started the development of high-performance materials by organizing the project team from KEK, JAEA and universities. In this paper, the scope of the project is introduced. Recent topics involve the development of intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless-steel, AlN-TiN ceramics and cladding techniques of thin tantalum or CrN film on a tungsten target by means of a molten-salt method and ion-beam-enhanced deposition. New observations on corrosion resistance are presented.

  2. Radiation Damage on Multiple Length Scales in Uranium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mahima

    Radiation damage in UO2 has been well studied but there exists little correlation between point defect accumulation, lattice structure changes and microstructure. This is partly because irradiated nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and its defect chemistry is extremely complicated resulting from fission of the material and consequent fission products being embedded in the fuel matrix [Olander1976]. To adequately study the evolution of defects from point defects through to microstructure features, the resulting defects have to be intentionally simplified for characterization. Ion accelerators have the unique capability of creating simple microstructure features using specific ions, without the added complication of fission and neutron activation from nuclear reactors. As an example, H+ ions have been used to create (only) a distribution of dislocations that were studied using various techniques. The ability to tune the energy or type of the ion to achieve desirable implantation depth and ideally simple microstructure renders it a lucrative instrument for this type of analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been utilized to study extended structure changes and microstructure evolution. Ion beam irradiations create displacements and displacement networks, voids, surface fracturing, gas bubbles and several other microstructure changes to model nuclear reactor damage [Noris1972]. Using an ion accelerator, it has been possible to isolate these radiation induced defects and study their subsequent evolution with increasing dose. Insofar, since all of the phenomena caused by radiation damage originate from point defects, the elucidation of radiation effects on the atomic scale is crucial. This is rendered complicated due to aperiodic irradiation defects. This lack of periodicity renders standard approaches, such as TEM and XRD ineffective, as these methods probe average structure over tens of Angstroms. Therefore, techniques

  3. Radiation Damage Studies with Hadrons on Materials and Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J

    2004-07-01

    Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) where the accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and {gamma}'s over their life[1]. Examples are NdFeB magnets considered for the damping rings and final focus, electronic and electro-optical devices to be utilized in detector readout and accelerator controls and CCDs required for the vertex detector. Effects of {gamma}'s on many materials have been presented[2] and our understanding of the situation for rare earth permanent magnets at PAC2003[3]. Here we give first measurements of the fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) together with the induced radioactivities. Damage appears to be proportional to the distances between the operating point and H{sub ci}.

  4. Characterization and modeling of radiation damages via internal radiative efficiency in multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kim, Changsu; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Chen, Shaoqiang; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    In order to understand the radiation effects in space-used multi-junction solar cells, we characterized degradations of internal radiative efficiency (ηint i ) in respective subcells in InGaP/GaAs double-junction solar cells after 1-MeV electron irradiations with different electrons fluences (Φ) via absolute electroluminescence (EL) measurements, because ηint i purely represents material-quality change due to radiation damage, independently from cell structures. We analyzed the degradation of ηint i under different Φ and found that the data of ηint i versus Φ in moderate and high Φ regions are very similar and almost independent of subcell materials, while the difference in beginning-of-life qualities of InGaP and GaAs materials causes dominant difference in sub-cell sensitivity to the low radiation damages. Finally, a simple model was proposed to explain the mechanism in degradation of ηint i, and also well explained the degradation behavior in open-circuit voltage for these multi-junction solar cells.

  5. Terahertz radiation at 0.380 THz and 2.520 THz does not lead to DNA damage in skin cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hintzsche, Henning; Jastrow, Christian; Heinen, Bernd; Baaske, Kai; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schwerdtfeger, Michael; Shakfa, Mohammed Khaled; Kärst, Uwe; Koch, Martin; Schrader, Thorsten; Stopper, Helga

    2013-01-01

    The question whether nonionizing electromagnetic radiation of low intensity can cause functional effects in biological systems has been a subject of debate for a long time. Whereas the majority of the studies have not demonstrated these effects, some aspects still remain unclear, e.g., whether high-frequency radiation in the terahertz range affects biological systems. In particular for frequencies higher than 0.150 THz, investigations of the ability of radiation to cause genomic damage have not been performed. In the present study, human skin cells were exposed in vitro to terahertz radiation at two specific frequencies: 0.380 and 2.520 THz. Power intensities ranged from 0.03-0.9 mW/cm(2) and the cells were exposed for 2 and 8 h. Our goal was to investigate whether the irradiation induced genomic damage in the cells. Chromosomal damage was not detected in the different cell types after exposure to radiation of both frequencies. In addition, cell proliferation was quantified and found to be unaffected by the exposure, and there was no increase in DNA damage measured in the comet assay for both frequencies. For all end points, cells treated with chemicals were included as positive controls. These positive control cells clearly showed decreased proliferation and increased genomic damage. The results of the present study are in agreement with findings from other studies investigating DNA damage as a consequence of exposure to the lower frequency range (<0.150 THz) and demonstrate for the first time that at higher frequencies (0.380 and 2.520 THz), nonionizing radiation does not induce genomic damage.

  6. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  7. Evaluating experimental molecular physics studies of radiation damage in DNA*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) is a mature field exploring the spectroscopy, excitation, ionisation of atoms and molecules in all three phases. Understanding of the spectroscopy and collisional dynamics of AMP has been fundamental to the development and application of quantum mechanics and is applied across a broad range of disparate disciplines including atmospheric sciences, astrochemistry, combustion and environmental science, and in central to core technologies such as semiconductor fabrications, nanotechnology and plasma processing. In recent years the molecular physics also started significantly contributing to the area of the radiation damage at molecular level and thus cancer therapy improvement through both experimental and theoretical advances, developing new damage measurement and analysis techniques. It is therefore worth to summarise and highlight the most prominent findings from the AMP community that contribute towards better understanding of the fundamental processes in biologically-relevant systems as well as to comment on the experimental challenges that were met for more complex investigation targets. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  8. Electron beam induced radiation damage in the catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Qianping; Chen, Jihua; Keffer, David J; Joy, David C

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopy is an essential tool for the evaluation of microstructure and properties of the catalyst layer (CL) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, electron microscopy has one unavoidable drawback, which is radiation damage. Samples suffer temporary or permanent change of the surface or bulk structure under radiation damage, which can cause ambiguity in the characterization of the sample. To better understand the mechanism of radiation damage of CL samples and to be able to separate the morphological features intrinsic to the material from the consequences of electron radiation damage, a series of experiments based on high-angle annular dark-field-scanning transmission scanning microscope (HAADF-STEM), energy filtering transmission scanning microscope (EFTEM), and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) are conducted. It is observed that for thin samples (0.3-1 times λ), increasing the incident beam energy can mitigate the radiation damage. Platinum nanoparticles in the CL sample facilitate the radiation damage. The radiation damage of the catalyst sample starts from the interface of Pt/C or defective thin edge and primarily occurs in the form of mass loss accompanied by atomic displacement and edge curl. These results provide important insights on the mechanism of CL radiation damage. Possible strategies of mitigating the radiation damage are provided. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Protein microcrystal diffraction and the effects of radiation damage with ultra-high-flux synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, B; Hodgson, K O; Helliwell, J R; Liddington, R; Papiz, M Z

    1985-01-01

    By using ultra-high-flux synchrotron x-radiation from a wiggler source, good Laue diffraction data have been obtained from protein microcrystals of size 30 X 35 X 10 microns3, mounted wet in glass capillaries. At the flux level of 10(13)-10(14) photons per sec/mm2, the radiation damage is still low enough to allow a large survey of reciprocal space for a microcrystal and a complete survey for a normal-sized protein crystal. The development of sources for ultra-high-intensity synchrotron radiation is thus an important improvement in the technique for determination of structure through protein crystallography as well as in other cases where crystal size is often a limiting factor. Images PMID:2415965

  10. Recovery of radiation-damaged plastic light-guide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, M. S.; Stovall, J. C.; Ermer, D. R.; Cooke, D. W.; Bennett, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation damage and subsequent recovery of PMMA-based and amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon-AF) light guides (LG) were studied using uv-visible absorption, ESR, and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) techniques. No appreciable decay of the γ-ray-induced 420-nm band of the PMMA-based LG was observed in air at room temperature (RT) within a week after irradiation, while it was found to be annealable by isothermal heating at temperatures varying between 40 and 100°C or by heating in a microwave oven. Emission of light was also observed during the isothermal annealing of the LG. X- and γ-irradiated Teflon-AF showed a broad absorption band spreading from 200 to 350 nm with no observable degradation of its optical clarity. In conjunction with ESR measurements the uv absorption was attributed to the radiation-induced peroxy radicals formed at the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) site of the main copolymer chain. The recovery of the Teflon-AF was obtained in a few days by post-irradiation storage in air at room temperature. However, a rapid recovery could be obtained by heating at higher temperatures (RT≤T≤95°C) as suggested by TSL result.

  11. Use of Displacement Damage Dose in an Engineering Model of GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, T. L.; Chock, R.; Long, K. J.; Bailey, S.; Messenger, S. R.; Walters, R. J.; Summers, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for calculating damage to solar cells are well documented in the GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL 96-9). An alternative, the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) method, has been developed by Summers, et al. This method is currently being implemented in the SAVANT computer program.

  12. Dynamic maps of UV damage formation and repair for the human genome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adebali, Ogun; Adar, Sheera; Sancar, Aziz

    2017-06-27

    Formation and repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells are affected by cellular context. To study factors influencing damage formation and repair genome-wide, we developed a highly sensitive single-nucleotide resolution damage mapping method [high-sensitivity damage sequencing (HS-Damage-seq)]. Damage maps of both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts [(6-4)PPs] from UV-irradiated cellular and naked DNA revealed that the effect of transcription factor binding on bulky adducts formation varies, depending on the specific transcription factor, damage type, and strand. We also generated time-resolved UV damage maps of both CPDs and (6-4)PPs by HS-Damage-seq and compared them to the complementary repair maps of the human genome obtained by excision repair sequencing to gain insight into factors that affect UV-induced DNA damage and repair and ultimately UV carcinogenesis. The combination of the two methods revealed that, whereas UV-induced damage is virtually uniform throughout the genome, repair is affected by chromatin states, transcription, and transcription factor binding, in a manner that depends on the type of DNA damage.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian; Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan

    2016-03-10

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation. PMID:26966202

  15. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  16. The genomic substrate for adaptive radiation in African cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Malinsky, Milan; Keller, Irene; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Ng, Alvin Y.; Lim, Zhi Wei; Bezault, Etienne; Turner-Maier, Jason; Johnson, Jeremy; Alcazar, Rosa; Noh, Hyun Ji; Russell, Pamela; Aken, Bronwen; Alföldi, Jessica; Amemiya, Chris; Azzouzi, Naoual; Baroiller, Jean-François; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Berlin, Aaron; Bloomquist, Ryan; Carleton, Karen L.; Conte, Matthew A.; D'Cotta, Helena; Eshel, Orly; Gaffney, Leslie; Galibert, Francis; Gante, Hugo F.; Gnerre, Sante; Greuter, Lucie; Guyon, Richard; Haddad, Natalie S.; Haerty, Wilfried; Harris, Rayna M.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Hourlier, Thibaut; Hulata, Gideon; Jaffe, David B.; Lara, Marcia; Lee, Alison P.; MacCallum, Iain; Mwaiko, Salome; Nikaido, Masato; Nishihara, Hidenori; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Penman, David J.; Przybylski, Dariusz; Rakotomanga, Michaelle; Renn, Suzy C. P.; Ribeiro, Filipe J.; Ron, Micha; Salzburger, Walter; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Santos, M. Emilia; Searle, Steve; Sharpe, Ted; Swofford, Ross; Tan, Frederick J.; Williams, Louise; Young, Sarah; Yin, Shuangye; Okada, Norihiro; Kocher, Thomas D.; Miska, Eric A.; Lander, Eric S.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Fernald, Russell D.; Meyer, Axel; Ponting, Chris P.; Streelman, J. Todd; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Seehausen, Ole; Di Palma, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are famous for large, diverse and replicated adaptive radiations in the Great Lakes of East Africa. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cichlid phenotypic diversity, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of five lineages of African cichlids: the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), an ancestral lineage with low diversity; and four members of the East African lineage: Neolamprologus brichardi/pulcher (older radiation, Lake Tanganyika), Metriaclima zebra (recent radiation, Lake Malawi), Pundamilia nyererei (very recent radiation, Lake Victoria), and Astatotilapia burtoni (riverine species around Lake Tanganyika). We found an excess of gene duplications in the East African lineage compared to tilapia and other teleosts, an abundance of non-coding element divergence, accelerated coding sequence evolution, expression divergence associated with transposable element insertions, and regulation by novel microRNAs. In addition, we analysed sequence data from sixty individuals representing six closely related species from Lake Victoria, and show genome-wide diversifying selection on coding and regulatory variants, some of which were recruited from ancient polymorphisms. We conclude that a number of molecular mechanisms shaped East African cichlid genomes, and that amassing of standing variation during periods of relaxed purifying selection may have been important in facilitating subsequent evolutionary diversification. PMID:25186727

  17. The genomic substrate for adaptive radiation in African cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Brawand, David; Wagner, Catherine E; Li, Yang I; Malinsky, Milan; Keller, Irene; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Ng, Alvin Y; Lim, Zhi Wei; Bezault, Etienne; Turner-Maier, Jason; Johnson, Jeremy; Alcazar, Rosa; Noh, Hyun Ji; Russell, Pamela; Aken, Bronwen; Alföldi, Jessica; Amemiya, Chris; Azzouzi, Naoual; Baroiller, Jean-François; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Berlin, Aaron; Bloomquist, Ryan; Carleton, Karen L; Conte, Matthew A; D'Cotta, Helena; Eshel, Orly; Gaffney, Leslie; Galibert, Francis; Gante, Hugo F; Gnerre, Sante; Greuter, Lucie; Guyon, Richard; Haddad, Natalie S; Haerty, Wilfried; Harris, Rayna M; Hofmann, Hans A; Hourlier, Thibaut; Hulata, Gideon; Jaffe, David B; Lara, Marcia; Lee, Alison P; MacCallum, Iain; Mwaiko, Salome; Nikaido, Masato; Nishihara, Hidenori; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Penman, David J; Przybylski, Dariusz; Rakotomanga, Michaelle; Renn, Suzy C P; Ribeiro, Filipe J; Ron, Micha; Salzburger, Walter; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Santos, M Emilia; Searle, Steve; Sharpe, Ted; Swofford, Ross; Tan, Frederick J; Williams, Louise; Young, Sarah; Yin, Shuangye; Okada, Norihiro; Kocher, Thomas D; Miska, Eric A; Lander, Eric S; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Fernald, Russell D; Meyer, Axel; Ponting, Chris P; Streelman, J Todd; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Seehausen, Ole; Di Palma, Federica

    2014-09-18

    Cichlid fishes are famous for large, diverse and replicated adaptive radiations in the Great Lakes of East Africa. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cichlid phenotypic diversity, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of five lineages of African cichlids: the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), an ancestral lineage with low diversity; and four members of the East African lineage: Neolamprologus brichardi/pulcher (older radiation, Lake Tanganyika), Metriaclima zebra (recent radiation, Lake Malawi), Pundamilia nyererei (very recent radiation, Lake Victoria), and Astatotilapia burtoni (riverine species around Lake Tanganyika). We found an excess of gene duplications in the East African lineage compared to tilapia and other teleosts, an abundance of non-coding element divergence, accelerated coding sequence evolution, expression divergence associated with transposable element insertions, and regulation by novel microRNAs. In addition, we analysed sequence data from sixty individuals representing six closely related species from Lake Victoria, and show genome-wide diversifying selection on coding and regulatory variants, some of which were recruited from ancient polymorphisms. We conclude that a number of molecular mechanisms shaped East African cichlid genomes, and that amassing of standing variation during periods of relaxed purifying selection may have been important in facilitating subsequent evolutionary diversification.

  18. Genomic damage in endstage renal disease-contribution of uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Nicole; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2010-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  19. Genomic Damage in Endstage Renal Disease—Contribution of Uremic Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2010-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation. PMID:22069557

  20. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, Gerald W.

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  1. Autophagy Promotes the Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Cells via Enhanced STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Li, Xin; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Fang, Yixuan; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Lan; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Jiang, Gaoyue; Xie, Jialing; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Jiayi; Li, Xiaotian; Yao, Lei; Zhang, Suping; Zhou, Daohong; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy protects hematopoietic cells from radiation damage in part by promoting DNA damage repair. However, the molecular mechanisms by which autophagy regulates DNA damage repair remain largely elusive. Here, we report that this radioprotective effect of autophagy depends on STAT3 signaling in murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs). Specifically, we found that STAT3 activation and nuclear translocation in BM-MNCs were increased by activation of autophagy with an mTOR inhibitor and decreased by knockout of the autophagy gene Atg7. The autophagic regulation of STAT3 activation is likely mediated by induction of KAP1 degradation, because we showed that KAP1 directly interacted with STAT3 in the cytoplasm and knockdown of KAP1 increased the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3. Subsequently, activated STAT3 transcriptionally upregulated the expression of BRCA1, which increased the ability of BM-MNCs to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. This novel finding that activation of autophagy can promote DNA damage repair in BM-MNCs via the ATG-KAP1-STAT3-BRCA1 pathway suggests that autophagy plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity of BM-MNCs and its activation may confer protection of BM-MNCs against radiation-induced genotoxic stress.

  2. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  3. Filia is an ESC-specific regulator of DNA damage response and safeguards genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Wei-dao; Duan, Ying-liang; Lu, Yong-qing; Cun, Yi-xian; Li, Chao-hui; Guo, Kun; Nie, Wen-hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Rugang; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in cell-based therapy, but the genomic instability seen in culture hampers full application. Greater understanding of the factors that regulate genomic stability in PSCs could help address this issue. Here we describe the identification of Filia as a specific regulator of genomic stability in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Filia expression is induced by genotoxic stress. Filia promotes centrosome integrity and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) through multiple pathways, including DDR signaling, cell cycle checkpoints and damage repair, ESC differentiation and apoptosis. Filia depletion causes ESC genomic instability, induces resistance to apoptosis and promotes malignant transformation. As part of its role in the DDR, Filia interacts with PARP1 and stimulates its enzymatic activity. Filia also constitutively resides on centrosomes and translocates to DNA damage sites and mitochondria, consistent with its multifaceted roles in regulating centrosome integrity, damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:25936915

  4. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  5. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  6. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  7. Impact of genomic damage and ageing on stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Axel; van Deursen, Jan M.; Rudolph, K. Lenhard; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of stem cell function contributes to the progressive deterioration of tissue maintenance and repair with ageing. Evidence is mounting that age-dependent accumulation of DNA damage in both stem cells and cells that comprise the stem cell microenvironment are partly responsible for stem cell dysfunction with ageing. Here, we review the impact of the various types of DNA damage that accumulate with ageing on stem cell functionality, as well as the development of cancer. We discuss DNA-damage-induced cell intrinsic and extrinsic alterations that influence these processes, and review recent advances in understanding systemic adjustments to DNA damage and how they affect stem cells. PMID:24576896

  8. [Cellphone electromagnetic radiation damages the testicular ultrastructure of male rats].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Hui-Rong; Ma, Xue-Lian; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Guo-Hong

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the influence of cellphone electromagnetic radiation (CER) on the testicular ultrastructure and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in male rats.atability, feasibility, applicability, and controllability in the construction of experimental animal models, we compared the major anatomic features of the penis of 20 adult beagle dogs with those of 10 adult men. Using microsurgical techniques, we performed cross-transplantation of the penis in the 20 (10 pairs) beagle dogs and observed the survival rate of the transplanted penises by FK506+MMF+MP immune induction. We compared the relevant indexes with those of the 10 cases of microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis. Thirty adult male SD rats were equally randomized into a 2 h CER, a 4 h CER, and a normal control group, the former two groups exposed to 30 days of 900 MHz CER for 2 and 4 hours a day, respectively, while the latter left untreated. Then the changes in the ultrastructure of the testis tissue were observed under the transmission electron microscope and the apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells was determined by TUNEL. Compared with the normal controls, the rats of the 2 h CER group showed swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, increased cell intervals, apparent vacuoles and medullization in some mitochondria, and increased apoptosis of spermatogenic cells, mainly the apoptosis of primary spermatocytes (P<0.05 ). In comparison with the 2 h CER group, the animals of the 4 h CER group exhibited swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, more separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, wider cell intervals, incomplete membrane of spermatogonial cells, fragments of cytoplasm, nuclear pyknosis and notch, slight dilation of perinuclear space, abnormalities of intracellular mitochondria with vacuoles, fuzzy structure, and fusion or disappearance of some cristae, and increased damage of mitochondria and apoptosis of spermatogenic

  9. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans. PMID:27899501

  10. Research progress in radiation detectors, pattern recognition programs, and radiation damage determination in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The radiological implications of statistical variations in energy deposition by ionizing radiation were investigated in the conduct of the following experiments: (1) study of the production of secondary particles generated by the passage of the primary radiation through bone and muscle; (2) the study of the ratio of nonreparable to reparable damage in DNA as a function of different energy deposition patterns generated by X rays versus heavy fast charged particles; (3) the use of electronic radiography systems for direct fluoroscopic tomography and for the synthesis of multiple planes and; (4) the determination of the characteristics of systems response to split fields having different contrast levels, and of minimum detectable contrast levels between the halves under realistic clinical situations.

  11. Radiation damage estimation in the Al-alloy cladding of the MNSR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukieh, M.; Ghazi, N.

    2014-06-01

    The radiation damage rates in the Al-303-1-alloy cladding of the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor reactor has been numerically estimated with the The MCNP-4C and NJOY93 codes and the ENDF/B-VI library. The calculations showed that the Al-cladding alloy had received a maximum radiation damage rate equal to 7.01×10-9 (dpa/s). The total damage and helium production rates in the Al-cladding alloy were 0.13 (dpa) and 1.01×10-2 (appm, He), respectively. The contribution of the fast neutrons in the radiation damage was most effective.

  12. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  13. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  14. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes.

  15. Review of radiation damage studies on DNW CMOS MAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, G.; Gaioni, L.; Manazza, A.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Zucca, S.; Bettarini, S.; Rizzo, G.; Morsani, F.; Bosisio, L.; Rashevskaya, I.; Cindro, V.

    2013-12-01

    Monolithic active pixel sensors fabricated in a bulk CMOS technology with no epitaxial layer and standard resistivity (10 Ω cm) substrate, featuring a deep N-well as the collecting electrode (DNW MAPS), have been exposed to γ-rays, up to a final dose of 10 Mrad (SiO2), and to neutrons from a nuclear reactor, up to a total 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of about 3.7 ·1013cm-2. The irradiation campaign was aimed at studying the effects of radiation on the most significant parameters of the front-end electronics and on the charge collection properties of the sensors. Device characterization has been carried out before and after irradiations. The DNW MAPS irradiated with 60Co γ-rays were also subjected to high temperature annealing (100 °C for 168 h). Measurements have been performed through a number of different techniques, including electrical characterization of the front-end electronics and of DNW diodes, laser stimulation of the sensors and tests with 55Fe and 90Sr radioactive sources. This paper reviews the measurement results, their relation with the damage mechanisms underlying performance degradation and provides a new comparison between DNW devices and MAPS fabricated in a CMOS process with high resistivity (1 kΩ cm) epitaxial layer.

  16. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated.

  17. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  18. Applying Genomic and Genetic Tools to Understand and Mitigate Damage from Exposure to Toxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Understand and Mitigate Damage from Exposure to Toxins PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Myers, Ph.D...2010 – 22 September 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Applying Genomic and Genetic Tools to Understand and Mitigate Damage from...dose-response to PB in larval and adult zebrafish at the biochemical and transcriptomic levels, validated a methods of treatment for inducing stress

  19. Biological consequences of radiation-induced DNA damage: relevance to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lomax, M E; Folkes, L K; O'Neill, P

    2013-10-01

    DNA damage of exposed tumour tissue leading to cell death is one of the detrimental effects of ionising radiation that is exploited, with beneficial consequences, for radiotherapy. The pattern of the discrete energy depositions during passage of the ionising track of radiation defines the spatial distribution of lesions induced in DNA with a fraction of the DNA damage sites containing clusters of lesions, formed over a few nanometres, against a background of endogenously induced individual lesions. These clustered DNA damage sites, which may be considered as a signature of ionising radiation, underlie the deleterious biological consequences of ionising radiation. The concepts developed rely in part on the fact that ionising radiation creates significant levels of clustered DNA damage, including complex double-strand breaks (DSB), to kill tumour cells as clustered damage sites are difficult to repair. This reduced repairability of clustered DNA damage using specific repair pathways is exploitable in radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. We discuss some potential strategies to enhance radiosensitivity by targeting the repair pathways of radiation-induced clustered damage and complex DNA DSB, through inhibition of specific proteins that are not required in the repair pathways for endogenous damage. The variety and severity of DNA damage from ionising radiation is also influenced by the tumour microenvironment, being especially sensitive to the oxygen status of the cells. For instance, nitric oxide is known to influence the types of damage induced by radiation under hypoxic conditions. A potential strategy based on bioreductive activation of pro-drugs to release nitric oxide is discussed as an approach to deliver nitric oxide to hypoxic tumours during radiotherapy. The ultimate aim of this review is to stimulate thinking on how knowledge of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage may contribute to the development of adjuncts to radiotherapy. Copyright

  20. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair). PMID:23549227

  1. Next generation testing strategy for assessment of genomic damage: A conceptual framework and considerations.

    PubMed

    Dearfield, Kerry L; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Benz, R Daniel; Douglas, George R; Elespuru, Rosalie K; Johnson, George E; Kirkland, David J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Li, Albert P; Marchetti, Francesco; Pottenger, Lynn H; Rorije, Emiel; Tanir, Jennifer Y; Thybaud, Veronique; van Benthem, Jan; Yauk, Carole L; Zeiger, Errol; Luijten, Mirjam

    2016-09-21

    For several decades, regulatory testing schemes for genetic damage have been standardized where the tests being utilized examined mutations and structural and numerical chromosomal damage. This has served the genetic toxicity community well when most of the substances being tested were amenable to such assays. The outcome from this testing is usually a dichotomous (yes/no) evaluation of test results, and in many instances, the information is only used to determine whether a substance has carcinogenic potential or not. Over the same time period, mechanisms and modes of action (MOAs) that elucidate a wider range of genomic damage involved in many adverse health outcomes have been recognized. In addition, a paradigm shift in applied genetic toxicology is moving the field toward a more quantitative dose-response analysis and point-of-departure (PoD) determination with a focus on risks to exposed humans. This is directing emphasis on genomic damage that is likely to induce changes associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. This paradigm shift is moving the testing emphasis for genetic damage from a hazard identification only evaluation to a more comprehensive risk assessment approach that provides more insightful information for decision makers regarding the potential risk of genetic damage to exposed humans. To enable this broader context for examining genetic damage, a next generation testing strategy needs to take into account a broader, more flexible approach to testing, and ultimately modeling, of genomic damage as it relates to human exposure. This is consistent with the larger risk assessment context being used in regulatory decision making. As presented here, this flexible approach for examining genomic damage focuses on testing for relevant genomic effects that can be, as best as possible, associated with an adverse health effect. The most desired linkage for risk to humans would be changes in loci associated with human diseases, whether in somatic

  2. Non-Problematic Risks from Low-Dose Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage clusters have been proposed and are usually considered to pose the threat of serious biological damage. This has been attributed to DNA repair debilitation or cessation arising from the complexity of cluster damage. It will be shown here, contrary to both previous suggestions and perceived wisdom, that radiation induced damage clusters contribute to non-problematic risks in the low-dose, low-LET regime. The very complexity of cluster damage which inhibits and/or compromises DNA repair will ultimately be responsible for the elimination and/or diminution of precancer-ous and cancerous cells. PMID:18648573

  3. Wideband optical coatings for protecting artwork from ultraviolet and infrared radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Angela; Polato, Pietro

    2003-09-01

    The damaging effects of illumination on artwork are well known. Art conservation requires protection from both vandalism and radiation damage. Glass is an appropriate material for these requirements but it partially transmits UV and IR radiation. An optical coating on glass that eliminates UV and IR radiation coming from natural or artificial illumination, is proposed. This coated glass, positioned in front of the artwork, is also able to reduce reflection without altering the appearance or colour.

  4. Alternative Splicing, DNA Damage and Modulating Drugs in Radiation Therapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jen-Yang; Li, Ruei-Nian; Chen, Ping-Ho; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy effectively destroys cancer cells in many sites of the body, but several limitations remain. This study investigated alternative splicing, which is a common mechanism of increased diversity in mRNAs and proteins. The relationships of alternative splicing to DNA damage and radiation such as UV and ionizing radiation were analyzed. The DNA damage responses of many genes involved in alternative splicing were compared between non-radiation and radiation treatments. Drugs that affect radioresistence or radiosensitization by modulating the effects of alternative splicing and radiation were also reviewed.

  5. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  7. Haploinsufficiency of DNA Damage Response Genes and their Potential Influence in Human Genomic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Genomic disorders are a clinically diverse group of conditions caused by gain, loss or re-orientation of a genomic region containing dosage-sensitive genes. One class of genomic disorder is caused by hemizygous deletions resulting in haploinsufficiency of a single or, more usually, several genes. For example, the heterozygous contiguous gene deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 causing DiGeorge syndrome involves at least 20-30 genes. Determining how the copy number variation (CNV) affects human variation and contributes to the aetiology and progression of various genomic disorders represents important questions for the future. Here, I will discuss the functional significance of one form of CNV, haploinsufficiency (i.e. loss of a gene copy), of DNA damage response components and its association with certain genomic disorders. There is increasing evidence that haploinsufficiency for certain genes encoding key players in the cells response to DNA damage, particularly those of the Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-pathway, has a functional impact. I will review this evidence and present examples of some well known clinically similar genomic disorders that have recently been shown to be defective in the ATR-dependent DNA damage response. Finally, I will discuss the potential implications of a haploinsufficiency-induced defective DNA damage response for the clinical management of certain human genomic disorders. PMID:19440510

  8. Silymarin Protects Epidermal Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and DNA Damage by Nucleotide Excision Repair Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Mantena, Sudheer K.; Meeran, Syed M.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  9. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  10. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  12. Recent radiation damage studies and developments of the Marlowe code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Hou, M.

    2014-07-01

    Radiation damage in materials relevant to applications evolves over time scales spanning from the femtosecond - the characteristic time for an atomic collision - to decades - the aging time expected for nuclear materials. The relevant kinetic energies of atoms span from thermal motion to the MeV range.The question motivating this contribution is to identify the relationship between elementary atomic displacements triggered by irradiation and the subsequent microstructural evolution of metals in the long term. The Marlowe code, based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) is used to simulate the sequences of atomic displacements generated by energetic primary recoils and the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA, parameterized on a range of ab initio calculations, is used to predict the subsequent long-term evolution of point defect and clusters thereof. In agreement with full Molecular Dynamics, BCA displacement cascades in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and a face-centered cubic (FCC) Febond Nibond Cr alloy display recursive properties that are found useful for predictions in the long term.The case of defects evolution in W due to external irradiation with energetic H and He is also discussed. To this purpose, it was useful to extend the inelastic energy loss model available in Marlowe up to the Bethe regime. The last version of the Marlowe code (version 15) was delivered before message passing instructions softwares (such as MPI) were available but the structure of the code was designed in such a way to permit parallel executions within a distributed memory environment. This makes possible to obtain N different cascades simultaneously using N independent nodes without any communication between processors. The parallelization of the code using MPI was recently achieved by one author of this report (C.J.O.). Typically, the parallelized version of Marlowe allows simulating millions of displacement cascades using a limited number of processors (<64) within only

  13. Radiation damages to amorphous-carbon optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, L.; Bittner, M.; De Grazia, M.; Feldhaus, J.; Gaudin, J.; Guizard, S.; Jacobi, S.; Kozlova, M.; Krasa, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Merdji, H.; Michaelsen, C.; Mocek, T.; Nietubyc, R.; Jurek, M.; Polan, J.; Prag, A. R.; Rus, B.; Sobierajski, R.; Steeg-Keitel, B.; Stoermer, M.; Stupka, M.; Vorlicek, V.; Wiesmann, J.; Wild, J.

    2005-08-01

    The multi-mJ, 21-nm soft-x-ray laser at the PALS facility was focused on the surface of amorphous carbon (a-C) coating, developed for heavily loaded XUV/x-ray optical elements. AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) images show 3-micrometer expansion of the irradiated material. Raman spectra, measured with an Ar+ laser microbeam in both irradiated and unirradiated areas, confirm a high degree of graphitization in the irradiated layer. In addition to this highfluence (~ 1 J/cm2), single-shot experiment, it was necessary to carry out an experiment to investigate consequences of prolonged XUV irradiation at relatively low fluence. High-order harmonic (HH) beam generated at the LUCA facility in CEA/Saclay Research Center was used as a source of short-wavelength radiation delivering high-energy photons on the surface at a low single-shot fluence but with high-average power. a-C irradiated at a low fluence, i.e., < 0.1 mJ/cm2 by many HH shots exhibits an expansion for several nanometers. Although it is less dramatic change of surface morphology than that due to single-hot x-ray-laser exposure even the observed nanometer-sized changes caused by the HH beam on a-C surface could influence reflectivity of a grazing incidence optical element. These results seem to be important for estimating damages to the surfaces of highly irradiated optical elements developed for guiding and focusing the ultraintense XUV/x-ray beams provided by new generation sources (i.e., VUV FEL and XFEL in Hamburg; LCLS in Stanford) because, up to now, only melting and vaporization, but not graphitization, have been taken into account.

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-09

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  15. Quantifying radiation damage in biomolecular small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Thorne, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly popular technique that provides low-resolution structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. Many of the practical limitations of the technique, such as minimum required sample volume, and of experimental design, such as sample flow cells, are necessary because the biological samples are sensitive to damage from the X-rays. Radiation damage typically manifests as aggregation of the sample, which makes the collected data unreliable. However, there has been little systematic investigation of the most effective methods to reduce damage rates, and results from previous damage studies are not easily compared with results from other beamlines. Here a methodology is provided for quantifying radiation damage in SAXS to provide consistent results between different experiments, experimenters and beamlines. These methods are demonstrated on radiation damage data collected from lysozyme, glucose isomerase and xylanase, and it is found that no single metric is sufficient to describe radiation damage in SAXS for all samples. The radius of gyration, molecular weight and integrated SAXS profile intensity constitute a minimal set of parameters that capture all types of observed behavior. Radiation sensitivities derived from these parameters show a large protein dependence, varying by up to six orders of magnitude between the different proteins tested. This work should enable consistent reporting of radiation damage effects, allowing more systematic studies of the most effective minimization strategies.

  16. Terahertz radiation increases genomic instability in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Korenstein-Ilan, Avital; Barbul, Alexander; Hasin, Pini; Eliran, Alon; Gover, Avraham; Korenstein, Rafi

    2008-08-01

    Terahertz radiation is increasingly being applied in new and evolving technologies applied in areas such as homeland security and medical imaging. Thus a timely assessment of the potential hazards and health effects of occupational and general population exposure to THz radiation is required. We applied continuous-wave (CW) 0.1 THz radiation (0.031 mW/ cm(2)) to dividing lymphocytes for 1, 2 and 24 h and examined the changes in chromosome number of chromosomes 1, 10, 11 and 17 and changes in the replication timing of their centromeres using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosomes 11 and 17 were most vulnerable (about 30% increase in aneuploidy after 2 and 24 h of exposure), while chromosomes 1 and 10 were not affected. We observed changes in the asynchronous mode of replication of centromeres 11, 17 and 1 (by 40%) after 2 h of exposure and of all four centromeres after 24 h of exposure (by 50%). It is speculated that these effects are caused by radiation-induced low-frequency collective vibrational modes of proteins and DNA. Our results demonstrate that exposure of lymphocytes in vitro to a low power density of 0.1 THz radiation induces genomic instability. These findings, if verified, may suggest that such exposure may result in an increased risk of cancer.

  17. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  18. Perspectives in radiation biophysics: From radiation track structure simulation to mechanistic models of DNA damage and repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Taleei, R.; Liamsuwan, T.; Liljequist, D.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2016-11-01

    In radiation targeted therapy and genetic risk estimation of low dose radiation protection there is a crucial need for full description of DNA damage response and repair (DDR) leading to cell death and cell mutation. We propose such a description can be arrived through realistic track-structure simulations together with mechanistic mathematical formulation of DDR and the availability of experimental data for testing the proof of principle. In this paper we review briefly first the state of the art in DNA damage and repair, and then the recent advances in the physics of track structure which represents an essential tool in radiation biophysics.

  19. Radiation damage in protein serial femtosecond crystallography using an x-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Lomb, Lukas; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Aquila, Andrew; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Rudek, Benedikt; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Shoeman, Robert L.; Andreasson, Jakob; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Doak, R. Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Fleckenstein, Holger; Fromme, Petra; Gebhardt, Maike; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hunter, Mark S.; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Kimmel, Nils; Kirian, Richard A.; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Meinhart, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C. H.; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Wunderer, Cornelia; Chapman, Henry N.; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers deliver intense femtosecond pulses that promise to yield high resolution diffraction data of nanocrystals before the destruction of the sample by radiation damage. Diffraction intensities of lysozyme nanocrystals collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source using 2 keV photons were used for structure determination by molecular replacement and analyzed for radiation damage as a function of pulse length and fluence. Signatures of radiation damage are observed for pulses as short as 70 fs. Parametric scaling used in conventional crystallography does not account for the observed effects. PMID:24089594

  20. A summary of radiation damage studies in barium fluoride from the GEM Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.L.

    1992-12-31

    A summary is given of the radiation damage studies in BaF{sub 2} carried out by the GEM Collaboration. Data are presented on the effects of radiation from low energy gamma rays, energetic neutrons and high energy hadrons. Results are given from various analytical techniques used to study crystal purity and structure, and the present understanding of the principle causes of damage is discussed. A brief summary is also given of the conclusions of an Expert Panel which reviewed the situation of radiation damage in BaF{sub 2} for the GEM experiment.

  1. A summary of radiation damage studies in barium fluoride from the GEM Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is given of the radiation damage studies in BaF[sub 2] carried out by the GEM Collaboration. Data are presented on the effects of radiation from low energy gamma rays, energetic neutrons and high energy hadrons. Results are given from various analytical techniques used to study crystal purity and structure, and the present understanding of the principle causes of damage is discussed. A brief summary is also given of the conclusions of an Expert Panel which reviewed the situation of radiation damage in BaF[sub 2] for the GEM experiment.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. DG25B, a novel bacterium with gamma-radiation resistance isolated from soil in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Kyum; Joo, Eun Sun; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Lee, Dae Sung; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Jung, Hee-Young

    2016-01-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, gamma and UV radiation resistant bacterium Hymenobacter radioresistens DG25B was isolated from a soil sample collected in South Korea. The complete genome sequence of H. radioresistens DG25B consists of one circular chromosome (3,874,646 bp). The bacterium was isolated from gamma ray irradiated soil and contains the genomic features of enzymes involved in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway that protect the damaged DNA. The genome also contains other genes involved in the efficient removal of double-strand breaks (DSB) caused by the ionizing radiations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome health nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics--diagnosis and nutritional treatment of genome damage on an individual basis.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The term nutrigenomics refers to the effect of diet on gene expression. The term nutrigenetics refers to the impact of inherited traits on the response to a specific dietary pattern, functional food or supplement on a specific health outcome. The specific fields of genome health nutrigenomics and genome health nutrigenetics are emerging as important new research areas because it is becoming increasingly evident that (a) risk for developmental and degenerative disease increases with DNA damage which in turn is dependent on nutritional status and (b) optimal concentration of micronutrients for prevention of genome damage is also dependent on genetic polymorphisms that alter function of genes involved directly or indirectly in uptake and metabolism of micronutrients required for DNA repair and DNA replication. Development of dietary patterns, functional foods and supplements that are designed to improve genome health maintenance in humans with specific genetic backgrounds may provide an important contribution to a new optimum health strategy based on the diagnosis and individualised nutritional treatment of genome instability i.e. Genome Health Clinics.

  4. Flavonoids can protect maize DNA from the induction of ultraviolet radiation damage.

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, A E; Walbot, V

    1994-01-01

    Diverse flavonoid compounds are widely distributed in angiosperm families. Flavonoids absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum, and it has been proposed that these compounds function as UV filters. We demonstrate that the DNA in Zea mays plants that contain flavonoids (primarily anthocyanins) is protected from the induction of damage caused by UV radiation relative to the DNA in plants that are genetically deficient in these compounds. DNA damage was measured with a sensitive and simple assay using individual monoclonal antibodies, one specific for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer damage and the other specific for pyrimidine(6,4)pyrimidone damage. PMID:8058838

  5. Radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Walker, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results of electron and proton irradiation and annealing of GaAs solar cells are presented along with some implications of these results. A comparison between the energy-levels produced by protons and by electrons which are not stopped in the material indicate that the damage produced by protons and electrons may be qualitatively different. Thus, annealing of proton damage may be very different from the annealing of electron damage.

  6. Status of radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; James, R.B.

    1998-04-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) is reviewed for the purpose of determining their applicability to space applications. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10{sup 10} p/cm{sup 2} and significant bulk leakage after 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2}. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum neutrons after fluences up to 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}, although activation was evident. CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}. Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2} and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} p/cm{sup 2}. Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. No radiation damage was found under these irradiation conditions.

  7. Wideband optical coatings for artwork protection from ultraviolet and infrared radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Angela M.; Polato, Pietro

    2003-11-01

    The damaging effects of illumination on artworks are well known. Art conservation requires protection against vandalism and protection against radiation damage. Glass is an appropriate material for both requirements, but it partially transmits ultraviolet and infrared radiation. An optical coating on glass that eliminates the ultraviolet and the infrared radiation coming from natural or artificial source of illumination, is proposed. This coated glass, positioned in front of the artwork, is also able to reduce the visible radiation without altering the vision or the color rendering.

  8. Radiation damage in protein crystals is reduced with a micron-sized X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Sanishvili, Ruslan; Yoder, Derek W; Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Xu, Shenglan; Vogt, Stefan; Stepanov, Sergey; Makarov, Oleg A; Corcoran, Stephen; Benn, Richard; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Smith, Janet L; Fischetti, Robert F

    2011-04-12

    Radiation damage is a major limitation in crystallography of biological macromolecules, even for cryocooled samples, and is particularly acute in microdiffraction. For the X-ray energies most commonly used for protein crystallography at synchrotron sources, photoelectrons are the predominant source of radiation damage. If the beam size is small relative to the photoelectron path length, then the photoelectron may escape the beam footprint, resulting in less damage in the illuminated volume. Thus, it may be possible to exploit this phenomenon to reduce radiation-induced damage during data measurement for techniques such as diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging that use X-rays to probe both crystalline and noncrystalline biological samples. In a systematic and direct experimental demonstration of reduced radiation damage in protein crystals with small beams, damage was measured as a function of micron-sized X-ray beams of decreasing dimensions. The damage rate normalized for dose was reduced by a factor of three from the largest (15.6 μm) to the smallest (0.84 μm) X-ray beam used. Radiation-induced damage to protein crystals was also mapped parallel and perpendicular to the polarization direction of an incident 1-μm X-ray beam. Damage was greatest at the beam center and decreased monotonically to zero at a distance of about 4 μm, establishing the range of photoelectrons. The observed damage is less anisotropic than photoelectron emission probability, consistent with photoelectron trajectory simulations. These experimental results provide the basis for data collection protocols to mitigate with micron-sized X-ray beams the effects of radiation damage.

  9. Radiation damage in protein crystals is reduced with a micron-sized X-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Sanishvili, Ruslan; Yoder, Derek W.; Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Xu, Shenglan; Vogt, Stefan; Stepanov, Sergey; Makarov, Oleg A.; Corcoran, Stephen; Benn, Richard; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage is a major limitation in crystallography of biological macromolecules, even for cryocooled samples, and is particularly acute in microdiffraction. For the X-ray energies most commonly used for protein crystallography at synchrotron sources, photoelectrons are the predominant source of radiation damage. If the beam size is small relative to the photoelectron path length, then the photoelectron may escape the beam footprint, resulting in less damage in the illuminated volume. Thus, it may be possible to exploit this phenomenon to reduce radiation-induced damage during data measurement for techniques such as diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging that use X-rays to probe both crystalline and noncrystalline biological samples. In a systematic and direct experimental demonstration of reduced radiation damage in protein crystals with small beams, damage was measured as a function of micron-sized X-ray beams of decreasing dimensions. The damage rate normalized for dose was reduced by a factor of three from the largest (15.6 μm) to the smallest (0.84 μm) X-ray beam used. Radiation-induced damage to protein crystals was also mapped parallel and perpendicular to the polarization direction of an incident 1-μm X-ray beam. Damage was greatest at the beam center and decreased monotonically to zero at a distance of about 4 μm, establishing the range of photoelectrons. The observed damage is less anisotropic than photoelectron emission probability, consistent with photoelectron trajectory simulations. These experimental results provide the basis for data collection protocols to mitigate with micron-sized X-ray beams the effects of radiation damage. PMID:21444772

  10. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A. ); Copper, P.K. )

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  11. Mechanisms of Damage to DNA Labeled with Electrophilic Nucleobases Induced by Ionizing or UV Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rak, Janusz; Chomicz, Lidia; Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Wityk, Paweł; Żyndul, Michał; Makurat, Samanta; Golon, Łukasz

    2015-07-02

    Hypoxia--a hallmark of solid tumors--makes hypoxic cells radioresistant. On the other hand, DNA, the main target of anticancer therapy, is not sensitive to the near UV photons and hydrated electrons, one of the major products of water radiolysis under hypoxic conditions. A possible way to overcome these obstacles to the efficient radio- and photodynamic therapy of cancer is to sensitize the cellular DNA to electrons and/or ultraviolet radiation. While incorporated into genomic DNA, modified nucleosides, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in particular, sensitize cells to both near-ultraviolet photons and γ rays. It is believed that, in both sensitization modes, the reactive nucleobase radical is formed as a primary product which swiftly stabilizes, leading to serious DNA damage, like strand breaks or cross-links. However, despite the apparent similarity, such radio- and photosensitization of DNA seems to be ruled by fundamentally different mechanisms. In this review, we demonstrate that the most important factors deciding on radiodamage to the labeled DNA are (i) the electron affinity (EA) of modified nucleoside (mNZ), (ii) the local surroundings of the label that significantly influences the EA of mNZ, and (iii) the strength of the chemical bond holding together the substituent and a nucleobase. On the other hand, we show that the UV damage to sensitized DNA is governed by long-range photoinduced electron transfer, the efficiency of which is controlled by local DNA sequences. A critical review of the literature mechanisms concerning both types of damage to the labeled biopolymer is presented. Ultimately, the perspectives of studies on DNA sensitization in the context of cancer therapy are discussed.

  12. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel; Watanabe, Sugiko; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Andersen, Jens S

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear acetyltransferases themselves are regulated, not on the protein abundance level, but by (de)acetylation; and (3) that the recently reported p53 co-activator and methyltransferase MLL3 is acetylated on five lysines during the DDR. For selected examples, protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were used to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.

  13. The Radiation environment and damage in the CDF tracking volume

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tesarek et al.

    2003-12-16

    The authors present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures, the radiation field can be separated into components from beam losses and collisions and can be checked for consistency between the measurements. They compare the radiation measurements with an increase in the leakage currents of the CDF silicon detectors and find reasonable agreement.

  14. Radiation damage to tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-08-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG) were exposed to [gamma] radiation form a [sup 60]Co source up to dose 579 Gray and 902 Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation does was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers.

  15. 4-(Nitrophenylsulfonyl)piperazines mitigate radiation damage to multiple tissues

    PubMed Central

    Micewicz, Ewa D.; Kim, Kwanghee; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Cheng, Genhong; Boxx, Gayle M.; Damoiseaux, Robert D.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Ruchala, Piotr; Nguyen, Christine; Purbey, Prabhat; Loo, Joseph; Deng, Gang; Jung, Michael E.; Sayre, James W.; Norris, Andrew J.; McBride, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Our ability to use ionizing radiation as an energy source, as a therapeutic agent, and, unfortunately, as a weapon, has evolved tremendously over the past 120 years, yet our tool box to handle the consequences of accidental and unwanted radiation exposure remains very limited. We have identified a novel group of small molecule compounds with a 4-nitrophenylsulfonamide (NPS) backbone in common that dramatically decrease mortality from the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (hARS). The group emerged from an in vitro high throughput screen (HTS) for inhibitors of radiation-induced apoptosis. The lead compound also mitigates against death after local abdominal irradiation and after local thoracic irradiation (LTI) in models of subacute radiation pneumonitis and late radiation fibrosis. Mitigation of hARS is through activation of radiation-induced CD11b+Ly6G+Ly6C+ immature myeloid cells. This is consistent with the notion that myeloerythroid-restricted progenitors protect against WBI-induced lethality and extends the possible involvement of the myeloid lineage in radiation effects. The lead compound was active if given to mice before or after WBI and had some anti-tumor action, suggesting that these compounds may find broader applications to cancer radiation therapy. PMID:28732024

  16. Baicalein protects mice against radiation-induced DNA damages and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2013-07-01

    Baicalein is the major flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicaleins. This flavonoid is used extensively in Chinese herbal medicine. In the present study baicalein is evaluated for its radioprotective properties. Human blood cells when exposed to the γ-radiation ex vivo in presence of baicalein underwent the reduced DNA damage compared to the control. Baicalein administration prior to the whole-body γ-radiation (4 Gy) exposure of mice resulted in protecting the damage to the DNA as measured in their blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Mice when exposed to the radiation (whole body; 1.7 Gy) resulted in damage to the bone marrow as measured by micronucleated reticulocyte (MNRET) formation. Baicalein pre-treatment reduces the radiation induced damage to the bone marrow cells, as there was decrease in the percentage MNRET formation. These findings indicate radio-protecting ability of baicalein.

  17. On the Use of SRIM/TRIM for Computing Radiation Damage Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Toloczko, M; Was, Gary; Certain, Alicia; Dwaraknath, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades have been made. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made.

  18. Damage Avoidance and DNA Repair Mechanisms of Extremophiles to Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. K.; Diruggiero, J.

    2010-04-01

    The results presented here support the idea that the radiation resistance of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is the product of mechanisms for cellular protection and detoxification and for the repair of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules.

  19. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  20. Radiation damage of F8 lead glass with 20 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. D.; Mitchell, R. E.; McChesney, P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Frye, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    Using a 20 MeV linear accelerator, we investigate the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the optical transparency of F8 lead glass. Specifically, we measure the change in attenuation length as a function of radiation dose. Comparing our results to similar work that utilized a proton beam, we conclude that F8 lead glass is more susceptible to proton damage than electron damage.

  1. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  2. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  3. DNA Damage and Genomic Instability Induced by Inappropriate DNA Re-Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    ml a that sustained rereplication leads to a dramatic decrease factor. Samples were fixed in 67% ethanol (vol/vol), washed twice with PBS, and...significant decrease in cell viability and a cellular DNA damage response. Strikingly, we have observed DNA damage in the absence of a classical...genome re-replicates. In this reporting period, we have shown that re-replication induces a rapid and significant decrease in cell viability and a

  4. Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Ohnishi, Ken; Takahashi, Akihisa; Taniguchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Masaru; Nakano, Tamotsu; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2002-12-01

    Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.

  5. Visualizing the search for radiation-damaged DNA bases in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Andrea J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2016-11-01

    The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway removes the vast majority of damages produced by ionizing radiation, including the plethora of radiation-damaged purines and pyrimidines. The first enzymes in the BER pathway are DNA glycosylases, which are responsible for finding and removing the damaged base. Although much is known about the biochemistry of DNA glycosylases, how these enzymes locate their specific damage substrates among an excess of undamaged bases has long remained a mystery. Here we describe the use of single molecule fluorescence to observe the bacterial DNA glycosylases, Nth, Fpg and Nei, scanning along undamaged and damaged DNA. We show that all three enzymes randomly diffuse on the DNA molecule and employ a wedge residue to search for and locate damage. The search behavior of the Escherichia coli DNA glycosylases likely provides a paradigm for their homologous mammalian counterparts.

  6. Selective enrichment of damaged DNA molecules for ancient genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contamination by present-day human and microbial DNA is one of the major hindrances for large-scale genomic studies using ancient biological material. We describe a new molecular method, U selection, which exploits one of the most distinctive features of ancient DNA—the presence of deoxyuracils—for selective enrichment of endogenous DNA against a complex background of contamination during DNA library preparation. By applying the method to Neanderthal DNA extracts that are heavily contaminated with present-day human DNA, we show that the fraction of useful sequence information increases ∼10-fold and that the resulting sequences are more efficiently depleted of human contamination than when using purely computational approaches. Furthermore, we show that U selection can lead to a four- to fivefold increase in the proportion of endogenous DNA sequences relative to those of microbial contaminants in some samples. U selection may thus help to lower the costs for ancient genome sequencing of nonhuman samples also. PMID:25081630

  7. Does iodinated contrast medium amplify DNA damage during exposure to radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognized increased risk of cancer following exposure of humans to ionizing radiation; this is felt to be most likely due to damage to DNA strands during exposure. Damage to DNA strands can be demonstrated microscopically following exposure to X-rays, and new evidence is emerging that this effect may be compounded by administration of iodinated contrast agents. PMID:26234959

  8. Annealing radiation damaged silicon solar cells with a copper halide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a multiply pulsed copper halide laser to significantly anneal out the damage to silicon solar cells caused by a simulated space radiation environment is investigated. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the amount of damage can be decreased by 41% as measured by the maximum power generated.

  9. Nanocrystal ghosting: Extensive radiation damage in MgO induced by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenfield, Zackery; Kane, Kenneth; Sawyer, William H.

    2017-03-01

    We report direct evidence of extensive radiation damage in MgO nanocrystals due to intense bombardment (2 × 10 electrons/nm sec) by electrons with beam energies between 60 keV and 120 keV. Based upon a minimum intensity necessary to produce the observed damage, we present an explanation based on the Knotek-Feibelman process.

  10. Keeping genome organized creates opportunities for damage | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Packing an entire genome inside the cramped quarters of a cell nucleus can put chromosomes at risk for damage, according to new research led by André Nussenzweig, Ph.D., Chief of CCR’s Laboratory of Genomic Integrity. The findings, reported July 20, 2017, in Cell, suggest that DNA breaks are routinely introduced and then repaired as a cell folds and organizes its genome, and that when repair processes fail, these breaks can give rise to chromosomal abnormalities characteristic of cancer cells. 

  11. Influence of correlation effects on radiation damage in solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, P. V.; Kulish, N. P.; Mel'nikova, N. A.; Grabovskii, Yu. E.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of correlation effects due to thermodynamic interaction of alloy components on segregation processes upon radiation treatment has been analyzed. The analysis has been performed for 53 metallic solid solutions. It has been shown that the short-range order in alloys causes a redistribution of flows of radiation defects and changes the mechanism of their annihilation, which in a certain temperature range is responsible for the high resistance of alloys to radiation swelling. The presence of two maxima in the curve of the temperature dependence of swelling for austenitic nickel-chromium alloys is associated with the existence therein of different types of short-range order at different temperatures.

  12. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  13. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  15. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  16. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  17. A new CT-based method to quantify radiation-induced lung damage in patients.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Wiegman, Erwin M; Langendijk, Johannes A; Widder, Joachim; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A new method to assess radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) using CT-scans was developed. It is more sensitive in detecting damage and corresponds better to physician-rated radiation pneumonitis than routinely-used methods. Use of this method may improve lung toxicity assessment and thereby facilitate development of more accurate predictive models for RILT.

  18. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclo­philin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. This analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite

  19. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room

  20. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature havemore » not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite

  1. Prevent Eye Damage: Protect Yourself from UV Radiation

    MedlinePlus

    ... With increased levels of UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface, largely due to stratospheric ozone layer depletion, ... for more information, and remember, a combination approach works best! For more information, contact: American Academy of ...

  2. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  3. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, Arno; Heibronn, L.H; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-01

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to a radiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers were irradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 10{sup 17} protons/cm{sup 2}. The samples lost approximately 75% of their pre-irradiation I{sub c}. This compares with Nb{sub 3}Sn, which loses about 50% at the same displacements per atom.

  4. Cytokine Disruption to Prevent Radiation Related Breast Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    radiation exposure. Some of the results were very impressive. We then also examined these three agent for their effects on murine mammary cancers...improved not reduced for murine mammary cancers (MCa35) compared to radiation alone (Figure 5). To demonstrate that the effect was true, we studied other...specifically in murine mammary cancer tumors actually improves the tumor response. The therapeutic gain of these agents is thus substantial and

  5. The radiation damage of crystalline silicon PN diode in tritium beta-voltaic battery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yisong; Yang, Yuqing; Liu, Yebing; Li, Hao; Wang, Guanquan; Hu, Rui; Xiong, Xiaoling; Luo, Shunzhong

    2014-08-01

    A tritium beta-voltaic battery using a crystalline silicon convertor composed of (100)Si/SiO2/Si3N4 film degrades remarkably with radiation from a high intensity titanium tritide film. Simulation and experiments were carried out to investigate the main factor causing the degradation. The radiation damages mainly comes from the x-ray emitted from the titanium tritide film and beta particle can relieve the damages. The x-ray radiation induced positive charges in the SiO2 film destroying the output property of the PN diode with the induction of an electric field.

  6. A thermochemical model of radiation damage and annealing applied to GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium conditions for continuous radiation damage and thermal annealing are reported. The calculations are based on a thermochemical model developed to analyze the incorporation of point imperfections in GaAs, and modified by introducing the radiation to produce native lattice defects rather than high-temperature and arsenic atmospheric pressure. The concentration of a set of defects, including vacancies, divacancies, and impurity vacancy complexes, are calculated as a function of temperature. Minority carrier lifetimes, short circuit current, and efficiency are deduced for a range of equilibrium temperatures. The results indicate that GaAs solar cells could have a mission life which is not greatly limited by radiation damage.

  7. A thermochemical model of radiation damage and annealing applied to GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium conditions for continuous radiation damage and thermal annealing are reported. The calculations are based on a thermochemical model developed to analyze the incorporation of point imperfections in GaAs, and modified by introducing the radiation to produce native lattice defects rather than high-temperature and arsenic atmospheric pressure. The concentration of a set of defects, including vacancies, divacancies, and impurity vacancy complexes, are calculated as a function of temperature. Minority carrier lifetimes, short circuit current, and efficiency are deduced for a range of equilibrium temperatures. The results indicate that GaAs solar cells could have a mission life which is not greatly limited by radiation damage.

  8. Understanding radiation damage on sub-cellular scale using RADAMOL simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2016-11-01

    We present an overview of the biophysical model RADAMOL developed as a Monte Carlo simulation tool for physical, physico-chemical and chemical stages of ionizing radiation action. Direct and indirect radiation damage by 10 keV electrons, and protons and alpha particles with energies from 1 MeV up to 30 MeV to a free DNA oligomer or DNA in the complex with lac repressor protein is analyzed. The role of radiation type and energy, oxygen concentration and DNA interaction with proteins on yields and distributions of primary biomolecular damage is demonstrated and discussed.

  9. A fluorescence enhancement assay for cellular DNA damage. [X Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, P.M.; Schwartz, H.S.

    1982-07-01

    A fluorescence procedure is described for quantitative measurement of DNA damage in mammalian cells. The technique is based upon the time-dependent partial alkaline unwinding of cellular DNA followed by determination of duplex:total DNA ratios with bisbenzamide, which has a differential molar fluorescence with single-stranded and duplex DNA. The method is rapid, does not require radioactive labeling of DNA, and is sufficiently sensitive to detect damage induced with 100 rads of X-irradiation. This method is standardized with respect to the alkaline unwinding unit, Mn0, and the unwinding constant, beta. Results obtained with this new technique and with hydroxylapatite chromatography for physical separation of single- and double-stranded DNA were confirmatory. The utility of the technique was demonstrated by detection of dose-related damage with X-irradiation and a variety of antineoplastic agents in unlabeled murine leukemia cells.

  10. Protective effect of an aminothiazole compound against γ-radiation induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    De, Strayo; Devasagayam, Thomas P A

    2011-11-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. During radiotherapy of cancer, one of the undesirable side-effects is toxicity to normal cells. Compounds with antioxidant activities are being tried as 'prophylactic radioprotectants' to overcome this problem. We evaluated the protective effect of an aminothiazole compound, in the form of dendrodoine analogue (DA) originally derived from a marine tunicate, against γ-radiation-induced damage to lipid, protein, and DNA besides its cytotoxicity. Oxidative damage was examined by different biochemcial assays. Our studies reveal that DA gave significant protection, in fairly low concentrations, against damage induced by γ-radiation to rat liver mitochondria, plasmid pBR322 DNA, and mouse splenic lymphocytes in vitro. It also protected against oxidative damage in whole-body irradiated mice exposed to therapeutic dose of radiation (2 Gy) in vivo. Spleen, a major target organ for radiation damage, of the irradiated mice showed significant protection when treated with DA, as examined by histopathology. In conclusion, due to the possible protective effects against normal cells/tissues both in vitro and in vivo, DA shows potential to be a radioprotector for possible use during radiotherapy.

  11. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis damage in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing; Li, Hai-Long; Wu, Hong-Yan; Gu, Mei; Li, Ying-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Ming, Hai-Xia; Dong, Xiao-Li; Liu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The main pathological change in radiation-induced heart disease is fibrosis. Emerging evidence has indicated that sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) was used for treating fibrosis diseases. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effect of STS on radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis (RICF) on cultured cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). CFs were irradiated with 1 or 2 Gy X-rays, and the expression of TGF-β1 and collagen I (Col-1) increased, indicating that low-dose X-rays promoted fibrosis damage effect. The fibrosis damage was accompanied by morphologic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as an increase in the expression of the ER stress-related molecules, GRP78 and CHOP. Administration of STS reduced ROS production and decreased the expression of Col-1, TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, GRP78, and CHOP in irradiated CFs, thus weakening the radiation-induced fibrosis damage and ER stress. Radiation-induced fibrosis damage was observed on a cellular level. The involvement of ER stress in radiation-induced fibrosis damage was demonstrated for the first time. STS attenuated the fibrosis damage effect in CFs and this effect may be related to its antioxidant action, and also related to its inhibition of ER stress and TGF-β1-Smad pathway. These results suggest that STS shows a good prospect in clinical prevention and treatment of RICF.

  12. Periodic annealing of radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R. Y.; Knechtli, R. C.; Kamath, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous annealing of GaAs solar cells is compared with periodic annealing to determine their relative effectiveness in minimizing proton radiation damage. It is concluded that continuous annealing of the cells in space at 150 C can effectively reduce the proton radiation damage to the GaAs solar cells. Periodic annealing is most effective if it can be initiated at relatively low fluences (approximating continuous annealing), especially if low temperatures of less than 200 C are to be used. If annealing is started only after the fluence of the damaging protons has accumulated to a high value 10 to the 11th power sq/pcm), effective annealing is still possible at relatively high temperatures. Finally, since electron radiation damage anneals even more easily than proton radiation damage, substantial improvements in GaAs solar cell life can be achieved by incorporating the proper annealing capabilities in solar panels for practical space missions where both electron and proton radiation damage have to be minimized.

  13. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  14. Radiation damage within nucleoprotein complexes studied by macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Charles S.; Carmichael, Ian; McGeehan, John E.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-11-01

    In X-ray crystallography, for the determination of the 3-D structure of macromolecules, radiation damage is still an inherent problem at modern third generation synchrotron sources, even when utilising cryo-crystallographic techniques (sample held at 100 K). At doses of just several MGy, at which a typical diffraction dataset is collected, site-specific radiation-induced chemical changes are known to manifest within protein crystals, and a wide body of literature is now devoted to understanding the mechanisms behind such damage. Far less is known regarding radiation-induced damage to crystalline nucleic acids and the wider class of nucleoprotein complexes during macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) data collection. As the MX structural biology community now strives to solve structures for increasingly larger and complex macromolecular assemblies, it essential to understand how such structures are affected by the X-ray radiation used to solve them. The purpose of this review is to summarise advances in the field of specific damage to nucleoprotein complexes and to present case studies of MX damage investigations on both protein-DNA (C.Esp1396I) and protein-RNA (TRAP) complexes. To motivate further investigations into MX damage mechanisms within nucleoprotein complexes, current and emerging protocols for investigating specific damage within Fobs(n)-Fobs(1) electron density difference maps are discussed.

  15. Past Exposure to Densely Ionizing Radiation Leaves a Unique Permanent Signature in the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hande, M. Prakash; Azizova, Tamara V.; Geard, Charles R.; Burak, Ludmilla E.; Mitchell, Catherine R.; Khokhryakov, Valentin F.; Vasilenko, Evgeny K.; Brenner, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Speculation has long surrounded the question of whether past exposure to ionizing radiation leaves a unique permanent signature in the genome. Intrachromosomal rearrangements or deletions are produced much more efficiently by densely ionizing radiation than by chemical mutagens, x-rays, or endogenous aging processes. Until recently, such stable intrachromosomal aberrations have been very hard to detect, but a new chromosome band painting technique has made their detection practical. We report the detection and quantification of stable intrachromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of healthy former nuclear-weapons workers who were exposed to plutonium many years ago. Even many years after occupational exposure, more than half the blood cells of the healthy plutonium workers contain large (>6 Mb) intrachromosomal rearrangements. The yield of these aberrations was highly correlated with plutonium dose to the bone marrow. The control groups contained very few such intrachromosomal aberrations. Quantification of this large-scale chromosomal damage in human populations exposed many years earlier will lead to new insights into the mechanisms and risks of cytogenetic damage. PMID:12679897

  16. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  17. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  18. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  19. Moderate acute intake of de-alcoholized red wine, but not alcohol, is protective against radiation-induced DNA damage ex vivo -- results of a comparative in vivo intervention study in younger men.

    PubMed

    Greenrod, W; Stockley, C S; Burcham, P; Abbey, M; Fenech, M

    2005-12-11

    Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remains unclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress in a crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21-26 years. The participants adhered to a low plant phenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300 mL of complete red wine, de-alcoholized red wine or ethanol on separate occasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiation-induced genome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentration was measured. Consumption of de-alcoholized red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1 and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wine protected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated with the concentration of total plasma catechin (R=-0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction of red wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin.

  20. Mutational strand asymmetries in cancer genomes reveal mechanisms of DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J.; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R.; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef; Braunstein, Lior Z.; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Wheeler, David A.; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional (“T-class”) asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations, and replicative (“R-class”) asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of Transcription-Coupled Damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand, and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  1. Altering genomic integrity: heavy metal exposure promotes trans-posable element-mediated damage

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Servant, Geraldine; Ade, Catherine; Roy-Enge, Astrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical for cellular homeostasis and survival. The active transposable elements (TEs) composed primarily of three mobile element lineages LINE-1, Alu, and SVA comprise approximately 30% of the mass of the human genome. For the past two decades, studies have shown that TEs significantly contribute to genetic instability and that TE-caused damages are associated with genetic diseases and cancer. Different environmental exposures, including several heavy metals, influence how TEs interact with its host genome increasing their negative impact. This mini-review provides some basic knowledge on TEs, their contribution to disease and an overview of the current knowledge on how heavy metals influence TE-mediated damage. PMID:25774044

  2. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    Viral manipulation of cellular proteins allows viruses to suppress host defenses and generate infectious progeny. Due to the linear double-stranded DNA nature of the adenovirus genome, the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is considered a barrier for successful infection. The adenovirus genome is packaged with protein VII, a viral-encoded histone-like core protein that is suggested to protect incoming viral genomes from detection by cellular DNA damage machinery. We showed that protein VII localizes to host chromatin during infection, leading us to hypothesize that protein VII may affect DNA damage responses on the cellular genome. Here, we show that protein VII at cellular chromatin results in a significant decrease in accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) following irradiation, indicating that protein VII inhibits DDR signaling. The oncoprotein SET was recently suggested to modulate the DDR by affecting access of repair proteins to chromatin. Since protein VII binds SET, we investigated a role for SET in DDR inhibition by protein VII. We show that knockdown of SET partially rescues the protein VII-induced decrease in γH2AX accumulation on the host genome, suggesting that SET is required for inhibition. Finally, we show that knockdown of SET also allows ATM to localize to incoming viral genomes bound by protein VII during infection with a mutant lacking early region E4. Together, our data suggest that the protein VII-SET interaction contributes to DDR evasion by adenovirus. Our results provide an additional example of a strategy used by adenovirus to manipulate the host DDR and show how viruses can modify cellular processes through manipulation of host chromatin.IMPORTANCE The DNA damage response (DDR) is a cellular network crucial for maintaining genome integrity. DNA viruses replicating in the nucleus challenge the resident genome and must overcome cellular responses, including the DDR. Adenoviruses are prevalent human pathogens that can cause a

  3. Sunscreens promote repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Akin, F J; Kligman, A M

    1983-08-01

    Chronic UV irradiation profoundly damages the dermis of human and animal skin. These alterations were thought to be irreversible. Recently, we showed that substantial repair occurred in hairless mice after stopping UV exposure. A band of new connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present study focussed on whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation was continued. Albino hairless mice were exposed to Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. The daily dose of UV (UVB + UVA) was 0.17 J/cm2. Sunscreens of sun protection factors (SPF) 6 and 15 were applied after 10 and 20 weeks of irradiation. Biopsies were taken at 10, 20, 30, and 45 weeks of the experiment. With both sunscreens, especially SPF-15, previously damaged dermis was repaired during continued irradiation. Repair occurred in situ and, in severely damaged skin, in the novel form of subepidermal reconstruction zones of new connective tissue with parallel collagen bundles and a network of fine elastic fibers.

  4. Dark progression reveals slow timescales for radiation damage between T = 180 and 240 K

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Can radiation damage to protein crystals be ‘outrun’ by collecting a structural data set before damage is manifested? Recent experiments using ultra-intense pulses from a free-electron laser show that the answer is yes. Here, evidence is presented that significant reductions in global damage at temperatures above 200 K may be possible using conventional X-ray sources and current or soon-to-be available detectors. Specifically, ‘dark progression’ (an increase in damage with time after the X-rays have been turned off) was observed at temperatures between 180 and 240 K and on timescales from 200 to 1200 s. This allowed estimation of the temperature-dependent timescale for damage. The rate of dark progression is consistent with an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 14 kJ mol−1. This is comparable to the activation energy for the solvent-coupled diffusive damage processes responsible for the rapid increase in radiation sensitivity as crystals are warmed above the glass transition near 200 K. Analysis suggests that at T = 300 K data-collection times of the order of 1 s (and longer at lower temperatures) may allow significant reductions in global radiation damage, facilitating structure solution on crystals with liquid solvent. No dark progression was observed below T = 180 K, indicating that no important damage process is slowed through this timescale window in this temperature range. PMID:21904032

  5. Quantifying X-ray radiation damage in protein crystals at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kmetko, Jan; Husseini, Naji S; Naides, Matthew; Kalinin, Yevgeniy; Thorne, Robert E

    2006-09-01

    The dependence of radiation damage to protein crystals at cryogenic temperatures upon the X-ray absorption cross-section of the crystal has been examined. Lysozyme crystals containing varying heavy-atom concentrations were irradiated and diffraction patterns were recorded as a function of the total number of incident photons. An experimental protocol and a coefficient of sensitivity to absorbed dose, proportional to the change in relative isotropic B factor, are defined that together yield a sensitive and robust measure of damage. Radiation damage per incident photon increases linearly with the absorption coefficient of the crystal, but damage per absorbed photon is the same for all heavy-atom concentrations. Similar damage per absorbed photon is observed for crystals of three proteins with different molecular sizes and solvent contents.

  6. Predicted highly expressed and putative alien genes of Deinococcus radiodurans and implications for resistance to ionizing radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Mrázek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Predicted highly expressed (PHX) and putative alien genes determined by codon usages are characterized in the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans (strain R1). Deinococcus radiodurans (DEIRA) can survive very high doses of ionizing radiation that are lethal to virtually all other organisms. It has been argued that DEIRA is endowed with enhanced repair systems that provide protection and stability. However, predicted expression levels of DNA repair proteins with the exception of RecA tend to be low and do not distinguish DEIRA from other prokaryotes. In this paper, the capability of DEIRA to resist extreme doses of ionizing and UV radiation is attributed to an unusually high number of PHX chaperone/degradation, protease, and detoxification genes. Explicitly, compared with all current complete prokaryotic genomes, DEIRA contains the greatest number of PHX detoxification and protease proteins. Other sources of environmental protection against severe conditions of UV radiation, desiccation, and thermal effects for DEIRA are the several S-layer (surface structure) PHX proteins. The top PHX gene of DEIRA is the multifunctional tricarboxylic acid (TCA) gene aconitase, which, apart from its role in respiration, also alerts the cell to oxidative damage. PMID:11296249

  7. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  8. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  9. Dicarbonyl proteome and genome damage in metabolic and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a potent protein-glycating agent. It is an arginine-directed glycating agent and often modifies functionally important sites in proteins. Glycation forms mainly MG-H1 [Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)ornithine] residues. MG-H1 content of proteins is quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis-MS/MS and also by immunoblotting with specific monoclonal antibodies. Methylglyoxal-modified proteins undergo cellular proteolysis and release MG-H1 free adduct for excretion. MG-H1 residues have been found in proteins of animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and protoctista. MG-H1 is often the major advanced glycation end-product in proteins of tissues and body fluids, increasing in diabetes and associated vascular complications, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and aging. Proteins susceptible to methylglyoxal modification with related functional impairment are called the DCP (dicarbonyl proteome). The DCP includes albumin, haemoglobin, transcription factors, mitochondrial proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, lens crystallins and others. DCP component proteins are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes and aging, oxidative stress, dyslipidaemia, cell detachment and anoikis and apoptosis. Methylglyoxal also modifies DNA where deoxyguanosine residues are modified to imidazopurinone MGdG {3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-6,7-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-6/7-methylimidazo-[2,3-b]purine-9(8)one} isomers. MGdG was the major quantitative adduct detected in vivo. It was linked to frequency of DNA strand breaks and increased markedly during apoptosis induced by a cell-permeant glyoxalase I inhibitor. Glyoxalase I metabolizes >99% methylglyoxal and thereby protects the proteome and genome. Gene deletion of GLO1 is embryonically lethal and GLO1 silencing increases methylglyoxal concentration, MG-H1 and MGdG, premature aging and disease. Studies of methylglyoxal glycation have importance for human health, longevity and

  10. Dark progression reveals slow timescales for radiation damage between T = 180 and 240 K

    SciTech Connect

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-09-01

    Between T = 180 and 240 K, radiation damage progresses on minute timescales when the X-rays are off, suggesting that a fraction of damage at higher temperatures may be outrun using currently available sources and detectors. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be ‘outrun’ by collecting a structural data set before damage is manifested? Recent experiments using ultra-intense pulses from a free-electron laser show that the answer is yes. Here, evidence is presented that significant reductions in global damage at temperatures above 200 K may be possible using conventional X-ray sources and current or soon-to-be available detectors. Specifically, ‘dark progression’ (an increase in damage with time after the X-rays have been turned off) was observed at temperatures between 180 and 240 K and on timescales from 200 to 1200 s. This allowed estimation of the temperature-dependent timescale for damage. The rate of dark progression is consistent with an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 14 kJ mol{sup −1}. This is comparable to the activation energy for the solvent-coupled diffusive damage processes responsible for the rapid increase in radiation sensitivity as crystals are warmed above the glass transition near 200 K. Analysis suggests that at T = 300 K data-collection times of the order of 1 s (and longer at lower temperatures) may allow significant reductions in global radiation damage, facilitating structure solution on crystals with liquid solvent. No dark progression was observed below T = 180 K, indicating that no important damage process is slowed through this timescale window in this temperature range.

  11. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

    2005-08-12

    DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  13. NASA's high efficiency and radiation damage solar cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    The conversion efficiency and the life expectancy of solar cells and arrays were evaluated for space applications. Efforts were made to improve the understanding of the conversion of electromagnetic radiation to useful forms of energy. A broad range of advanced concepts were evaluated.

  14. Cellular Senescence, Radiation Damage to Mitochondria, and the Compensatory Response in Ripening Pear Fruits 1

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Roger J.; Yu, Ida K.; Ku, Lily L.; Fisher, L. Karl; Dehgan, Nancy

    1968-01-01

    A compensatory response, viz. in vivo recovery from radiation damage to mitochondria, occurs in preclimacteric pear fruits (Pyrus communis L.) treated with ionizing radiation. The compensatory response is absent or markedly impaired in senescent fruits irradiated at or near the climacteric peak. Senescent cells failed to recover from harmful effects of radiation on: 1) mitochondrial yield, 2) in vivo incorporation of amino acids into mitochondrial protein, and 3) mitochondrial respiratory control and ADP/O. A diminished response to “split-dose” irradiation and a delayed rate of recovery confirmed the degeneracy and loss of compensatory power with cell age. A loss of restorative activity, especially in mitochondria that supply the cell with essential energy, may underlie the more obvious signs of cumulative stress that accompany cellular senescence. Use of ionizing radiation as an investigative tool and the molecular implications of radiation damage, recovery, and cellular senescence are discussed. PMID:16656887

  15. [Cutaneous damage after acute exposure to ionizing radiation: decisive for the prognosis of radiation accident victims].

    PubMed

    Dörr, H; Baier, T; Meineke, V

    2013-12-01

    The cutaneous radiation syndrome includes all deterministic effects on the skin and visible parts of the mucosa from ionizing radiation. The Intensity and duration of radiation-induced skin symptoms depend on the kind and quality of ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was the investigation of the importance of the time of the development of radiation induced-skin effects on the prognosis of radiation accident victims. Clinical data about radiation accident victims from the database SEARCH were used. 211 cases with good documentation regarding radiation-induced skin effects were selected. From these 211 patients, 166 survived the acute phase of the acute radiation syndrome, while 45 died during the acute phase. Among those patients who did not survive the acute phase, 82.2 % showed their first documented radiation-induced skin symptoms during the first 3 days after radiation exposure. Of those patients whose first documented radiation-induced skin symptoms appeared on or after day four, 94.2 % survived the acute phase. The time to the occurrence of the first radiation-induced skin effects is diagnostically significant. The skin plays an important role in the clinical course of radiation syndromes and in the development of radiation-induced multi-organ failure. In a retrospective data analysis like this, the quality of data might be a limitation.

  16. Analyses of the secondary particle radiation and the DNA damage it causes to human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lebel E.; Rusek A.; Sivertz, M.; Yip, K.; Thompson, K.; Tafrov, S.

    2011-11-22

    High-energy protons, and high mass and energy ions, along with the secondary particles they produce, are the main contributors to the radiation hazard during space explorations. Skin, particularly the epidermis, consisting mainly of keratinocytes with potential for proliferation and malignant transformation, absorbs the majority of the radiation dose. Therefore, we used normal human keratinocytes to investigate and quantify the DNA damage caused by secondary radiation. Its manifestation depends on the presence of retinol in the serum-free media, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. We simulated the generation of secondary radiation after the impact of protons and iron ions on an aluminum shield. We also measured the intensity and the type of the resulting secondary particles at two sample locations; our findings agreed well with our predictions. We showed that secondary particles inflict DNA damage to different extents, depending on the type of primary radiation. Low-energy protons produce fewer secondary particles and cause less DNA damage than do high-energy protons. However, both generate fewer secondary particles and inflict less DNA damage than do high mass and energy ions. The majority of cells repaired the initial damage, as denoted by the presence of 53BPI foci, within the first 24 hours after exposure, but some cells maintained the 53BP1 foci longer.

  17. Analyses of the Secondary Particle Radiation and the DNA Damage it Causes to Human Keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lebel E. A.; Tafrov S.; Rusek, A.; Sivertz, M. B.; Yip, K.; Thompson, K. H.

    2011-11-01

    High-energy protons, and high mass and energy ions, along with the secondary particles they produce, are the main contributors to the radiation hazard during space explorations. Skin, particularly the epidermis, consisting mainly of keratinocytes with potential for proliferation and malignant transformation, absorbs the majority of the radiation dose. Therefore, we used normal human keratinocytes to investigate and quantify the DNA damage caused by secondary radiation. Its manifestation depends on the presence of retinol in the serum-free media, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. We simulated the generation of secondary radiation after the impact of protons and iron ions on an aluminum shield. We also measured the intensity and the type of the resulting secondary particles at two sample locations; our findings agreed well with our predictions. We showed that secondary particles inflict DNA damage to different extents, depending on the type of primary radiation. Low-energy protons produce fewer secondary particles and cause less DNA damage than do high-energy protons. However, both generate fewer secondary particles and inflict less DNA damage than do high mass and energy ions. The majority of cells repaired the initial damage, as denoted by the presence of 53BPI foci, within the first 24 hours after exposure, but some cells maintained the 53BP1 foci longer.

  18. Initial Biological Damage from Space Radiation: Implications for Development of Biological Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to high-energy nuclear particles originating from the galactic cosmic rays, high-energy protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field or solar particle events, and secondary radiation produced by nuclear reactions. Important differences between conventional radiation including X-rays or gamma-rays, and high-energy nuclei occur at the level of initial damage to DNA and other potential biological target molecules, and to tissues. Such differences include a large fraction of the initial damage from high charge and energy (HZE) nuclear particles manifested as irreparable lesions including small- and large-scale DNA deletions. Also, low dose-rate exposures in space result in a heterogeneous population of damaged cells distinct from energetic photon irradiation of tissue. We present an overview of the initial biological damage and dose and dose-rate effects produced by ionizing radiation using track structure and nuclear reaction models. Implications of the differences in cellular and tissue damage between conventional radiation and space radiation for the development of biological countermeasures are discussed.

  19. Initial Biological Damage from Space Radiation: Implications for Development of Biological Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to high-energy nuclear particles originating from the galactic cosmic rays, high-energy protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field or solar particle events, and secondary radiation produced by nuclear reactions. Important differences between conventional radiation including X-rays or gamma-rays, and high-energy nuclei occur at the level of initial damage to DNA and other potential biological target molecules, and to tissues. Such differences include a large fraction of the initial damage from high charge and energy (HZE) nuclear particles manifested as irreparable lesions including small- and large-scale DNA deletions. Also, low dose-rate exposures in space result in a heterogeneous population of damaged cells distinct from energetic photon irradiation of tissue. We present an overview of the initial biological damage and dose and dose-rate effects produced by ionizing radiation using track structure and nuclear reaction models. Implications of the differences in cellular and tissue damage between conventional radiation and space radiation for the development of biological countermeasures are discussed.

  20. The yield, processing, and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shikazono, Naoya; Noguchi, Miho; Fujii, Kentaro; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yokoya, Akinari

    2009-01-01

    After living cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, a variety of chemical modifications of DNA are induced either directly by ionization of DNA or indirectly through interactions with water-derived radicals. The DNA lesions include single strand breaks (SSB), base lesions, sugar damage, and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). Clustered DNA damage, which is defined as two or more of such lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA induced by a single radiation track, is considered to be a unique feature of ionizing radiation. A double strand break (DSB) is a type of clustered DNA damage, in which single strand breaks are formed on opposite strands in close proximity. Formation and repair of DSBs have been studied in great detail over the years as they have been linked to important biological endpoints, such as cell death, loss of genetic material, chromosome aberration. Although non-DSB clustered DNA damage has received less attention, there is growing evidence of its biological significance. This review focuses on the current understanding of (1) the yield of non-DSB clustered damage induced by ionizing radiation (2) the processing, and (3) biological consequences of non-DSB clustered DNA damage.

  1. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described.

  2. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment.

  4. Estimation of low-dose radiation-responsive proteins in the absence of genomic instability in normal human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Jung Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Cha Soon

    2017-07-25

    Low-dose radiation has various biological effects such as adaptive responses, low-dose hypersensitivity, as well as beneficial effects. However, little is known about the particular proteins involved in these effects. Here, we sought to identify low-dose radiation-responsive phosphoproteins in normal fibroblast cells. We assessed genomic instability and proliferation of fibroblast cells after γ-irradiation by γ-H2AX foci and micronucleus formation analyses and BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. We screened fibroblast cells 8 h after low-dose (0.05 Gy) γ-irradiation using Phospho Explorer Antibody Microarray and validated two differentially expressed phosphoproteins using Western blotting. Cell proliferation proceeded normally in the absence of genomic instability after low-dose γ-irradiation. Phospho antibody microarray analysis and Western blotting revealed increased expression of two phosphoproteins, phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418), 8 h after low-dose radiation. Our findings suggest that low-dose radiation of normal fibroblast cells activates the expression of phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418) in the absence of genomic instability. Therefore, these proteins may be involved in DNA damage repair processes.

  5. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the {open_quotes}Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNA{close_quotes}.

  6. Mitotic DNA damages induced by carbon-ion radiation incur additional chromosomal breaks in polyploidy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Libin; Liu, Xiongxiong; Jin, Xiaodong; Zhao, Ting; Ye, Fei; Liu, Xinguo; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Li, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    Compared with low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, carbon-ion radiation has been proved to induce high frequency of more complex DNA damages, including DNA double strands (DSBs) and non-DSB clustered DNA lesions. Chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin has been reported to elicit additional H2AX phosphorylation in polyploidy. Here, we investigated whether mitotic DNA damage induced by high-LET carbon-ion radiation could play the same role. We demonstrate that impairment of post-mitotic G1 and S arrest and abrogation of post-mitotic G2-M checkpoint failed to prevent mis-replication of damaged DNA and mis-separation of chromosomes. Meanwhile, mitotic slippage only nocodazole-related, cytokinesis failure and cell fusion collectively contributed to the formation of binucleated cells. Chk1 and Cdh1 activation was inhibited when polyploidy emerged in force, both of which are critical components for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. Carbon-ion radiation irrelevant of nocodazole incurred additional DNA breaks in polyploidy, manifesting as structural and numerical karyotype changes. The proliferation of cells given pre-synchronization and radiation was completely inhibited and cells were intensely apoptotic. Since increased chromosomal damage resulted in extensive H2AX phosphorylation during polyploidy, we propose that the additional γ-H2AX during polyploidy incurred by carbon-ion radiation provides a final opportunity for these dangerous and chromosomally unstable cells to be eliminated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Models of CNS radiation damage during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopewell, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    The primary structural and functional arrangement of the different cell types within the CNS are reviewed. This was undertaken with a view to providing a better understanding of the complex interrelationships that may contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in this tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. The spectrum of possible CNS radiation-induced syndromes are discussed although not all have an immediate relevance to exposure during space flight. The specific characteristics of the lesions observed would appear to be dose related. Very high doses may produce an acute CNS syndrome that can cause death. Of the delayed lesions, selective coagulation necrosis of white matter and a later appearing vascular microangiopathy, have been reported in patients after cancer therapy doses. Lower doses, perhaps very low doses, may produce a delayed generalised CNS atrophy; this effect and the probability of the induction of CNS tumors could potentially have the greatest significance for space flight.

  8. Radiation damage in diagnostic window materials for the TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1981-07-01

    The general problem of evaluating diagnostic window materials for the TFTR at the tank wall location is described. Specific evaluations are presented for several materials: vitreous silica, crystal quartz, sapphire, zinc selenide, and several fluorides: lithium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and calcium fluoride; and seal glasses are discussed. The effects of the neutrons will be minimal. The major problems arise from the high flux of ionizing radiation, mainly the soft x rays which are absorbed near the surface of the materials. Additionally, this large energy deposition causes a significant thermal pulse with attendant thermal stresses. It is thus desirable to protect the windows with cover slips where this is feasible or to reduce the incident radiation by mounting the windows on long pipes. A more detailed summary is given at the end of this report.

  9. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Laser Radiation Final Report T. Lawwill, M.D. and R.S. Crockett, Ph.D. July 1981 - Supported by U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command Fort...Army Medical Research and Development Command July 1981 Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701 ATTN: SGRD-RMS 13. NUMBEROFPAGES "- _158 14. MONITORING AGENCY...professor. ANIMAL USE STATEMENT In conducting the research described in this report, the investigator adhered to the "Guide for Laboratory Animal

  10. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-11-27

    The use of HTS materials in high radiation environmentsrequires that the superconducting properties remain constant up to aradiation high dose. BSCCO-2223 samples from two manufacturers wereirradiated with 50 MeV protons at fluences of up to 5 x 1017 protons/cm2.The samples lost approximately 75 percent of their pre-irradiation Ic.This compares with Nb3Sn, which loses about 50 percent at the samedisplacements per atom.

  11. An Assessment of Radiation Damage Models and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Mansur, Louis K

    2005-05-01

    The current state of development of the primary models used for investigating and simulating irradiation effects in structural alloys of interest to the U.S. DOE's Generation-IV reactor program are discussed. The underlying theory that supports model development is also described where appropriate. First, the key processes that underlie radiation-induced changes in material properties are summarized, and the types of radiation effects that subsequently arise are described. Future development work needed in order for theory, modeling, and computational materials science to support and add value to the Gen IV reactor materials program are then outlined. The expected specific outcomes and overall benefits of the required effort are: the knowledge to extrapolate material behavior to conditions for which there are no experimental data; systematic understanding of mechanisms and processes to enable confident interpolation between point-by-point experimental observations; acceleration of the development, selection, and qualification of materials for reactor service; and prediction of material response to real-world operating load histories which often involve a complicated superposition of time, temperature, radiation dose rate, and mechanical loading conditions. Opportunities for international collaboration to accelerate progress in all of the required research areas are briefly discussed, particularly in the context of two well coordinated, broad-based research projects on modeling and simulation of radiation effects on materials that are currently funded in Europe. In addition to providing the opportunity for substantial leveraging of the DOE-funded activities in this area, these projects may serve as models for future development within the Gen-IV program. The larger of these two projects, which involves 12 European research laboratories and 16 universities, is called PERFECT and is funded by the European Union. A smaller effort focusing on developing predictive

  12. Higher-Density Culture in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Results in DNA Damage and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kurt; Zambelli, Filippo; Mertzanidou, Afroditi; Smolders, Ilse; Geens, Mieke; Nguyen, Ha Thi; Barbé, Lise; Sermon, Karen; Spits, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) show great promise for clinical and research applications, but their well-known proneness to genomic instability hampers the development to their full potential. Here, we demonstrate that medium acidification linked to culture density is the main cause of DNA damage and genomic alterations in hESC grown on feeder layers, and this even in the short time span of a single passage. In line with this, we show that increasing the frequency of the medium refreshments minimizes the levels of DNA damage and genetic instability. Also, we show that cells cultured on laminin-521 do not present this increase in DNA damage when grown at high density, although the (long-term) impact on their genomic stability remains to be elucidated. Our results explain the high levels of genome instability observed over the years by many laboratories worldwide, and show that the development of optimal culture conditions is key to solving this problem. PMID:26923824

  13. From DNA radiation damage to cell death: theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-10-05

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to "historical" approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA "sublesions" and "lesions" as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  14. From DNA Radiation Damage to Cell Death: Theoretical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to “historical” approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA “sublesions” and “lesions” as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively. PMID:20976308

  15. Diffraction data analysis in the presence of radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Borek, Dominika; Cymborowski, Marcin; Machius, Mischa; Minor, Wladek; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2010-04-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the acquisition of a complete set of diffraction intensities typically involves a high cumulative dose of X-ray radiation. In the process of data acquisition, the irradiated crystal lattice undergoes a broad range of chemical and physical changes. These result in the gradual decay of diffraction intensities, accompanied by changes in the macroscopic organization of crystal lattice order and by localized changes in electron density that, owing to complex radiation chemistry, are specific for a particular macromolecule. The decay of diffraction intensities is a well defined physical process that is fully correctable during scaling and merging analysis and therefore, while limiting the amount of diffraction, it has no other impact on phasing procedures. Specific chemical changes, which are variable even between different crystal forms of the same macromolecule, are more difficult to predict, describe and correct in data. Appearing during the process of data collection, they result in gradual changes in structure factors and therefore have profound consequences in phasing procedures. Examples of various combinations of radiation-induced changes are presented and various considerations pertinent to the determination of the best strategies for handling diffraction data analysis in representative situations are discussed.

  16. DIETARY FLAXSEED PREVENTS RADIATION-INDUCED OXIDATIVE LUNG DAMAGE, INFLAMMATION AND FIBROSIS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF THORACIC RADIATION INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James C.; Krochak, Ryan; Blouin, Aaron; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vachani, Anil; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) has high contents of omega-3 fatty acids and lignans with antioxidant properties. Its use in preventing thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)-induced pneumonopathy has never been evaluated. We evaluated FS supplementation given to mice given before and post-XRT. FS-derived lignans, known for their direct antioxidant properties, were evaluated in abrogating ROS generation in cultured endothelial cells following gamma radiation exposure. Mice were fed 10% FS or isocaloric control diet for three weeks and given 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT. Lungs were evaluated at 24 hours for markers of radiation-induced injury, three weeks for acute lung damage (lipid peroxidation, lung edema and inflammation), and at four months for late lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis). FS-Lignans blunted ROS generation in vitro, resulting from radiation in a dose-dependent manner. FS-fed mice had reduced expression of lung injury biomarkers (Bax, p21, and TGF-beta1) at 24 hours following XRT and reduced oxidative lung damage as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels at 3 weeks following XRT. In addition, FS-fed mice had decreased lung fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content and decreased inflammatory cell influx into lungs at 4 months post XRT. Importantly, when Lewis Lung carcinoma cells were injected systemically in mice, FS dietary supplementation did not appear to protect lung tumors from responding to thoracic XRT. Dietary FS is protective against pulmonary fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative lung damage in a murine model. Moreover, in this model, tumor radioprotection was not observed. FS lignans exhibited potent radiation-induced ROS scavenging action. Taken together, these data suggest that dietary flaxseed may be clinically useful as an agent to increase the therapeutic index of thoracic XRT by increasing the radiation tolerance of lung tissues. PMID:18981722

  17. Modeling and Measuring the Effects of Radiation Damage Annealing on Helium Diffusion Kinetics in Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, C. D.; Fox, M.; Shuster, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding helium diffusion kinetics in apatite is critical for the accurate interpretation of (U-Th)/He thermochronometric data. This problem is complicated by the observation that helium diffusivity is not a simple function of temperature, but may evolve as a function of damage to the apatite crystal lattice resulting from alpha recoil. This `radiation damage' increases as a function of the amount of radiometric parent products, or effective uranium concentration, and time, but decreases due to thermal annealing of damage, necessitating a detailed understanding of radiation damage production and annealing in cases of burial heating over geologic timescales. Published observations [1,2] suggest that annealing rates of damage caused by alpha recoil and fission tracks in apatite differ. Existing models, however, assume the diffusion kinetics resulting from the two sources of damage are identical [3], demonstrating the need for further investigation of these damage sources. We present modeling and experimental work designed to interrogate the effects of radiation damage and its annealing on helium diffusion kinetics in apatite. Using previously published results [4] that investigated the effects of annealing temperature and duration on measured helium diffusivity, we fit a set of functions that are then integrated into a numerical model that tracks the evolution of radiation damage and apparent (U-Th)/He age. We compare the results of this model calibration to existing models [3]. In addition, we present data from two suites of diffusion experiments. The first suite, intended to test the published methodology and results, uses Durango apatite, while the second uses Sierran (CA) granite as a first test to determine if apatite of varying chemistry and age responds differently to the thermal annealing of radiation damage. Ultimately, the updated model and experimental results will benefit the interpretation of the effects of radiation damage accumulation and

  18. Post Situ neutron and gamma radiation damage tests on different quartz types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Baker, D.; Schletzbaum, J.; Bruecken, P.; Onel, Y.; Konik, A.; Akgun, U.

    2016-10-01

    Post-Situ neutron and gamma radiation damage studies performed on seven types of quartz fibers are reported. All fibers contained quartz cores, some of which were UV enhanced. The fiber cladding was either polymer or quartz, while the buffer was either polymide or acrylite. Previous studies with electron and proton irradiation on numerous types of quartz fibers have shown different optical degradation levels. However, neutron and gamma irradiation has not been investigated for similar quartz fibers before. After 17.6 × 104 Gray of neutron and 73.5 × 104 Gray of gamma radiation, wavelength specific damage to each type of fibers was determined. It is seen that the FBP type quartz fiber by Polymicro shows the least damage due to neutron and gamma radiations.

  19. Review of radiation damage in GaN-based materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, Stephen J.; Deist, Richard; Ren, Fan; Liu, Lu; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Kim, Jihyun

    2013-09-15

    A review of the effects of proton, neutron, γ-ray, and electron irradiation on GaN materials and devices is presented. Neutron irradiation tends to create disordered regions in the GaN, while the damage from the other forms of radiation is more typically point defects. In all cases, the damaged region contains carrier traps that reduce the mobility and conductivity of the GaN and at high enough doses, a significant degradation of device performance. GaN is several orders of magnitude more resistant to radiation damage than GaAs of similar doping concentrations. In terms of heterostructures, preliminary data suggests that the radiation hardness decreases in the order AlN/GaN > AlGaN/GaN > InAlN/GaN, consistent with the average bond strengths in the Al-based materials.

  20. Radiation Tolerant Interfaces: Influence of Local Stoichiometry at the Misfit Dislocation on Radiation Damage Resistance of Metal/Oxide Interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Choudhury, Samrat; Manandhar, Sandeep; ...

    2017-04-24

    The interaction of radiation with materials controls the performance, reliability, and safety of many structures in nuclear power systems. Revolutionary improvements in radiation damage resistance may be attainable if methods can be found to manipulate interface properties to give optimal interface stability and point defect recombination capability. To understand how variations in interface properties such as misfit dislocation density and local chemistry affect radiation-induced defect absorption and recombination, a model system of metallic CrxV1-x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) epitaxial films deposited on MgO(001) single crystal substrates has been explored in this paper. By controlling film composition, the lattice mismatchmore » between the film and MgO is adjusted to vary the misfit dislocation density at the metal/oxide interface. The stability of these interfaces under various irradiation conditions is studied experimentally and theoretically. The results indicate that, unlike at metal/metal interfaces, the misfit dislocation density does not dominate radiation damage tolerance at metal/oxide interfaces. Rather, the stoichiometry and the location of the misfit dislocation extra half-plane (in the metal or the oxide) drive radiation-induced defect behavior. Finally, together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity of defect recombination to interfacial chemistry and provide new avenues for engineering radiation-tolerant nanomaterials for next-generation nuclear power plants.« less

  1. The use of displacement damage dose to correlate degradation in solar cells exposed to different radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.; Burke, Edward A.; Shapiro, Philip; Statler, Richard; Messenger, Scott R.; Walters, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    It has been found useful in the past to use the concept of 'equivalent fluence' to compare the radiation response of different solar cell technologies. Results are usually given in terms of an equivalent 1 MeV electron or an equivalent 10 MeV proton fluence. To specify cell response in a complex space-radiation environment in terms of an equivalent fluence, it is necessary to measure damage coefficients for a number of representative electron and proton energies. However, at the last Photovoltaic Specialist Conference we showed that nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) could be used to correlate damage coefficients for protons, using measurements for GaAs as an example. This correlation means that damage coefficients for all proton energies except near threshold can be predicted from a measurement made at one particular energy. NIEL is the exact equivalent for displacement damage of linear energy transfer (LET) for ionization energy loss. The use of NIEL in this way leads naturally to the concept of 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence. The situation for electron damage is more complex, however. It is shown that the concept of 'displacement damage dose' gives a more general way of unifying damage coefficients. It follows that 1 MeV electron equivalent fluence is a special case of a more general quantity for unifying electron damage coefficients which we call the 'effective 1 MeV electron equivalent dose'.

  2. Global radiation damage: temperature dependence, time dependence and how to outrun it.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Matthew; Hopkins, Jesse B; Badeau, Ryan; Mulichak, Anne M; Keefe, Lisa J; Thorne, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    A series of studies that provide a consistent and illuminating picture of global radiation damage to protein crystals, especially at temperatures above ∼200 K, are described. The radiation sensitivity shows a transition near 200 K, above which it appears to be limited by solvent-coupled diffusive processes. Consistent with this interpretation, a component of global damage proceeds on timescales of several minutes at 180 K, decreasing to seconds near room temperature. As a result, data collection times of order 1 s allow up to half of global damage to be outrun at 260 K. Much larger damage reductions near room temperature should be feasible using larger dose rates delivered using microfocused beams, enabling a significant expansion of structural studies of proteins under more nearly native conditions.

  3. Radiation damage studies for the SDC electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R.; Imlay, R. L.; Khosravi, E. S.; Lim, Jit-Ning; Lyndon, C.; McMills, G.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W. J.; Courtney, J. C.; Tashakkori, R.; Vegara, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results from a year long study aimed at radiation resistance and optical performance of scintillator tile with green wave shifter fiber readout. A careful investigation of several rad-hard plastic scintillators from Bicron and Kuraray, studies indicate that for a specific rad-hard Bicron scintillator, it is possible to build a tile/fiber EM calorimeter that can operate in the design luminosity of SSC. This calorimeter with excellent optical response would only have a light loss of about 5% after being exposed to 1 Mrad.

  4. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  5. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Zeng, Jing; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Wang, Hong-Mei; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury.

  6. Modeling of secondary radiation damage in LIGA PMMA resist exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2003-01-01

    Secondary radiation during LIGA PMMA resist exposure adversely affects feature definition, sidewall taper and overall sidewall offset. Additionally, it can degrade the resist adjacent to the substrate, leading to the loss of free-standing features through undercutting during resist development or through mechanical failure of the degraded material. The source of this radiation includes photoelectrons, Auger electrons, fluorescence photons, etc. Sandia"s Integrated Tiger Series (ITS), a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code, was used to compute dose profiles within 1 to 2 microns of the absorber edge and near the interface of the resist with a metallized substrate. The difficulty of sub-micron resolution requirement was overcome by solving a few local problems having carefully designed micron-scale geometries. The results indicate a 2-μm dose transition region near the absorber edge resulting from PMMA"s photoelectrons. This region leads to sidewall offset and to tapered sidewalls following resist development. The results also show a dose boundary layer of around 1 μm near the substrate interface due to electrons emitted from the substrate metallization layer. The maximum dose at the resist bottom under the absorber can be very high and can lead to feature loss during development. This model was also used to investigate those resist doses resulting from multi-layer substrate.

  7. Modification of radiation damage in rat spinal cord by mitotane

    SciTech Connect

    Glicksman, A.S.; Bliven, S.F.; Leith, J.T.

    1982-07-01

    Modification of the paralytic response in rats after 6-MV photon irradiation of the spinal cord with either single or split exposures (two equal fractions given in a 24-hour period) by mitotane was investigated. Mitotane was administered as a suspension in physiologic saline (300 mg/kg/day) for either 5 days prior to or 5 days after irradiation. For rats receiving split doses of 6-MV photons, either the last two doses of mitotane were given 2 hours prior to each radiation fraction or mitotane was begun 2 hours after the second fraction and continued for 5 days. The data to 6 months after irradiation indicate that, in rats given mitotane for 5 days prior to single-dose photon irradiation, the paralytic response (as defined by the dose needed to produce paralysis in 50% of the irradiated groups of rats) was enhanced by a dose-enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.40. The DEF in the group of rats given mitotane after single doses of 6-MV photons was 1.15. In the split-dose irradiation experiments, the DEF for the groups of rats given mitotane prior to each radiation fraction was 1.36; while the DEF for the group of rats receiving mitotane beginning after the second fraction was 1.18. These data indicate that mitotane can potentiate the effects of 6-MV photon irradiation to the central nervous system, with mitotane administered prior to irradiation being the most effective sequence.

  8. Radiation damage in high voltage silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Brandhorst, H., Jr.; Swartz, C. K.; Weizer, V. G.

    1980-01-01

    Three high open-circuit voltage cell designs based on 0.1 ohm-cm p-type silicon were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and their performance determined to fluences as high as 10 to the 15th power/sq cm. Of the three cell designs, radiation induced degradation was greatest in the high-low emitter (HLE cell). The diffused and ion implanted cells degraded approximately equally but less than the HLE cell. Degradation was greatest in an HLE cell exposed to X-rays before electron irradiation. The cell regions controlling both short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage degradation were defined in all three cell types. An increase in front surface recombination velocity accompanied time dependent degradation of an HLE cell after X-irradiation. It was speculated that this was indirectly due to a decrease in positive charge at the silicon-oxide interface. Modifications aimed at reducing radiation induced degradation are proposed for all three cell types.

  9. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  10. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  11. Repair of ionizing radiation DNA base damage in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Kinsella, T.J.; Dobson, P.P.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Micrococcus luteus endonuclease sensitive sites were measured by alkaline elution in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts after ionizing radiation. Due to the sensitivity of this assay, repair of base damage after 3 to 6 kilorads has been measured after oxic or hypoxic radiation. With 5.5 kilorads of oxic radiation, more than 50% of the base damage was removed after 1.5 h of repair incubation in all cells, including exr+ and exr- AT cells, and approximately 75% was removed by 4 h. After 3 or 4.5 kilorads of hypoxic X-irradiation, repair was equivalent in normal and exr- AT cells. This study included three exr- AT strains which have been reported to be deficient in the removal of gamma-ray base damage at higher doses. Since these strains repaired ionizing radiation base damage normally at lower doses, which are more relevant to survival, it is concluded that the X-ray hypersensitivity of AT cells is probably not related to the repair of base damage.

  12. Prediction and measurement of radiation damage to CMOS devices on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Danchenko, V.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Sing, M.; Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The initial results obtained from the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors Radiation Effects Measurement experiment are presented. Predictions of radiation damage to C-MOS devices are based on standard environment models and computational techniques. A comparison of the shifts in CMOS threshold potentials, that is, those measured in space to those obtained from the on the ground simulation experiment with Co 60, indicated that the measured space damage is greater than predicted by a factor of two for shields thicker than 100 mils (2.54 mm), but agrees well with predictions for the thinner shields.

  13. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Ionization and proton induced radiation damage in crystal scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Crystal detectors have been used widely in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, medical instruments and homeland security applications. A crucial issue for crystal detectors to be used for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers is radiation damage by ionization dose as well as charged and neutral hadrons. This paper reports recent investigations on radiation damage in various crystal scintillators. Irradiations up to 340 Mrad of ionization dose, 1E16 p/cm^2 fluence and 1016 n/cm2 fluence were carried out at the JPL total ionization dose facility and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, respectively. Results of these investigations show excellent radiation hardness of bright and fast LYSO crystals which may provide a stable detector in an extreme harsh radiation environment, such as the proposed HL-LHC.

  15. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  16. The influence of neutron radiation damage on the optical properties of plastic scintillator UPS 923A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthembu, Skhathisomusa; Davydov, Yuri; Baranov, Vladimir; Mellado Garcia, Bruce; Mdhluli, Joyful; Sideras-Haddad, Elias

    2017-09-01

    Plastic scintillators are vital in the reconstruction of hadronic particle energy and tracks resulting from the collision of high energy particles in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These plastic scintillators are exposed to harsh radiation environments and are susceptible to radiation damage. The effects of radiation damage on the transmittance, luminescence and light yield of Ukraine polystyrene-based scintillator UPS 923A were studied. Samples were irradiated with fast neutrons, of varying energies and fluences, using the IBR-2 reactor FLNP (Frank Laboratory for Nuclear Problems) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. Results show a small change in the transmittance of the higher energy visible spectrum, and a noticeable change in the light yield of the samples as a result of the damage. There is no change observed on the luminescence as a result of radiation damage at studied fluences. The doses and uences of the neutrons shall be increased and changes in optical properties as a result of the radiation shall be further studied.

  17. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shangcheng; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Xubu; Li, Maoquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhong, Min

    2010-01-22

    Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress may be involved in the adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the brain. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are closely associated with various nervous system diseases and mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation can cause oxidative damage to mtDNA. In this study, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to pulsed RF electromagnetic fields at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. At 24 h after exposure, we found that RF radiation induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG), a common biomarker of DNA oxidative damage, in the mitochondria of neurons. Concomitant with this finding, the copy number of mtDNA and the levels of mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts showed an obvious reduction after RF exposure. Each of these mtDNA disturbances could be reversed by pretreatment with melatonin, which is known to be an efficient antioxidant in the brain. Together, these results suggested that 1800 MHz RF radiation could cause oxidative damage to mtDNA in primary cultured neurons. Oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of RF radiation in the brain.

  18. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  19. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  20. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: measurement and biological role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Gasparutto, Didier; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2005-02-01

    Emphasis is placed in this short review on recent developments concerning several aspects of the chemical and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation on both isolated and cellular DNA. This includes the mechanism of formation of single and tandem DNA lesions upon one-electron oxidation and one hydroxyl radical hit only. Information is also provided on the specificity of DNA repair enzymes and the measurement of radiation-induced damage in cellular DNA.

  1. Hyperfast Correlated Dynamics of Radiation Damage and Recovery in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun

    The response of solid-state materials to radiation is governed through a host of mechanisms that have time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and years. Metastable liquid-like regions that typically last for several picoseconds and more are commonly observed in ultra-fast experiments and simulations. In this investigation, we make quantitative predictions on correlated dynamical motion of the atoms as the liquid-like state is formed and condensed following an ion or neutron impact. Simulations on three materials -- copper, silicon and argon -- that have very different bond structures reveal an anisotropic and heterogeneous dynamical structure. Of utmost importance are the dynamical correlations during the recovery period, which corresponds to the condensation of the liquid-like state. Using molecular dynamics simulations and with the appropriate non-equilibrium shock physics formalism, the dynamical metrics of the liquid-like state are evaluated through the density correlator and van Hove self-correlation function, as well as through defect, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic field data, following a confined ion/neutron impact. These correlation functions can also be experimentally accessed or inferred from the state-of-the-art ultrafast pump-probe experimental methods. The hopping mechanism from the van-Hove self-correlation, the fractallike condensation and the fast decay of the density correlator attest to a rapid defect recovery in copper. In contrast, silicon portrays dynamically heterogeneous regions that resist recovery to the underlying lattice structure, and exhibits a non-decaying density correlator that is strikingly analogous to that of a supercooled liquid. Ion hammering and pump-probe experiments allude to a liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon -- from a high density liquid to a low density liquid -- before silicon is amorphized; the inference, however, is based on indirect interpretations. The simulations presented in this dissertation

  2. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  3. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  4. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage λ in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair. PMID:20660760

  5. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-08-10

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage lambda in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair.

  6. Mitigation of whole-body gamma radiation-induced damages by Clerodendron infortunatum in mammalian organisms.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tiju; Menon, Aditya; Majeed, Teeju; Nair, Sivaprabha V; John, Nithu Sara; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2016-11-17

    Several phytoceuticals and extracts of medicinal plants are reported to mitigate deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. The potential of hydro-alcoholic extract of Clerodendron infortunatum (CIE) for providing protection to mice exposed to gamma radiation was investigated. Oral administration of CIE bestowed a survival advantage to mice exposed to lethal doses of gamma radiation. Radiation-induced depletion of the total blood count and bone marrow cellularity were prevented by treatment with CIE. Damage to the cellular DNA (as was evident from the comet assay and the micronucleus index) was also found to be decreased upon CIE administration. Radiation-induced damages to intestinal crypt cells was also reduced by CIE. Studies on gene expression in intestinal cells revealed that there was a marked increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in mice exposed to whole-body 4 Gy gamma radiation, and that administration of CIE resulted in significant lowering of this ratio, suggestive of reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis. Also, in the intestinal tissue of irradiated animals, following CIE treatment, levels of expression of the DNA repair gene Atm were found to be elevated, and there was reduction in the expression of the inflammatory Cox-2 gene. Thus, our results suggest a beneficial use of Clerodendron infortunatum for mitigating radiation toxicity.

  7. A Network of Conserved Damage Survival Pathways Revealed by a Genomic RNAi Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Wiles, Amy M.; Bhavani, Selvaraj; Ruan, Jianhua; Leder, Philip; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Damage initiates a pleiotropic cellular response aimed at cellular survival when appropriate. To identify genes required for damage survival, we used a cell-based RNAi screen against the Drosophila genome and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS). Similar studies performed in other model organisms report that damage response may involve pleiotropic cellular processes other than the central DNA repair components, yet an intuitive systems level view of the cellular components required for damage survival, their interrelationship, and contextual importance has been lacking. Further, by comparing data from different model organisms, identification of conserved and presumably core survival components should be forthcoming. We identified 307 genes, representing 13 signaling, metabolic, or enzymatic pathways, affecting cellular survival of MMS–induced damage. As expected, the majority of these pathways are involved in DNA repair; however, several pathways with more diverse biological functions were also identified, including the TOR pathway, transcription, translation, proteasome, glutathione synthesis, ATP synthesis, and Notch signaling, and these were equally important in damage survival. Comparison with genomic screen data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed no overlap enrichment of individual genes between the species, but a conservation of the pathways. To demonstrate the functional conservation of pathways, five were tested in Drosophila and mouse cells, with each pathway responding to alkylation damage in both species. Using the protein interactome, a significant level of connectivity was observed between Drosophila MMS survival proteins, suggesting a higher order relationship. This connectivity was dramatically improved by incorporating the components of the 13 identified pathways within the network. Grouping proteins into “pathway nodes” qualitatively improved the interactome organization, revealing a highly organized “MMS survival

  8. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  9. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  10. Neutron radiation damage and recovery studies of SiPMs

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Rao, T.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2016-12-01

    We characterized the performance of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) before and after exposure of up to 1012 neutron/cm2 dosage. We show that the typical orders of magnitude increase of dark current upon neutron irradiation can be suppressed by operating it at a lower temperature and single-photoelectron detection capability can be restored. The required operating temperature depends on the dosage received. Furthermore, after high temperature thermal annealing, there is compelling evidence that the extrinsic dark current is lowered by orders of magnitude and single-photon detection performance are to some extent recovered at room temperature. Our experimental findings might have widespread implications for extending the functionality and the useful lifetime of current and future large scale SiPM detectors deployed in ionization radiation environment.

  11. [Modification of radiation damage to biological objects by lasers].

    PubMed

    Voskanian, K Sh; Vorozhzova, S V; Abrosimova, A N; Mitsyn, G V; Gaevskiĭ, V N

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments had the purpose to study effects of gamma-rays 60Co (5 Gy) and the combined effects of laser 650 nm (1 mJ/cm2) and gamma-rays 60Co (5 Gy) on survivability, body mass, integument and mitotic index of marrow cells (MC) of young mice C57BL/6. Laser was applied to the mouse hairy back only. Ten months of gamma-irradiation brought death to 50% of mice; the combined irradiation killed only 30%. Starting on month six after gamma-irradiation, body mass was less in comparison with mice exposed to the combined irradiation. In addition, all mice lost body mass sharply before death. All gamma-irradiated mice were touched with grey over the period of 30 days; in 40 days, 10 of 20 mice had incipient local radiation alopecia on the back that passed fully within next month. However, all mice developed radiation ulcers on the fourth month since irradiation. Two mice formed also neck tumors. In 5 months tails fell off in 2 mice. Some grey streaks appeared on mice exposed to the combined irradiation 3 months later only; three mice remained black throughout the follow-up. Alopecia was found in three survivors in 5 months after irradiation. Mitotic activity of marrow cells obtained from mice on day 15 since exposure to lasing and combined irradiation was higher in comparison with cells from intact mice. In a year, the MC mitotic index was higher in mice exposed to the combined irradiation as compared with the gamma-irradiated mice.

  12. Radiation-generated short DNA fragments may perturb non-homologous end-joining and induce genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Dalong; Winters, Thomas A.; Jung, Mira; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Cavalli, Luciane R.; Chasovkikh, Sergey; Haddad, Bassem R.; Dritschilo, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation (high-LET) experience more severe biological damage than do cells exposed to sparsely ionizing radiation (low-LET). The prevailing hypothesis is that high-LET radiations induce DNA double strand-breaks (DSB) that are more complex and clustered, and are thereby more challenging to repair. Here, we present experimental data obtained by atomic force microscopy imaging, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity determination, DNA ligation assays, and genomic studies to suggest that short DNA fragments are important products of radiation-induced DNA lesions, and that the lengths of DNA fragments may be significant in the cellular responses to ionizing radiation. We propose the presence of a subset of short DNA fragments that may affect cell survival and genetic stability following exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the enhanced biological effects of high-LET radiation may be explained, in part, by the production of increased quantities of short DNA fragments. PMID:21628845

  13. Optimization of radiation damage to proteins using X-ray nanofocusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boularaoui, Selwa; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Lee, S.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    The need to understand protein structure and perform treatment lead to the use of X-ray and particle-based radiation. Since the use of such radiation has undesirable side effects, mostly through the damage to proteins, it is important to continuously work on decreasing radiation damage. We outline the proposal to use the kinoform refractive optics to focus X-rays on the nanoscale to minimize the radiation damage to protein crystals under study. These optics devices are nanofabricated from low-Z elements (silicon, diamond) and can be used at synchrotron X-ray radiation facilities. We discuss the automated setup that performs nanopositioning of the nanofocusing element, and collects the chemical and structural protein solution under study. We offer simple mathematical models in irradiation and in treatment that help optimize the radiation parameters. This work is supported in part by Khalifa University IRF-Level 1 Fund. The work at BNL-NSLS is supported through US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  14. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  16. DNA damage responses by human ELG1 in S phase are important to maintain genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nilabja; Banerjee, Soma; Lee, Kyoo-young; Wincovitch, Stephen; Pak, Evgenia; Nakanishi, Koji; Jasin, Maria; Dutra, Amalia; Myung, Kyungjae

    2009-10-01

    Genomic integrity depends on DNA replication, recombination and repair, particularly in S phase. We demonstrate that a human homologue of yeast Elg1 plays an important role in S phase to preserve genomic stability. The level of ELG1 is induced during recovery from a variety of DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, ELG1 forms distinct foci at stalled DNA replication forks that are different from DNA double strand break foci. Targeted gene knockdown of ELG1 resulted in spontaneous foci formation of gamma-H2AX, 53BP1 and phosphorylated-ATM that mark chromosomal breaks. Abnormal chromosomes including fusions, inversions and hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents were also observed in cells expressing low level of ELG1 by targeted gene knockdown. Knockdown of ELG1 by siRNA reduced homologous recombination frequency in the I-SceI induced double strand break-dependent assay. In contrast, spontaneous homologous recombination frequency and sister chromatin exchange rate were upregulated when ELG1 was silenced by shRNA. Taken together, we propose that ELG1 would be a new member of proteins involved in maintenance of genomic integrity.

  17. Genomic instability and DNA damage responses in progeria arising from defective maturation of prelamin A.

    PubMed

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for aLMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component.

  18. Effect of superposed electromagnetic noise on DNA damage of lens epithelial cells induced by microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ke; Wu, Wei; Yu, Yibo; Zeng, Qunli; He, Jiliang; Lu, Deqiang; Wang, Kaijun

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the influence of the 1.8-GHz radiofrequency fields (RFs) of the Global System for Mobile Communications on DNA damage, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) and whether the effects induced by RF could be blocked by superposing of electromagnetic noise. After 24-hour intermittent exposure at the specific absorption rate of 1 W/kg, 2 W/kg, 3 W/kg, and 4 W/kg, the DNA damage of hLECs was examined by alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence microscope detection of the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) foci, respectively. ROS production was quantified by the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. DNA damage examined by alkaline comet assay was significantly increased after 3 W/kg and 4 W/kg radiation (P < 0.05), whereas the double-strand breaks (DSBs) evaluated by gammaH2AX foci were significantly increased only after 4 W/kg radiation (P < 0.05). Significantly elevated intracellular ROS levels were also detected in the 3-W/kg and 4-W/kg groups (P < 0.05). After exposure to 4 W/kg for 24 hours, hLECs exhibited significant G(0)/G(1) arrest (P < 0.05). There was no detectable difference in cell apoptosis between the microwave radiation and sham exposure groups (P > 0.05). All the effects mentioned were blocked when the RF was superposed with 2 muT electromagnetic noise. Microwave radiation induced hLEC DNA damage after G(0)/G(1) arrest does not lead to cell apoptosis. The increased ROS observed may be associated with DNA damage. Superposed electromagnetic noise blocks microwave radiation-induced DNA damage, ROS formation, and cell cycle arrest.

  19. Depletion layer recombination effects on the radiation damage hardness of gallium arsenide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, G. F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The significant effect of junction depletion layer recombination on the efficiency of windowed GaAs cells was demonstrated. The effect becomes more pronounced as radiation damage occurs. The depletion is considered for 1 MeV electron fluences up to 10 to the 16th power e/sq m. The cell modeling separates damage in emitter and base or buffer layers using different damage coefficients is reported. The lower coefficient for the emitter predicts less loss of performance at fluences greater than 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. A method for obtaining information on junction recombination effects as damage proceeds is described; this enables a more complete diagnosis of damage to be made.

  20. ATM deficiency generating genomic instability sensitizes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to therapy-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Perkhofer, Lukas; Schmitt, Anna; Romero Carrasco, Maria Carolina; Ihle, Michaela; Hampp, Stephanie; Ruess, Dietrich Alexander; Hessmann, Elisabeth; Russell, Ronan; Lechel, André; Azoitei, Ninel; Lin, Qiong; Liebau, Stefan; Hohwieler, Meike; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Lesina, Marina; Algül, Hana; Gieldon, Laura; Schröck, Evelin; Gaedcke, Jochen; Wagner, Martin; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Sipos, Bence; Seufferlein, Thomas; Reinhardt, Hans Christian; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Kleger, Alexander

    2017-08-08

    Pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDAC) harbour recurrent functional mutations of the master DNA damage response kinase ATM which has been shown to accelerate tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To study how ATM deficiency affects genome integrity in this setting, we evaluated the molecular and functional effects of conditional Atm deletion in a mouse model of PDAC. ATM deficiency was associated with increased mitotic defects, recurrent genomic rearrangements and deregulated DNA integrity checkpoints, reminiscent of human PDAC. We hypothesized that altered genome integrity might allow synthetic lethality-based options for targeted therapeutic intervention. Supporting this possibility, we found that the PARP inhibitor olaparib or ATR inhibitors reduced the viability of PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo associated with a genotype-selective increase in apoptosis. Overall, our results offered a preclinical mechanistic rationale for the use of PARP and ATR inhibitors to improve treatment of ATM-mutant PDAC. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Genome damage in induced pluripotent stem cells: assessing the mechanisms and their consequences.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Samer M I; Elbaz, Judith; Nagy, Andras A

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues discovered how to reprogram terminally differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent stem cell state. The resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made a paradigm shift in the field, further nailing down the disproval of the long-held dogma that differentiation is unidirectional. The prospect of using iPSCs for patient-specific cell-based therapies has been enticing. This promise, however, has been questioned in the last two years as several studies demonstrated intrinsic epigenetic and genomic anomalies in these cells. Here, we not only review the recent critical studies addressing the genome integrity during the reprogramming process, but speculate about the underlying mechanisms that could create de novo genome damage in iPSCs. Finally, we discuss how much an elevated mutation load really matters considering the safety of future therapies with cells heavily cultured in vitro.

  2. Calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons in compound materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.; Jouanne, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many years have been devoted to study the behaviour of solids submitted to impinging particles like ions or neutrons. The nuclear evaluations describe more and more accurately the various neutron-atom interactions. Anisotropic neutron-atom cross-sections are now available for many elements. Moreover, clear mathematical formalism now allows to calculate the number of displacements per atom in polyatomic targets in a realistic way using the binary collision approximation (BCA) framework. Even if these calculations do not take into account relaxation processes at the end of the displacement spike, they can be used to compare damages induced by different facilities like pressurized water reactors (PWR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), high temperature reactors (HTR) and fusion facilities like the European Spallation Source (ESS) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) on a defined material. In this paper, a formalism is presented to describe the neutron-atom cross-section and primary recoil spectra taking into account the anisotropy of nuclear reactions extracted from nuclear evaluations. Such a formalism permitted to compute displacement per atom production rate, primary and weighted recoil spectra within the BCA. The multigroup approximation has been used to calculate displacement per atom production rate and recoil spectra for a define nuclear reactor. All these informations are useful to compare recoil spectra and displacement per atom production rate produced by particle accelerator and nuclear reactor.

  3. Exploiting Radiation Damage to Map Proteins in Nucleoprotein Complexes: The Internal Structure of Bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Naiqian; Wu, Weimin; Watts, Norman R.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2014-01-01

    In the final stage of radiation damage in cryo-electron microscopy of proteins, bubbles of hydrogen gas are generated. Proteins embedded in DNA bubble sooner than free-standing proteins and DNA does not bubble under the same conditions. These properties make it possible to distinguish protein from DNA. Here we explored the scope of this technique (“bubblegram imaging”) by applying it to bacteriophage T7, viewed as a partially defined model system. T7 has a thin-walled icosahedral capsid, 60 nm in diameter, with a barrel-shaped protein core under one of its twelve vertices (the portal vertex). The core is densely wrapped with DNA but details of their interaction and how their injection into a host bacterium is coordinated are lacking. With short (10 sec) intervals between exposures of 17 electrons/Å2 each, bubbling starts in the third exposure, with 1 – 4 bubbles nucleating in the core: in subsequent exposures, these bubbles grow and merge. A 3D reconstruction from fifth-exposure images depicts a bipartite cylindrical gas cloud in the core. In its portal-proximal half, the axial region is gaseous whereas in the portal-distal half, it is occupied by a 3 nm-wide dense rod. We propose that they respectively represent core protein and an end of the packaged genome, poised for injection into a host cell. Single bubbles at other sites may represent residual scaffolding protein. Thus, bubbling depends on dose rate, protein amount, and tightness of the DNA seal. PMID:24345345

  4. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  5. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  6. Near infrared radiation damage mechanism in the lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Galichanin, Konstantin; Kronschläger, Martin; Schulmeister, Karl; Yu, Zhaohua

    2015-03-01

    The current data strongly indicates that there is no photochemical effect of in vivo exposure to 1090 nm near IRR radiation within the pupil. Four groups of 20 Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally exposed in vivo to 96 W·cm-2 centered inside the pupil for 10, 18, 33 and 60 min, respectively depending on group belonging. This resulted in radiant exposure doses of 57, 103, 198 and 344 kJ·cm-2. Temperature evolution at the limbus during the exposure and difference of intensity of forward light scattering between the exposed and the contralateral not exposed eye was measured at 1 week after exposure. The temperature at the limbus was found to increase exponentially towards an asymptote with an asymptote temperature of around 7 °C and a time constant (1/k) of around 15 s. No increase of light scattering was found despite that the cumulated radiant exposure dose was [80;250] times the threshold for photochemically induced cataract suggested by previous empirical data. It is concluded that at 1090 nm near IRR there is no photochemical effect.

  7. Computational determination of radiation damage effects on DNA structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies of several radiation originated lesions on the DNA molecules are presented. The pyrimidine lesions (cytosinyl radical, thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine lesion (8-oxoguanine) were subjected to the MD simulations for several hundred picoseconds using MD simulation code AMBER 5.0 (4.0). The simulations were performed for fully dissolved solute molecules in water. Significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed in all cases which may be categorized as: a) the breaking of hydrogen bonds network between complementary bases and resulted opening of the double helix (cytosinyl, radical, 8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flippingout of adenine on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes related to the overall collapsing of the double helical structure around the lesion, are expected to facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA in the formation of DNA-enzyme complex. The stable DNA-enzyme complex is a necessary condition for the onset of the enzymatic repair process. In addition to structural changes, specific values of electrostatic interaction energy were determined at several lesion sites (thymine dimer, thymine glycol and 8-oxoguanine). This lesion-specific electrostatic energy is a factor that enables repair enzyme to discriminate lesion from the native site during the scanning of the DNA surface.

  8. Compensation for radiation damage of SOI pixel detector via tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Hamasaki, R.; Ikegami, Y.; Kurachi, I.; Miyoshi, T.; Nishimura, R.; Tauchi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.

    2016-09-01

    We are developing a method for removing holes trapped in the oxide layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) monolithic pixel detector after irradiation. Radiation that passes through the detector generates positive charge by trapped holes in the buried oxide layer (BOX) underneath the MOSFET. The positive potential caused by these trapped holes modifies the characteristics of the MOSFET of the signal readout circuit. In order to compensate for the effect of the positive potential, we tried to recombine the trapped holes with electrons via Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling. By applying high voltage to the buried p-well (BPW) under the oxide layer with the MOSFET fixed at 0 V, electrons are injected into the BOX by FN tunneling. X-rays cause a negative shift in the threshold voltage Vth of the MOSFET. We can successfully recover Vth close to its pre-irradiation level after applying VBPW ≥ 120 V. However, the drain leakage current increased after applying VBPW; we find that this can be suppressed by applying a negative voltage to the BPW.

  9. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation‑induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague‑Dawley rats (6‑weeks‑old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF‑β1/Smads and NF‑κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery.

  10. The influence of artificial radiation damage and thermal annealing on helium diffusion kinetics in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, David L.; Farley, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work [Shuster D. L., Flowers R. M. and Farley K. A. (2006) The influence of natural radiation damage on helium diffusion kinetics in apatite. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.249(3-4), 148-161] revealing a correlation between radiogenic 4He concentration and He diffusivity in natural apatites suggests that helium migration is retarded by radiation-induced damage to the crystal structure. If so, the He diffusion kinetics of an apatite is an evolving function of time and the effective uranium concentration in a cooling sample, a fact which must be considered when interpreting apatite (U-Th)/He ages. Here we report the results of experiments designed to investigate and quantify this phenomenon by determining He diffusivities in apatites after systematically adding or removing radiation damage. Radiation damage was added to a suite of synthetic and natural apatites by exposure to between 1 and 100 h of neutron irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The samples were then irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and the resulting spallogenic 3He used as a diffusant in step-heating diffusion experiments. In every sample, irradiation increased the activation energy ( E a) and the frequency factor ( D o/ a2) of diffusion and yielded a higher He closure temperature ( T c) than the starting material. For example, 100 h in the reactor caused the He closure temperature to increase by as much as 36 °C. For a given neutron fluence the magnitude of increase in closure temperature scales negatively with the initial closure temperature. This is consistent with a logarithmic response in which the neutron damage is additive to the initial damage present. In detail, the irradiations introduce correlated increases in E a and ln( D o/a 2) that lie on the same array as found in natural apatites. This strongly suggests that neutron-induced damage mimics the damage produced by U and Th decay in natural apatites. To investigate the potential consequences of annealing of radiation damage, samples of

  11. Radiation-induced brain damage, impact of Michael Robbins' work and the need for predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Pataje G S; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Stone, Helen B; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Mehta, Minesh P; Coleman, C Norman

    2014-09-01

    To review the literature on radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the context of treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors with a focus on Michael Robbins' work on mechanisms of injury and approaches to mitigation, and also to identify other potential opportunities to improve treatment outcome and quality of life (QOL). Brain tumors remain a significant challenge for patients, their families, the physicians treating them, and researchers seeking more effective treatments. Current treatment of brain tumors involves combinations of radiotherapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted agents. As patient survival improves with advances in treatment there is an increasing concern for the cognitive deficits that may become apparent months or years after treatment some of which are related to radiation-induced brain damage. One area of Michael Robbins' research was unraveling the mechanisms of radiation-induced cognitive deficits, which formed the basis for the development of some mitigators of radiation injury. Extrapolating from this, new opportunities to identify and develop putative predictive biomarkers of radiation-induced brain damage can be explored. Predictive biomarkers of radiation-induced brain injury may enable stratifying patients for customization of treatment and thus aid in improving the QOL and possibly prolonging survival. Here we discuss the challenges involved in leveraging recent advances in radiation-specific biomarker research and translating them to radiotherapy, which for the foreseeable future is likely to remain a cornerstone of the treatment of brain tumors.

  12. TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  13. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions.

  14. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN TUNGSTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the accumulation of radiation damage created by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) of various energies, at 300 K and for a dose rate of 10-4 dpa/s in bulk tungsten using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  15. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions. PMID:27827423

  16. Measurement of high-voltage and radiation-damage limitations to advanced solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, D. A.; Severance, P. S.; Keinhardt, K. C.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the reconfigured Photovoltaic Array Space Power (PASP) Plus experiment: its objectives, solar-array complement, and diagnostic sensors. Results from a successful spaceflight will lead to a better understanding of high-voltage and radiation-damage limitations in the operation of new-technology solar arrays.

  17. TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  18. Variable-Temperature Cryostat For Radiation-Damage Testing Of Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Samuel R.; Puc, Bernard P.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-temperature cryostats developed to study radiation damage to, and annealing of, germanium gamma-ray detectors. Two styles: one accommodates large single detector and one accommodates two medium-sized detectors. New cryostats allow complete testing of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detectors without breaking cryostat vacuum and removing detectors for annealing.

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  20. DSB repair model for mammalian cells in early S and G1 phases of the cell cycle: application to damage induced by ionizing radiation of different quality.

    PubMed

    Taleei, Reza; Girard, Peter M; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to test the hypothesis that kinetics of double strand breaks (DSB) repair is governed by complexity of DSB. To test the hypothesis we used our recent published mechanistic mathematical model of DSB repair for DSB induced by selected protons, deuterons, and helium ions of different energies representing radiations of different qualities. In light of recent advances in experimental and computational techniques, the most appropriate method to study cellular responses in radiation therapy, and exposures to low doses of ionizing radiations is using mechanistic approaches. To this end, we proposed a 'bottom-up' approach to study cellular response that starts with the DNA damage. Monte Carlo track structure method was employed to simulate initial damage induced in the genomic DNA by direct and indirect effects. Among the different types of DNA damage, DSB are known to be induced in simple and complex forms. The DSB repair model in G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle was employed to calculate the repair kinetics. The model considers the repair of simple and complex DSB, and the DSB produced in the heterochromatin. The inverse sampling method was used to calculate the repair kinetics for each individual DSB. The overall repair kinetics for 500 DSB induced by single tracks of the radiation under test were compared with experimental results. The results show that the model is capable of predicting the repair kinetics for the DSB induced by radiations of different qualities within an accepted range of uncertainty.

  1. Genetic and physiological damage induced by cosmic radiation on dry plant seeds during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, A. R.

    Total evaluation of cosmic radiation effect with or without discrimination of individualized HZE-ion effects in dry Arabidopsis seeds flown for 10 days on STS-9, yielded significant evidence for radiation damage in space. They depend on the biological criteria tested (seed germination, morphogenesis, embryo lethality, mutation rate) which stand for early, physiological and late genetic effects. They are also related to the radiation shielding environment in the space shuttle. Proceeding from these results three direct questions can be posed for present (LDEF-1) and future (ERA-1, D-2) experiments in space: What is the influence of cosmic radiation on cytogenetic repair and ontogenetic restitution processes? Does microgravity disorder the morphogenesis (i.e. growth and cell differentiation)? Is there an interaction between the effects of cosmic radiation and microgravity in eukaryotic plant systems?

  2. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    PubMed Central

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystalliz­ation or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions. PMID:21931220

  3. Opposite Roles for p38MAPK-Driven Responses and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Persistence and Resolution of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Erica; Wang, Huichen; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    We report the functional and temporal relationship between cellular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, p38MAPK-dependent responses and genomic instability persisting in the progeny of cells exposed to sparsely ionizing low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation such as X-rays or high-charge and high-energy (HZE) particle high-LET radiation such as 56Fe ions. We found that exposure to low and high-LET radiation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a threshold-like response induced independently of radiation quality and dose. This response was sustained for two weeks, which is the period of time when genomic instability is evidenced by increased micronucleus formation frequency and DNA damage associated foci. Indicators for another persisting response sharing phenotypes with stress-induced senescence, including beta galactosidase induction, increased nuclear size, p38MAPK activation and IL-8 production, were induced in the absence of cell proliferation arrest during the first, but not the second week following exposure to high-LET radiation. This response was driven by a p38MAPK-dependent mechanism and was affected by radiation quality and dose. This stress response and elevation of ROS affected genomic instability by distinct pathways. Through interference with p38MAPK activity, we show that radiation-induced stress phenotypes promote genomic instability. In contrast, exposure to physiologically relevant doses of hydrogen peroxide or increasing endogenous ROS levels with a catalase inhibitor reduced the level of genomic instability. Our results implicate persistently elevated ROS following exposure to radiation as a factor contributing to genome stabilization. PMID:25271419

  4. Opposite roles for p38MAPK-driven responses and reactive oxygen species in the persistence and resolution of radiation-induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Werner, Erica; Wang, Huichen; Doetsch, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    We report the functional and temporal relationship between cellular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, p38MAPK-dependent responses and genomic instability persisting in the progeny of cells exposed to sparsely ionizing low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation such as X-rays or high-charge and high-energy (HZE) particle high-LET radiation such as (56)Fe ions. We found that exposure to low and high-LET radiation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a threshold-like response induced independently of radiation quality and dose. This response was sustained for two weeks, which is the period of time when genomic instability is evidenced by increased micronucleus formation frequency and DNA damage associated foci. Indicators for another persisting response sharing phenotypes with stress-induced senescence, including beta galactosidase induction, increased nuclear size, p38MAPK activation and IL-8 production, were induced in the absence of cell proliferation arrest during the first, but not the second week following exposure to high-LET radiation. This response was driven by a p38MAPK-dependent mechanism and was affected by radiation quality and dose. This stress response and elevation of ROS affected genomic instability by distinct pathways. Through interference with p38MAPK activity, we show that radiation-induced stress phenotypes promote genomic instability. In contrast, exposure to physiologically relevant doses of hydrogen peroxide or increasing endogenous ROS levels with a catalase inhibitor reduced the level of genomic instability. Our results implicate persistently elevated ROS following exposure to radiation as a factor contributing to genome stabilization.

  5. Damage pattern as a function of radiation quality and other factors.

    PubMed

    Burkart, W; Jung, T; Frasch, G

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of damage pattern in critical cellular structures such as DNA is an important prerequisite for a mechanistic assessment of primary radiation damage, its possible repair, and the propagation of residual changes in somatic and germ cells as potential contributors to disease or ageing. Important quantitative insights have been made recently on the distribution in time and space of critical lesions from direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation on mammalian cells. When compared to damage from chemicals or from spontaneous degradation, e.g. depurination or base deamination in DNA, the potential of even low-LET radiation to create local hot spots of damage from single particle tracks is of utmost importance. This has important repercussions on inferences from critical biological effects at high dose and dose rate exposure situations to health risks at chronic, low-level exposures as experienced in environmental and controlled occupational settings. About 10,000 DNA lesions per human cell nucleus and day from spontaneous degradation and chemical attack cause no apparent effect, but a dose of 4 Gy translating into a similar number of direct and indirect DNA breaks induces acute lethality. Therefore, single lesions cannot explain the high efficiency of ionizing radiation in the induction of mutation, transformation and loss of proliferative capacity. Clustered damage leading to poorly repairable double-strand breaks or even more complex local DNA degradation, correlates better with fixed damage and critical biological endpoints. A comparison with other physical, chemical and biological agents indicates that ionizing radiation is indeed set apart from these by its unique micro- and nano-dosimetric traits. Only a few other agents such as bleomycin have a similar potential to cause complex damage from single events. However, in view of the multi-stage mechanism of carcinogenesis, it is still an open question whether dose-effect linearity for complex

  6. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    SciTech Connect

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-06-15

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin.

  7. New Order-Parameter-Based Method for Characterizing Radiation Damage in Amorphous Materials.

    PubMed

    Galanakis, Nikolaos; Travis, Karl P

    2017-10-02

    We present a new method of characterizing damage arising from α-recoil cascades in amorphous materials including glasses. The approach taken is topological, yielding information on atom connectivity and utilizing complete sets of orthogonal functions (spherical harmonics and Hermite functions) to compute order parameters. The utility of our new approach is demonstrated by first applying it to models of radiation-damaged crystalline zircon, enabling validation against the standard defect counting method (Wigner-Seitz). We then apply it to a simple model of a glass, obtained by supercooling a Lennard-Jones liquid, for which defect counting methods are inapplicable. The method shows great promise for use in characterizing damage in more complicated glasses, particularly those of interest in the immobilization of nuclear waste, and when used in conjunction with nonequilibrium computer simulation could be a powerful tool to elucidate experimental data on the radiation tolerance of such wasteforms.

  8. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E. )

    1989-08-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage.

  9. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use. PMID:26960126

  10. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  11. Flow cytometric determination of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its correlation with cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Welleweerd, J.; Wilder, M.E.; Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-07-01

    Chinese hamster M3-1 cells were irradiated with several doses of x rays or ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/Pu. Propidium iodide-stained chromosome suspensions were prepared at different times after irradiation; cells were also assayed for survival. The DNA histograms of these chromosomes showed increased background counts with increased doses of radiation. This increase in background was cell-cycle dependent and was correlated with cell survival. The correlation between radiation-induced chromosome damage and cell survival was the same for X rays and ..cap alpha.. particles. Data are presented which indicate that flow cytometric analysis of chromosomes of irradiated cell populations can be a useful adjunct to classical cytogenic analysis of irradiation-induced chromosomal damage by virtue of its ability to express and measure chromosomal damage not seen by classical cytogenic methods.

  12. A whole-genome, radiation hybrid map of wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Generating a reference sequence of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a challenging task because of its large, highly repetitive and allopolyploid genome. Ordering of BAC- and NGS-based contigs in ongoing wheat genome-sequencing projects primarily uses recombination and comparative genomics-base...

  13. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction and measurement of radiation damage to CMOS devices on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Danchenko, V.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Sing, M.; Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The CMOS Radiation Effects Measurement (CREM) experiment is presently being flown on the Explorer-55. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate device performance in the actual space radiation environment and to correlate the respective measurements to on-the-ground laboratory irradiation results. The experiment contains an assembly of C-MOS and P-MOS devices shielded in front by flat slabs of aluminum and by a practically infinite shield in the back. Predictions of radiation damage to C-MOS devices are based on standard environment models and computational techniques. A comparison of the shifts in CMOS threshold potentials, that is, those measured in space to those obtained from the on-the-ground simulation experiment with Co-60, indicates that the measured space damage is smaller than predicted by about a factor of 2-3 for thin shields, but agrees well with predictions for thicker shields.

  15. An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

    2006-07-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

  16. The effect of space radiation on the induction of chromosome damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the cytogenetic damage caused by space radiation, chromosome exchanges in lymphocytes from crewmembers of long-term Mir missions, and a shorter duration shuttle mission, were examined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was observed after the long duration flights. The ratio of aberrations identified as complex was higher post-flight for some crewmembers, which is thought to be an indication of exposure to high-LET radiation. Ground-based studies have shown that the frequency of aberrations measured post-flight could be influenced by a mitotic delay in cells damaged by high-LET radiation and this effect could lower biological dose estimates. To counteract this effect, prematurely condensed chromosome (PCC) spreads were collected. Frequencies of aberrations in PCC were compared with those in metaphase spreads.

  17. Radiation Damage Effects in Space-borne CCD Detectors Operated in TDI Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas, Juan C.; Corcione, L.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Gai, M.

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the astrometric and photometric implications of a series of laboratory tests conducted to study the effects of radiation damage caused by solar protons in space-borne charge coupled devices (CCDs). The photometric effects, i.e., charge loss (CL) and the astrometric effects, i.e., location biases, associated with the radiation-induced distortion on the sampled line spread function (LSF), are assessed via a Gaussian fitting model. Data reduction is supported by a detailed analysis of the experimental setup. Charge loss and centroid shift variations are evaluated as functions of the simulated star brightness and the level of diffuse optical background to derive useful hints for modeling and calibration of the radiation damaged LSF during actual payload operations in orbit.

  18. The effect of space radiation on the induction of chromosome damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the cytogenetic damage caused by space radiation, chromosome exchanges in lymphocytes from crewmembers of long-term Mir missions, and a shorter duration shuttle mission, were examined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was observed after the long duration flights. The ratio of aberrations identified as complex was higher post-flight for some crewmembers, which is thought to be an indication of exposure to high-LET radiation. Ground-based studies have shown that the frequency of aberrations measured post-flight could be influenced by a mitotic delay in cells damaged by high-LET radiation and this effect could lower biological dose estimates. To counteract this effect, prematurely condensed chromosome (PCC) spreads were collected. Frequencies of aberrations in PCC were compared with those in metaphase spreads.

  19. A simple model of space radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stith, J. J.; Stock, L. V.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model is derived for the radiation damage of shallow junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and specific experimental studies of radiation effects with electron and proton beams. In particular, the extreme sensitivity of the cell to protons stopping near the cell junction is predicted by the model. The equivalent fluence concept is of questionable validity for monoenergetic proton beams. Angular factors are quite important in establishing the cell sensitivity to incident particle types and energies. A fluence of isotropic incidence 1 MeV electrons (assuming infinite backing) is equivalent to four times the fluence of normal incidence 1 MeV electrons. Spectral factors common to the space radiations are considered, and cover glass thickness required to minimize the initial damage for a typical cell configuration is calculated. Rough equivalence between the geosynchronous environment and an equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence (normal incidence) is established.

  20. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect</