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Sample records for radiation dose dependent

  1. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  2. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  3. Dose-dependent radiation-induced hypotension in the canine

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Hampton, J.D.; Doyle, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-induced early transient incapacitation (ETI) is often accompanied by severe systemic hypotension. However, postradiation hypotension does not occur with equal frequency in all species and is not reported with consistency in the canine. In an attempt to clarify the differences in reported canine post-radiation blood pressures, canine systemic blood pressures were determined both before and after exposure to gamma radiation of either 80 or 100 Gy. Data obtained from six sham-radiated beagles and 12 radiated beagles indicated that 100-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation produced a decrease in systemic mean blood pressure while 80-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation did not. Analysis of this data could be consistent with a quantal response to a gamma radiation dose between 80 Gy and 100 Gy.

  4. Angular absorbed dose dependence of internal radiation-generating devices in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of the absorbed dose from internal radiation-generating devices located within a tumor mass is investigated. Given the systematics of proton and heavy-ion differential scattering cross sections, candidate internal radiation-generating devices will have a relatively constant absorbed dose output beyond a critical angle. Inside this angle, the absorbed dose output is suppressed because elastic and inelastic differential cross sections are peaked in the beam direction. This peaking increases in severity as the particle energy increases and suggests internal radiation-generating devices must have a limited rotation capability to compensate for the depression in the absorbed dose for angles near the beam direction.

  5. Radiation dose dependent change in physiochemical, mechanical and barrier properties of guar gum based films.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K; Gupta, Sumit; Bahadur, Jitendra; Mazumder, S; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2013-11-06

    Mechanical and water vapor barrier properties of biodegradable films prepared from radiation processed guar gum were investigated. Films prepared from GG irradiated up to 500 Gy demonstrated significantly higher tensile strength as compared to non-irradiated control films. This improvement in tensile strength observed was demonstrated to be due to the ordering of polymer structures as confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering analysis. Exposure to doses higher than 500 Gy, however, resulted in a dose dependent decrease in tensile strength. A dose dependent decrease in puncture strength with no significant differences in the percent elongation was also observed at all the doses studied. Water vapor barrier properties of films improved up to 15% due to radiation processing. Radiation processing at lower doses for improving mechanical and barrier properties of guar based packaging films is demonstrated here for the first time.

  6. OPERATOR DEPENDENCY OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE IN CARDIAC INTERVENTIONS: FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA LOW DOSE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Ozpelit, Mehmet Emre; Ercan, Ertugrul; Ozpelit, Ebru; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat; Yilmaz, Akar

    2017-04-15

    Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  8. Dose-rate dependent effects of ionizing radiation on vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Suvorava, T; Luksha, L; Bulanova, K Ya; Lobanok, L M

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dose-rate dependent effects of ionising radiation on endothelium- and NO-mediated reactivity of aorta and coronary vessels. Rats were exposed to acute ((137)Cs, 9 x 10(-4) Gy s(-1), 18 min) and chronic ((137)Cs, 2.8 x 10(-7) Gy s(-1), 41 days) radiation in 1 Gy dose. Acute irradiation transiently increased coronary flow in eNOS-activity-dependent manner on day 3 after exposure. In striking contrast, chronic irradiation caused a significant depression of coronary flow even on day 90 after irradiation and abolished the effects of NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 micromol l(-1)). Furthermore, low intensity radiation strongly diminished the vasodilator properties of NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (5 micromol l(-1)). A similar pattern was observed in aortic rings. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was increased on days 3 and 10 after acute irradiation, but strongly inhibited following chronic exposure for the entire post-radiation period. This was accompanied by a diminished vasodilator response to NO-donor on days 3, 10 and 30 of post-radiation but not on day 90. The data suggest that ionising radiation in 1 Gy induces changes of aortic and coronary vessels reactivity depending on the dose-rate and the interval after exposure.

  9. Ionizing radiation sensitivity of the ocular lens and its dose rate dependence.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection reduced the threshold for the lens effects of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. On one hand, the revised threshold of 0.5 Gy is much lower than previously recommended thresholds, but mechanisms behind high radiosensitivity remain incompletely understood. On the other hand, such a threshold is independent of dose rate, in contrast to previously recommended separate thresholds each for single and fractionated/protracted exposures. Such a change was made predicated on epidemiological evidence suggesting that a threshold for fractionated/protracted exposures is not higher than an acute threshold, and that a chronic threshold is uncertain. Thus, the dose rate dependence is still unclear. This paper therefore reviews the current knowledge on the radiosensitivity of the lens and the dose rate dependence of radiation cataractogenesis, and discusses its mechanisms. Mounting biological evidence indicates that the lens cells are not necessarily radiosensitive to cell killing, and the high radiosensitivity of the lens thus appears to be attributable to other mechanisms (e.g., excessive proliferation, abnormal differentiation, a slow repair of DNA double-strand breaks, telomere, senescence, crystallin changes, non-targeted effects and inflammation). Both biological and epidemiological evidence generally supports the lack of dose rate effects. However, there is also biological evidence for the tissue sparing dose rate (or fractionation) effect of low-LET radiation and an enhancing inverse dose fractionation effect of high-LET radiation at a limited range of LET. Emerging epidemiological evidence in chronically exposed individuals implies the inverse dose rate effect. Further biological and epidemiological studies are warranted to gain deeper knowledge on the radiosensitivity of the lens and dose rate dependence of radiation cataractogenesis.

  10. Low Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity is Caused by p53-dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Enns, L; Bogen, K; Wizniak, J; Murtha, A; Weinfeld, M

    2004-04-08

    Exposure to environmental radiation and the application of new clinical modalities, such as radioimmunotherapy, have heightened the need to understand cellular responses to low dose and low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Many tumor cell lines have been observed to exhibit a hypersensitivity to radiation doses below 50 cGy, which manifests as a significant deviation from the clonogenic survival response predicted by a linear-quadratic fit to higher doses. However, the underlying processes for this phenomenon remain unclear. Using a gel microdrop/flow cytometry assay to monitor single cell proliferation at early times post irradiation, we examined the response of human A549 lung carcinoma, T98G glioma and MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines exposed to gamma radiation doses from 0 to 200 cGy delivered at 0.18 and 22 cGy/min. The A549 and T98G cells, but not MCF7 cells, showed the marked hypersensitivity at doses <50 cGy. To further characterize the low-dose hypersensitivity, we examined the influence of low-dose radiation on cell cycle status and apoptosis by assays for active caspase-3 and phosphatidylserine translocation (annexin-V binding). We observed that caspase-3 activation and annexin-V binding mirrored the proliferation curves for the cell lines. Furthermore, the low-dose hypersensitivity and annexin-V binding to irradiated A549 and T98G cells were eliminated by treating the cells with pifithrin, an inhibitor of p53. When p53-inactive cell lines (2800T skin fibroblasts and HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells) were examined for similar patterns, we found that there was no HRS and apoptosis was not detectable by annexin-V or caspase-3 assays. Our data therefore suggest that low-dose hypersensitivity is associated with p53-dependent apoptosis.

  11. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively). We successfully developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  12. Cell-density dependent effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Sarimov, R M; Belyaev, I Ya

    2003-01-01

    The changes in genome conformational state (GCS) induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in E. coli cells were measured by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in cellular lysates. Effects of X-rays at doses 0.1 cGy--1 Gy depended on post-irradiation time. Significant relaxation of DNA loops followed by a decrease in AVTD. The time of maximum relaxation was between 5-80 min depending on the dose of irradiation. U-shaped dose response was observed with increase of AVTD in the range of 0.1-4 Gy and decrease in AVTD at higher doses. No such increase in AVTD was seen upon irradiation of cells at the beginning of cell lysis while the AVTD decrease was the same. Significant differences in the effects of X-rays and gamma-rays at the same doses were observed suggesting a strong dependence of low-dose effects on LET. Effects of 0.01 cGy gamma-rays were studied at different cell densities during irradiation. We show that the radiation-induced changes in GCS lasted longer at higher cell density as compared to lower cell density. Only small amount of cells were hit at this dose and the data suggest cell-to-cell communication in response to low-dose ionizing radiation. This prolonged effect was also observed when cells were irradiated at high cell density and diluted to low cell density immediately after irradiation. These data suggest that cell-to-cell communication occur during irradiation or within 3 min post-irradiation. The cell-density dependent response to low-dose ionizing radiation was compared with previously reported data on exposure of E. coli cells to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency and extremely high frequency (millimeter waves). The body of our data show that cells can communicate in response to electromagnetic fields and ionizing radiation, presumably by reemission of secondary photons in infrared-submillimeter frequency range.

  13. Cerebral Cortex Regions Selectively Vulnerable to Radiation Dose-Dependent Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Tyler M; Karunamuni, Roshan; Kaifi, Samar; Burkeen, Jeffrey; Connor, Michael; Krishnan, Anitha Priya; White, Nathan S; Farid, Nikdokht; Bartsch, Hauke; Murzin, Vyacheslav; Nguyen, Tanya T; Moiseenko, Vitali; Brewer, James B; McDonald, Carrie R; Dale, Anders M; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A

    2017-04-01

    Neurologic deficits after brain radiation therapy (RT) typically involve decline in higher-order cognitive functions such as attention and memory rather than sensory defects or paralysis. We sought to determine whether areas of the cortex critical to cognition are selectively vulnerable to radiation dose-dependent atrophy. We measured change in cortical thickness in 54 primary brain tumor patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT. The study patients underwent high-resolution, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted; T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, FLAIR) before RT and 1 year afterward. Semiautomated software was used to segment anatomic regions of the cerebral cortex for each patient. Cortical thickness was measured for each region before RT and 1 year afterward. Two higher-order cortical regions of interest (ROIs) were tested for association between radiation dose and cortical thinning: entorhinal (memory) and inferior parietal (attention/memory). For comparison, 2 primary cortex ROIs were also tested: pericalcarine (vision) and paracentral lobule (somatosensory/motor). Linear mixed-effects analyses were used to test all other cortical regions for significant radiation dose-dependent thickness change. Statistical significance was set at α = 0.05 using 2-tailed tests. Cortical atrophy was significantly associated with radiation dose in the entorhinal (P=.01) and inferior parietal ROIs (P=.02). By contrast, no significant radiation dose-dependent effect was found in the primary cortex ROIs (pericalcarine and paracentral lobule). In the whole-cortex analysis, 9 regions showed significant radiation dose-dependent atrophy, including areas responsible for memory, attention, and executive function (P≤.002). Areas of cerebral cortex important for higher-order cognition may be most vulnerable to radiation-related atrophy. This is consistent with clinical observations that brain radiation patients experience deficits in domains of

  14. Distribution of uranium in drinking water and associated age-dependent radiation dose in India.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Mohapatra, S; Chakrabarty, A; Sumesh, C G; Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2009-09-01

    Exposure due to natural radiation is of particular importance because it accounts for the largest contribution (nearly 85 %) to the total collective dose of the world population. An attempt has been made to present the feasibility of uranium occurrence in drinking water samples from different states of India, by laser-induced fluorimetry. The associated age-dependent radiation dose was estimated by taking the prescribed water intake values of different age groups. The concentration of uranium obtained, i.e. 0.1 +/- 0.01 to 19.6 +/- 1.8 microg l(-1), is well below the drinking water guideline value of 30 microg l(-1). The annual ingestion dose due to uranium in drinking water for various age groups is found to vary from 0.14 to 48 microSv y(-1).

  15. Nanoparticle location and material dependent dose enhancement in X-ray radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mainul

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high atomic number (Z) materials can act as radiosensitizers to enhance radiation dose delivered to tumors. An analytical approach is used to calculate dose enhancements to tumor endothelial cells and their nuclei for a series of nanoparticles (bismuth, gold and platinum) located at different locations relative to nuclei by considering contributions from both photoelectrons and Auger electrons. The ratio of the dose delivered to cells with and without the nanoparticles is known as the dose enhancement factor (DEF). DEFs depend on material composition, size and location of nanoparticles with respect to the cell and the nucleus. Energy of irradiating X-ray beam affects X-ray absorption by nanoparticles and plays an important role in dose enhancements. For diagnostic X-ray sources, bismuth nanoparticles provide higher dose enhancements than gold and platinum nanoparticles for a given nanoparticle size, concentration and location. The highest DEFs are achieved for nanoparticles located closest to the nucleus where energy depositions from short range Auger electrons are maximum. With nanoparticles ranging in diameter between 2-400 nm, the dose enhancement increases with decrease in particle size. The results are useful in finding optimized conditions for nanoparticle enhanced X-ray radiation therapy of cancer. PMID:23393610

  16. Characterization of dose-dependent Young's modulus for a radiation-sensitive polymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescenti, Remo A.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Bush, Nigel L.; Webb, Steve

    2009-02-01

    Radiation-sensitive polymer gels for clinical dosimetry have been intensively investigated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because the transversal magnetic relaxation time is dependent on irradiation dose. MRI is expensive and not easily available in most clinics. For this reason, low-cost, quick and easy-to-use potential alternatives such as optical computed tomography (CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound attenuation CT have also been studied by others. Here, we instead evaluate the dose dependence of the elastic material property, Young's modulus and the dose response of the viscous relaxation of radiation-sensitive gels to discuss their potential for dose imaging. Three batches of a radiation-sensitive polymer gel (MAGIC gel) samples were homogeneously irradiated to doses from 0 Gy to 45.5 Gy. Young's modulus was computed from the measured stress on the sample surface and the strain applied to the sample when compressing it axially, and the viscous relaxation was determined from the stress decay under sustained compression. The viscous relaxation was found not to change significantly with dose. However, Young's modulus was dose dependent; it approximately doubled in the gels between 0 Gy and 20 Gy. By fitting a second-order polynomial to the Young's modulus-versus-dose data, 99.4% of the variance in Young's modulus was shown to be associated with the change in dose. The precision of the gel production, irradiation and Young's modulus measurement combined was found to be 4% at 2 Gy and 3% at 20 Gy. Potential sources of measurement error, such as those associated with the boundary conditions in the compression measurement, inhomogeneous polymerization, temperature (up to 1% error) and the evaporation of water from the sample (up to 1% error), were estimated and discussed. It was concluded that Young's modulus could be used for dose determination. Imaging techniques such as elastography may help to achieve this if they can provide a local measurement of Young

  17. The Problem of using Quartz as a radiation dosimeter: fundamentals of dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G. E.; Finch, A. A.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Hole, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Quartz is widely used as a radiation dosimeter in Quaternary geomorphological and archaeological dating applications through Optically Stimulated Luminescence (over 1,200 journal publications since 2000). However, obtaining an accurate equivalent radiation dose (DE) can be challenging, especially where the luminescence intensity of the quartz is dim. The causes of variation in luminescence intensity between quartz grains of different provenances, transport and thermal histories is unknown, however it has been suggested that it relates to either the dosimetric history of the grain, or mechanical processes which occur in transit. Investigation of the fundamental properties of the luminescence of quartz, enables investigation of dose dependent changes in luminescence intensity. A series of dose dependence experiments were conducted using spectroscopic ionoluminescence, which comprises the excitation of quartz with protons accelerated at 0.95 MeV. The energy delivered to the sample throughout ion implantation is similar to that received during gamma irradiation, and thus approximates sample radiation dosing. A natural macro-crystal of α-quartz was investigated parallel and perpendicular to c, to observe any orientation dependent effects, as well as a calibration quartz from the Risø National Laboratory, Denmark, and a Scottish geomorphological sample, prepared using standard laboratory procedures. The calibration quartz sample has excellent luminescence intensity and is suited to analysis using the single-aliquot regenerative dose (SAR) standard OSL protocol, the Scottish sample alternatively has very dim luminescence and exhibits variable behaviour when analysed with SAR. Despite the differences between the luminescence behaviour of the samples, all three responded to the dose dependence experiments in a similar manner. The UV/blue emission was observed to deplete with increasing dose, whereas the red emission, not normally analysed within OSL, exhibited increased

  18. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

  19. Dose-dependent Cortical Thinning After Partial Brain Radiation in High-grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Roshan; Bartsch, Hauke; White, Nate S.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Carmona, Ruben; Marshall, Deborah; Seibert, Tyler M.; McDonald, Carrie R.; Farid, Nikdokht; Krishnan, Anithapriya; Kuperman, Joshua; Mell, Loren; Brewer, James B.; Dale, Anders M.; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced cognitive deficits may be mediated by tissue damage to cortical regions. Volumetric changes in cortex can be reliably measured using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used these methods to study the association between radiation therapy (RT) dose and change in cortical thickness in high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. Methods and Materials We performed a voxel-wise analysis of MR imaging from 15 HGG patients who underwent fractionated partial brain RT. Three-dimensional MRI was acquired pre- and 1-year post-RT. Cortex was parcellated with well-validated segmentation software (Freesufer). Surgical cavities were censored. Each cortical voxel was assigned a change in cortical thickness between time points, RT dose value, and neuroanatomic label by lobe. Effect of dose, neuroanatomic location, age, and chemotherapy on cortical thickness was tested using linear mixed effects (LME) modeling. Results Cortical atrophy was seen after 1-year post RT, with greater effects at higher doses. Estimates from LME modeling showed that cortical thickness decreased by −0.0033 mm (p<0.001) for every 1 Gy increase in RT dose. Temporal and limbic cortex exhibited the largest change in cortical thickness per Gy, compared to other regions (p<0.001). Age and chemotherapy were not significantly associated with cortical thickness change. Conclusions We found dose-dependent thinning of the cerebral cortex, with varying neuroanatomical regional sensitivity, one year after fractionated partial brain RT. The magnitude of thinning parallels one-year atrophy rates seen in neurodegenerative diseases, and may contribute to cognitive decline following high-dose RT. PMID:26853338

  20. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  1. Dose-dependent effects of gamma radiation on lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. capitata) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Delia; Cristea, Victoria; Daraban, Liviu

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of gamma radiation on lettuce growth and development, as well as on the content of photosynthetic pigments in 28 days lettuce leaf. Lettuce dry seeds were exposed to a (60)Co [Cobalt-60] gamma source at doses ranging from 2-70 Gray (Gy). The photosynthetic pigment content was determined spectrophotometrically. Our results showed that an irradiation dose between of 2-30 Gy enhanced the growth parameters (final germination percentage, germination index, root and hypocotyl length) as compared to untreated plants. Seed germination test revealed that 30 Gy irradiation dose induced the highest increase of growth parameters, while at 70 Gy a significant decrease of plant vegetative growth was recorded. The results indicated that exposing the seeds at doses ranging from 2-30 Gy enhanced the photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoids) content, while at higher doses (70 Gy)) the decrease of the assimilatory pigments was noticed. The present results suggested that seed treatment with gamma radiations (0-30 Gy) was effective in stimulating plant growth and development, as well as the content of assimilatory pigments. At a higher dose of 70 Gy, there was a drastic reduction in the length of shoots and roots and also in the total chlorophyll content. These observations confirm that ionizing radiation stimulates physiological parameters up to certain low doses, and then it inhibits these parameters at higher doses.

  2. Microenvironment and Dose-Delivery-Dependent Response after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation in Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Rynkeviciene, Ryte; Venius, Jonas; Pasukoniene, Vita; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2017-09-01

    A significant body of knowledge about radiobiology is based on studies of single dose cellular irradiation, despite the fact that conventional clinical applications using dose fractionation. In addition, cellular radiation response strongly depends on cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, which are poorly established in cancer cells grown under standard 2D cell culture conditions. In this study, we investigated the response of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) DLD1 and HT29 cell lines, bearing distinct p53 mutations, to a single 2 or 10 Gy dose or fractionated 5 × 2 Gy doses of radiation using global transcriptomics analysis. To examine cellular response to radiation in a cell-ECM-interaction-dependent manner, CRC cells were grown under laminin-rich ECM 3D cell culture conditions. Microarray data analysis revealed that, overall, a total of 1,573 and 935 genes were differentially expressed (fold change >1.5; P < 0.05) in DLD1 and HT29 cells, respectively, at 4 h postirradiation. However, compared to a single dose of radiation, fractionated doses resulted in significantly different transcriptomic response in both CRC cell lines. Furthermore, pathway enrichment analysis indicated that p53 pathway and cell cycle/DNA damage repair or immune response functional categories were most significantly altered in DLD1 or HT29 cells, respectively, after fractionated irradiations. Novel observations of radiation-response-mediated activation of pro-survival pathways in CRC cells grown under lr-ECM 3D cell culture conditions using fractionated doses provide new directions for the development of more efficient radiotherapy strategies. Our results also indicated that cell line specific radiation response with or without activation of the conventional p53 pathway is ECM dependent, suggesting that the ECM is a key component in cellular radiation response.

  3. Mechanistic Modeling of Dose and Dose Rate Dependences of Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Break Rejoining Kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic modeling of DNA double strand break (DSB) rejoining is important for quantifying and medically exploiting radiation-induced cytotoxicity (e.g. in cancer radiotherapy). Most radiation-induced DSBs are quickly-rejoinable and are rejoined within the first 1–2 hours after irradiation. Others are slowly-rejoinable (persist for several hours), and yet others are essentially unrejoinable (persist for >24 hours). The dependences of DSB rejoining kinetics on radiation dose and dose rate remain incompletely understood. We hypothesize that the fraction of slowly-rejoinable and/or unrejoinable DSBs increases with increasing dose/dose rate. This radiation-dependent (RD) model was implemented using differential equations for three DSB classes: quickly-rejoinable, slowly-rejoinable and unrejoinable. Radiation converts quickly-rejoinable to slowly-rejoinable, and slowly-rejoinable to unrejoinable DSBs. We used large published data sets on DSB rejoining in yeast exposed to sparsely-ionizing (electrons and γ-rays, single or split-doses, high or low dose rates) and densely-ionizing (α-particles) radiation to compare the performances of the proposed RD formalism and the established two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model. These yeast DSB rejoining data were measured within the radiation dose range relevant for clonogenic cell survival, whereas in mammalian cells DSB rejoining is usually measured only at supra-lethal doses for technical reasons. The RD model described both sparsely-ionizing and densely-ionizing radiation data much better than the TLK model: by 217 and 14 sample-size-adjusted Akaike information criterion units, respectively. This occurred because: the RD (but not the TLK) model reproduced the observed upwardly-curving dose responses for slowly-rejoinable/unrejoinable DSBs at long times after irradiation; the RD model adequately described DSB yields at both high and low dose rates using one parameter set, whereas the TLK model overestimated low dose rate data

  4. Dose rate dependency of electronic personal dosemeters measuring X- and gamma-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, J P; Shen, H; Downton, B

    2008-01-01

    Three models of electronic personal dosemeters (EPDs)-Siemens Mk 2.3, Rados RAD-60S and Vertec Bleeper Sv-were irradiated with seven photon beam qualities: 60Co, 137Cs and the ISO narrow spectrum series X-ray qualities N-250, N-200, N-150, N-60 and N-20. The personal dose equivalent rates delivered to the devices varied between 0.002 and 0.25 mSv s(-1). Measurements were made with the EPDs mounted free-in-air as well as against Lucite and water phantoms. Results for all models of EPDs showed differences in personal dose equivalent energy response for different energies covered by this range of radiation qualities, with different models showing variations from 15 to 65%. In some cases, the personal dose equivalent rate response of these devices varied by a factor of 3 between irradiations at typical calibration dose rates and those normally encountered by nuclear energy workers.

  5. [Dependence of vitamin C content in animal tissues on the dose of UV radiation].

    PubMed

    Dev'iatka, D G; Iatsina, O V

    1977-01-01

    The content of vitamin C in tissues was determined for animals synthetizing (rabbits) and nonsynthetizing (guinea pigs) it with UV radiation. Significant doses of radiation cause a considerable decrease in the content of vitamin C in blood of both animal species. In the adrenal, liver, spleen, lung, small intestine, kidney, brain tissues and vitamin C content decreases in animals nonsynthetizing the vitamin and, vice versa, it rises in the vitamin-synthetizing animals. After irradiation with small doses the vitamin C content in blood and tissues of animals nonsynthetizing it lowers but not below the normal level. Additional administration of 100 mg of ascorbic acid (under conditions of sufficient supply of vitamin C with food) does not prevent a decrease in the content of vitamin C in blood of the animals irradiated with significant UV doses. An opinion is advanced as to necessity of vitamin C rationing taking into account "the UV climate" of the area and dose of radiation from the artifical sources.

  6. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Hlatky, L R

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival relationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The MOnte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation.

  7. Determination of the absorbed dose and the average LET of space radiation in dependence on shielding conditions.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Schoner, W; Noll, M; Fugger, M; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V

    1999-01-01

    The HTR method, developed for determination of absorbed dose and average LET of mixed radiation fields in space, was applied during several space missions on space station MIR, space shuttles and satellites. The method utilises the changes of peak height ratios in the glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer LET. Due to the small size of the dosemeters the evaluation of the variation of absorbed dose and average LET in dependence on the position of the dosemeters inside the space station is possible. The dose and LET distribution was determined during the experiment ADLET where dosemeters were exposed in two positions with different shielding conditions and during two following experiments (MIR-95, MIR-96) using six positions inside the space station. The results were compared with the shielding conditions of the positions. Calculations of the absorbed dose were carried out for comparison. Results have shown that the average LET increases with increasing absorbing thickness while the absorbed dose decreases.

  8. Radiation dose differences between digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are dependent on breast thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, Maram M.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Bourne, Roger; Rickard, Mary; Diffey, Jennifer; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiation dose derived from digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) at different tube current-exposure time product (mAs) and at 6 phantom thicknesses from 10 to 60 mm. Materials and Methods A total of 240 DM and DBT cranio-caudal (CC) phantom images were acquired at each thickness and at four exposure levels (the baseline mAs, 50%, 25% and 12.5% the baseline mAs). The incident Air Kerma (K) at the surface of the phantoms was measured using a solid state dosimeter. Mean Glandular Doses (MGD) were calculated for both modalities (DM and DBT). Results DBT dose was greater than that of DM for all mAs at each phantom thickness. For a breast thickness of 50 mm (close to average sized breast), the dose for DBT (2.32 mGy) was 13% higher than that for DM (2.05 mGy). The results also show that the difference in MGD between DM and DBT was less for the thicker compared with the thinner phantom, this difference being approximately a factor of 2.58 at 10 mm compared with a factor of 1.08 at 60 mm. While the MGD increased with increasing phantom thickness for both modalities, the dose increase with DBT was less than for DM, with the difference between 10 and 60 mm being a factor of 7 for DM and 3 for DBT. Conclusion The radiation dose from DBT was higher than that of DM and the difference in dose between DM and DBT decreases as phantom thickness increases.

  9. Radiation dose dependent risk of liver cancer mortality in the German uranium miners cohort 1946-2003.

    PubMed

    Dufey, F; Walsh, L; Sogl, M; Tschense, A; Schnelzer, M; Kreuzer, M

    2013-03-01

    An increased risk of mortality from primary liver cancers among uranium miners has been observed in various studies. An analysis of the data from a German uranium miner cohort (the 'Wismut cohort') was used to assess the relationship with ionising radiation. To that end the absorbed organ dose due to high and low linear energy transfer radiation was calculated for 58 987 miners with complete information on radiation exposure from a detailed job-exposure matrix. 159 deaths from liver cancer were observed in the follow-up period from 1946 to 2003. Relative risk models with either linear or categorical dependence on high and low linear energy transfer radiation liver doses were fitted by Poisson regression, stratified on age and calendar year. The linear trend of excess relative risk in a model with both low and high linear transfer radiation is -0.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.7, 2.1) Gy(-1) and 48.3 (95% CI: -32.0, 128.6) Gy(-1) for low and high linear energy transfer radiation, respectively, and thus not statistically significant for either dose. The increase of excess relative risk with equivalent liver dose is 0.57 (95% CI: -0.69, 1.82) Sv(-1). Adjustment for arsenic only had a negligible effect on the radiation risk. In conclusion, there is only weak evidence for an increase of liver cancer mortality with increasing radiation dose in the German uranium miners cohort considered. However, both a lack of statistical power and potential misclassification of primary liver cancer are issues.

  10. Time-dependent dose-response relation for absence of vaginal elasticity after gynecological radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Alevronta, Eleftheria; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Al-Abany, Massoud; Nyberg, Tommy; Lind, Helena; Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Dunberger, Gail; Bergmark, Karin; Steineck, Gunnar; Lind, Bengt K

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the dose-response relation between the dose to the vagina and the patient-reported symptom 'absence of vaginal elasticity' and how time to follow-up influences this relation. The study included 78 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated between 1991 and 2003 with external beam radiation therapy. Of those, 24 experienced absence of vaginal elasticity. A normal tissue complication model is introduced that takes into account the influence of time to follow-up on the dose-response relation and the patient's age. The best estimates of the dose-response parameters were calculated using Probit, Probit-Relative Seriality (RS) and Probit-time models. Log likelihood (LL) values and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) were used to evaluate the model fit. The dose-response parameters for 'absence of vaginal elasticity' according to the Probit and Probit-time models with the 68% Confidence Intervals (CI) were: LL=-39.8, D50=49.7 (47.2-52.4) Gy, γ50=1.40 (1.12-1.70) and LL=-37.4, D50=46.9 (43.5-50.9) Gy, γ50=1.81 (1.17-2.51) respectively. The proposed model, which describes the influence of time to follow-up on the dose-response relation, fits our data best. Our data indicate that the steepness of the dose-response curve of the dose to the vagina and the symptom 'absence of vaginal elasticity' increases with time to follow-up, while D50 decreases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dose-dependent effects of gamma radiation on the early zebrafish development and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Brede, Dag Anders; Skjerve, Eystein; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Lind, Ole Christian; Christensen, Terje; Berg, Vidar; Teien, Hans-Christian; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah Helen; Aleström, Peter; Lyche, Jan Ludvig

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation from natural sources or anthropogenic activity has the potential to cause oxidative stress or genetic damage in living organisms, through the ionization and excitation of molecules and the subsequent production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The present work focuses on radiation-induced biological effects using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) vertebrate model. Changes in developmental traits and gene expression in zebrafish were assessed after continuous external gamma irradiation (0.4, 3.9, 15 and 38 mGy/h) with corresponding controls, starting at 2.5 hours post fertilization (hpf) and lasting through embryogenesis and the early larval stage. The lowest dose rate corresponded to recommended benchmarks at which adverse effects are not expected to occur in aquatic ecosystems (2–10 mGy/day). The survival observed at 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) in the 38 mGy/h group was significantly lower, while other groups showed no significant difference compared to controls. The total hatching was significantly lower from controls in the 15 mGy/h group and a delay in hatching onset in the 0.4 mGy/h group was observed. The deformity frequency was significantly increased by prolonged exposure duration at dose rates ≥ 0.4 mGy/h. Molecular responses analyzed by RNA-seq at gastrulation (5.5 hpf transcriptome) indicate that the radiation induced adverse effects occurred during the earliest stages of development. A dose-response relationship was found in the numbers of differentially regulated genes in exposure groups compared to controls at a total dose as low as 1.62 mGy. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified retinoic acid receptor activation, apoptosis, and glutathione mediated detoxification signaling as the most affected pathways in the lower dose rate (0.54 mGy/h), while eif2 and mTOR, i.e., involved in the modulation of angiogenesis, were most affected in higher dose rates (5.4 and 10.9 mGy/h). By comparing gene expression data, myc

  12. Exposure to ionizing radiation reveals global dose- and time-dependent changes in the urinary metabolome of rat

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tytus D.; Tyburski, John B.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Kalinich, John F.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for exposures to ionizing radiation has increased in recent years. Although advances have been made, understanding the global metabolic response as a function of both dose and exposure time is challenging considering the complexity of the responses. Herein we report our findings on the dose- and time-dependency of the urinary response to ionizing radiation in the male rat using radiation metabolomics. Urine samples were collected from adult male rats, exposed to 0.5 to 10 Gy γ–radiation, both before from 6 to 72 h following exposures. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and deconvoluted mass chromatographic data were initially analyzed by principal component analysis. However, the breadth and complexity of the data necessitated the development of a novel approach to summarizing biofluid constituents after exposure, called Visual Analysis of Metabolomics Package (VAMP). VAMP revealed clear urine metabolite profile differences to as little as 0.5 Gy after 6 h exposure. Via VAMP, it was discovered that the response to radiation exposure found in rat urine is characterized by an overall net down-regulation of ion excretion with only a modest number of ions excreted in excess over pre-exposure levels. Our results show both similarities and differences with the published mouse urine response and a dose- and time-dependent net decrease in urine ion excretion associated with radiation exposure. These findings mark an important step in the development of minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. VAMP should have general applicability in metabolomics to visualize overall differences and trends in many sample sets. PMID:26557048

  13. Lack of Radiation Dose or Quality Dependence of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Chou, William S.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Park, Howard; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a phenotype that alters cell morphology, disrupts morphogenesis, and increases motility. Our prior studies have shown that the progeny of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) irradiated with 2 Gy undergoes transforming growth factor {beta} (TGF-{beta})-mediated EMT. In this study we determined whether radiation dose or quality affected TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT. Methods and Materials: HMECs were cultured on tissue culture plastic or in Matrigel (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) and exposed to low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and TGF-{beta} (400 pg/mL). Image analysis was used to measure membrane-associated E-cadherin, a marker of functional epithelia, or fibronectin, a product of mesenchymal cells, as a function of radiation dose and quality. Results: E-cadherin was reduced in TGF-{beta}-treated cells irradiated with low-LET radiation doses between 0.03 and 2 Gy compared with untreated, unirradiated cells or TGF-{beta} treatment alone. The radiation quality dependence of TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT was determined by use of 1 GeV/amu (gigaelectron volt / atomic mass unit) {sup 56}Fe ion particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Radiation Laboratory. On the basis of the relative biological effectiveness of 2 for {sup 56}Fe ion particles' clonogenic survival, TGF-{beta}-treated HMECs were irradiated with equitoxic 1-Gy {sup 56}Fe ion or 2-Gy {sup 137}Cs radiation in monolayer. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}-treated HMECs irradiated with either high- or low-LET radiation exhibited similar loss of E-cadherin and gain of fibronectin and resulted in similar large, poorly organized colonies when embedded in Matrigel. Moreover, the progeny of HMECs exposed to different fluences of {sup 56}Fe ion underwent TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT even when only one-third of the cells were directly traversed by the particle. Conclusions: Thus TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT, like other non-targeted radiation effects, is

  14. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  15. Gamma-radiation-induced phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 is dose-dependent in MOLT-4 leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tichý, A; Záskodová, D; Zoelzer, F; Vávrová, J; Sinkorová, Z; Pejchal, J; Osterreicher, J; Rezácová, M

    2009-01-01

    Molecular indicators of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are powerful tools in biodosimetry. The studies reported here were undertaken with the motivation to find such a marker among the mo lecules involved in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase- dependent signalling induced by ionizing radiation (ATM-kinase, checkpoint kinase-2, protein p53, and oncoprotein Mdm2). In our previous work on T-lymphocyte leukaemia MOLT-4 cells we described the mentioned molecules of ATM-dependent pathway and none of them showed a pronounced dosedependent response. Here we employed Western blotting and ELISA assay to investigate the response of post-translationally modified p53 (particularly phosphorylated on serine 15) after gamma-irradiation. We have found the amount of phosphorylated p53 to be homogenously increased after irradiation by the doses of 0.5 to 7.5 Gy. The dose-dependent response was pronounced especially after the doses up to 3.0 Gy. The presented data indicate that p53 phosphorylated on serine 15 might be used as a potential biodosimetric marker.

  16. Extent of radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib depends on its dose, the radiation dose and the integrity of the homologous recombination pathway of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Caroline V M; de Haan, Rosemarie; Hageman, Floor; Oostendorp, Tim P D; Carli, Annalisa L E; O'Connor, Mark J; Jonkers, Jos; Verheij, Marcel; van den Brekel, Michiel W; Vens, Conchita

    2015-09-01

    The PARP inhibitor olaparib is currently tested in clinical phase 1 trials to define safe dose levels in combination with RT. However, certain clinically relevant insights are still lacking. Here we test, while comparing to single agent activity, the olaparib dose and genetic background dependence of olaparib-mediated radiosensitization. Long-term growth inhibition and clonogenic assays were used to assess radiosensitization in BRCA2-deficient and BRCA2-complemented cells and in a panel of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. The extent of radiosensitization greatly depended on the olaparib dose, the radiation dose and the homologous recombination status of cells. Olaparib concentrations that resulted in radiosensitization prevented PAR induction by irradiation. Seven hours olaparib exposures were sufficient for radiosensitization. Importantly, the radiosensitizing effects can be observed at much lower olaparib doses than the single agent effects. Extrapolation of these data to the clinic suggests that low olaparib doses are sufficient to cause radiosensitization, underlining the potential of the treatment. Here we show that drug doses achieving radiosensitization can greatly differ from those achieving single agent activities, an important consideration when developing combined radiotherapy strategies with novel targeted agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Ecological and biological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster features depending on the dose of electromagnetic radiation of various types].

    PubMed

    Babkina, V V; Chernova, G V; Allenova, E A; Endebera, O P; Naumkina, E N

    2013-01-01

    Biological effects of exposure to red light (lambda = 660 +/- 10 nm) on the viability and morphophysiological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster have been studied. The ability of this physical agent to modify these features is shown. The degree of expression and impact of biological effects depend on the dose, functional and genetic status of the organism. The study of the life expectancy of the exposed to EHF and white light D. melanogaster has revealed that expression of the features depends on the radiation doses, genotype, sex, the nature of the position of wings and lighting conditions. It has been found that the dark mode (24 h-night) is more favorable than the artificial lighting. Individuals with the left wing at the top are more sensitive to the external factors.

  18. Low-dose radiation augments vasculogenesis signaling through HIF-1-dependent and -independent SDF-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Oren Z; Greives, Matthew R; Singh, Sunil P; Thanik, Vishal D; Chang, Christopher C; Seiser, Natalie; Brown, Daniel J; Knobel, Denis; Schneider, Robert J; Formenti, Silvia C; Saadeh, Pierre B; Levine, Jamie P

    2010-11-04

    The inflammatory response to ionizing radiation (IR) includes a proangiogenic effect that could be counterproductive in cancer but can be exploited for treating impaired wound healing. We demonstrate for the first time that IR stimulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) up-regulation in endothelial cells (ECs), a HIF-1α-independent up-regulation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), as well as endothelial migration, all of which are essential for angiogenesis. 5 Gray IR-induced EC HIF-1α and SDF-1 expression was greater when combined with hypoxia suggesting an additive effect. While small interfering RNA silencing of HIF-1α mRNA and abolition of HIF-1α protein induction down-regulated SDF-1 induction by hypoxia alone, it had little effect on SDF-1 induction by IR, demonstrating an independent pathway. SDF-1-mediated EC migration in hypoxic and/or radiation-treated media showed IR induced strong SDF-1-dependent migration of ECs, augmented by hypoxia. IR activates a novel pathway stimulating EC migration directly through the expression of SDF-1 independent of HIF-1α induction. These observations might be exploited for stimulation of wound healing or controlling tumor angiogenesis.

  19. Radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays: integral multiplicity and coupling function for radiation dose, monitoring and forecasting, 1. For aircrafts in dependence of shielding and airline parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Lev I.

    On the basis of cosmic ray CR and solar activity SA data in the past for more than four solar cycles taking into account the theory of convection-diffusion and drift global modulation of galactic CR in the Heliosphere we determine the parameters of convection-diffusion and drift mechanisms of CR long term variation in dependence of particles energy By using these results and published regularly elsewhere predictions of expected SA variation we may made prediction of expected in near future long-term CR intensity variation on the Earth and long-term change of radiation environment in the Heliosphere owed by galactic CR From other hand we introduce new nominations integral multiplicity and coupling function for radiation dose inside aircraft caused by galactic CR in dependence of shielding and altitude By the method of coupling functions we estimate the connection between CR intensity long-term variation and radiation hazard for aircrafts in dependence of altitude geomagnetic cutoff rigidity and shielding inside aircraft We show that by this way we may made monitoring and prediction of expected differential per unit of time and integral radiation doze for crew passengers and electronic systems at any aircraft lines characterized by dependence from several parameters in time altitude cutoff rigidity shielding We take into account also expected long-term changes in the planetary distribution of cutoff rigidities which also influenced on galactic CR intensity and through CR -- influenced on radiation hazard inside aircraft

  20. Not all 2 gray radiation prescriptions are equivalent: Cytotoxic effect depends on delivery sequences of partial fractionated doses

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.-S. . E-mail: plin@vcu.edu; Wu, Andrew

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether or not the commonly prescribed daily dose of 2 Gy (whole fraction), when delivered as various partial fraction (PF) dose sequences simulating clinical treatment fields, produces equal biologic effects. Methods and Materials: Eleven actively proliferating cell lines derived from human and animal tissues were used in this study. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays were used to determine the radiation effects on cell proliferation and survival, respectively. The 2 Gy dose was divided into 2 or more PFs for delivery to simulate the delivery of clinical treatment fields. Most irradiation sequences contained two parts consisting of at least 1 small PF, denoted by S which was 0.5 Gy or less, and a large PF, denoted by L which was 1 Gy or more. Irradiation schemes were designed to include the following conditions: (a) the 2 Gy dose divided into combinations of an L-dose and one or more S-doses; (b) the L-dose given either before or after the S-doses; and (c) delivery of all partial fractions within a fixed total time. Results: Significant differences in biologic effect were observed between sequences in which the L-dose was given before or after the S-doses in both the MTT and clonogenic assays. Nearly all the latter schemes, that is S-L, produced greater cytotoxic effects than the L-S schemes. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the biologic effects of 2 Gy may differ in different clinical settings depending on the size and sequence of the partial fractions. The variation between cytotoxic effects is likely a result of the combination of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and higher-dose increased radioresistance (IRR) effects established recently. We suggest that to ensure the optimal biologic effect of a prescribed dose of 2 Gy clinically, it is critical to consider the sequence in which the treatment fields are delivered when partial fractions of different sizes are used.

  1. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  2. Mammary carcinogenic effect of low-dose fission radiation in Wistar/Furth rats and its dependency on prolactin.

    PubMed

    Yokoro, K; Sumi, C; Ito, A; Hamada, K; Kanda, K; Kobayashi, T

    1980-06-01

    The mammary carcinogenic effect in rats of low-dose fission radiation and its dependency on prolactin were studied. A total of 141 female W/Fu rats were exposed to 4.8, 8.9, or 19.5 rads of fission radiation that had both fision neutrons of 2.0 million electron volts (MeV) and gamma ray components similar to those produced by the Hiroshima bomb. Only 1 of 48 rats (2.0%) developed mammary tumor (MT) after irradiation alone, whereas 20 of 48 rats (41.6%) developed MT's if prolactin was supplied shortly after irradiation by means of grafting of the prolactin-secreting pituitary tumor. Furthermore, MT's occurred in 11 of 45 rats (24.4%) treated with prolactin as late as 12 months after irradiation, which suggested the long-term survival of radiation-induced dormant MT cells. A correlation was found between the development of MT and the elevation of serum prolactin level; most MT's appeared shortly after the grafted mammotropic pituitary tumor became palpable. The growth of MT's appeared to be promoted by prolactin in collaboration with ovarian hormones; the growth of adenocarcinomas was dependent on prolactin and ovarian hormones, whereas the growth of fibroadenomas appeared to be less hormone-dependent. Much higher biologic effectiveness, especially in the low-dose range, was found with 2.0-MeV fission neutrons compared with 14.1-MeV fast neutrons or 180-kilovolt peak X-rays in rat mammary carcinogenesis.

  3. Mammary carcinogenic effect of low-dose fission radiation in Wistar/Furth rats and its dependency on prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoro, K.; Sumi, C.; Ito, A.; Hamada, K.; Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1980-06-01

    The mammary carcinogenic effect in rats of low-dose fission radiation and its dependency on prolactin were studied. A total of 141 female W/Fu rats were exposed to 4.8, 8.9, or 19.5 rads of fission radiation that had both fission neutrons of 2.0 million electron volts (MeV) and gamma ray components similar to those produced by the Hiroshima bomb. Only 1 of 48 rats (2.0%) developed mammary tumor (MT) after irradiation alone, whereas 20 of 48 rats (41.6%) developed MT's if prolactin was supplied shortly after irradiation by means of grafting of the prolactin-secreting pituitary tumor. Furthermore, MT's occurred in 11 of 45 rats (24.4%) treated wit prolactin as late as 12 months after irradiation, which suggested the long-term survival of radiation-induced dormant MT cells. A correlation was found between the development of MT and the elevation of serum prolactin level; most MT's appeared shortly after the grafted mammotropic pituitary tumor became palpable. The growth of MT's appeared to be promoted by prolactin in collaboration with ovarian hormones; the growth of adenocarcinomas was dependent on prolactin and ovarian hormones, whereas the growth of fibroadenomas appeared to be less hormone-dependent. Much higher bioiogic effectiveness, especially in the low-dose range, was found with 2.0-MeV fission neutrons compared with 14.1-MeV fast neutrons or 180-kilovolt peak X-rays in rat mammary carcinogenesis.

  4. Dose-dependent misrejoining of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts: Experimental and theoretical study for high and low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Cooper, Brian; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Holley, William; Chatterjee, Aloke

    2004-11-18

    Misrejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was measured in human primary fibroblasts after exposure to X-rays and high LET particles (He, N and Fe) in the dose range 10-80 Gy. To measure joining of wrong DNA ends, the integrity of a 3.2 Mbp restriction fragment was analyzed directly after exposure and after 16 hr of repair incubation. It was found that the misrejoining frequency for X-rays was non-linearly related to dose, with less probability of misrejoining at low doses than at high doses. The dose dependence for the high LET particles, on the other hand, was closer to being linear, with misrejoining frequencies higher than for X-rays particularly at the lower doses. These experimental results were simulated with a Monte-Carlo approach that includes a cell nucleus model with all 46 chromosomes present, combined with realistic track structure simulations to calculate the geometrical positions of all DSBs induced for each dose. The model assumes that the main determinant for misrejoining probability is the distance between two simultaneously present DSBs. With a Gaussian interaction probability function with distance, it was found that both the low and high LET data could be fitted with an interaction distance (sigma of the Gaussian curve) of 0.25 {micro}m. This is half the distance previously found to best fit chromosomal aberration data in human lymphocytes using the same methods (Holley et al. Radiat. Res . 158, 568-580 (2002)). The discrepancy may indicate inadequacies in the chromosome model, for example insufficient chromosomal overlap, but may also partly be due to differences between fibroblasts and lymphocytes. Although the experimental data was obtained at high doses, the Monte Carlo calculations could be extended to lower doses. It was found that a linear component of misrejoining versus dose dominated for doses below 1 Gy for all radiations, including X-rays. The calculated relative biological efficiency (RBE) for misrejoining at this low dose

  5. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  6. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Jursinic, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433-0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42-2.58 g/cm(3) and relative sensitivity of 0.92-1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92-1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al2O3:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm(3). The angular dependence is not related to Al2O3:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  7. Dose-dependent misrejoining of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts: experimental and theoretical study for high- and low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Cooper, Brian; Cooper, Priscilla K; Holley, William R; Chatterjee, Aloke

    2005-05-01

    Misrejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was measured in human primary fibroblasts after exposure to X rays and high-LET particles (helium, nitrogen and iron) in the dose range 10-80 Gy. To measure joining of wrong DNA ends, the integrity of a 3.2-Mbp restriction fragment was analyzed directly after exposure and after 16 h of repair incubation. It was found that the misrejoining frequency for X rays was nonlinearly related to dose, with less probability of misrejoining at low doses than at high doses. The dose dependence for the high-LET particles, on the other hand, was closer to being linear, with misrejoining frequencies higher than for X rays, particularly at the lower doses. These experimental results were simulated with a Monte Carlo approach that includes a cell nucleus model with all 46 chromosomes present, combined with realistic track structure simulations to calculate the geometrical positions of all DSBs induced for each dose. The model assumes that the main determinant for misrejoining probability is the distance between two simultaneously present DSBs. With a Gaussian interaction probability function with distance, it was found that the data for both low- and high-LET radiation could be fitted with an interaction distance (sigma of the Gaussian curve) of 0.25 microm. This is half the distance previously found to best fit chromosomal aberration data in human lymphocytes using the same methods (Holley et al., Radiat. Res. 158, 568-580, 2002). The discrepancy may indicate inadequacies in the chromosome model, for example insufficient chromosomal overlap, but may also be partly due to differences between fibroblasts and lymphocytes.

  8. Sensitivity and dose dependency of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Huang, Wen-Jing; Takamura, Syu; Hayashi, Fumiko; Doi, Hanako; Kitajima, Yuriko; Ono, Yusuke; Ogi, Tomoo; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the sensitivity and dose dependency of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were daily exposed to 0, 2, 10, 50, and 250 mGy γ-ray for 1 month in succession, respectively. The damage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were investigated within 2 hours (acute phase) or at 3 months (chronic phase) after the last exposure. Daily exposure to over 10 mGy γ-ray significantly decreased the number and colony-forming capacity of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells at acute phase, and did not completely recover at chronic phase with 250 mGy exposure. Interestingly, the daily exposure to 10 or 50 mGy γ-ray decreased the formation of mixed types of colonies at chronic phase, but the total number of colonies was comparable to control. Immunostaining analysis showed that the formation of 53BP1 foci in c-kit+ stem/progenitor cells was significantly increased with daily exposure to 50 and 250 mGy at acute phase, and 250 mGy at chronic phase. Many genes involved in toxicity responses were up- or down-regulated with the exposures to all doses. Our data have clearly shown the sensitivity and dose dependency of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells of mice with daily exposures to 2 ~ 250 mGy γ-ray. PMID:25623887

  9. Dose- and time-dependent increase of lysosomal enzymes in embryonic cartilage in vitro after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelissen, M.; de Ridder, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Radiation doses of 20, 50 or 100 Gy caused the same time related decrease for RNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis in embryonic cartilage in vitro (4 days culture). In this paper, participation of lysosomes in this radiation response is investigated. Therefore, we employ a cytochemical method using beta-glycerophosphate as substrate for acid phosphatase (AP) detection. Increase of AP was found 2 days after irradiation and increased during the whole culture period. The increase was more pronounced with a higher radiation dose. Stimulation of AP activity explains the observed radiation response of RNA and PG synthesis.

  10. Dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells of mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Urata, Yoshishige; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells (CDCs), a mixed cell population grown from heart tissues. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 250 mGy γ-rays for 7 days and atrial tissues were collected for experiments 24 hours after last exposure. The number of CDCs was significantly decreased by daily exposure to over 250 mGy. Interestingly, daily exposure to over 50 mGy significantly decreased the c-kit expression and telomerase activity, increased 53BP1 foci in the nuclei of CDCs. However, CD90 expression and growth factors production in CDCs were not significantly changed even after daily exposure to 250 mGy. We further evaluated the reversibility of radiation-induced injury in CDCs at 1 week and 3 weeks after a single exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays. The number and growth factors production of CDCs were soon recovered at 1 week. However, the increased expression of CD90 were retained at 1 week, but recovered at 3 weeks. Moreover, the decreased expression of c-kit, impaired telomerase activity, and increased 53BP1 foci were poorly recovered even at 3 weeks. These data may help us to find the most sensitive and reliable bio-parameter(s) for evaluating radiation-induced injury in CDCs. PMID:28098222

  11. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Aoki-Nakano, Mizuho; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Wada, Seiichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-09-01

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV µm(-1)), neon (375 keV µm(-1)) and argon ions (1260 keV µm(-1)) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1-6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Dose-Dependent Changes in the Antigenicity of Bacterial Endotoxin Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    56T for 30 minutics. WVhen tested in double site 02 5 54) Itg of S DS-tirca itd L PS %%ais .pplied. After elect rophorcsis, immunodiffusion (see below...irradiated RSE in double immunodiffusion (Figures Ila and b). The appearance and density of the precipitin bands were dependent on the E. cok 0113...other (RSE), we found 2 distinct major antigenic components experiments as well. Like RSE antisera, antimeningococ- with double immunodiffusion in the

  13. Signal transduction through p53-dependent pathway after low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Wang Xinjiang

    1995-12-31

    In the study of cell-cycle events, recent attention has focused on the signal transduction pathway in which a tumor-suppressor protein, wild-type (wt) p53 protein, acts as the key protein. A major advance in recent years has been the partial elucidation of the G{sub 1}-arrest mechanism. However, the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of components of the cell-cycle machinery remain unknown. We have investigated the induction of p53, WAF1, and cdk2 after gamma-ray irradiation using two human glioblastoma cell lines, U-87MG bearing the wt p53 gene and the other, T98G, a mutant gene. After the cells have been irradiated with gamma rays at 3 Gy, the level of p53 and WAF1 mRNAs in U-87MG increased gradually for up to 10 h, whereas these mRNAs were overexpressed in T98G, and these levels remained relatively stable after irradiation. In an attempt to examine the induction of cdk2 after gamma-ray irradiation, we analyzed the level of cdk2 mRNA using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. We calculated the amounts of cdk2 mRNA relative to that of b-actin mRNA in both cell lines, then plotted them against those in nonirradiated cells. After irradiation, the level of cdk2 mRNA in U-87MG gradually increased more than twofold by 10 h after gamma-ray irradiation, whereas the level of the mRNA in T98G remained relatively stable after irradiation. This result demonstrates that wtp53 induces the expression of not only WAF1 but also cdk2. The induction of wt p53 protein accumulation in rats exposed to x radiation is also discussed.

  14. Dose-dependent changes in the antigenicity of bacterial endotoxin exposed to ionizing radiation. Report No. 2, 1986-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Mocca, L.F.; Elin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the highly purified US reference standard endotoxin (RSE) exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation were studied with double immuno-diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Rabbit RSE antisera identified 2 distinct major antigenic components for untreated RSE: one related to the O-polysaccharide side chain (O-antigenic specificity), the other to the R-core. Based on a serologic cross-reactivity of R-core of RSE (Escherichia coli 0113) with the R-core of the lipopolysaccharide from E. coli 0111, the core type of E. coli 0113 was identified as coli R3. Increasing exposure of RSE to ionizing radiation progressively destroyed all antigenic reactivities; at lower doses of radiation the rate of elimination differed for the 2 antigen classes. The O-polysaccharide was more sensitive to gamma radiation than the R-core and the O-antigenicity was lost before that of the R-core. Endotoxin molecules containing incomplete R-core (radiation-induced or mutant) did not react with the RSE antiserum. Keywords: Antigenicity, Reprints. (KT/KR)

  15. Time- and radiation-dose dependent changes in the plasma proteome after total body irradiation of non-human primates: Implications for biomarker selection.

    PubMed

    Byrum, Stephanie D; Burdine, Marie S; Orr, Lisa; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is a complex multi-organ disease resulting from total body exposure to high doses of radiation. Individuals can be exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) in a number of ways, including terrorist radiological weapons or nuclear accidents. In order to determine whether an individual has been exposed to high doses of radiation and needs countermeasure treatment, robust biomarkers are needed to estimate radiation exposure from biospecimens such as blood or urine. In order to identity such candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure, high-resolution proteomics was used to analyze plasma from non-human primates following whole body irradiation (Co-60 at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy) with a twelve day observation period. A total of 663 proteins were evaluated from the plasma proteome analysis. A panel of plasma proteins with characteristic time- and dose-dependent changes was identified. In addition to the plasma proteomics study reported here, we recently identified candidate biomarkers using urine from these same non-human primates. From the proteomic analysis of both plasma and urine, we identified ten overlapping proteins that significantly differentiate both time and dose variables. These shared plasma and urine proteins represent optimal candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure.

  16. Time- and radiation-dose dependent changes in the plasma proteome after total body irradiation of non-human primates: Implications for biomarker selection

    PubMed Central

    Burdine, Marie S.; Orr, Lisa; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is a complex multi-organ disease resulting from total body exposure to high doses of radiation. Individuals can be exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) in a number of ways, including terrorist radiological weapons or nuclear accidents. In order to determine whether an individual has been exposed to high doses of radiation and needs countermeasure treatment, robust biomarkers are needed to estimate radiation exposure from biospecimens such as blood or urine. In order to identity such candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure, high-resolution proteomics was used to analyze plasma from non-human primates following whole body irradiation (Co-60 at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy) with a twelve day observation period. A total of 663 proteins were evaluated from the plasma proteome analysis. A panel of plasma proteins with characteristic time- and dose-dependent changes was identified. In addition to the plasma proteomics study reported here, we recently identified candidate biomarkers using urine from these same non-human primates. From the proteomic analysis of both plasma and urine, we identified ten overlapping proteins that significantly differentiate both time and dose variables. These shared plasma and urine proteins represent optimal candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure. PMID:28350824

  17. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated retrospective radiation dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M

    1997-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction is used to estimate exposure to radiation that has occurred externally, e.g., from an atomic bomb, or internally, e.g., from radionuclide ingestion. This commentary reviews techniques for biological dosimetry that have been developed to estimate radiation doses from internal exposures, but which can also be used to estimate external exposures. The author argues for increased development and use of these biological tools.

  19. A dose-dependent perturbation in cardiac energy metabolism is linked to radiation-induced ischemic heart disease in Mayak nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Omid; Azizova, Tamara; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Subramanian, Vikram; Bakshi, Mayur V; Moseeva, Maria; Zubkova, Olga; Hauck, Stefanie M; Anastasov, Nataša; Atkinson, Michael J; Tapio, Soile

    2017-02-07

    Epidemiological studies show a significant increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) incidence associated with total external gamma-ray dose among Mayak plutonium enrichment plant workers. Our previous studies using mouse models suggest that persistent alteration of heart metabolism due to the inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha accompanies cardiac damage after high doses of ionising radiation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced IHD in humans. The cardiac proteome response to irradiation was analysed in Mayak workers who were exposed only to external doses of gamma rays. All participants were diagnosed during their lifetime with IHD that also was the cause of death. Label-free quantitative proteomics analysis was performed on tissue samples from the cardiac left ventricles of individuals stratified into four radiation dose groups (0 Gy, < 100 mGy, 100-500 mGy, and > 500 mGy). The groups could be separated using principal component analysis based on all proteomics features. Proteome profiling showed a dose-dependent increase in the number of downregulated mitochondrial and structural proteins. Both proteomics and immunoblotting showed decreased expression of several oxidative stress responsive proteins in the irradiated hearts. The phosphorylation of transcription factor PPAR alpha was increased in a dose-dependent manner, which is indicative of a reduction in transcriptional activity with increased radiation dose. These data suggest that chronic external radiation enhances the risk for IHD by inhibiting PPAR alpha and altering the expression of mitochondrial, structural, and antioxidant components of the heart.

  20. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraeni, N.; Hiswara, E.; Kartikasari, D.; Waris, A.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits.

  1. Radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Cohnen, M; Kemper, J; Möbes, O; Pawelzik, J; Mödder, U

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology.

  2. Radiation: Doses, Effects, Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lean, Geoffrey, Ed.

    Few scientific issues arouse as much public controversy as the effects of radiation. This booklet is an attempt to summarize what is known about radiation and provide a basis for further discussion and debate. The first four chapters of the booklet are based on the most recent reports to the United Nations' General Assembly by the United Nations…

  3. Time-dependent estimates of organ dose and dose equivalent rates for human crews in deep space from the 26 October 2003 solar energetic particle event (Halloween event) using the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PourArsalan, M.; Townsend, L. W.; Schwadron, N. A.; Kozarev, K.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.

    2010-08-01

    The Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module is being developed for use by a broad spectrum of researchers to predict energetic particle intensities and radiation exposures at any location in deep space. In this work we demonstrate the capabilities of the module for performing analyses of time-dependent exposures from solar energetic particle events at various locations in space by calculating cumulative dose and dose equivalent, and their time rates of change, for the skin and bone marrow of crew members shielded by as much as 10 g/cm2 of aluminum shielding for the Halloween events of late October 2003.

  4. Radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays: integral multiplicity and coupling function for radiation dose, monitoring and forecasting, 2. For satellites in dependence of their orbits in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Lev I.

    Here we use results obtained in paper 1 on the parameters of convection-diffusion and drift modulations of galactic cosmic rays CR in the Heliosphere in dependence of particles energy Then by using published regularly elsewhere predictions of expected solar activity variation we may make prediction of expected in near future long-term CR intensity variation From other hand we introduce new nominations integral multiplicity and coupling function for radiation dose inside satellite caused by galactic CR in dependence of shielding By the method of coupling functions we estimate the connection between CR intensity long-term variation and radiation hazard for satellites in dependence of their orbits cutoff rigidity changing along the orbit We show that by this way we may made monitoring and prediction of expected differential per unit of time and integral radiation doze per some interval of time for astronauts e g on ISS and electronic systems We take into account also expected long-term changes in the planetary distribution of cutoff rigidities which also influenced on galactic CR intensity and through CR -- influenced on radiation hazard inside satellite In this paper we do not consider radiation hazard for satellites from trapped radiation Reference 1 Lev I Dorman Radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays integral multiplicity and coupling function for radiation dose monitoring and forecasting 1 For aircrafts in dependence of shielding and airline parameters Abstract for COSPAR-2006 on Session PSW1

  5. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ware, J. H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons. PMID:20726731

  6. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  7. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  8. Immunological low-dose radiation modulates the pediatric medulloblastoma antigens and enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; McDonald, Daniel; Lowe, Stephen; Bredlau, Amy-Lee; Vanek, Kenneth; Patel, Sunil J; Cheshier, Samuel; Eskandari, Ramin

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapy can be an effective treatment for pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) patients. However, major subpopulations do not respond to immunotherapy, due to the lack of antigenic mutations or the immune-evasive properties of MB cells. Clinical observations suggest that radiation therapy (RT) may expand the therapeutic reach of immunotherapy. The aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of low-dose X-ray radiation (LDXR, 1 Gy) on the functional immunological responses of MB cells (DAOY, D283, and D341). Induction of MB cell death was examined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by fluorescent probes. Changes in the expression of  human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and caspase-3 activities during treatment were analyzed using Western blotting and caspase-3 assay. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LDXR upregulated the expression of HLA class I and HLA II molecules by more than 20% compared with control and high-dose (12 Gy) groups in vitro. Several of these HLA subtypes, such as MAGE C1, CD137, and ICAM-1, have demonstrated upregulation. In addition, LDXR increases ROS production in association with phosphorylation of NF-κB and cell surface expression of mAb target molecules (HER2 and VEGF). These data suggest that a combined LDXR and mAb therapy can create a synergistic effect in vitro. These results suggest that LDXR modulates HLA molecules, leading to alterations in T-cell/tumor-cell interaction and enhancement of T-cell-mediated MB cell death. Also, low-dose radiotherapy combined with monoclonal antibody therapy may one day augment the standard treatment for MB, but more investigation is needed to prove its utility as a new therapeutic combination for MB patients.

  9. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  10. Dependence of coronary 3-dimensional dose maps on coronary topologies and beam set in breast radiation therapy: a study based on CT angiographies.

    PubMed

    Moignier, Alexandra; Broggio, David; Derreumaux, Sylvie; El Baf, Fida; Mandin, Anne-Marie; Girinsky, Théodore; Paul, Jean-François; Chea, Michel; Jenny, Catherine; Franck, Didier; Aubert, Bernard; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2014-05-01

    In left-side breast radiation therapy (RT), doses to the left main (LM) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries are usually assessed after delineation by prior anatomic knowledge on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scan. In this study, dose sensitivity due to interindividual coronary topology variation was assessed, and hot spots were located. Twenty-two detailed heart models, created from heart computed tomography angiographies, were fitted into a single representative female thorax. Two breast RT protocols were then simulated into a treatment planning system: the first protocol comprised tangential and tumoral bed beams (TGs_TB) at 50 + 16 Gy, the second protocol added internal mammary chain beams at 50 Gy to TGs_TB (TGs_TB_IMC). For the heart, the LAD, and the LM, several dose indicators were calculated: dose-volume histograms, mean dose (Dmean), minimal dose received by the most irradiated 2% of the volume (D2%), and 3-dimensional (3D) dose maps. Variations of these indicators with anatomies were studied. For the LM, the intermodel dispersion of Dmean and D2% was 10% and 11%, respectively, with TGs_TB and 40% and 80%, respectively, with TGs_TB_IMC. For the LAD, these dispersions were 19% (Dmean) and 49% (D2%) with TGs_TB and 35% (Dmean) and 76% (D2%) with TGs_TB_IMC. The 3D dose maps revealed that the internal mammary chain beams induced hot spots between 20 and 30 Gy on the LM and the proximal LAD for some coronary topologies. Without IMC beams, hot spots between 5 and 26 Gy are located on the middle and distal LAD. Coronary dose distributions with hot spot location and dose level can change significantly depending on coronary topology, as highlighted by 3D coronary dose maps. In clinical practice, coronary imaging may be required for a relevant coronary dose assessment, especially in cases of internal mammary chain irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  12. EXOMARS IRAS (DOSE) radiation measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, C.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Fonte, S.; Pauselli, C.; Reitz, G.; Beaujean, R.

    The characterization and the study of the radiations on their interaction with organic matter is of great interest in view of the human exploration on Mars. The Ionizing RAdiation Sensor (IRAS) selected in the frame of the ExoMars/Pasteur ESA mission is a lightweight particle spectrometer combining various techniques of radiation detection in space. It characterizes the first time the radiation environment on the Mars surface, and provide dose and dose equivalent rates as precursor information absolutely necessary to develop ways to mitigate the radiation risks for future human exploration on Mars. The Martian radiation levels are much higher than those found on Earth and they are relatively low for space. Measurements on the surface will show if they are similar or not to those seen in orbit (modified by the presence of ``albedo'' neutrons produced in the regolith and by the thin Martian atmosphere). IRAS consists of a telescope based on segmented silicon detectors of about 40\\userk\\milli\\metre\\user;k diameter and 300\\user;k\\micro\\metre\\user;k thickness, a segmented organic scintillator, and of a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The telescope will continuously monitor temporal variation of the particle count rate, the dose rate, particle and LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra. Tissue equivalent BC430 scintillator material will be used to measure the neutron dose. Neutrons are selected by a criteria requiring no signal in the anti-coincidence. Last, the passive thermoluminescence dosimeter, based on LiF:Mg detectors, regardless the on board operation timing, will measure the total dose accumulated during the exposure period and due to beta and gamma radiation, with a responsivity very close to that of a human tissue.

  13. Transient impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in relatively low-dose of acute radiation syndrome is associated with inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Jong Choon; Kang, Seong Soo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Shin, Taekyun; Jin, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Sung Ho; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2008-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, which occurs constitutively, is vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), the change in the adult hippocampal function is poorly understood. This study analyzed the changes in apoptotic cell death and neurogenesis in the DGs of hippocampi from adult ICR mice with single whole-body gamma-irradiation using the TUNEL method and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX). In addition, the hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tasks after single whole-body gamma-irradiation were examined in order to evaluate the hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction in the relatively low-dose exposure of ARS. The number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the dentate gyrus (DG) was increased 6-12 h after acute gamma-irradiation (a single dose of 0.5 to 4 Gy). In contrast, the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells began to decrease significantly 6 h postirradiation, reaching its lowest level 24 h after irradiation. The level of Ki-67 and DCX immunoreactivity decreased in a dose-dependent manner within the range of irradiation applied (0-4 Gy). In passive avoidance and object recognition memory test, the mice trained 1 day after acute irradiation (2 Gy) showed significant memory deficits, compared with the sham controls. In conclusion, the pattern of the hippocampus-dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the change in neurogenesis after acute irradiation. It is suggested that a relatively low dose of ARS in adult ICR mice is sufficiently detrimental to interrupt the functioning of the hippocampus, including learning and memory, possibly through the inhibition of neurogenesis.

  14. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    MedlinePlus

    ... that the best approach is to make individual measurements of breast milk activity and individual-specific projections ... 70:437–439; 1997. (5,000 patient dose measurements from 375 hospitals) International Commission on Radiation Protection. ...

  15. Dependences of mucosal dose on photon beams in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C.L.; Owrangi, Amir M.

    2012-07-01

    Dependences of mucosal dose in the oral or nasal cavity on the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration, and mucosal thickness were studied for small photon fields using Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based code), which were validated by measurements. Cylindrical mucosa phantoms (mucosal thickness = 1, 2, and 3 mm) with and without the bone and air inhomogeneities were irradiated by the 6- and 18-MV photon beams (field size = 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2}) with gantry angles equal to 0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign , and 180 Degree-Sign , and multibeam configurations using 2, 4, and 8 photon beams in different orientations around the phantom. Doses along the central beam axis in the mucosal tissue were calculated. The mucosal surface doses were found to decrease slightly (1% for the 6-MV photon beam and 3% for the 18-MV beam) with an increase of mucosal thickness from 1-3 mm, when the beam angle is 0 Degree-Sign . The variation of mucosal surface dose with its thickness became insignificant when the beam angle was changed to 180 Degree-Sign , but the dose at the bone-mucosa interface was found to increase (28% for the 6-MV photon beam and 20% for the 18-MV beam) with the mucosal thickness. For different multibeam configurations, the dependence of mucosal dose on its thickness became insignificant when the number of photon beams around the mucosal tissue was increased. The mucosal dose with bone was varied with the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration and mucosal thickness for a small segmental photon field. These dosimetric variations are important to consider improving the treatment strategy, so the mucosal complications in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be minimized.

  16. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  18. Dependence of Coronary 3-Dimensional Dose Maps on Coronary Topologies and Beam Set in Breast Radiation Therapy: A Study Based on CT Angiographies

    SciTech Connect

    Moignier, Alexandra; Girinsky, Théodore; Paul, Jean-François; and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: In left-side breast radiation therapy (RT), doses to the left main (LM) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries are usually assessed after delineation by prior anatomic knowledge on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scan. In this study, dose sensitivity due to interindividual coronary topology variation was assessed, and hot spots were located. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two detailed heart models, created from heart computed tomography angiographies, were fitted into a single representative female thorax. Two breast RT protocols were then simulated into a treatment planning system: the first protocol comprised tangential and tumoral bed beams (TGs{sub T}B) at 50 + 16 Gy, the second protocol added internal mammary chain beams at 50 Gy to TGs{sub T}B (TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC). For the heart, the LAD, and the LM, several dose indicators were calculated: dose-volume histograms, mean dose (D{sub mean}), minimal dose received by the most irradiated 2% of the volume (D{sub 2%}), and 3-dimensional (3D) dose maps. Variations of these indicators with anatomies were studied. Results: For the LM, the intermodel dispersion of D{sub mean} and D{sub 2%} was 10% and 11%, respectively, with TGs{sub T}B and 40% and 80%, respectively, with TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC. For the LAD, these dispersions were 19% (D{sub mean}) and 49% (D{sub 2%}) with TGs{sub T}B and 35% (D{sub mean}) and 76% (D{sub 2%}) with TGs{sub T}B{sub I}MC. The 3D dose maps revealed that the internal mammary chain beams induced hot spots between 20 and 30 Gy on the LM and the proximal LAD for some coronary topologies. Without IMC beams, hot spots between 5 and 26 Gy are located on the middle and distal LAD. Conclusions: Coronary dose distributions with hot spot location and dose level can change significantly depending on coronary topology, as highlighted by 3D coronary dose maps. In clinical practice, coronary imaging may be required for a relevant coronary dose assessment

  19. Pediatric CT: Strategies to Lower Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Claudia; Alessio, Adam M.; Otto, Randolph K.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Philips, Grace S.; Swanson, Jonathan O.; Thapa, Mahesh M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The introduction of MDCT has increased the utilization of CT in pediatric radiology along with concerns for radiation sequelae. This article reviews general principles of lowering radiation dose, the basic physics that impact radiation dose, and specific CT integrated dose-reduction tools focused on the pediatric population. CONCLUSION The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding CT dose reduction methods, their limitations, and an outlook on future developments with a focus on the pediatric population. The discussion will initially focus on general considerations that lead to radiation dose reduction, followed by specific technical features that influence the radiation dose. PMID:23617474

  20. Age and gender patterns of thyroid cancer incidence in Ukraine depending on thyroid radiation doses from radioactive iodine exposure after the Chornobyl NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Fuzik, M M; Prysyazhnyuk, A Y; Shibata, Y; Romanenko, A Y; Fedorenko, Z P; Gudzenko, N A; Gulak, L O; Trotsyuk, N K; Goroh, Y L; Khukhrianska, O M; Sumkina, O V; Saenko, V A; Yamashita, S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the thyroid cancer incidence in a whole territory of Ukraine and to clear up its age and gender patterns depending on average regional (oblast) thyroid doses from radioactive iodine due to the Chornobyl accident. MATERIALS AND METHODS. On the basis of average accumulated thyroid doses from radioactive iodine the geographical regions of Ukraine with low and high average thyroid doses were identified for a comparative analysis performance. Methods of descriptive epidemiology were used. The level and dynamics of thyroid cancer incidence were analyzed in different gender and age groups (both for attained age and age at the moment of the Chornobyl accident). Results of this study confirmed the radiation excess of thyroid cancer in individuals who were children and adolescents in 1986. Some excess was observed in elder age groups too. Especial situation was observed in female age group 40-49 at the moment of the Chornobyl accident i.e. the age-specific thyroid cancer incidence rates were significantly higher in "high exposure" regions comparing with "low exposure" ones during all years of observation within 1989-2009. A probable radiation excess of thyroid cancer was suggested not only in children and adolescents but also in adult age groups. In elder age groups this excess was less expressed and manifested after a longer period of time. The origin of the phenomenon in female age group of 40-49 is unclear now. Hypothesis of combined effect of radiation and natural changing of hormonal status in this age should be checked in the future studies. Fuzik M. M, Prysyazhnyuk A. Ye, Shibata Y., Romanenko A. Yu., Fedorenko Z. P., Gudzenko N. A., Gulak L. O., Trotsyuk N. K., Goroh Ye. L., Khukhrianska O. M., Sumkina O. V., Saenko V. A., Yamashita Sh., 2013.

  1. Cyclophosphamide-induced enhancement of stem cell recovery from whole-body irradiation is radiation dose-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Pantel, K.; Nakeff, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Although the enhancement of CFU-S recovery by CY pretreatment has been described for combinations of TBI greater than 4 Gy, no information exists as to whether such enhancement is operative at lower TBI doses (less than 3 Gy). B6D2F1 mice received intraperitoneal injections of CY (2 and 5 mg/mouse) at various time intervals prior to 2, 5 or 9 Gy TBI. The control group received the same dose of TBI without CY pretreatment. Six days after TBI, we determined the femoral content of CFU-S. Administration of 5 mg CY per mouse 3 days prior to 5 or 9 Gy TBI enhanced recovery of CFU-S with a substantial increase in CFU-S of 3- and 30-fold over control, respectively. In contrast, the administration of CY prior to 2 Gy TBI delayed recovery with CFU-S remaining at only 10 to 40% of control. This prolongation in CFU-S recovery was similar for CY doses of either 2 or 5 mg per mouse at all the time intervals tested (2, 3, 4 and 7 days prior to TBI). Our results demonstrate an enhancement of CFU-S recovery by pretreatment with CY for high doses of TBI that is reversed if the subsequent TBI dose is too low.

  2. Dose-dependent and gender-related radiation-induced transcription alterations of Gadd45a and Ier5 inhuman lymphocytes exposed to gamma ray emitted by (60)Co.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Hassan; Manoochehri, Mahdi; Modarres Mosalla, Sayed Mahdi; Ghafori, Mostafa; Karimi, Ali Akbar

    2013-04-01

    Growth arrest DNA damage-inducible 45a gene (Gadd45a) and immediate early response gene 5 (Ier5) have been emphasised as ideal radiation biomarkers in several reports. However, some aspects of radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of these genes are unknown. In this study, gender-dependency and dose-dependency as two factors that may affect radiation-induced transcription of Gadd45a and Ier5 genes were investigated. Human lymphocyte cells from six healthy voluntary blood donors (three women and three men) were irradiated in vitro with doses of 0.5-4.0 Gy from a (60)Co source and RNA isolated 4 h later using the High Pure RNA Isolation Kit. Dose and gender dependency of radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of Gadd45a and Ier5 genes were studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that as a whole, Gadd45a and Ier5 gave responses to gamma rays, while the responses were independent of radiation doses. Therefore, regardless of radiation dose, Gadd45a and Ier5 can be considered potential radiation biomarkers. Besides, although radiation-induced transcriptional alterations of Gadd45a in female and male lymphocyte samples were insignificant at 0.5 Gy, at other doses, their quantities in female samples were at a significantly higher level than in male samples. Radiation-induced transcription of Ier5 of females samples had a reduction in comparison with male samples at 1 and 2 Gy, but at doses of 0.5 and 4 Gy, females were significantly more susceptible to radiation-induced transcriptional alteration of Ier5.

  3. Induction of Sperm Head Abnormalities by Incorporated Radionuclides: Dependence on Subcellular Distribution, Type of Radiation, Dose Rate, and Presence of Radioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Dandamudi V.; Narra, Venkateswara R.; Howell, Roger W.; Lanka, Venkata K.; Sastry, Kandula S. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the biological effects caused by exposure to external beams of radiation, the effects of tissue-incorporated radionuclides are highly dependent on the type of radiation emitted and on their distribution at the macroscopic, microscopic, and subcellular levels, which are in turn determined by the chemical nature of the radionuclides administered. Induction of abnormalities of sperm heads in mice is investigated in this work after the injection of a variety of radiochemicals including α emitters. When the initial slopes of the dose–response curves are used to compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of different radiocompounds, the α particles emitted in the decay of 210Po are more effective than Auger electrons emitted by 125I incorporated in the DNA of the spermatogonial cells, and both emissions are more effective than X rays. It is also shown that the Auger emitters (125I, 111In) distributed in the cell nucleus are more efficient in producing abnormalities than the same radionuclides localized in the cytoplasm. These findings are consistent with our earlier observations, where spermatogonial cell survival is assayed as a function of the testicular absorbed dose. Further, chronic irradiation of testis with γ rays from intratesticularly administered 7Be is about three times more effective in causing abnormalities than a single acute exposure to 120-kVp X rays. The resulting RBE values correlate well with our data on sperm head survival with the same radiocompounds. Finally, the radioprotector cysteamine, when administered in small, nontoxic amounts, significantly reduces the incidence of sperm abnormalities from α-particle radiation as well as emissions from 125I incorporated into DNA, the dose reduction factors being 10 and 14, respectively. PMID:1986404

  4. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  5. Effects of low doses of radiation.

    PubMed

    Fry, R J

    1996-06-01

    This is a brief review of what is known from experimental studies about the effects of low doses of radiation, and approaches that might improve risk estimates are discussed. The dose-response relationships for cancer induction by radiation vary markedly between tissues. The evidence suggests that 1) the induction of the initial events is dependent on the cell type because the size and/or the number of targets and how the cells handle the initial lesions differs between cell types; and 2) there are marked differences among tissues how initial lesions are expressed and proceed to overt cancer. The recent findings about adaptive responses are discussed in the context of what they contribute to our understanding about the response to irradiation. Lastly, the possibility of extending the approach of determining "The probability of causation," which Vic Bond played such an important role in establishing, is raised.

  6. Assessment of the risk of solar ultraviolet radiation to amphibians. I. Dose-dependent induction of hindlimb malformations in the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed

    Ankley, Gerald T; Diamond, Stephen A; Tietge, Joseph E; Holcombe, Gary W; Jensen, Kathleen M; Defoe, David L; Peterson, Ryan

    2002-07-01

    A number of environmental stressors have been hypothesized as responsible for recent increases in limb malformations in several species of North American amphibians. The purpose of this study was to generate dose-response data suitable for assessing the potential role of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in causing limb malformations in a species in which this phenomenon seemingly is particularly prevalent, the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens). Frogs were exposed from early embryonic stages through complete metamorphosis to varying natural sunlight regimes, including unaltered (100%) sunlight, sunlight subjected to neutral density filtration to achieve relative intensities of 85%, 75%, 65%, 50%, and 25% of unaltered sunlight, and sunlight filtered with glass or acrylamide to attenuate, respectively, the UVB (290-320 nm) and UVB plus UVA (290-380 nm) portions of the spectrum. The experiments were conducted in a controlled setting, with continual monitoring of UVB, UVA, and visible light to support a robust exposure assessment. Full sunlight caused approximately 50% mortality of the frogs during early larval development; no significant treatment-related mortality occurred under any of the other exposure regimes, including 100% sunlight with glass or acrylamide filtration. There was a dose-dependent (p < 0.0001) induction of hindlimb malformations in the frogs, with the percentage of affected animals ranging from about 97% under unaltered sunlight to 0% in the 25% neutral density treatment. Malformations were comprised mostly of missing or truncated digits, and generally were bilateral as well as symmetrical. Filtration of sunlight with either glass or acrylamide both significantly reduced the incidence of malformed limbs. The estimated sunlight dose resulting in a 50% limb malformation rate (ED50) was 63.5%. The limb ED50 values based on measured sunlight intensities corresponded to average daily doses of 4.5 and 100 Wh x m(-2) for UVB and UVA, respectively

  7. Coronary CT angiography with low radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2010-02-01

    With the introduction of 64-slice CT and dual-source CT technology, coronary CT angiography(CCTA) has emerged as a useful diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive assessment of coronary heart disease. Recently, the risks associated with ionizing radiation on CT have raised serious concerns.The main concern of exposure to ionizing radiation is the potential risk of cancer. CCTA involves much higher radiation dose with the advances in the spatial and temporal resolution of cardiac CT. Currently,various dose-saving algorithms, such as ECG (electrocardiography)-based dose modulation, reduced tube voltage, and prospective ECG gating, high-pitch helical scanning are available to lower radiation exposure during cardiac CT. Therefore, careful selection of CT scanning protocols is needed to keep the radiation exposure 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)'. In this review we will discuss the radiation dose safety issues, the measurement of radiation dose and current use of dose-saving techniques in CCTA.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets.

    PubMed

    Dant, James T; Richardson, Richard B; Nie, Linda H

    2013-05-21

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of (223)Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of (223)Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from (223)Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, (153)Sm and (89)Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from (223)Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from (153)Sm and (89)Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from (223)Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and (223)Ra may be a more

  10. Radiation Dose Optimization For Critical Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadegan, Yasaman

    Ionizing radiation used in the patient diagnosis or therapy has negative effects on the patient body in short term and long term depending on the amount of exposure. More than 700,000 examinations are everyday performed on Interventional Radiology modalities, however; there is no patient-centric information available to the patient or the Quality Assurance for the amount of organ dose received. In this study, we are exploring the methodologies to systematically reduce the absorbed radiation dose in the Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Radiology procedures. In the first part of this study, we developed a mathematical model which determines a set of geometry settings for the equipment and a level for the energy during a patient exam. The goal is to minimize the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organs while maintaining image quality required for the diagnosis. The model is a large-scale mixed integer program. We performed polyhedral analysis and derived several sets of strong inequalities to improve the computational speed and quality of the solution. Results present the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organ can be reduced up to 99% for a specific set of angles. In the second part, we apply an approximate gradient method to simultaneously optimize angle and table location while minimizing dose in the critical organs with respect to the image quality. In each iteration, we solve a sub-problem as a MIP to determine the radiation field size and corresponding X-ray tube energy. In the computational experiments, results show further reduction (up to 80%) of the absorbed dose in compare with previous method. Last, there are uncertainties in the medical procedures resulting imprecision of the absorbed dose. We propose a robust formulation to hedge from the worst case absorbed dose while ensuring feasibility. In this part, we investigate a robust approach for the organ motions within a radiology procedure. We minimize the absorbed dose for the critical

  11. CT radiation dose awareness among paediatricians.

    PubMed

    Al-Rammah, Tamader Y

    2016-08-31

    The radiation dose delivered from computed tomography (CT) scanning and the risks associated with ionising radiation are major concerns in paediatric imaging. Compared to adults, children have increased organ sensitivity and a longer expected lifetime in which cancer may develop. Therefore, it is important to investigate the awareness of paediatricians (referring physicians) regarding radiation doses and the associated risks. A multiple-choice survey was distributed among paediatricians in 8 hospitals in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. Among the 162 respondents, only 24 (15 %) were aware of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle. Approximately half (54 %) of the respondents believed that multi-slice CT delivered a low radiation dose, and 100 (62 %) of the respondents were not aware that radiation is considered carcinogenic by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. Among the respondents, 110 (68 %) did not have any specific education regarding radiation during their training. There was an overall underestimation (83 %) of the CT radiation dose, and 70 % thought that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) delivered some level of ionising radiation. Among paediatricians in Saudi Arabian hospitals, there was a wide underestimation of the CT radiation dose and the associated risks for children. We should improve paediatricians' knowledge about radiation doses. Radiologists, paediatricians, radiation technologists and medical physicists should work together to optimise CT guidelines and protocols to reduce the radiation risks for children.

  12. Dose-dependent analysis of acute medical effects of mixed neutron-gamma radiation from selected severe 235U or 239Pu criticality accidents in USSR, United States, and Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barabanova, Tatyana; Wiley, Albert L; Bushmanov, Andrey

    2012-04-01

    Eight of the most severe cases of acute radiation disease (ARS) known to have occurred in humans (as the result of criticality accidents) had survival times less than 120 h (herein defined as "early death"). These accidents were analyzed and are discussed with respect to the specific accident scenarios and the resulting accident-specific, mixed neutron-gamma radiation clinical dose distributions. This analysis concludes that the cardiovascular system appears to be the most critical organ system failure for causing "early death" following approximate total body, mixed gamma-neutron radiation doses greater than 40-50 Gy. The clinical data also suggest that there was definite chest dose dependence in the resulting survival times for these eight workers, who unfortunately suffered profound radiation injury and unusual clinical effects from such high dose radiation exposures. In addition, "toxemic syndrome" is correlated with the irradiation of large volumes of soft tissues. Doses to the hands or legs greater than 80-100 Gy or radiation lung injury also play significant but secondary roles in causing "early death" in accidents delivering chest doses greater than 50 Gy.

  13. Study on dependence of dose enhancement on cluster morphology of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy using a body-centred cubic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Chung, Kwangzoo; Shin, Jung Wook; Cheon, Wonjoong; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho

    2017-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected in a body for dose enhancement in radiation therapy are known to form clusters. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the GNP morphology using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared the model predictions with experimental data. The cluster morphology was approximated as a body-centred cubic (BCC) structure by placing GNPs at the 8 corners and the centre of a cube with an edge length of 0.22–1.03 µm in a 4  ×  4  ×  4 µm3 water-filled phantom. We computed the dose enhancement ratio (DER) for 50 and 260 kVp photons as a function of the distance from the cube centre for 12 different cube sizes. A 10 nm-wide concentric shell shaped detector was placed up to 100 nm away from a GNP at the cube centre. For model validation, simulations based on BCC and nanoparticle random distribution (NRD) models were performed using parameters that corresponded to the experimental conditions, which measured increases in the relative biological effect due to GNPs. We employed the linear quadratic model to compute cell surviving fraction (SF) and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER). The DER is inversely proportional to the distance to the GNPs. The largest DERs were 1.97 and 1.80 for 50 kVp and 260 kVp photons, respectively. The SF predicted by the BCC model agreed with the experimental value within 10%, up to a 5 Gy dose, while the NRD model showed a deviation larger than 10%. The SERs were 1.21  ±  0.13, 1.16  ±  0.11, and 1.08  ±  0.11 according to the experiment, BCC, and NRD models, respectively. We most accurately predicted the GNP radiosensitization effect using the BCC approximation and suggest that the BCC model is effective for use in nanoparticle dosimetry.

  14. The angular dependence of a 2-dimensional diode array and the feasibility of its application in verifying the composite dose distribution of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Lin; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Li-Xin; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Shao-Min

    2010-06-01

    The planning dose distribution of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has to be verified before clinical implementation. The commonly used verification method is to measure the beam fluency at 0 degree gantry angle with a 2-dimensional (2D) detector array, but not the composite dose distribution of the real delivery in the planned gantry angles. This study was to investigate the angular dependence of a 2D diode array (2D array) and the feasibility of using it to verify the composite dose distribution of IMRT. Angular response of the central detector in the 2D array was measured for 6 MV X-ray, 10 cmx10 cm field and 100 cm source axis distance (SAD) in different depths. With the beam incidence angle of 0-60 degrees, at intervals of 10 degrees, and inherent buildup of the 2D array (2 g/cm2), the array was irradiated and the readings of the central diode were compared with the measurement of thimble ionization chamber. Using a combined 30 cmx30 cmx30 cm phantom which consisted of solid water slabs on top and underlying the 2D array, with the diode detectors placed at 8 g/cm2 depth, measurements were taken for beam angles of 0 degrees-180 degrees at intervals of 10 degrees and compared with the calculation of treatment planning system (TPS) that pre-verified with ion chamber measuring. Differences between the array detector and thimble chamber measurements were greater than 1% and 3.5% when the beam angle was larger than 30 degrees and 60 degrees, respectively. The measurements in the combined phantom were different from the calculation as high as 20% for 90 degrees beam angle, 2% at 90 degrees+/-5 degrees and less than 1% for all the other beam angles. The 2D diode array is capable of being used in composite dose verification of IMRT when the beam angles of 90 degrees+/-5 degrees and 270 degrees+/-5 degrees are avoided.

  15. ["Dose-risk" relationships at low doses of radiation].

    PubMed

    Stefanou, E P

    1988-01-01

    The ionizing radiation is inherently harmful to human beings, and people must be protected from unnecessary or excessive exposure to it. The harmful nature of high doses of x rays has been known for many years. However, for low doses such as those commonly employed in dental radiographic procedures the magnitude of the risk (or even if there is a risk) remains uncertain. The purpose of this paper is to do an analysis of the Dose-risk relationships at low doses of radiation according to the latest recommendations and philosophy of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP).

  16. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  17. Dose- and Ion-Dependent Effects in the Oxidative Stress Response to Space-Like Radiation Exposure in the Skeletal System.

    PubMed

    Alwood, Joshua S; Tran, Luan H; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Kumar, Akhilesh; Hilton, Diane; Tahimic, Candice G T; Globus, Ruth K

    2017-10-10

    Space radiation may pose a risk to skeletal health during subsequent aging. Irradiation acutely stimulates bone remodeling in mice, although the long-term influence of space radiation on bone-forming potential (osteoblastogenesis) and possible adaptive mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation impairs osteoblastogenesis in an ion-type specific manner, with low doses capable of modulating expression of redox-related genes. 16-weeks old, male, C57BL6/J mice were exposed to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) protons (150 MeV/n) or high-LET (56)Fe ions (600 MeV/n) using either low (5 or 10 cGy) or high (50 or 200 cGy) doses at NASA's Space Radiation Lab. Five weeks or one year after irradiation, tissues were harvested and analyzed by microcomputed tomography for cancellous microarchitecture and cortical geometry. Marrow-derived, adherent cells were grown under osteoblastogenic culture conditions. Cell lysates were analyzed by RT-PCR during the proliferative or mineralizing phase of growth, and differentiation was analyzed by imaging mineralized nodules. As expected, a high dose (200 cGy), but not lower doses, of either (56)Fe or protons caused a loss of cancellous bone volume/total volume. Marrow cells produced mineralized nodules ex vivo regardless of radiation type or dose; (56)Fe (200 cGy) inhibited osteoblastogenesis by more than 90% (5 weeks and 1 year post-IR). After 5 weeks, irradiation (protons or (56)Fe) caused few changes in gene expression levels during osteoblastogenesis, although a high dose (56)Fe (200 cGy) increased Catalase and Gadd45. The addition of exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) protected marrow-derived osteoprogenitors from the damaging effects of exposure to low-LET ((137)Cs γ) when irradiated in vitro, but had limited protective effects on high-LET (56)Fe-exposed cells. In sum, either protons or (56)Fe at a relatively high dose (200 cGy) caused persistent bone loss, whereas only high-LET (56)Fe increased

  18. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  19. Low-dose radiation: a cause of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.

    1980-08-15

    It is likely that the breast is the organ most sensitive to radiation carcinogenesis in postpubertal women. Studies of different exposed populations have yielded remarkably consistent results, in spite of wide differences in underlying breast cancer rates and conditions of exposure. Excess risk is approximately proportional to dose, and is relatively independent of ionization density and fractionization of dose. This implies that the risk associated with low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation can be estimated with some confidence from higher-dose data. Excess risk is heavily dependent on age at exposure but relatively independent of population differences in normal risk. The temporal patterns after exposure of both radiation-induced and naturally occurring breast cancer are similar, suggesting a strong influence of factors other than radiation on radiation-induced breast cancer. Uncertainties remain about risks from exposures before puberty and after menopause.

  20. Biological-Based Modeling of Low Dose Radiation Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R., Ph.D.

    2006-11-08

    threshold. However, low-dose and low-dose-rate induced adapted protection leads to hormetic type dose-response relationships (e.g. U or J shaped) for cancer induction. Indeed, our research findings point to several dose zones of biological responses: (1) The natural background radiation dose zone over which increasing background radiation doses appear to lead to decrease cancer risk (Transition Zone A) due to activation (in a stochastic manner) of a system of protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair, apoptosis of unstable cells, and immune system activation. (2) A dose zone just above natural background radiation exposure over which cancer risk appears to further decrease and then remain suppressed at a relatively constant level below the spontaneous frequency (Zone of Maximal Protection); (3) higher but moderate doses over which cancer risk increases rather steeply over relative narrow dose range (Transition Zone B) due to radiation related suppression of protective processes (immune system function and selective apoptosis of unstable cells); (4) higher doses (LNT zone) where cancer risk increases as a linear function of dose for a range of doses (protective processes maximally suppressed in this zone). The indicted dose zones are dose-rate and radiation-type dependent with the protective zone increasing as dose rate is decreases and exposure time extended. In fact, natural background low-LET radiation appears to be protecting us not only from cancer occurrence but also from other genomic instability associated diseases via repeatedly inducing transient adapted protection. Reducing natural background radiation exposure (e.g., via relocation) over extended periods (years) would be expected to cause more harm than benefit. The harm would be expressed as increased cases of cancer and other genomic-instability-associated diseases as well as in significantly reduced life expectancy.

  1. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  2. Effects Of Dose Rates On Radiation Damage In CMOS Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Coss, James R.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes measurements of effects of ionizing-radiation dose rate on consequent damage to complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic devices. Depending on irradiation time and degree of annealing, survivability of devices in outer space, or after explosion of nuclear weapons, enhanced. Annealing involving recovery beyond pre-irradiation conditions (rebound) detrimental. Damage more severe at lower dose rates.

  3. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18-20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent.

  4. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18–20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent. PMID:26612096

  5. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations. PMID:26672725

  6. Dose estimation software for radiation biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Lloyd, David C

    2010-02-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of chromosome damage in blood lymphocytes is widely used for radiation biodosimetry. Mathematical and statistical analysis is extremely important for accurate assessment of the data and results, and there are a number of classical statistical methods which are routinely employed. However, the large number of different mathematical techniques, the dependence of the models on certain statistical principles, and the complexity of some of the methods can lead to errors in data analysis and thus misinterpretation of results. Cytogenetic dose estimation software has been developed to address these problems by simplifying mathematical and statistical analysis of the cytogenetic data. "Dose Estimate" is a collection of mathematical and statistical methods based on the cytogenetic methods that are used for biodosimetry at the Health Protection Agency and elsewhere in the radiation cytogenetics community. Details of the biological and mathematical tools incorporated into the software are presented. Preliminary testing has been carried out, and the results demonstrate the accuracy and usefulness of the software in its current form. Proposals for improving the software through implementation of recently published Bayesian analysis techniques for cytogenetics are also outlined. An evaluation copy of the software is available on request from the authors.

  7. Radiation dose optimization in thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Tack, D

    2010-01-01

    Guidelines for reduction of CT radiation dose were introduced in 1997 and are now more than 12 years old. The process initiated by the European Regulatory authorities to reduce the excess of radiation from CT has however not produced the expected results. Reference diagnostic levels (DRL) from surveys are still twice as high as needed in most European countries and were not significantly reduced as compared to the initial European ones. Many factors may at least explain partially the lack of dose reduction. One of them is the complexity of the dose optimization process while maintaining image quality at a diagnostically acceptable level. Chest is an anatomical region where radiation dose could be substantially reduced because of high natural contrasts between structures, such as air in the lungs and fat in the mediastinum. In this article, the concept of CT radiation dose optimization and the factors that contribute to maintain global excess in radiation dose are reviewed and a brief summary of results from research in the field of chest CT radiation dose is given.

  8. Radiation dose to the global flying population.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis E; Eastham, Sebastian D; Barrett, Steven R H

    2016-03-01

    Civil airliner passengers and crew are exposed to elevated levels of radiation relative to being at sea level. Previous studies have assessed the radiation dose received in particular cases or for cohort studies. Here we present the first estimate of the total radiation dose received by the worldwide civilian flying population. We simulated flights globally from 2000 to 2013 using schedule data, applying a radiation propagation code to estimate the dose associated with each flight. Passengers flying in Europe and North America exceed the International Commission on Radiological Protection annual dose limits at an annual average of 510 or 420 flight hours per year, respectively. However, this falls to 160 or 120 h on specific routes under maximum exposure conditions.

  9. Patient Radiation Doses from Diagnostic Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, D.

    1996-01-01

    Explains how x-ray doses to patients are measured. Describes how different techniques expose patients to differing amounts of ionizing radiation. Compares these figures with other natural and man-made sources. (Author/MKR)

  10. Use of a dose-dependent follow-up protocol and mechanisms to reduce patients and staff radiation exposure in congenital and structural interventions.

    PubMed

    Sawdy, Jaclynn M; Kempton, Tanya Maria; Olshove, Vincent; Gocha, Mark; Chisolm, Joanne L; Hill, Sharon L; Kirk, Amy; Cheatham, John P; Holzer, Ralf J

    2011-07-01

    Increasingly complex structural/congenital cardiac interventions require efforts at reducing patient/staff radiation exposure. Standard follow-up protocols are often inadequate in detecting all patients that may have sustained radiation burns. Single-center retrospective chart review divided into four intervals. Phase 1 (07/07-06/08, 413 procedures (proc)): follow-up based on fluoroscopy time only; frame rate for digital acquisition (DA) 30 fps, and fluoroscopy (FL) 30 fps. Dose-based follow-up was used for phase 2-4. Phase 2 (07/08-08/09, 458 proc): DA: 30 fps, FL: 15 fps. Phase 3 (09/09-06/10, 350 proc): DA: 15-30 fps, FL: 15 fps, use of added radiation protection drape. Phase 4 (07/10-10/10, 89 proc): DA: 15-30 fps, FL: 15 fps, superior noise reduction filter (SNRF) with high-quality fluoro-record capabilities. There was a significant reduction in the median cumulative air kerma between the four study periods (710 mGy vs. 566 mGy vs. 498 mGy vs. 241 mGy, P < 0.001), even though the overall fluoroscopy times remained very similar (25 min vs. 26 min vs. 26 min vs. 23 min, P = 0.957). There was a trend towards lower physician radiation exposure over the four study periods (137 mrem vs. 126 mrem vs. 108 mrem vs. 59 mrem, P = 0.15). Fifteen patients with radiation burns were identified during the study period. When changing to a dose-based follow-up protocol (phase 1 vs. phase 2), there was a significant increase in the incidence of detected radiation burns (0.5% vs. 2%, P = 0.04). Dose-based follow-up protocols are superior in detecting radiation burns when compared to fluoroscopy time-based protocols. Frame rate reduction of fluoroscopy and cine acquisition and use of modified imaging equipment can achieve a significant reduction to patient/staff exposure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-08-07

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096{+-}0.019(1 SD) and 0.092{+-}0.016(1 SD){mu}Sv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11{+-}0.042(1 SD) and 0.091{+-}0.026(1 SD){mu}Sv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, {sup 222}Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  12. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation.

  13. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  14. Radiation measurements and doses at SST altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foelsche, T.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation components and dose equivalents due to galactic and solar cosmic rays in the high atmosphere, especially at SST altitudes, are presented. The dose equivalent rate for the flight personnel flying 500 hours per year in cruise altitudes of 60,000-65,000 feet (18-19.5 km) in high magnetic latitudes is about 0.75-1.0 rem per year averaged over the solar cycle, or about 15-20 percent of the maximum permissible dose rate.

  15. Radiation Dose from Reentrant Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Cleghorn, T. E.; Watts, J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating the crew exposures during an EVA, the contribution of reentrant electrons has always been neglected. Although the flux of these electrons is small compared to the flux of trapped electrons, their energy spectrum extends to several GeV compared to about 7 MeV for trapped electrons. This is also true of splash electrons. Using the measured reentrant electron energy spectra, it is shown that the dose contribution of these electrons to the blood forming organs (BFO) is more than 10 times greater than that from the trapped electrons. The calculations also show that the dose-depth response is a very slowly changing function of depth, and thus adding reasonable amounts of additional shielding would not significantly lower the dose to BFO.

  16. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Giovanna; Constine, Louis S.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Correa, Candace; Pierce, Lori J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-03-01

    The literature is reviewed to identify the main clinical and dose-volume predictors for acute and late radiation-induced heart disease. A clear quantitative dose and/or volume dependence for most cardiac toxicity has not yet been shown, primarily because of the scarcity of the data. Several clinical factors, such as age, comorbidities and doxorubicin use, appear to increase the risk of injury. The existing dose-volume data is presented, as well as suggestions for future investigations to better define radiation-induced cardiac injury.

  17. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  18. Low dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction.

    PubMed

    Kantak, S S; Diglio, C A; Onoda, J M

    1993-09-01

    We characterized in vitro the effects of gamma-radiation (12.5-100 cGy) on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMEC) morphology and F-actin organization. Cellular retraction was documented by phase-contrast microscopy and the organization of actin microfilaments was determined by immunofluorescence. Characterization included radiation dose effects, their temporal duration and reversibility of the effects. A dose-dependent relationship between the level of exposure (12.5-100 cGy) and the rate and extent of endothelial retraction was observed. Moreover, analysis of radiation-induced depolymerization of F-actin microfilament stress fibres correlated positively with the changes in PMEC morphology. The depolymerization of the stress fibre bundles was dependent on radiation dose and time. Cells recovered from exposure to reform contact inhibited monolayers > or = 24 h post-irradiation. Concomitantly, the depolymerized microfilaments reorganized to their preirradiated state as microfilament stress fibres arrayed parallel to the boundaries of adjacent contact-inhibited cells. The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Our data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema.

  19. Radiation dose from cigarette tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Papastefanou, C.

    2008-08-07

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb of the uranium series and {sup 228}Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made produced radionuclides, such as {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for {sup 226}Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 79.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), while for {sup 228}Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 67.1 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}) and for {sup 210}Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 104.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 251.5 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). The annual effective dose from {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv y{sup -1} (average 199.3 nSv y{sup -1})

  20. Radiation Dose from Cigarette Tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papastefanou, C.

    2008-08-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as 226Ra and 210Pb of the uranium series and 228Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made produced radionuclides, such as 137Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv y-1 (average 79.7 μSv y-1), while for 228Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv y-1 (average 67.1 μSv y-1) and for 210Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv y-1 (average 104.7 μSv y-1), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv y-1 (average 251.5 μSv y-1). The annual effective dose from 137Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv y-1 (average 199.3 nSv y-1).

  1. Mapping of cosmic radiation dose in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Poje, M; Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Miklavčić, I; Faj, D; Varga Pajtler, M; Planinić, J

    2012-01-01

    The Earth is continually bombarded by high-energy particles coming from the outer space and the sun. These particles, termed cosmic radiation, interact with nuclei of atmospheric constituents and decrease in intensity with depth in the atmosphere. Measurements of photon and gamma radiation, performed with a Radiameter at 1 m above the ground, indicated dose rates of 50-100 nSv/h. The neutron dose rate was measured with the CR-39 track etch detector calibrated by the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. Correlation between neutron dose rates and altitudes at 36 sites was examined in order to obtain a significant positive correlation coefficient; the resulting linear regression enabled estimation of a neutron dose at particular altitude. The measured neutron dose rate in Osijek (altitude of 89 m, latitude of 45.31° N) was 110 nSv/h. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, M.K.

    1984-09-20

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  3. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1986-01-01

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  4. Galactic cosmic radiation doses to astronauts outside the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Letaw, J.R.

    1987-12-06

    The dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic radiation outside the magnetosphere were computed. The principal radiation components considered include primary cosmic rays, spallation fragments of the heavy ions, and secondary products (protons, neutrons, alphas, and recoil nuclei) from interactions in tissue. Three mission environments were considered: free space, the lunar surface, and the martian surface. The annual dose equivalents to the blood-forming organs in these environments are approximately 500 mSv, 250 mSv, and 120 mSv, respectively (1 mSv = 0.1 rem). The dose on the lunar surface is one-half of free space because there is only a single hemisphere of exposure. The dose on the martian surface is half again the dose on the moon because of the shielding provided by a thin, carbon dioxide atmosphere. Dose versus aluminum shielding thickness functions have been computed for the free space exposure. Galactic cosmic radiation is energetic and highly penetrating. 30 cm of aluminum shielding reduces the dose equivalent 25% to 40% (depending on the phase of the solar cycle). Aiming for conformity with the draft NCRP annual dose limit for space station crew members, which is 500 mSv/yr, we recommend 7.5 cm of aluminum shielding in all habitable areas of spacecraft designed for long-duration missions outside Earth's magnetosphere. This shielding thickness reduces the galactic cosmic ray dose and diminishes the risk to astronauts from energetic particle events.

  5. Radiation Dose Estimation by Automated Cytogenetic Biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Peter K; Li, Yanxin; Wilkins, Ruth C; Flegal, Farrah N; Knoll, Joan H M

    2016-12-01

    The dose from ionizing radiation exposure can be interpolated from a calibration curve fit to the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (DCs) at multiple doses. As DC counts are manually determined, there is an acute need for accurate, fully automated biodosimetry calibration curve generation and analysis of exposed samples. Software, the Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identifier (ADCI), is presented which detects and discriminates DCs from monocentric chromosomes, computes biodosimetry calibration curves and estimates radiation dose. Images of metaphase cells from samples, exposed at 1.4-3.4 Gy, that had been manually scored by two reference laboratories were reanalyzed with ADCI. This resulted in estimated exposures within 0.4-1.1 Gy of the physical dose. Therefore, ADCI can determine radiation dose with accuracies comparable to standard triage biodosimetry. Calibration curves were generated from metaphase images in ~10 h, and dose estimations required ~0.8 h per 500 image sample. Running multiple instances of ADCI may be an effective response to a mass casualty radiation event. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Biodosimetry and assessment of radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Rafael Herranz; Domene, Mercedes Moreno; Rodríguez, María Jesús Prieto

    2011-01-01

    Aim When investigating radiation accidents, it is very important to determine the exposition dose to the individuals. In the case of exposures over 1 Gy, clinicians may expect deterministic effects arising the following weeks and months, in these cases dose estimation will help physicians in the planning of therapy. Nevertheless, for doses below 1 Gy, biodosimetry data are important due to the risk of developing late stochastic effects. Finally, some accidental overexposures are lack of physical measurements and the only way of quantifying dose is by biological dosimetry. Background The analysis of chromosomal aberrations by different techniques is the most developed method of quantifying dose to individuals exposed to ionising radiations.1,2 Furthermore, the analysis of dicentric chromosomes observed in metaphases from peripheral lymphocytes is the routine technique used in case of acute exposures to assess radiation doses. Materials and methods Solid stain of chromosomes is used to determine dicentric yields for dose estimation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for translocations analysis is used when delayed sampling or suspected chronically irradiation dose assessment. Recommendations in technical considerations are based mainly in the IAEA Technical Report No. 405.2 Results Experience in biological dosimetry at Gregorio Marañón General Hospital is described, including own calibration curves used for dose estimation, background studies and real cases of overexposition. Conclusion Dose assessment by biological dosimeters requires a large previous standardization work and a continuous update. Individual dose assessment involves high qualification professionals and its long time consuming, therefore requires specific Centres. For large mass casualties cooperation among specialized Institutions is needed. PMID:24376970

  7. Radiation-induced oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder by gamma rays and electron beams: A clear dependence of dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglong; Xu, Lu; Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2015-10-01

    Oxidation is an important effect of irradiation on polyethylene in air. In this work, oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder (ca. 110 μm in diameter) induced by gamma rays (γ ray) and electron beams (EB) in air resulted in some large differences in properties, such as oxidative scission due to dose rate differences. However, other properties, such as surface wettability and thermal stability were not that greatly affected. The dose-rates used were 0.0019 kGy/s from a cobalt-60 gamma source and 92 kGy/s from an electron beam. The chemical structure, oxidation level, surface wettability and thermal stability of irradiated UHMWPE were analyzed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA and the static contact angle. Hydrophilic carboxyl and carbonyl groups were present on the surface of irradiated UHMWPE after irradiation in air, resulting in a decrease in the contact angle. After irradiation at 300 kGy, the gel content of the γ ray-irradiated UHMWPE samples decreased to almost zero, while that of EB irradiated UHMWPE decreased to 57%. For UHMWPE powder irradiated by gamma rays at lower doses, radiation-induced oxidation was complete and consistent with a simple theoretic estimation. Surface wettability was primarily affected by surface oxidation, and the oxidation level of UHMWPE could be easily predicted.

  8. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Michael N.

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  9. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Timothy Y.; Almond, Peter R.; Park, Hwan C.; Lindberg, Robert D.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-15

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer.

  10. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    SciTech Connect

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  11. Meta-analysis of non-tumour doses for radiation-induced cancer on the basis of dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Tanooka, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of cancer risk of ionising radiation as a function of dose-rate. Non-tumour dose, D(nt), defined as the highest dose of radiation at which no statistically significant tumour increase was observed above the control level, was analysed as a function of dose-rate of radiation. An inverse correlation was found between D(nt) and dose-rate of the radiation. D(nt) increased 20-fold with decreasing dose-rate from 1-10(-8) Gy/min for whole body irradiation with low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Partial body radiation also showed a dose-rate dependence with a 5- to 10-fold larger D(nt) as dose rate decreased. The dose-rate effect was also found for high LET radiation but at 10-fold lower D(nt) levels. The cancer risk of ionising radiation varies 1000-fold depending on the dose-rate of radiation and exposure conditions. This analysis explains the discrepancy of cancer risk between A-bomb survivors and radium dial painters.

  12. Study of 201 non-small cell lung cancer patients given stereotactic ablative radiation therapy shows local control dependence on dose calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Kujtim; Oliver, Jasmine; Baker, Ryan; Dilling, Thomas J; Stevens, Craig W; Kim, Jongphil; Yue, Binglin; Demarco, Marylou; Zhang, Geoffrey G; Moros, Eduardo G; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    Pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithms differ significantly when used in the thorax. However, such differences have seldom been previously directly correlated with outcomes of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation (SABR). Data for 201 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated with 50 Gy in 5 fractions of 10 Gy each. The radiation prescription mandated that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) receive the prescribed dose. One hundred sixteen patients were planned with BrainLab treatment planning software (TPS) with the PB algorithm and treated on a Novalis unit. The other 85 were planned on the Pinnacle TPS with the CCC algorithm and treated on a Varian linac. Treatment planning objectives were numerically identical for both groups. The median follow-up times were 24 and 17 months for the PB and CCC groups, respectively. The primary endpoint was local/marginal control of the irradiated lesion. Gray's competing risk method was used to determine the statistical differences in local/marginal control rates between the PB and CCC groups. Twenty-five patients planned with PB and 4 patients planned with the CCC algorithms to the same nominal doses experienced local recurrence. There was a statistically significant difference in recurrence rates between the PB and CCC groups (hazard ratio 3.4 [95% confidence interval: 1.18-9.83], Gray's test P=.019). The differences (Δ) between the 2 algorithms for target coverage were as follows: ΔD99GITV = 7.4 Gy, ΔD99PTV = 10.4 Gy, ΔV90GITV = 13.7%, ΔV90PTV = 37.6%, ΔD95PTV = 9.8 Gy, and ΔDISO = 3.4 Gy. GITV = gross internal tumor volume. Local control in patients receiving who were planned to the same nominal dose with PB and CCC algorithms were statistically significantly different. Possible alternative explanations are described in the report, although they are not thought likely to explain the difference. We

  13. Study of 201 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Given Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Shows Local Control Dependence on Dose Calculation Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Latifi, Kujtim; Oliver, Jasmine; Baker, Ryan; Dilling, Thomas J.; Stevens, Craig W.; Kim, Jongphil; Yue, Binglin; DeMarco, MaryLou; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithms differ significantly when used in the thorax. However, such differences have seldom been previously directly correlated with outcomes of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation (SABR). Methods and Materials: Data for 201 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated with 50 Gy in 5 fractions of 10 Gy each. The radiation prescription mandated that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) receive the prescribed dose. One hundred sixteen patients were planned with BrainLab treatment planning software (TPS) with the PB algorithm and treated on a Novalis unit. The other 85 were planned on the Pinnacle TPS with the CCC algorithm and treated on a Varian linac. Treatment planning objectives were numerically identical for both groups. The median follow-up times were 24 and 17 months for the PB and CCC groups, respectively. The primary endpoint was local/marginal control of the irradiated lesion. Gray's competing risk method was used to determine the statistical differences in local/marginal control rates between the PB and CCC groups. Results: Twenty-five patients planned with PB and 4 patients planned with the CCC algorithms to the same nominal doses experienced local recurrence. There was a statistically significant difference in recurrence rates between the PB and CCC groups (hazard ratio 3.4 [95% confidence interval: 1.18-9.83], Gray's test P=.019). The differences (Δ) between the 2 algorithms for target coverage were as follows: ΔD99{sub GITV} = 7.4 Gy, ΔD99{sub PTV} = 10.4 Gy, ΔV90{sub GITV} = 13.7%, ΔV90{sub PTV} = 37.6%, ΔD95{sub PTV} = 9.8 Gy, and ΔD{sub ISO} = 3.4 Gy. GITV = gross internal tumor volume. Conclusions: Local control in patients receiving who were planned to the same nominal dose with PB and CCC algorithms were statistically significantly different. Possible alternative

  14. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios.

  15. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  16. Investigation of radiation doses in open space using TLD detectors.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G; Facius, R; Bilski, P; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    The low energy component of the cosmic radiation field is strongly modified by the shielding of the spacecraft and it is time and location dependent. Thermoluminescent lithium fluoride detectors have been applied to determine the radiation doses inside the ESA-Facility BIOPAN. The BIOPAN facility was mounted outside and launched on a Foton spacecraft and opened to space to allow exposure of several experiments to open space. Standard TLD-600. TLD-700 chips, two layers MTS-Ns sintered pellets with different effective thickness of the sensitive layer and MTS-N of different thickness have been exposed with different shielding thicknesses in front of them. The measured TL signal in the 0.1 mm thick detector just shielded by an aluminised Kapton foil of 25 microm thickness in front yielded a dose of 29.8 Gy (calibrated with 137Cs gamma rays) for an exposure time of 12.7 days: after 2.5 g.cm(-2) shielding the doses dropped to 3 mGy. The monitoring of radiation doses and its depth dose distribution outside the spacecraft are of great interest for radiation protection of astronauts working in open space. The knowledge of depth-dose distribution is a prerequisite to determine the organ doses an astronaut will receive during an extravehicular activity (EVA). The BIOPAN experiments are to be continued in the future.

  17. Peripheral Doses from Noncoplanar IMRT for Pediatric Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W.K.; Leung, Lucullus H.T.; Kwong, Dora L.W.; Wong, Wicger; Lam, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The use of noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) might result in better sparing of some critical organs because of a higher degree of freedom in beam angle optimization. However, this can lead to a potential increase in peripheral dose compared with coplanar IMRT. The peripheral dose from noncoplanar IMRT has not been previously quantified. This study examines the peripheral dose from noncoplanar IMRT compared with coplanar IMRT for pediatric radiation therapy. Five cases with different pediatric malignancies in head and neck were planned with both coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT techniques. The plans were performed such that the tumor coverage, conformality, and dose uniformity were comparable for both techniques. To measure the peripheral doses of the 2 techniques, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed in 10 different organs of a 5-year-old pediatric anthropomorphic phantom. With the use of noncoplanar beams, the peripheral doses to the spinal cord, bone marrow, lung, and breast were found to be 1.8-2.5 times of those using the coplanar technique. This is mainly because of the additional internal scatter dose from the noncoplanar beams. Although the use of noncoplanar technique can result in better sparing of certain organs such as the optic nerves, lens, or inner ears depending on how the beam angles were optimized on each patient, oncologists should be alert of the possibility of significantly increasing the peripheral doses to certain radiation-sensitive organs such as bone marrow and breast. This might increase the secondary cancer risk to patients at young age.

  18. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  19. Low-dose radiation and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Linos, A.; Gray, J.E.; Orvis, A.L.; Kyle, R.A.; O'Fallon, W.M.; Kurland, L.T.

    1980-05-15

    We investigated the effect of diagnostic and low-level therapeutic radiation (less than 300 rads to bone marrow) on the development of leukemia. During this study, 138 patients with leukemia (representing all known incidence cases of leukemia in residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, between 1955 and 1974) were each matched with two controls, and the lifelong experiences of both groups with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic radiation were ascertained. No statistically significant increase was found in the risk of developing leukemia after radiation doses of 0 to 300 rads (3 Gy) to the bone marrow when these amounts were administered in small doses over long periods of time, as in routine medical care.

  20. Imaging practices and radiation doses from imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Teemu; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Florea, Tudor

    2017-03-25

    Modern radiotherapy treatments require frequent imaging for accurate patient positioning relative to the therapeutic radiation beam. Imaging practices in five Finnish radiotherapy clinics were assessed and discussed from the patient dose optimization point of view. The results show that imaging strategies are not jointly established and variations exist. The organ absorbed doses depend on imaging technique and imaging frequency. In particular, organ doses from the cone beam computed tomography can have very large variations (a factor of 10-50 in breast imaging and factor of 5 in prostate imaging). The cumulative imaging organ dose from the treatment can vary by a factor of ten or more for the same treatment, depending on the chosen technique and imaging frequency. Awareness and optimization of the imaging dose in image-guided radiotherapy should be strengthened.

  1. Radiation dose to the walls of hollow organs

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The radiation doses to the walls of hollow organs, from activity in their contents, have traditionally been estimated as the sum of the photon dose to the wall and the maximum electron/beta dose. The photon dose is usually estimated by Monte Carlo methods, and the nonpenetrating dose estimated as the surface dose, equal to one half of the average dose to the volume. Some clinical experience, such as lack of radiotoxicity in patients estimated to have received more than 10 Gy to the walls of organs in the GI tract, led us to investigate the appropriateness of this approach. While the photon dose is thought to be fairly uniform throughout the walls of hollow organs, the electron and beta doses drop off rapidly from a maximum at the surface of the organ`s contents to zero at distances dependent on emission energy. The degree to which the activity is separated from the target cells in the wall, the uniformity of activity distribution within the contents, and the location of the cells at risk for tissue injury and carcinogenesis are some of the issues which determine the appropriate dose(s) to report. For example, in the stomach, the wall thickness varies from 0.6-1.3 cm. The epithelial surface mucus cells are 20-40 micrometers in height, and are located beneath a mucus layer which varies typically between about 0.18 and 0.6 mm in thickness This layer is thus thick enough to attenuate almost all of the electron energy emitted from Tc-99m and I-123 and 26-50% of the beta energy of Y-90. The maximum dose to the surface mucus cells, or a volume averaged dose to these and other cells, may be a better predictor of radiation effects than the maximum dose at the surface of the contents.

  2. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Units of radiation dose. 20.1004 Section 20.1004 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1004 Units of radiation dose. (a) Definitions. As used in this part, the units of radiation dose are:...

  3. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Units of radiation dose. 20.1004 Section 20.1004 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1004 Units of radiation dose. (a) Definitions. As used in this part, the units of radiation dose are:...

  4. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Units of radiation dose. 20.1004 Section 20.1004 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1004 Units of radiation dose. (a) Definitions. As used in this part, the units of radiation dose are: Gray...

  5. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Units of radiation dose. 20.1004 Section 20.1004 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1004 Units of radiation dose. (a) Definitions. As used in this part, the units of radiation dose are: Gray...

  6. 10 CFR 20.1004 - Units of radiation dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Units of radiation dose. 20.1004 Section 20.1004 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION General Provisions § 20.1004 Units of radiation dose. (a) Definitions. As used in this part, the units of radiation dose are: Gray...

  7. Estimated radiation dose from timepieces containing tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell-Boyer, L M

    1980-01-01

    Luminescent timepieces containing radioactive tritium, either in elemental form or incorporated into paint, are available to the general public. The purpose of this study was to estimate potential radiation dose commitments received by the public annually as a result of exposure to tritium which may escape from the timepieces during their distribution, use, repair, and disposal. Much uncertainty is associated with final dose estimates due to limitations of empirical data from which exposure parameters were derived. Maximum individual dose estimates were generally less than 3 ..mu..Sv/yr, but ranged up to 2 mSv under worst-case conditions postulated. Estimated annual collective (population) doses were less than 5 person/Sv per million timepieces distributed.

  8. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT: a review.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeshi; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Stiller, Wolfram; Takahashi, Masaya; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2008-02-01

    This article aims to summarize the available data on reducing radiation dose exposure in routine chest CT protocols. First, the general aspects of radiation dose in CT and radiation risk are discussed, followed by the effect of changing parameters on image quality. Finally, the results of previous radiation dose reduction studies are reviewed, and important information contributing to radiation dose reduction will be shared. A variety of methods and techniques for radiation dose reduction should be used to ensure that radiation exposure is kept as low as is reasonably achievable.

  9. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Methods for estimating radiation doses received by commercial aircrew.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Pierre; Fuller, Nicolas; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François

    2003-07-01

    Radiation doses received onboard aircraft are monitored in Europe to protect aircrew in accordance with a European Union directive. The French Aviation Authorities have developed a system called SIEVERT, using calculation codes to monitor effective radiation doses. For the galactic cosmic ray component, a 3-D world map of effective dose rates is computed using available operational codes. Detailed flight plans are used to ensure sufficient precision. For the solar particle event component, a semi-empirical model called SiGLE has been developed to calculate a time-dependent map of effective dose rates in the course of the event. SiGLE is based on particle transport code results and measurements during solar particle events onboard Concorde airplanes. We present a comparison of the calculated effective radiation dose and measured dose equivalent for various flights onboard Air France aircraft. The agreement is within 15%, which is about the precision of the state-of-the-art dosimetric measurements. Meteorological effects on the dose calculation appear to be negligible. Preliminary results based on solar particle events observed since 1942 with ionization chambers and neutron monitors are given. The present analysis shows that for the galactic cosmic ray component, monthly world maps based on neutron monitor observations are sufficient to ensure a precision of about 20% on the dose estimate for each flight. For the past 40 yr, according to the model SiGLE, none of the solar events has given an effective radiation dose larger than 1 mSv for flights on the most exposed routes.

  11. Strategies for reducing radiation dose in CT.

    PubMed

    McCollough, Cynthia H; Primak, Andrew N; Braun, Natalie; Kofler, James; Yu, Lifeng; Christner, Jodie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the media has focused on the potential danger of radiation exposure from CT, even though the potential benefit of a medically indicated CT far outweighs the potential risks. This attention has reminded the radiology community that doses must be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) while maintaining diagnostic image quality. To satisfy the ALARA principle, the dose reduction strategies described in this article must be well understood and properly used. The use of CT must also be justified for the specific diagnostic task.

  12. Optical fibres for high radiation dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, H.; Kohn, O.; Schmidt, H. U.; Bawirzanski, E.; Landers, A.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of modern single mode (SM) and graded index (GI) fibres as well as a new pure silica multimode step index (MMSI) fibre with high OH content were irradiated at a Co-60 gamma ray source with a dose rate of approximately = 1.5Gy/s up to a total dose of 10(exp 6)Gy. The radiation-induced loss of all fibres was measured continuously during and after irradiation at discrete wavelengths (approximately = 850, approximately = 1070, approximately = 1300, approximately = 1550nm). With one SM fibre type also the 'breaking stress' before and after irradiation was determined. Radiation-induced losses of approximately less than 5dB/50m (at approximately = 1300nm) were found with some of the SM fibres, whereas the MMSI fibre showed a final induced loss of only 0.5dB/50m at 1070nm wavelength. The breaking stress of the SM fibre increased by about 10%.

  13. The stage-specific testicular germ cell apoptotic response to low-dose radiation and 2,5-hexanedione combined exposure. II: qRT-PCR array analysis reveals dose dependent adaptive alterations in the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Natasha R; Huse, Susan M; Boekelheide, Kim

    2014-12-01

    Testicular effects of chemical mixtures may differ from those of the individual chemical constituents. This study assessed the co-exposure effects of the model germ cell- and Sertoli cell-specific toxicants, X-irradiation (x-ray), and 2,5-hexanedione (HD), respectively. In high-dose studies, HD has been shown to attenuate x-ray-induced germ cell apoptosis. Adult rats were exposed to different levels of x-ray (0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy) or HD (0.33%), either alone or in combination. To assess cell type-specific attenuation of x-ray effects with HD co-exposure, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to enrich the targeted cell population and examine a panel of apoptosis-related transcripts using PCR arrays. The apoptosis PCR arrays identified significant dose-dependent treatment effects on several genes, with downregulation of death receptor 5 (DR5), Naip2, Sphk2, Casp7, Aven, Birc3, and upregulation of Fas. The greatest difference in transcript response to exposure was seen with 0.5 Gy x-ray exposure, and the attenuation effect seen with the combined high-dose x-ray and HD did not persist into the low-dose range. Examination of protein levels in staged tubules revealed a significant upregulation in DR5, following high-dose co-exposure. These results provide insight into the testis cell-specific apoptotic response to low-dose co-exposures of model testicular toxicants. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  14. Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

  15. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  16. Impact of dose calculation algorithm on radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Zhou; Xiao, Ying; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The quality of radiation therapy depends on the ability to maximize the tumor control probability while minimize the normal tissue complication probability. Both of these two quantities are directly related to the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems. The commonly used dose calculation algorithms in the treatment planning systems are reviewed in this work. The accuracy comparisons among these algorithms are illustrated by summarizing the highly cited research papers on this topic. Further, the correlation between the algorithms and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability values are manifested by several recent studies from different groups. All the cases demonstrate that dose calculation algorithms play a vital role in radiation therapy. PMID:25431642

  17. 42 CFR 81.6 - Use of radiation dose information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of radiation dose information. 81.6 Section 81... Probability of Causation § 81.6 Use of radiation dose information. Determining probability of causation will require the use of radiation dose information provided to DOL by the National Institute for...

  18. 42 CFR 81.6 - Use of radiation dose information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of radiation dose information. 81.6 Section 81... Probability of Causation § 81.6 Use of radiation dose information. Determining probability of causation will require the use of radiation dose information provided to DOL by the National Institute for Occupational...

  19. 42 CFR 81.6 - Use of radiation dose information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of radiation dose information. 81.6 Section 81... Probability of Causation § 81.6 Use of radiation dose information. Determining probability of causation will require the use of radiation dose information provided to DOL by the National Institute for Occupational...

  20. 42 CFR 81.6 - Use of radiation dose information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of radiation dose information. 81.6 Section 81... Probability of Causation § 81.6 Use of radiation dose information. Determining probability of causation will require the use of radiation dose information provided to DOL by the National Institute for Occupational...

  1. 42 CFR 81.6 - Use of radiation dose information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of radiation dose information. 81.6 Section 81... Probability of Causation § 81.6 Use of radiation dose information. Determining probability of causation will require the use of radiation dose information provided to DOL by the National Institute for Occupational...

  2. Radiation dose from cardiac computed tomography before and after implementation of radiation dose-reduction techniques.

    PubMed

    Raff, Gilbert L; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M; Share, David A; Goraya, Tauqir Y; Kazerooni, Ella A; Moscucci, Mauro; Gentry, Ralph E; Abidov, Aiden

    2009-06-10

    Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease, but radiation dose from this procedure is of concern. To determine whether a collaborative radiation dose-reduction program would be associated with reduced radiation dose in patients undergoing CCTA in a statewide registry over a 1-year period and to define its effect on image quality. A prospective, controlled, nonrandomized study conducted during a control period (July-August 2007), an intervention period (September 2007-April 2008), and a follow-up period (May-June 2008) at 15 hospital imaging centers participating in the Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Consortium in Michigan, which included small community hospitals and large academic medical centers. A total of 4995 sequential patients undergoing CCTA for suspected coronary artery disease were enrolled; 4862 patients (97.3%) had complete radiation data for analysis. A best-practice CCTA scan model was used, which included minimized scan range, heart rate reduction, electrocardiographic-gated tube current modulation, and reduced tube voltage in suitable patients. Primary outcomes included dose-length product and effective radiation dose from all phases of the CCTA scan. Secondary outcomes were image quality assessed by a 4-point scale (1 indicated excellent; 2, good; 3, adequate; and 4, nondiagnostic) and frequency of diagnostic-quality scans. Compared with the control period, patients' estimated median radiation dose in the follow-up period was reduced by 53.3% (dose-length product decreased from 1493 mGy x cm [interquartile range {IQR}, 855-1823 mGy x cm] to 697 mGy x cm [IQR, 407-1163 mGy x cm]; P < .001) and effective dose from 21 mSv (IQR, 12-26 mSv) to 10 mSv (IQR, 6-16 mSv) (P < .001). The greatest reduction in dose occurred at low-volume sites. There were no significant changes in median image quality assessment during the control period compared with the follow-up period (median image quality of 2 [images

  3. Age-dependent changes in oxygen tension, radiation dose and sensitivity within normal and diseased coronary arteries-Part C: oxygen effect and its implications on high- and low-LET dose.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Richard B

    2008-10-01

    The aim is to study the implications of the decrease in oxygen concentration in the coronary artery walls with age and atherosclerosis, particularly with regard to an associated reduction in the radiosensitivity to high-and low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) irradiation. In accompanying papers, the age-dependent morphology and composition for the wall layers of normal and diseased coronary arteries were developed in Part A from published data. In Part B, the oxygen concentration in the coronary artery walls was evaluated taking account the diffusion of oxygen from blood and the solubility of oxygen in tissues. In this part the oxygen effect was evaluated using published experimental data. Based on simulation results from the one-dimensional diffusion model, the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) is lower in the hypoxic vessel walls of aged and atherosclerotic arteries. Consequently the high-LET radiation damage arising from both the radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) decay chains to the intimal layer of highly diseased arteries was estimated to be reduced by approximately 37% due to hypoxia. A greater reduction in radiosensitivity (51%) due to hypoxia was determined for low-LET irradiation. These results imply that the oxygen effect, and other radiation biological factors, have a significant influence on radiation biological effects and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and patients receiving radiotherapy of the mediastinum.

  4. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  5. Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Low-Dose Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyesi, Hargita; Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    We have studied low dose radiation induced gene expression alterations in a primary human fibroblast cell line using Agilent's whole human genome microarray. Cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.1; 0.5 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated. We observed differential regulation of approximately 300-500 genes represented on the microarray. Of these, 126 were differentially expressed at both doses, among them significant elevation of GDF-15 and KITLG was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Based on the transcriptional studies we selected GDF-15 to assess its role in radiation response, since GDF-15 is one of the p53 gene targets and is believed to participate in mediating p53 activities. First we confirmed gamma-radiation induced dose-dependent changes in GDF-15 expression by qRT-PCR. Next we determined the effect of GDF-15 silencing on radiosensitivity. Four GDF-15 targeting shRNA expressing lentiviral vectors were transfected into immortalized human fibroblast cells. We obtained efficient GDF-15 silencing in one of the four constructs. RNA interference inhibited GDF-15 gene expression and enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells. Our studies proved that GDF-15 plays an essential role in radiation response and may serve as a promising target in radiation therapy.

  6. Radiation equivalent dose simulations for long-term interplanetary flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the human interplanetary flights. The unmanned flights inside heliosphere and human flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot term human flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long-term human flights set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition to cosmic radiation. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and soalr particle events (SPE). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. SPE are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but particle fluxes are much more higher. The probability of SPE increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and effect of GCR and SPE would be minimized. Combining GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations with time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SPE spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in an anthropomorphic human phantom inside the shielding capsule. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. We use quality factors to recalculate absorbed dose into biological equivalent dose, which give more information about risks for astronaut's health. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We try to find an optimal combination of shielding material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow

  7. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  9. Dose dependence of interface traps in gate oxides at high levels of total dose

    SciTech Connect

    Baze, M.P.; Plaag, R.E.; Johnston, A.H. )

    1989-12-01

    Interface traps in gate oxides were found to saturate at high total dose levels. An empirical model was developed to describe the nonlinear dependence and saturation characteristics. Three different processes were studied including CMOS/SOS, hardened bulk CMOS and unhardened bulk CMOS using several combinations of dose rate and bias. An evaluation was made of the model's accuracy in extrapolating the effect of interface traps to very high doses. A possible application of the model in characterizing devices for space environments is discussed along with implications for a physical model of radiation induced interface trap buildup.

  10. Monte Carlo dose enhancement studies in microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: A radical radiation therapy treatment for gliomas requires extremely high absorbed doses resulting in subsequent deleterious side effects in healthy tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an innovative technique based on the fact that normal tissue can withstand high radiation doses in small volumes without any significant damage. The synchrotron-generated x-ray beam is collimated and delivered to an array of narrow micrometer-sized planar rectangular fields. Several preclinical experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) confirmed that MRT yields a higher therapeutic index than nonsegmented beams of the same characteristics. This index can be greatly improved by loading the tumor with high atomic number (Z) contrast agents. The aim of this work is to find the high-Z element that provides optimum dose enhancement. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/penEasy) were performed to assess the peak and valley doses as well as their ratio (PVDR) in healthy tissue and in the tumor, loaded with different contrast agents. The optimization criteria used were maximization of the ratio between the PVDR values in healthy tissue respect to the PVDR in the tumor and minimization of bone and brain valley doses. Results: Dose enhancement factors, PVDR, and valley doses were calculated for different high-Z elements. A significant decrease of PVDR values in the tumor, accompanied by a gain in the valley doses, was found in the presence of high-Z elements. This enables the deposited dose in the healthy tissue to be reduced. The optimum high-Z element depends on the irradiation configuration. As a general trend, the best outcome is provided by the highest Z contrast agents considered, i.e., gold and thallium. However, lanthanides (especially Lu) and hafnium also offer a satisfactory performance. Conclusions: The remarkable therapeutic index in microbeam radiation therapy can be further

  11. Low dose ionizing radiation detection using conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E.A.B.; Borin, J.F.; Nicolucci, P.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Netto, T. Ghilardi; Bianchi, R.F.

    2005-03-28

    In this work, the effect of gamma radiation on the optical properties of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{sup '}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) is studied. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with different doses from 0 Gy to 152 Gy using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source. For thin films, significant changes in the UV-visible spectra were only observed at high doses (>1 kGy). In solution, shifts in absorption peaks are observed at low doses (<10 Gy), linearly dependent on dose. The shifts are explained by conjugation reduction, and possible causes are discussed. Our results indicate that MEH-PPV solution can be used as a dosimeter adequate for medical applications.

  12. Whole-Body Exposure to (28)Si-Radiation Dose-Dependently Disrupts Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis and Proliferation in the Short Term and New Neuron Survival and Contextual Fear Conditioning in the Long Term.

    PubMed

    Whoolery, Cody W; Walker, Angela K; Richardson, Devon R; Lucero, Melanie J; Reynolds, Ryan P; Beddow, David H; Clark, K Lyles; Shih, Hung-Ying; LeBlanc, Junie A; Cole, Mara G; Amaral, Wellington Z; Mukherjee, Shibani; Zhang, Shichuan; Ahn, Francisca; Bulin, Sarah E; DeCarolis, Nathan A; Rivera, Phillip D; Chen, Benjamin P C; Yun, Sanghee; Eisch, Amelia J

    2017-09-25

    Astronauts traveling to Mars will be exposed to chronic low doses of galactic cosmic space radiation, which contains highly charged, high-energy (HZE) particles. (56)Fe-HZE-particle exposure decreases hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and disrupts hippocampal function in young adult rodents, raising the possibility of impaired astronaut cognition and risk of mission failure. However, far less is known about how exposure to other HZE particles, such as (28)Si, influences hippocampal neurogenesis and function. To compare the influence of (28)Si exposure on indices of neurogenesis and hippocampal function with previous studies on (56)Fe exposure, 9-week-old C57BL/6J and Nestin-GFP mice (NGFP; made and maintained for 10 or more generations on a C57BL/6J background) received whole-body (28)Si-particle-radiation exposure (0, 0.2 and 1 Gy, 300 MeV/n, LET 67 KeV/μ, dose rate 1 Gy/min). For neurogenesis assessment, the NGFP mice were injected with the mitotic marker BrdU at 22 h postirradiation and brains were examined for indices of hippocampal proliferation and neurogenesis, including Ki67(+), BrdU(+), BrdU(+)NeuN(+) and DCX(+) cell numbers at short- and long-term time points (24 h and 3 months postirradiation, respectively). In the short-term group, stereology revealed fewer Ki67(+), BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells in 1-Gy-irradiated group relative to nonirradiated control mice, fewer Ki67(+) and DCX(+) cells in 0.2 Gy group relative to control group and fewer BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells in 1 Gy group relative to 0.2 Gy group. In contrast to the clearly observed radiation-induced, dose-dependent reductions in the short-term group across all markers, only a few neurogenesis indices were changed in the long-term irradiated groups. Notably, there were fewer surviving BrdU(+) cells in the 1 Gy group relative to 0- and 0.2-Gy-irradiated mice in the long-term group. When the short- and long-term groups were analyzed by sex, exposure to radiation had a similar effect on

  13. [Dose and time dependency of "CT clearance"].

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, H A; Klose, K J; Dexheimer, C; von Steinijans

    1989-06-01

    The contrast medium dose used in CT renal function analysis corresponds to about 1 ml/kg body weight at a measurement interval of 5 or 10 minutes. In the present study the dependence of "CT clearance" on dosage and time was examined in 12 healthy subjects. The amount of clearance was directly proportional to the employed contrast medium dose and to the length of the measurement interval. On account of the superior signal-to-noise ratio, the higher dose (1 ml/kg body weight) will continue to be preferred in future. The measurement interval can be limited to 10 minutes.

  14. Radiation doses in paediatric interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Tsapaki, Virginia; Kottou, Sofia; Korniotis, Sarantis; Nikolaki, Niki; Rammos, Spyridon; Apostolopoulou, Sotiria C

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to investigate paediatric doses in coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in the largest cardiac hospital in Greece. Forty procedures were carried out by two board-certified senior interventional cardiologists. Data collected were: patient weight, height, age, fluoroscopy time (FT), total number of images (N) and kerma-area product (KAP). Median (range) age was 7.5 y (17 d to 17 y). Median FT, N and KAP were 4 min, 655, 2.1 Gy cm2 for CA and 12.1 min, 1296, 14.7 Gy cm2 for PTCA (corresponding adult diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are: 6.5 min, 700, 45 Gy cm2 for CA and 15.5 min, 1000 and 85 Gy cm2 for PTCA). The highest percentage of cine dose was in newborns (0-1 y) (CA: 92% and PTCA: 100%). As age increased, cine dose percentage decreased, whereas total radiation dose increased. Median paediatric FT and N recorded reached or even exceeded adult DRL and should be optimised. Paediatric DRL should be set.

  15. Pediatric cardiac-gated CT angiography: assessment of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Caroline L; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Frush, Donald P; Chan, Frandics P; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Lowry, Carolyn R; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine a dose range for cardiac-gated CT angiography (CTA) in children. ECG-gated cardiac CTA simulating scanning of the heart was performed on an anthropomorphic phantom of a 5-year-old child on a 16-MDCT scanner using variable parameters (small field of view; 16 x 0.625 mm configuration; 0.5-second gantry cycle time; 0.275 pitch; 120 kVp at 110, 220, and 330 mA; and 80 kVp at 385 mA). Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology measured 20 organ doses. Effective dose calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) was compared with effective dose determined from measured absorbed organ doses. Highest organ doses included breast (3.5-12.6 cGy), lung (3.3-12.1 cGy), and bone marrow (1.7-7.6 cGy). The 80 kVp/385 mA examination produced lower radiation doses to all organs than the 120 kVp/220 mA examination. MOSFET effective doses (+/- SD) were as follows: 110 mA: 7.4 mSv (+/- 0.6 mSv), 220 mA: 17.2 mSv (+/- 0.3 mSv), 330 mA: 25.7 mSv (+/- 0.3 mSv), 80 kVp/385 mA: 10.6 mSv (+/- 0.2 mSv). DLP effective doses for diagnostic runs were as follows: 110 mA: 8.7 mSv, 220 mA: 19 mSv, 330 mA: 28 mSv, 80 kVp/385 mA: 12 mSv. DLP effective doses exceeded MOSFET effective doses by 9.7-17.2%. Radiation doses for a 5-year-old during cardiac-gated CTA vary greatly depending on parameters. Organ doses can be high; the effective dose may reach 28.4 mSv. Further work, including determination of size-appropriate mA and image quality, is important before routine use of this technique in children.

  16. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

  17. Radiation dose-reduction strategies in thoracic CT.

    PubMed

    Moser, J B; Sheard, S L; Edyvean, S; Vlahos, I

    2017-05-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) machines have the capability to perform thoracic CT for a range of clinical indications at increasingly low radiation doses. This article reviews several factors, both technical and patient-related, that can affect radiation dose and discusses current dose-reduction methods relevant to thoracic imaging through a review of current techniques in CT acquisition and image reconstruction. The fine balance between low radiation dose and high image quality is considered throughout, with an emphasis on obtaining diagnostic quality imaging at the lowest achievable radiation dose. The risks of excessive radiation dose reduction are also considered. Inappropriately low dose may result in suboptimal or non-diagnostic imaging that may reduce diagnostic confidence, impair diagnosis, or result in repeat examinations incurring incremental ionising radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects of Optic Nerves and Chiasm

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, Charles; Martel, Mary K.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Flickinger, John; Nam, Jiho; Kirkpatrick, John

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating radiation toxicity of the optic nerves and chiasm to quantitative dose and dose-volume measures were reviewed. Few studies have adequate data for dose-volume outcome modeling. The risk of toxicity increased markedly at doses >60 Gy at {approx}1.8 Gy/fraction and at >12 Gy for single-fraction radiosurgery. The evidence is strong that radiation tolerance is increased with a reduction in the dose per fraction. Models of threshold tolerance were examined.

  19. Practical strategies to reduce pediatric CT radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thomas R

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a brief review of CT scanning radiation sensitivity in children and explain CT scan parameters that affect radiation dose. We discuss key factors influencing radiation dose and study quality and how these factors can be used to optimize scan protocols with the goal of reducing pediatric CT radiation dose without compromising diagnostic quality. Finally, we provide some practical tips for reducing radiation doses to children. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION TO AMPHIBIANS. 1) DOSE-DEPENDENT INDUCTION OF HINDLIMB MALFORMATIONS IN THE NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG (RANA PIPIENS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental stressors have been hypothesized as responsible for seeming increases in limb malformations in several species of North American amphibians. The purpose of this study was to generate dose-response data suitable for assessing the potential role of solar u...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION TO AMPHIBIANS. 1) DOSE-DEPENDENT INDUCTION OF HINDLIMB MALFORMATIONS IN THE NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG (RANA PIPIENS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental stressors have been hypothesized as responsible for seeming increases in limb malformations in several species of North American amphibians. The purpose of this study was to generate dose-response data suitable for assessing the potential role of solar u...

  3. Radiation quality and the shape of dose-effect curves at low doses of ionizing radiation for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Petin, V G; Kapultcevich, Yu G

    2014-06-01

    To explain different yeast and mammalian cell response to low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in low dose region, the dependence of fine target structure on the stage of cell growth was supposed. Theoretical consideration based on this suggestion was carried out. Results of calculations are qualitatively in agreement with experimental data under assuming that hit-event for both mammalian and yeast cells is a group of ionizations produced by the same ionizing particle. In the dependence of cell cycle phase, sensitive sites (presumable the vulnerable sections of chromosomes) can be located either in periphery of cell nucleus forming a thin layer inside the nucleus or distributed evenly over the whole nucleus. Such rearrangement of the target results in the alteration of the dependence of both survival curve shape and the relative biological effectiveness values on radiation quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation-induced bioeffects in animal models.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-03-01

    Animal experimental studies indicate that acute or chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) (≤100 mSv) or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (LDRIR) (<6 mSv/h) exposures may be harmful. It induces genetic and epigenetic changes and is associated with a range of physiological disturbances that includes altered immune system, abnormal brain development with resultant cognitive impairment, cataractogenesis, abnormal embryonic development, circulatory diseases, weight gain, premature menopause in female animals, tumorigenesis and shortened lifespan. Paternal or prenatal LDIR/LDRIR exposure is associated with reduced fertility and number of live fetuses, and transgenerational genomic aberrations. On the other hand, in some experimental studies, LDIR/LDRIR exposure has also been reported to bring about beneficial effects such as reduction in tumorigenesis, prolonged lifespan and enhanced fertility. The differences in reported effects of LDIR/LDRIR exposure are dependent on animal genetic background (susceptibility), age (prenatal or postnatal days), sex, nature of radiation exposure (i.e. acute, fractionated or chronic radiation exposure), type of radiation, combination of radiation with other toxic agents (such as smoking, pesticides or other chemical toxins) or animal experimental designs. In this review paper, we aimed to update radiation researchers and radiologists on the current progress achieved in understanding the LDIR/LDRIR-induced bionegative and biopositive effects reported in the various animal models. The roles played by a variety of molecules that are implicated in LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects will be elaborated. The review will help in future investigations of LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects by providing clues for designing improved animal research models in order to clarify the current controversial/contradictory findings from existing studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research

  5. Source term calculations for assessing radiation dose to equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, R.S.; Freeman-Kelly, R.; Cybulskis, P.; Curtis, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    This study examines results of analyses performed with the Source Term Code Package to develop updated source terms using NUREG-0956 methods. The updated source terms are to be used to assess the adequacy of current regulatory source terms used as the basis for equipment qualification. Time-dependent locational distributions of radionuclides within a containment following a severe accident have been developed. The Surry reactor has been selected in this study as representative of PWR containment designs. Similarly, the Peach Bottom reactor has been used to examine radionuclide distributions in boiling water reactors. The time-dependent inventory of each key radionuclide is provided in terms of its activity in curies. The data are to be used by Sandia National Laboratories to perform shielding analyses to estimate radiation dose to equipment in each containment design. See NUREG/CR-5175, Beta and Gamma Dose Calculations for PWR and BWR Containments.'' 6 refs., 11 tabs.

  6. Variations of the radiation dose onboard Mir station.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, M I; Teltsov, M V; Shumshurov, V I; Tsetlin, V V

    1998-01-01

    Dose variations, associated with the 11-year solar activity cycle, seasonal variations of particle fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts at the station orbit, and solar proton events are studied, using prolonged measurements of radiation doses inside orbital station Mir. Daily averages of radiation doses during the declining phase of the 22nd solar cycle and during transition to the 23rd solar activity cycle reached very large values for astronauts and significantly exceed the values calculated according to existing models.

  7. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes.

  8. Measurement and assessment of radiation dose of astronauts in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Binquan; Sun, Yue-qiang; Yang, Chuibai; Zhang, Shenyi; Liang, Jinbao

    Astronauts in flight are exposed by the space radiation, which is mainly composed of proton, electron, heavy ion, and neutron. To assess the radiation risk, measurement and assessment of radiation dose of astronauts is indispensable. Especially, measurement for heavy ion radiation is most important as it contributes the major dose. Until now, most of the measurements and assessments of radiation dose of astronauts are based on the LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectrum of space radiation. However, according to the ICRP Publication 123, energy and charge number of heavy ions should be measured in order to assess space radiation exposure to astronauts. In addition, from the publication, quality factors for each organs or tissues of astronauts are different and they should be calculated or measured independently. Here, a method to measure the energy and charge number of heavy ion and a voxel phantom based on the anatomy of Chinese adult male are presented for radiation dose assessment of astronauts.

  9. Ultraviolet B radiation increases hairless mouse mast cells in a dose-dependent manner and alters distribution of UV-induced mast cell growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Murphy, G F

    1996-01-01

    In studies of the effects of chronic UVB irradiation on dermal connective tissue in the hairless mouse, we observed that the number and size of mast cells was increased. Because mast cells are known to be associated with connective tissue remodeling, we examined and quantified the effect of increasing UVB (290-320 nm) doses on this cell. Groups of mice were exposed to filtered FS-40 Westinghouse lamps (290-400 nm: peak irradiance 313 nm) for 1-5 minimal erythema doses (MED) thrice weekly for 10 weeks. Appropriate controls were included. Biopsies, processed for light microscopy, were stained with toluidine blue. Mast cells were counted in 15 high-magnification fields per specimen with upper and lower dermis scored separately. Significant increases in large densely granular mast cells occurred at 2 MED in the lower dermis, in association with a UVB-exacerbated granulomatous reaction. In the upper dermis, mast cells were significantly increased with 3 MED. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a dual role in UV-irradiated skin with those in the lower dermis related to inflammation processes and those in the upper dermis involved in connective tissue modeling. To gain understanding of the mechanism of mast cell recruitment and maturation, we examined the effect of UVB on mast cell growth factor expression. This was enhanced in the epidermis by UVB, with a shift from cytoplasmic staining to membrane-associated or intercellular staining at 2 MED and higher. Dermal dendritic and mononuclear cells also showed increased reactivity.

  10. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.

    1980-01-01

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident. (PCS)

  11. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettivier, G.; Fedon, C.; Di Lillo, F.; Longo, R.; Sarno, A.; Tromba, G.; Russo, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  12. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Li, X. Allen; El Naqa, Issam; Hahn, Carol A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-03-01

    We have reviewed the published data regarding radiotherapy (RT)-induced brain injury. Radiation necrosis appears a median of 1-2 years after RT; however, cognitive decline develops over many years. The incidence and severity is dose and volume dependent and can also be increased by chemotherapy, age, diabetes, and spatial factors. For fractionated RT with a fraction size of <2.5 Gy, an incidence of radiation necrosis of 5% and 10% is predicted to occur at a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy (range, 100-140) and 150 Gy (range, 140-170), respectively. For twice-daily fractionation, a steep increase in toxicity appears to occur when the biologically effective dose is >80 Gy. For large fraction sizes (>=2.5 Gy), the incidence and severity of toxicity is unpredictable. For single fraction radiosurgery, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between the target size and the risk of adverse events. Substantial variation among different centers' reported outcomes have prevented us from making toxicity-risk predictions. Cognitive dysfunction in children is largely seen for whole brain doses of >=18 Gy. No substantial evidence has shown that RT induces irreversible cognitive decline in adults within 4 years of RT.

  13. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Di Lillo, F; Longo, R; Sarno, A; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-21

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  14. High and low dose radiation effects on mammary adenocarcinoma cells – an epigenetic connection

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidia; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer, including breast cancer, depends largely on radiation therapy and proper diagnostics. The effect of ionizing radiation on cells and tissues depends on the radiation dose and energy level, but there is insufficient evidence concerning how tumor cells respond to the low and high doses of radiation that are often used in medical diagnostic and treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiation-induced gene expression changes in the MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line. Using microarray technology tools, we were able to screen the differential gene expressions profiles between various radiation doses applied to MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the substantial alteration in the expression level of genes after high-dose treatment. In contrast, no dramatic gene expression alterations were noticed after the application of low and medium doses of radiation. In response to a high radiation dose, MCF-7 cells exhibited down-regulation of biological pathways such as cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair and activation of the p53 pathway. Similar dose-dependent responses were seen on the epigenetic level, which was tested by a microRNA expression analysis. MicroRNA analysis showed dose-dependent radiation-induced microRNA expression alterations that were associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death. An increased rate of apoptosis was determined by an Annexin V assay. The results of this study showed that high doses of radiation affect gene expression genetically and epigenetically, leading to alterations in cell cycle, DNA replication, and apoptosis. PMID:27226982

  15. High and low dose radiation effects on mammary adenocarcinoma cells - an epigenetic connection.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidia; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of cancer, including breast cancer, depends largely on radiation therapy and proper diagnostics. The effect of ionizing radiation on cells and tissues depends on the radiation dose and energy level, but there is insufficient evidence concerning how tumor cells respond to the low and high doses of radiation that are often used in medical diagnostic and treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate radiation-induced gene expression changes in the MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line. Using microarray technology tools, we were able to screen the differential gene expressions profiles between various radiation doses applied to MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the substantial alteration in the expression level of genes after high-dose treatment. In contrast, no dramatic gene expression alterations were noticed after the application of low and medium doses of radiation. In response to a high radiation dose, MCF-7 cells exhibited down-regulation of biological pathways such as cell cycle, DNA replication, and DNA repair and activation of the p53 pathway. Similar dose-dependent responses were seen on the epigenetic level, which was tested by a microRNA expression analysis. MicroRNA analysis showed dose-dependent radiation-induced microRNA expression alterations that were associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death. An increased rate of apoptosis was determined by an Annexin V assay. The results of this study showed that high doses of radiation affect gene expression genetically and epigenetically, leading to alterations in cell cycle, DNA replication, and apoptosis.

  16. AS-2, a novel inhibitor of p53-dependent apoptosis, prevents apoptotic mitochondrial dysfunction in a transcription-independent manner and protects mice from a lethal dose of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Akinori; Ariyasu, Shinya; Wang, Bing; Asanuma, Tetsuo; Onoda, Takayoshi; Sawa, Akiko; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ippei; Togami, Shotaro; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Inaba, Toshiya; Aoki, Shin

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • A bidentate HQ derivative, AS-2, suppresses p53-dependent apoptosis by DNA damage. • AS-2 does not significantly affect nuclear p53 response. • UV-excited blue emission of AS-2 clearly showed its extranuclear localization. • AS-2 prevents mitochondrial dysfunction despite the increase of mitochondrial p53. • AS-2 protects mice from a radiation dose that causes lethal hematopoietic syndrome. - Abstract: In a previous study, we reported that some tetradentate zinc(II) chelators inhibit p53 through the denaturation of its zinc-requiring structure but a chelator, Bispicen, a potent inhibitor of in vitro apoptosis, failed to show any efficient radioprotective effect against irradiated mice because the toxicity of the chelator to mice. The unsuitability of using tetradentate chelators as radioprotectors prompted us to undertake a more extensive search for p53-inhibiting agents that are weaker zinc(II) chelators and therefore less toxic. Here, we show that an 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) derivative, AS-2, suppresses p53-dependent apoptosis through a transcription-independent mechanism. A mechanistic study using cells with different p53 characteristics revealed that the suppressive effect of AS-2 on apoptosis is specifically mediated through p53. In addition, AS-2 was less effective in preventing p53-mediated transcription-dependent events than pifithrin-μ (PFTμ), an inhibitor of transcription-independent apoptosis by p53. Fluorescence visualization of the extranuclear distribution of AS-2 also supports that it is ineffective on the transcription-dependent pathway. Further investigations revealed that AS-2 suppressed mitochondrial apoptotic events, such as the mitochondrial release of intermembrane proteins and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, although AS-2 resulted in an increase in the mitochondrial translocation of p53 as opposed to the decrease of cytosolic p53, and did not affect the apoptotic interaction of p53 with Bcl-2. AS-2 also

  17. Early Mucosal Reactions During and After Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: Dependence of Treatment Tolerance on Radiation Dose and Schedule Duration

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, John D. Lawrence, Geoff P.; Malik, Zafar; Nahum, Alan E.; Mayles, W. Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To more precisely localize the dose-time boundary between head-and-neck radiotherapy schedules inducing tolerable and intolerable early mucosal reactions. Methods and Materials: Total cell-kill biologically effective doses (BED{sub CK}) have been calculated for 84 schedules, including incomplete repair effects, but making no other corrections for the effect of schedule duration T. [BED{sub CK},T] scatterplots are graphed, overlying BED{sub CKboundary}(T) curves on the plots and using discriminant analysis to optimize BED{sub CKboundary}(T) to best represent the boundary between the tolerable and intolerable schedules. Results: More overlap than expected is seen between the tolerable and intolerable treatments in the 84-schedule [BED{sub CK},T] scatterplot, but this was largely eliminated by removing gap and tolerated accelerating schedules from the plot. For the remaining 57 predominantly regular schedules, the BED{sub CKboundary}(T) boundary increases with increasing T (p = 0.0001), curving upwards significantly nonlinearly (p = 0.00007) and continuing to curve beyond 15 days (p = 0.035). The regular schedule BED{sub CKboundary}(T) boundary does not describe tolerability well for accelerating schedules (p = 0.002), with several tolerated accelerating schedules lying above the boundary where regular schedules would be intolerable. Gap schedule tolerability also is not adequately described by the regular schedule boundary (p = 0.04), although no systematic offset exists between the regular boundary and the overall gap schedule tolerability pattern. Conclusions: All schedules analyzed (regular, gap, and accelerating) with BED{sub CK} values below BED{sub CKboundary}(T)=69.5x(T/32.2)/sin((T/32.2){sup (radians)})-3.5Gy= {sub 10}(forT{<=}50 days) are tolerable, and many lying above the boundary are intolerable. The accelerating schedules analyzed were tolerated better overall than are the regular schedules with similar [BED{sub CK},T] values.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF AGE-DEPENDENT RADIATION DOSE DUE TO INTAKE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN DRINKING WATER FROM SIKAR DISTRICT, RAJASTHAN, INDIA.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Vikas; Rani, Asha; Balaram, V

    2016-10-01

    The concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th have been determined in drinking water samples collected from the Sikar district of Rajasthan State, India. The samples have been analysed by using high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. (238)U content in water samples ranged from 8.20 to 202.63 µg l(-1) and (232)Th content ranged from 0.57 to 1.46 µg l(-1) The measured (238)U content in 25 % of the analysed samples exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) and United States Environmental Protection Agency drinking water guidelines of 30 µg l(-1) and 12.5 % of the samples exceeded the 60 µg l(-1) Indian maximum acceptable concentration recommended by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, India. The annual effective doses (µSv y(-1)) due to ingestion of (238)U and (232)Th for different age groups were also calculated. The results compared with the recommended value reported by the WHO. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Radiation dose in computed tomography of the chest.

    PubMed

    Tack, D; Gevenois, P A

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of the eighties, computed tomography (CT) has been more and more widely used as this technique provides precise anatomical details on the lungs, the mediastinum, and the chest wall. However, CT requires the use of ionizing radiations. The collective radiation from CT is therefore in constant increase. As evaluated on atomic bomb survivors, ionizing radiations increase the mortality by cancer. The risk is proportional to the dose and the dose related to CT is much higher than that related to a chest radiograph, both being in the field "of low-level radiations" a range of radiation dose from which no increase in cancer mortality could be demonstrated. This article outlines the risk estimation in the field of low-level radiations, the various methods to measure and estimate the radiation dose, the CT parameters influencing the radiation dose, dose comparisons between CT and most other imaging techniques of the chest, the newly developed so called "Low-Dose" CT techniques and highlights some of the unresolved questions related to radiation dose in clinical CT practice.

  20. Concurrent image and dose reconstruction for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Ke

    The importance of knowing the patient actual position is essential for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This procedure uses tightened margin and escalated tumor dose. In order to eliminate the uncertainty of the geometry in IMRT, daily imaging is prefered. The imaging dose, limited field of view and the imaging concurrency of the MVCT (mega-voltage computerized tomography) are investigated in this work. By applying partial volume imaging (PVI), imaging dose can be reduced for a region of interest (ROI) imaging. The imaging dose and the image quality are quantitatively balanced with inverse imaging dose planning. With PVI, 72% average imaging dose reduction was observed on a typical prostate patient case. The algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) based projection onto convex sets (POCS) shows higher robustness than filtered back projection when available imaging data is not complete and continuous. However, when the projection is continuous as in the actual delivery, a non-iterative wavelet based multiresolution local tomography (WMLT) is able to achieve 1% accuracy within the ROI. The reduction of imaging dose is dependent on the size of ROI. The improvement of concurrency is also discussed based on the combination of PVI and WMLT. Useful target images were acquired with treatment beams and the temporal resolution can be increased to 20 seconds in tomotherapy. The data truncation problem with the portal imager was also studied. Results show that the image quality is not adversely affected by truncation when WMLT is employed. When the online imaging is available, a perturbation dose calculation (PDC) that estimates the actual delivered dose is proposed. Corrected from the Fano's theorem, PDC counts the first order term in the density variation to calculate the internal and external anatomy change. Although change in the dose distribution that is caused by the internal organ motion is less than 1% for 6 MV beams, the external anatomy change has

  1. Measurement of dose in radionuclide therapy by using Cerenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yao; Tang, Xiaobin; Shu, Diyun; Shao, Wencheng; Gong, Chunhui; Geng, Changran; Zhang, Xudong; Yu, Haiyan

    2017-08-14

    This work aims to determine the relationship between Cerenkov photon emission and radiation dose from internal radionuclide irradiation. Water and thyroid phantoms were used to simulate the distribution of Cerenkov photon emission and dose deposition through Monte Carlo method. The relationship between Cerenkov photon emission and dose deposition was quantitatively analyzed. A neck phantom was also used to verify Cerenkov photon detection for thyroid radionuclide therapy. Results show that Cerenkov photon emission and dose deposition exhibit the same distribution pattern in water phantom, and this relative distribution relationship also existed in the thyroid phantom. Moreover, Cerenkov photon emission exhibits a specific quantitative relation to dose deposition. For thyroid radionuclide therapy, only a part of Cerenkov photon produced by thyroid could penetrate the body for detection; therefore, the use of Cerenkov radiation for measurement of radionuclide therapy dose may be more suitable for superficial tumors. This study demonstrated that Cerenkov radiation has the potential to be used for measuring radiation dose for radionuclide therapy.

  2. Digital radiography: image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2008-11-01

    Digital radiography devices, rapidly replacing analog screen-film detectors, are now common in diagnostic radiological imaging, where implementation has been accelerated by the commodity status of electronic imaging and display systems. The shift from narrow latitude, fixed-speed screen-film detectors to wide latitude, variable-speed digital detectors has created a flexible imaging system that can easily result in overexposures to the patient without the knowledge of the operator, thus potentially increasing the radiation burden of the patient population from radiographic examinations. In addition, image processing can be inappropriately applied causing inconsistent or artifactual appearance of anatomy, which can lead to misdiagnosis. On the other hand, many advantages can be obtained from the variable-speed digital detector, such as an ability to lower dose in many examinations, image post-processing for disease-specific conditions, display flexibility to change the appearance of the image and aid the physician in making a differential diagnosis, and easy access to digital images. An understanding of digital radiography is necessary to minimize the possibility of overexposures and inconsistent results, and to achieve the principle of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for the safe and effective care of all patients. Thus many issues must be considered for optimal implementation of digital radiography, as reviewed in this article.

  3. The effect of radiation dose on the onset and progression of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Brad A; Ma, Htet S W; Hansen, Katherine S; Perks, Julian; Kent, Michael S; Fragoso, Ruben C; Marcu, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive understanding of how the selection of radiation dose affects the temporal and spatial progression of radiation-induced necrosis in the rat model. Necrosis was induced with a single fraction of radiation exposure, at doses ranging between 20 and 60 Gy, to the right hemisphere of 8-week-old Fischer rats from a linear accelerator. The development and progression of necrosis in the rats was monitored and quantified every other week with T1- and T2-weighted gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI studies. The time to onset of necrosis was found to be dose-dependent, but after the initial onset, the necrosis progression rate and total volume generated was constant across different doses ranging between 30 and 60 Gy. Radiation doses less than 30 Gy did not develop necrosis within 33 weeks after treatment, indicating a dose threshold existing between 20 and 30 Gy. The highest dose used in this study led to the shortest time to onset of radiation-induced necrosis, while producing comparable disease progression dynamics after the onset. Therefore, for the radiation-induced necrosis rat model using a linear accelerator, the most optimum results were generated from a dose of 60 Gy.

  4. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  5. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  6. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    R Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  7. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    R Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  8. Comparison of radiation dose to operator between transradial and transfemoral coronary angiography with optimised radiation protection: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiliang; Jin, Zhigeng; Jing, Limin

    2014-03-01

    A growing concern in applying radial access in cardiac catheterisation is the increased operator radiation exposure. This study used an anthropomorphic phantom to simulate transradial and transfemoral coronary angiography with optimised radiation protection conditions. Operator radiation exposure was measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters at predefined locations. Compared with the femoral route, the radial route was associated with a dose decrease of 15 % at the operator's chest level with optimised radiation shielding. However, radiation exposure to the operator's hand remained significantly higher when applying radial access even with collective protective equipment used (by a factor of 2). Furthermore, the efficiency of operator radiation protection was found to be dependent on the tube incidence. Awareness should be raised about the significant increase of radiation exposure to operators' hands in transradial coronary angiography. Protection to reduce the dose level to the hands is necessary and should be further improved.

  9. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  10. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  11. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  12. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-22

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  13. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.; Meznarich, H.K.; Thrall, K.D. . Div. of Regulatory Applications); Traub, R.J. )

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radionuclides in chemical forms that provided a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were estimated for these materials, and were combined with data from biokinetic transfer models to predict radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodologies were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed for representative situations; introduction of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman's blood at successive months of pregnancy was assumed to accommodate the stage dependence of geometric relationships and biological behaviors. Summary tables of results, correlations, and dosimetric relations, and of tentative generalized categorizations, are provided in the report.

  14. Modeling the radiation doses from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph; Liu, Ningyu; Rassoul, Hamid

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are intense bursts of gamma-rays that originate from thunderclouds, from altitudes that commercial aircraft fly. Based upon the fluence of gamma-rays measured by the RHESSI spacecraft, Dwyer et al. [2010] inferred radiation doses to individuals inside aircraft in the 0.001 - 0.1 Sv range, depending upon the assumed size of the TGF source region. The largest doses occur when an aircraft is directly struck by the energetic electron beam that produces the TGF. The relativistic feedback discharge model is a self-consistent model that includes the generation of runaway electrons via the positron and x-ray feedback mechanisms and the electric field changes due to the resulting ionization and low-energy electron and ion currents. This model has successfully explained many properties of TGFs, including the gamma-ray intensities, durations, multi-pulsed structures as well as discharge currents and radio emissions. In this presentation we discuss new radiation dose calculations based upon the relativistic feedback discharge model and compare these calculations to previous work.

  15. [About Dose-Effect Relationship in the Environment Radiation Protection].

    PubMed

    Udalova, A A

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important stages in the development of a methodology for the environment radiation protection is the assessment and justification of critical radiation exposure levels for ecosystem components. In this study application of the approach for critical dose level estimation is demonstrated on the example of the data about ionizing radiation effect on reproduction and survival of agricultural plants after acute and chronic exposures. Influence of the type of dose-effect relationship on the estimated values of the critical doses and dose rates is studied using three models (linear, logarithmic and logistic). The findings obtained do not provide any robust recommendations in favor of one of the three tested functions. The models of dose-effect relationship (threshold or non-threshold) and types of radiation-induced effects (stochastic and deterministic) are discussed from the viewpoint of developing a system for radiation protection of human and non-human biota.

  16. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation dose reduction in multidetector CT in fracture evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jung Woo; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Mi Sung

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether multidetector CT with low-dose radiation (low-dose CT) of joints can be useful when evaluating fractures. Our study included CT scans of 398 patients, 103 shoulder cases, 109 wrist cases, 98 pelvis cases and 88 ankle cases. There were 191 females and 207 males. The low-dose CTs were performed using identical voltage and parameters with the exception of decreased (half of standard dose) tube current. Low-dose and standard-dose images were compared with regards to objective image quality, subjective evaluation of image quality and diagnostic performance for the fractures. There was no significant difference of image noise between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT in every joint (p > 0.05). Each mean value of subjective score did not show significant difference according to the dosage of the CT scan. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity (96-100%), specificity (95.2-100%) or accuracy (97.9-100%) between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT (p values, 0.1336-1.000). The evaluation of extremities for fractures using low-dose CT can reduce radiation exposure by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT without affecting image quality or diagnostic performance. Advances in knowledge: Low-dose CT of the extremities (shoulder, pelvis, ankle and wrist) can reduce radiation dose by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT and does not significantly affect image quality or diagnostic performance in fracture detection.

  18. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  19. Radiation dose estimates for copper-64 citrate in man

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, J.E.; Carlton, J.E.; Stabin, M.; Watson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Tumor imaging agents suitable for use with positron emission tomographs are constantly sought. We have performed studies with animal-tumor-bearing models that have demonstrated the rapid uptake of copper-64. The radiation dose estimates for man indicate that the intravenous administration of 7.0 mCi would result in radiation doses to the kidney of 9.8 to 10.5 rads with other organs receiving substantially less radiation. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Impact of dose and volume on radiation-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Giovanna; Manfrida, Stefania; Cellini, Francesco; Giammarino, Daniela; Petrone, Adelina; Vitucci, Pasquale; Cellini, Numa

    2005-01-01

    There is a relationship between a given radiation dose and the resulting biological effect in the management of head and neck cancer. Radiation mucositis represents a frequent complication in cancer chemoradiation. Its prevention and treatment are major goals in radiation therapy schedules. Critical tissues can be spared using high conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) based on consensus guidelines for target volume. Current approaches to radiation mucositis with respect to the dose and volume impact are illustrated. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  1. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure.

  2. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Friend, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  3. Radiation dose of CT coronary angiography in clinical practice: objective evaluation of strategies for dose optimization.

    PubMed

    Yerramasu, Ajay; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Atwal, Satvir; Goodman, Dennis; Lipkin, David; Lahiri, Avijit

    2012-07-01

    CT coronary angiography (CTCA) is an evolving modality for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Radiation burden associated with CTCA has been a major concern in the wider application of this technique. It is important to reduce the radiation dose without compromising the image quality. To estimate the radiation dose of CTCA in clinical practice and evaluate the effect of dose-saving algorithms on radiation dose and image quality. Effective radiation dose was measured from the dose-length product in 616 consecutive patients (mean age 58 ± 12 years; 70% males) who underwent clinically indicated CTCA at our institution over 1 year. Image quality was assessed subjectively using a 4-point scale and objectively by measuring the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in the coronary arteries. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with radiation dose. Mean effective radiation dose of CTCA was 6.6 ± 3.3 mSv. Radiation dose was significantly reduced by dose saving algorithms such as 100 kV imaging (-47%; 95% CI, -44% to -50%), prospective gating (-35%; 95% CI, -29% to -40%) and ECG controlled tube current modulation (-23%; 95% CI, -9% to -34%). None of the dose saving algorithms were associated with a significant reduction in mean image quality or the frequency of diagnostic scans (P = non-significant for all comparisons). Careful application of radiation-dose saving algorithms in appropriately selected patients can reduce the radiation burden of CTCA significantly, without compromising the image quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Total dose performance of radiation hardened voltage regulators and references

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, S.; Gorelick, J.; Pease, R.; Rax, B.; Ladbury, R.

    2001-01-01

    Total dose test of commercially available radiation hardened bipolar voltage regulators and references show reduced sensitivity to dose rate and varying sensitivity to bias under pressure. Behavior of critical parameters in different dose rate and bias conditions is compared and the impact to hardness assurance methodology is discussed.

  5. Method for inserting noise in digital mammography to simulate reduction in radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2015-03-01

    The quality of clinical x-ray images is closely related to the radiation dose used in the imaging study. The general principle for selecting the radiation is ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"). The practical optimization, however, remains challenging. It is well known that reducing the radiation dose increases the quantum noise, which could compromise the image quality. In order to conduct studies about dose reduction in mammography, it would be necessary to acquire repeated clinical images, from the same patient, with different dose levels. However, such practice would be unethical due to radiation related risks. One solution is to simulate the effects of dose reduction in clinical images. This work proposes a new method, based on the Anscombe transformation, which simulates dose reduction in digital mammography by inserting quantum noise into clinical mammograms acquired with the standard radiation dose. Thus, it is possible to simulate different levels of radiation doses without exposing the patient to new levels of radiation. Results showed that the achieved quality of simulated images generated with our method is the same as when using other methods found in the literature, with the novelty of using the Anscombe transformation for converting signal-independent Gaussian noise into signal-dependent quantum noise.

  6. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  7. Investigation of DNA Damage Dose-Response Kinetics after Ionizing Radiation Schemes Similar to CT Protocols.

    PubMed

    Elgart, S Robin; Bostani, Maryam; Mok, Karen C; Adibi, Ali; Ruehm, Stefan; Enzmann, Dieter; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2015-06-01

    Although there has been extensive research done on the biological response to doses of ionizing radiation relevant to radiodiagnostic procedures, very few studies have examined radiation schemes similar to those frequently utilized in CT exams. Instead of a single exposure, CT exams are often made up of a series of scans separated on the order of minutes. DNA damage dose-response kinetics after radiation doses and schemes similar to CT protocols were established in both cultured (ESW-WT3) and whole blood lymphocytes and compared to higher dose exposures. Both the kinetics and extent of H2AX phosphorylation were found to be dose dependent. Damage induction and detection showed a clear dose response, albeit different, at all time points and differences in the DNA repair kinetics of ESW-WT3 and whole blood lymphocytes were characterized. Moreover, using a modified split-dose in vitro experiment, we show that phosphorylation of H2AX is significantly reduced after exposure to CT doses fractionated over a few minutes compared to the same total dose delivered as a single exposure. Because the split-dose exposures investigated here are more similar to those experienced during a CT examination, it is essential to understand why and how these differences occur. This work provides compelling evidence supporting differential biological responses not only between high and low doses, but also between single and multiple exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  8. Comparison of x-radiation doses between conventional and rare earth panoramic radiographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Skoczylas, L.J.; Preece, J.W.; Langlais, R.P.; McDavid, W.D.; Waggener, R.G. )

    1989-12-01

    The radiation dose to radiobiologically critical organs at various anatomic sites in a phantom was compared with the use of rare earth screen/film combinations and calcium tungstate screen/film combinations. Rare earth screens and films produced a reduction in dose up to 40% to 50% depending on the anatomic site.

  9. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE PAGES

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; ...

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  10. Radiation doses to insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.; Den Hartog, P.K.; Semones, E.J.; Job, P.K.

    1997-09-01

    Dose measurements made on and around the insertion devices (IDs) at the Advanced Photon Source are reported. Attempts are made to compare these dose rates to dose rates that have been reported to cause radiation-induced demagnetization, but comparisons are complicated by such factors as the particular magnet material and the techniques used in its manufacture, the spectrum and type of radiation, and the demagnetizing field seen by the magnet. The spectrum of radiation at the IDs. It has almost no effect on the dose to the downstream ends of the IDs, however, since much of the radiation travels through the ID vacuum chamber and cannot be readily shielded. Opening the gaps of the IDs during injection and at other times also helps decrease the radiation exposure.

  11. Automated extraction of radiation dose information for CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to radiation as a result of medical imaging is currently in the spotlight, receiving attention from Congress as well as the lay press. Although scanner manufacturers are moving toward including effective dose information in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine headers of imaging studies, there is a vast repository of retrospective CT data at every imaging center that stores dose information in an image-based dose sheet. As such, it is difficult for imaging centers to participate in the ACR's Dose Index Registry. The authors have designed an automated extraction system to query their PACS archive and parse CT examinations to extract the dose information stored in each dose sheet. First, an open-source optical character recognition program processes each dose sheet and converts the information to American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text. Each text file is parsed, and radiation dose information is extracted and stored in a database which can be queried using an existing pathology and radiology enterprise search tool. Using this automated extraction pipeline, it is possible to perform dose analysis on the >800,000 CT examinations in the PACS archive and generate dose reports for all of these patients. It is also possible to more effectively educate technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians about exposure to radiation from CT by generating report cards for interpreted and performed studies. The automated extraction pipeline enables compliance with the ACR's reporting guidelines and greater awareness of radiation dose to patients, thus resulting in improved patient care and management.

  12. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  13. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Ubeda, C; Leyton, F; Miranda, P

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 microGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 microGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  14. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  15. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  16. Dose-dependent white matter damage after brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael; Karunamuni, Roshan; McDonald, Carrie; White, Nathan; Pettersson, Niclas; Moiseenko, Vitali; Seibert, Tyler; Marshall, Deborah; Cervino, Laura; Bartsch, Hauke; Kuperman, Joshua; Murzin, Vyacheslav; Krishnan, Anitha; Farid, Nikdokht; Dale, Anders; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona

    2016-11-01

    Brain radiotherapy is limited in part by damage to white matter, contributing to neurocognitive decline. We utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with multiple b-values (diffusion weightings) to model the dose-dependency and time course of radiation effects on white matter. Fifteen patients with high-grade gliomas treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy underwent MRI with DTI prior to radiotherapy, and after months 1, 4-6, and 9-11. Diffusion tensors were calculated using three weightings (high, standard, and low b-values) and maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (λ∥), and radial diffusivity (λ⊥) were generated. The region of interest was all white matter. MD, λ∥, and λ⊥ increased significantly with time and dose, with corresponding decrease in FA. Greater changes were seen at lower b-values, except for FA. Time-dose interactions were highly significant at 4-6months and beyond (p<.001), and the difference in dose response between high and low b-values reached statistical significance at 9-11months for MD, λ∥, and λ⊥ (p<.001, p<.001, p=.005 respectively) as well as at 4-6months for λ∥ (p=.04). We detected dose-dependent changes across all doses, even <10Gy. Greater changes were observed at low b-values, suggesting prominent extracellular changes possibly due to vascular permeability and neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Low radiation dose in computed tomography: the role of iodine.

    PubMed

    Aschoff, Andrik J; Catalano, Carlo; Kirchin, Miles A; Krix, Martin; Albrecht, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Recent approaches to reducing radiation exposure during CT examinations typically utilize automated dose modulation strategies on the basis of lower tube voltage combined with iterative reconstruction and other dose-saving techniques. Less clearly appreciated is the potentially substantial role that iodinated contrast media (CM) can play in low-radiation-dose CT examinations. Herein we discuss the role of iodinated CM in low-radiation-dose examinations and describe approaches for the optimization of CM administration protocols to further reduce radiation dose and/or CM dose while maintaining image quality for accurate diagnosis. Similar to the higher iodine attenuation obtained at low-tube-voltage settings, high-iodine-signal protocols may permit radiation dose reduction by permitting a lowering of mAs while maintaining the signal-to-noise ratio. This is particularly feasible in first pass examinations where high iodine signal can be achieved by injecting iodine more rapidly. The combination of low kV and IR can also be used to reduce the iodine dose. Here, in optimum contrast injection protocols, the volume of CM administered rather than the iodine concentration should be reduced, since with high-iodine-concentration CM further reductions of iodine dose are achievable for modern first pass examinations. Moreover, higher concentrations of CM more readily allow reductions of both flow rate and volume, thereby improving the tolerability of contrast administration.

  18. Low radiation dose in computed tomography: the role of iodine

    PubMed Central

    Aschoff, Andrik J; Catalano, Carlo; Krix, Martin; Albrecht, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Recent approaches to reducing radiation exposure during CT examinations typically utilize automated dose modulation strategies on the basis of lower tube voltage combined with iterative reconstruction and other dose-saving techniques. Less clearly appreciated is the potentially substantial role that iodinated contrast media (CM) can play in low-radiation-dose CT examinations. Herein we discuss the role of iodinated CM in low-radiation-dose examinations and describe approaches for the optimization of CM administration protocols to further reduce radiation dose and/or CM dose while maintaining image quality for accurate diagnosis. Similar to the higher iodine attenuation obtained at low-tube-voltage settings, high-iodine-signal protocols may permit radiation dose reduction by permitting a lowering of mAs while maintaining the signal-to-noise ratio. This is particularly feasible in first pass examinations where high iodine signal can be achieved by injecting iodine more rapidly. The combination of low kV and IR can also be used to reduce the iodine dose. Here, in optimum contrast injection protocols, the volume of CM administered rather than the iodine concentration should be reduced, since with high-iodine-concentration CM further reductions of iodine dose are achievable for modern first pass examinations. Moreover, higher concentrations of CM more readily allow reductions of both flow rate and volume, thereby improving the tolerability of contrast administration. PMID:28471242

  19. Health Benefits of Exposure to Low-dose Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy

    2016-03-01

    Although there is no doubt that exposure to high doses of radiation (delivered at a high dose-rate) induces harmful effects, the health risks and benefits of exposure to low levels (delivered at a low dose-rate) of toxic agents is still a challenging public health issue. There has been a considerable amount of published data against the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for assessing risk of cancers induced by radiation. The LNT model for risk assessment creates "radiophobia," which is a serious public health issue. It is now time to move forward to a paradigm shift in health risk assessment of low-dose exposure by taking the differences between responses to low and high doses into consideration. Moreover, future research directed toward the identification of mechanisms associated with responses to low-dose radiation is critically needed to fully understand their beneficial effects.

  20. SCCT guidelines on radiation dose and dose-optimization strategies in cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra S; Abbara, Suhny; Chen, Marcus Y; Gentry, Ralph; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Raff, Gilbert L; Shaw, Leslee J; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few years, computed tomography (CT) has developed into a standard clinical test for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. The emergence of cardiovascular CT during a period of dramatic increase in radiation exposure to the population from medical procedures and heightened concern about the subsequent potential cancer risk has led to intense scrutiny of the radiation burden of this new technique. This has hastened the development and implementation of dose reduction tools and prompted closer monitoring of patient dose. In an effort to aid the cardiovascular CT community in incorporating patient-centered radiation dose optimization and monitoring strategies into standard practice, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography has produced a guideline document to review available data and provide recommendations regarding interpretation of radiation dose indices and predictors of risk, appropriate use of scanner acquisition modes and settings, development of algorithms for dose optimization, and establishment of procedures for dose monitoring.

  1. SCCT guidelines on radiation dose and dose-optimization strategies in cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra S.; Abbara, Suhny; Chen, Marcus Y.; Gentry, Ralph; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, computed tomography (CT) has developed into a standard clinical test for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. The emergence of cardiovascular CT during a period of dramatic increase in radiation exposure to the population from medical procedures and heightened concern about the subsequent potential cancer risk has led to intense scrutiny of the radiation burden of this new technique. This has hastened the development and implementation of dose reduction tools and prompted closer monitoring of patient dose. In an effort to aid the cardiovascular CT community in incorporating patient-centered radiation dose optimization and monitoring strategies into standard practice, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography has produced a guideline document to review available data and provide recommendations regarding interpretation of radiation dose indices and predictors of risk, appropriate use of scanner acquisition modes and settings, development of algorithms for dose optimization, and establishment of procedures for dose monitoring. PMID:21723512

  2. Commentary 2 to Cox and Little: radiation-induced oncogenic transformation: the interplay between dose, dose protraction, and radiation quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence for end points such as oncogenic transformation in vitro, and carcinogenesis and life shortening in vivo, suggesting that dose protraction leads to an increase in effectiveness relative to a single, acute exposure--at least for radiations of medium linear energy transfer (LET) such as neutrons. Table I contains a summary of the pertinent data from studies in which the effect is seen. [table: see text] This phenomenon has come to be known as the "inverse dose rate effect," because it is in marked contrast to the situation at low LET, where protraction in delivery of a dose of radiation, either by fractionation or low dose rate, results in a decreased biological effect; additionally, at medium and high LET, for radiobiological end points such as clonogenic survival, the biological effectiveness is independent of protraction. The quantity and quality of the published reports on the "inverse dose rate effect" leaves little doubt that the effect is real, but the available evidence indicates that the magnitude of the effect is due to a complex interplay between dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Here, we first summarize the available data on the inverse dose rate effect and suggest that it follows a consistent pattern in regard to dose, dose rate, and radiation quality; second, we describe a model that predicts these features; and, finally, we describe the significance of the effect for radiation protection.

  3. Commentary 2 to Cox and Little: radiation-induced oncogenic transformation: the interplay between dose, dose protraction, and radiation quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence for end points such as oncogenic transformation in vitro, and carcinogenesis and life shortening in vivo, suggesting that dose protraction leads to an increase in effectiveness relative to a single, acute exposure--at least for radiations of medium linear energy transfer (LET) such as neutrons. Table I contains a summary of the pertinent data from studies in which the effect is seen. [table: see text] This phenomenon has come to be known as the "inverse dose rate effect," because it is in marked contrast to the situation at low LET, where protraction in delivery of a dose of radiation, either by fractionation or low dose rate, results in a decreased biological effect; additionally, at medium and high LET, for radiobiological end points such as clonogenic survival, the biological effectiveness is independent of protraction. The quantity and quality of the published reports on the "inverse dose rate effect" leaves little doubt that the effect is real, but the available evidence indicates that the magnitude of the effect is due to a complex interplay between dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Here, we first summarize the available data on the inverse dose rate effect and suggest that it follows a consistent pattern in regard to dose, dose rate, and radiation quality; second, we describe a model that predicts these features; and, finally, we describe the significance of the effect for radiation protection.

  4. Ultraviolet Radiation Dose National Standard of México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, R.; Rosas, E.

    2006-09-01

    We present the Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Dose National Standard for México. The establishment of this measurement reference at Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM) eliminates the need of contacting foreign suppliers in the search for traceability towards the SI units when calibrating instruments at 365 nm. Further more, the UV Radiation Dose National Standard constitutes a highly accurate and reliable source for the UV radiation dose measurements performed in medical and cosmetic treatments as in the the food and pharmaceutics disinfection processes, among other.

  5. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Traub, R.J.; Meznarich, H.K. )

    1990-10-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements to provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Fractional placental transfer and ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials, and were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry. The MIRD methodologies were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation adsorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed for representative situations; introduction of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman's blood at successive months of pregnancy was assumed to accommodate the stage dependence of geometric relationships and biological behaviors. Summary tables of results, correlations, and dosimetric relations, and of tentative generalized categorizations are provided in the report. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Cytokine profile of breast cell lines after different radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Bravatà, Valentina; Minafra, Luigi; Forte, Giusi Irma; Cammarata, Francesco Paolo; Russo, Giorgio; Di Maggio, Federica Maria; Augello, Giuseppa; Lio, Domenico; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2017-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) treatment activates inflammatory processes causing the release of a great amount of molecules able to affect the cell survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytokine signature of conditioned medium produced by non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, as well as MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, after single high doses of IR in order to understand their role in high radiation response. We performed a cytokine profile of irradiated conditioned media of MCF10A, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines treated with 9 or 23 Gy, by Luminex and ELISA analyses. Overall, our results show that both 9 Gy and 23 Gy of IR induce the release within the first 72 h of cytokines and growth factors potentially able to influence the tumor outcome, with a dose-independent and cell-line dependent signature. Moreover, our results show that the cell-senescence phenomenon does not correlate with the amount of 'senescence-associated secretory phenotype' (SASP) molecules released in media. Thus, additional mechanisms are probably involved in this process. These data open the possibility to evaluate cytokine profile as useful marker in modulating the personalized radiotherapy in breast cancer care.

  7. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-woo; Jeong, Kyu-hwan; Kim, Jong-il; Im, Chae-wan

    2015-07-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  8. Wound Trauma Alters Ionizing Radiation Dose Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-11

    the Chernobyl reactor meltdown, 10% of 237 victims exposed to radiation received thermal burns [3]. In animals including mice [4,5], rats [6,7...Barabanova AV: Significance of beta-radiation skin burns in Chernobyl patients for the theory and practice of radiopathology. Vojnosanit Pregl 2006, 63

  9. Microelectronic Chips For Radiation-Dose Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Lin, Yu-Sang; Ray, Kevin P.; Sokoloski, Martin M.

    1993-01-01

    Custom-made single-chip complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit designed to reveal effects of ionizing radiation on itself and similar integrated circuits. Potential terrestrial use: safety-oriented monitoring of ionizing radiation at nuclear powerplants, nuclear-waste sites, and the like.

  10. CT Radiation Dose Optimization and Estimation: an Update for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with the increasing utilization of CT examinations, the greater concern about radiation hazards from examinations has been addressed. In this regard, CT radiation dose optimization has been given a great deal of attention by radiologists, referring physicians, technologists, and physicists. Dose-saving strategies are continuously evolving in terms of imaging techniques as well as dose management. Consequently, regular updates of this issue are necessary especially for radiologists who play a pivotal role in this activity. This review article will provide an update on how we can optimize CT dose in order to maximize the benefit-to-risk ratio of this clinically useful diagnostic imaging method. PMID:22247630

  11. CT radiation dose optimization and estimation: an update for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with the increasing utilization of CT examinations, the greater concern about radiation hazards from examinations has been addressed. In this regard, CT radiation dose optimization has been given a great deal of attention by radiologists, referring physicians, technologists, and physicists. Dose-saving strategies are continuously evolving in terms of imaging techniques as well as dose management. Consequently, regular updates of this issue are necessary especially for radiologists who play a pivotal role in this activity. This review article will provide an update on how we can optimize CT dose in order to maximize the benefit-to-risk ratio of this clinically useful diagnostic imaging method.

  12. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography: techniques and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Liu, Xin; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Qu, Mingliang; Christner, Jodie; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2011-01-01

    Despite universal consensus that computed tomography (CT) overwhelmingly benefits patients when used for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk of cancer induction from CT due to the exponentially increased use of CT in medicine. Keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, consistent with the diagnostic task, remains the most important strategy for decreasing this potential risk. This article summarizes the general technical strategies that are commonly used for radiation dose management in CT. Dose-management strategies for pediatric CT, cardiac CT, dual-energy CT, CT perfusion and interventional CT are specifically discussed, and future perspectives on CT dose reduction are presented. PMID:22308169

  13. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography: techniques and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lifeng; Liu, Xin; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Qu, Mingliang; Christner, Jodie; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2009-10-01

    Despite universal consensus that computed tomography (CT) overwhelmingly benefits patients when used for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk of cancer induction from CT due to the exponentially increased use of CT in medicine. Keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, consistent with the diagnostic task, remains the most important strategy for decreasing this potential risk. This article summarizes the general technical strategies that are commonly used for radiation dose management in CT. Dose-management strategies for pediatric CT, cardiac CT, dual-energy CT, CT perfusion and interventional CT are specifically discussed, and future perspectives on CT dose reduction are presented.

  14. New image-processing and noise-reduction software reduces radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Tsai, Shirling; Modrall, J Gregory; Anderson, Jon A; Rectenwald, John; Timaran, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    procedures with and without Clarity were not significantly different. For all cases, procedure radiation dose to the patient and the primary and assistant operators were significantly decreased in the Clarity group by 60% compared with the non-Clarity group. By procedure type, fluorography dose rates decreased from 44% for fenestrated endovascular repair and up to 70% with lower extremity interventions. Fluoroscopy dose rates also significantly decreased, from about 37% to 47%, depending on procedure type. The AlluraClarity system reduces the patient and primary operator's radiation dose by more than half during CEPs. This feature appears to be an effective tool in lowering the radiation dose while maintaining image quality. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive (137)Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation dose measurement for various parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Hee-Joung; Jeon, Seong Su; Cho, Hyo-Min; Nam, So Ra; Jung, Ji-Young

    2008-03-01

    The MDCT parameters affecting radiation dose include tube voltage, tube current, change of beam collimation, and size of the human body. The purpose of this study was to measure and evaluate radiation dose for MDCT parameters. A comparative analysis of the radiation dose according to before and after the calibration of the ionization chamber was performed. The ionization chamber was used for measuring radiation dose in the MDCT, as well as of CTDI W according to temperature and pressure correction factors in the CT room. As a result, the patient dose of CTDI W values linearly increased as tube voltage and current were increased, and nonlinearly decreased as beam collimation was increased. And the CTDI W value which was reflected calibration factors, as well as correction factors of temperature and pressure, was found to be greater by the range of 0.479 ~ 3.162 mGy in effective radiation dose than the uncorrected value. Also, Under the abdomen routine CT conditions used in hospitals, patient exposure dose showed a difference of a maximum of 0.7 mSv between before and after the application of such factors. These results imply that the calibration of the ion chamber, and the application of temperature and pressure of the CT room are crucial in measuring and calculating patient exposure dose.

  17. Painting Dose: The ART of Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Hannah J; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2016-11-15

    The discovery of X rays in 1895 captivated society like no other scientific advance. Radiation instantly became the subject not only of numerous scientific papers but also of circus bazaars, poetry, fiction, costume design, comics, and marketing for household items. Its spread was "viral." What is not well known, however, is its incorporation into visual art, despite the long tradition of medicine and surgery as a subject in art. Using several contemporary search methods, we identified 5 examples of paintings or sculpture that thematically feature radiation therapy. All were by artists with exhibited careers in art: Georges Chicotot, Marcel Duchamp, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Robert Pope, and Cookie Kerxton. Each artist portrays radiation differently, ranging from traditional healer, to mysterious danger, to futuristic propaganda, to the emotional challenges of undergoing cancer therapy. This range captures the complex role of radiation as both a therapy and a hazard. Whereas some of these artists are now world famous, none of these artworks are as well known as their surgical counterparts. The penetration of radiation into popular culture was rapid and pervasive; yet, its role as a thematic subject in art never fully caught on, perhaps because of a lack of understanding of the technology, radiation's intangibility, or even a suppressive effect of society's ambivalent relationship with it. These 5 artists have established a rich foundation upon which pop culture and art can further develop with time to reflect the extraordinary progress of modern radiation therapy.

  18. Assessment of the effective dose equivalent for external photon radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.D.; Poston, J.W.; Xu, X.G. )

    1993-02-01

    Beginning in January 1994, US nuclear power plants must change the way that they determine the radiation exposure to their workforce. At that time, revisions to Title 10 Part 20 of the Code of Federal Regulations will be in force requiring licensees to evaluate worker radiation exposure using a risk-based methodology termed the effective dose equivalent.'' A research project was undertaken to improve upon the conservative method presently used for assessing effective dose equivalent. In this project effective dose equivalent was calculated using a mathematical model of the human body, and tracking photon interactions for a wide variety of radiation source geometries using Monte Carlo computer code simulations. Algorithms were then developed to relate measurements of the photon flux on the surface of the body (as measured by dosimeters) to effective dose equivalent. This report (Volume I of a two-part study) describes: the concept of effective dose equivalent, the evolution of the concept and its incorporation into regulations, the variations in human organ susceptibility to radiation, the mathematical modeling and calculational techniques used, the results of effective dose equivalent calculations for a broad range of photon energiesand radiation source geometries. The study determined that for beam radiation sources the highest effective dose equivalent occurs for beams striking the front of the torso. Beams striking the rear of the torsoproduce the next highest effective dose equivalent, with effective dose equivalent falling significantly as one departs from these two orientations. For point sources, the highest effective dose equivalent occurs when the sources are in contact with the body on the front of the torso. For females the highest effective dose equivalent occurs when the source is on the sternum, for males when it is on the gonads.

  19. Principles of CT: radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-12-01

    This article discusses CT radiation dose, the measurement of CT dose, and CT image quality. The most commonly used dose descriptor is CT dose index, which represents the dose to a location (e.g., depth) in a scanned volume from a complete series of slices. A weighted average of the CT dose index measured at the center and periphery of dose phantoms provides a convenient single-number estimate of patient dose for a procedure, and this value (or a related indicator that includes the scanned length) is often displayed on the operator's console. CT image quality, as in most imaging, is described in terms of contrast, spatial resolution, image noise, and artifacts. A strength of CT is its ability to visualize structures of low contrast in a subject, a task that is limited primarily by noise and is therefore closely associated with radiation dose: The higher the dose contributing to the image, the less apparent is image noise and the easier it is to perceive low-contrast structures. Spatial resolution is ultimately limited by sampling, but both image noise and resolution are strongly affected by the reconstruction filter. As a result, diagnostically acceptable image quality at acceptable doses of radiation requires appropriately designed clinical protocols, including appropriate kilovolt peaks, amperages, slice thicknesses, and reconstruction filters.

  20. New model for assessing dose, dose rate, and temperature sensitivity of radiation-induced absorption in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gilard, Olivier; Quadri, Gianandrea; Caussanel, Matthieu; Duval, Herve; Reynaud, Francois

    2010-11-15

    A new theoretical approach is proposed to explain the dose, dose rate and temperature sensitivity of the radiation-induced absorption (RIA) in glasses. In this paper, a {beta}{sup th}-order dispersive kinetic model is used to simulate the growth of the density of color centers in irradiated glasses. This model yields an explanation for the power-law dependence on dose and dose rate usually observed for the RIA in optical fibers. It also leads to an Arrhenius-like relationship between the RIA and the glass temperature during irradiation. With a very limited number of adjustable parameters, the model succeeds in explaining, with a good agreement, the RIA growth of two different optical fiber references over wide ranges of dose, dose rate and temperature.

  1. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  2. Strategies for reduction of radiation dose in cardiac multislice CT.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-François; Abada, Hicham T

    2007-08-01

    Because cardiac computed tomography (CT) (mainly coronary CT angiography) is a very promising technique, used more and more for coronary artery evaluation, the benefits and risks of this new low-invasive technique must be balanced. Radiation dose is a major concern for coronary CT angiography, especially in case of repeated examinations or in particular subgroups of patients (for example young female patients). Radiation dose to patient tends to increase from 16- to 64-slice CT. Radiation exposure in ECG-gated acquisitions may reach up to 40 mSv; considerable differences are attributable to the performance of CT machines, to technical dose-sparing tools, but also to radiological habits. Setting radiation dose at the lowest level possible should be a constant goal for the radiologist. Current technological tools are detailed in regard to their efficiency. Optimisation is necessary, by a judicious use of technological tools and also by individual adaptation of kV or mAs. This paper reviews the different current strategies for radiation dose reduction, keeping image quality constant. Data from the literature are discussed, and future technological developments are considered in regards to radiation dose reduction. The particular case of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease is also addressed.

  3. Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Helmrot, Ebba; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2005-01-01

    Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality control and it is important to have a well-defined and easy to use method for dose measurements. In dental radiology, the most commonly used dose parameters for the setting of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for intraoral examinations and dose width product (DWP) for panoramic examinations. DWP is the air kerma at the front side of the secondary collimator integrated over the collimator width and an exposure cycle. ESAK or DWP is usually measured in the absence of the patient but with the same settings of tube voltage (kV), tube current (mA) and exposure time as with the patient present. Neither of these methods is easy to use, and, in addition, DWP is not a risk related quantity. A better method of monitoring patient dose would be to use a dose area product (DAP) meter for all types of dental examinations. In this study, measurements with a DAP meter are reported for intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DWP is also measured with a pencil ionisation chamber and the product of DWP and the height H (DWP x H) of the secondary collimator (measured using film) was compared to DAP. The results show that it is feasible to measure DAP using a DAP meter for both intraoral and panoramic examinations. The DAP is therefore recommended for the setting of DRLs.

  4. Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminum alloy: low dose effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjana, K.; Ampornrat, P.; Channuie, J.

    2017-06-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminium alloy 6061 (AA6061) immersed in demineralized water was studied at radiation dose up to 206 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the oxide produced on the post-irradiated samples were investigated using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) of the post-irradiated samples were measured. The corrosion behavior of AA6061 appeared to be dose dependent under the experimental conditions. A dramatic change in surface morphology was observed in the samples exposed to gamma radiation at 206 kGy. At this radiation dose the aluminium oxide scale developed can be clearly seen. The results from electrochemical corrosion tests have shown that the corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) can be undoubtedly decreased by gamma irradiation, giving corrosion rate of 7 × 10-4 mm/yr.

  5. Space Radiation Quality Factors and the Delta Ray Dose and Dose-Rate Reduction Effectiveness Factor.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Cacao, Eliedonna; Alp, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors recommend that the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor used for space radiation risk assessments should be based on a comparison of the biological effects of energetic electrons produced along a cosmic ray particles path in low fluence exposures to high dose-rate gamma-ray exposures of doses of about 1 Gy. Methods to implement this approach are described.

  6. Dose-response effect of human equivalent radiation in the murine mandible: A radiomorphometric assessment

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Laura A.; Jing, X. Lin; Donneys, Alexis; Farberg, Aaron S.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of adjuvant irradiation for head and neck cancer, the extent of damage to the underlying bone is not fully understood, but is associated with pathologic fractures, nonunion, and osteoradionecrosis. The authors’ laboratory previously demonstrated that radiation significantly impedes new bone formation in the murine mandible. We hypothesize that the detrimental effects of human equivalent radiation on the murine mandible results in a dose-dependent degradation in traditional micro-CT metrics. Methods Fifteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three radiation dosage groups: low (5.91 Gy), middle (7 Gy), and high (8.89 Gy), delivered in five daily fractions. These dosages approximated 75, 100 and 150 percent, respectively, of the biologically equivalent dose that the human mandible receives during radiation treatment. Hemimandibles were harvested 56 days after radiation and scanned using microCT. Bone mineral density, tissue mineral density, and bone volume fraction were measured along with microdensitometry measurements. Results Animals demonstrated dose dependent side effects of mucositis, alopecia, weight loss and mandibular atrophy with increasing radiation. Traditional microCT parameters were not sensitive enough to demonstrate statistically significant differences between the radiated groups; however microdensitometry analysis showed clear differences between radiated groups and statistically significant changes between radiated and non-radiated groups. Conclusions The authors report dose-dependent and clinically significant side effects of fractionated human equivalent radiation to the murine mandible. The authors further report the limited capacity of traditional micro-CT metrics to adequately capture key changes in bone composition and present microdensitometric histogram analysis in order to demonstrate significant radiation induced changes in mineralization patterns. PMID:24036733

  7. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-02-25

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region.

  8. Awakening the immune system with radiation: Optimal dose and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Minn, Andy J; Vonderheide, Robert H; Wherry, E John; Hahn, Stephen M; Maity, Amit

    2015-11-28

    The importance of ionizing radiation has historically been limited to achieving local control of tumor cells. However, emerging evidence over the last decade suggests an increasingly important role for radiation in amplifying the antitumor immune response elicited by immunomodulatory agents. Combination of radiation with immunotherapy has been shown to elicit powerful systemic responses in several pre-clinical tumor models. Additionally, recent clinical observations support the use of radiation therapy for augmenting antitumor immunity in the metastatic setting. However, radiation dose and fractionation schedules for optimal synergy between radiotherapy and immunotherapy are not well defined. Here we review pre-clinical and clinical data relating to radiation dose and fractionation in the setting of immunotherapy and discuss optimal strategies for combining the two therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CT-fluoroscopy in chest interventional radiology: sliding scale of imaging parameters based on radiation exposure dose and factors increasing radiation exposure dose.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Yoshikazu; Yamakado, K; Takaki, H; Yamada, T; Kodama, H; Nagasawa, N; Nakatsuka, A; Uraki, J; Takeda, K

    2013-02-01

    To verify the usefulness of a sliding scale of imaging parameters to reduce radiation exposure during chest interventional radiology (IR), and to identify factors that increase radiation exposure in order to obtain acceptable computed tomography (CT)-fluoroscopy image quality. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, for which the need for informed consent was waived. Interventional radiologists determined the optimal CT-fluoroscopy imaging parameters using the sliding scale based on the radiation exposure dose. The imaging parameters were changed from those generating low radiation (120 kV/10 mA, 1.2 mGy/s) to others generating higher radiation exposure until acceptable image quality was obtained for each procedure. Validation of the imaging parameter sliding scale was done using regression analysis. Factors that increase radiation exposure were identified using multiple regression analysis. In 125 patients, 217 procedures were performed, of which 72 procedures (33.2%, 72/217) were performed with imaging parameters of minimum radiation exposure, but increased radiation exposure was necessary in 145 (66.8%, 145/217). Significant correlation was found between the radiation exposure dose and the percentage achievement of acceptable image quality (R(2) = 0.98). Multivariate regression analysis showed that high body weight (p < 0.0001), long device passage (p < 0.0001), and lesions above the aortic arch (p = 0.04) were significant independent factors increasing radiation exposure. Although increased radiation exposure dose might be necessary to obtain acceptable chest CT-fluoroscopy images depending on the patient, lesion, and procedure characteristics, a sliding scale of imaging parameters helps to reduce radiation exposure. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  11. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  12. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph; Nam, Jiho; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating esophageal radiation toxicity to clinical variables and to quantitative dose and dose-volume measures derived from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer are reviewed. A variety of clinical and dosimetric parameters have been associated with acute and late toxicity. Suggestions for future studies are presented.

  13. Fetal radiation dose in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kelaranta, Anna; Kaasalainen, Touko; Seuri, Raija; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-01

    The connection between recorded volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol) and determined mean fetal dose (Df) was examined from metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dose measurements on an anthropomorphic female phantom in four stages of pregnancy in a 64-slice CT scanner. Automated tube current modulation kept the mean Df fairly constant through all pregnancy stages in trauma (4.4-4.9 mGy) and abdomino-pelvic (2.1-2.4 mGy) protocols. In pulmonary angiography protocol, the mean Df increased exponentially as the distance from the end of the scan range decreased (0.01-0.09 mGy). For trauma protocol, the relative mean Df as a function of gestational age were in the range 0.80-0.97 compared with the mean CTDI vol. For abdomino-pelvic protocol, the relative mean Df was 0.57-0.79 and for pulmonary angiography protocol, 0.01-0.05 compared with the mean CTDI vol, respectively. In conclusion, if the fetus is in the primary beam, the CTDI vol can be used as an upper estimate of the fetal dose. If the fetus is not in the primary beam, the fetal dose can be estimated by considering also the distance of the fetus from the scan range.

  14. Flight attendant radiation dose from solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeri L; Mertens, Christopher J; Grajewski, Barbara; Luo, Lian; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Cassinelli, Rick T

    2014-08-01

    Research has suggested that work as a flight attendant may be related to increased risk for reproductive health effects. Air cabin exposures that may influence reproductive health include radiation dose from galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events. This paper describes the assessment of radiation dose accrued during solar particle events as part of a reproductive health study of flight attendants. Solar storm data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Weather Prediction Center list of solar proton events affecting the Earth environment to ascertain storms relevant to the two study periods (1992-1996 and 1999-2001). Radiation dose from exposure to solar energetic particles was estimated using the NAIRAS model in conjunction with galactic cosmic radiation dose calculated using the CARI-6P computer program. Seven solar particle events were determined to have potential for significant radiation exposure, two in the first study period and five in the second study period, and over-lapped with 24,807 flight segments. Absorbed (and effective) flight segment doses averaged 6.5 μGy (18 μSv) and 3.1 μGy (8.3 μSv) for the first and second study periods, respectively. Maximum doses were as high as 440 μGy (1.2 mSv) and 20 flight segments had doses greater than 190 μGy (0.5 mSv). During solar particle events, a pregnant flight attendant could potentially exceed the equivalent dose limit to the conceptus of 0.5 mSv in a month recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  15. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  16. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M. )

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Lisjak, I; Vekić, B; Poje, M; Planinić, J

    2008-02-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 microSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 microSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 microSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 microSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  18. Somnolence syndrome in leukemic children following reduced daily dose fractions of cranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Littman, P.; Rosenstock, J.; Gale, G.; Krisch, R.E.; Meadows, A.; Sather, H.; Coccia, P.; DeCamagro, B.

    1984-10-01

    A group of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia was studied to investigate if a reduction in daily dose fraction of cranial radiation would reduce the incidence of somnolence syndrome. Thirty-one evaluable patients received 100 rad x 18 cranial radiation therapy. Sixty-six similar evaluable patients were given 180 rad x 10. Both groups received the same chemotherapy including intrathecal methotrexate. Clinically detectable somnolence appeared in 58% of each group without significant differences in the overall frequency or severity of somnolence. This study failed to substantiate a radiation dose fraction size dependence for somnolence syndrome in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  19. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  20. Radiation doses in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Haegg, N.C.

    1989-01-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl led to releases of large amounts of radioactive matter that was spread over the world and particularly over Europe. The radioactive material released gave rise to radiation doses originating from inhalation, external radiation from both the passing cloud and radioactive material deposited on the ground, and internal irradiation from consumption of food stuffs. This paper summarizes the consequences in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident. The emphasis is mainly on radiation doses received by the public and the long-term effects in Sweden.

  1. Effect of real-time radiation dose feedback on pediatric interventional radiology staff radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Racadio, John; Nachabe, Rami; Carelsen, Bart; Racadio, Judy; Hilvert, Nicole; Johnson, Neil; Kukreja, Kamlesh; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare individual staff radiation dose levels during interventional radiologic (IR) procedures with and without real-time feedback to evaluate whether it has any impact on staff radiation dose. A prospective trial was performed in which individuals filling five different staff roles wore radiation dosimeters during all IR procedures during two phases: a 12-week "closed" phase (measurements recorded but display was off, so no feedback was provided) and a 17-week "open" phase (display was on and provided real-time feedback). Radiation dose rates were recorded and compared by Mann-Whitney U test. There was no significant difference in median procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or patient dose (dose-area product normalized to fluoroscopy time) between the two phases. Overall, the median staff dose was lower in the open phase (0.56 µSv/min of fluoroscopy time) than in the closed phase (3.01 µSv/min; P < .05). The IR attending physician dose decreased significantly for procedures for which the physicians were close to the patient, but not for ones for which they were far away. A radiation dose monitoring system that provides real-time feedback to the interventional staff can significantly reduce radiation exposure to the primary operator, most likely by increasing staff compliance with use of radiation protection equipment and dose reduction techniques. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Total-dose radiation hardness assurance for space electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P.S.; Fleetwood, D.M. )

    1991-01-05

    An improved standard total-dose test method is described to qualify electronics for a low-dose-rate radiation environment typical of space systems. The method consists of {sup 60}Co irradiation at a dose rate of 1--3 Gy(Si)/s (100--300 rad(Si)/s) and a subsequent 373 K (100 {degree}C) bake. New initatives in radiation hardness assurance are also briefly discussed, including the Qualified Manufactures List (QML) test methodology and the possible use of 1/f noise measurements as a nondestructive screen for oxide-trap charge related failure.

  3. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities.

  4. Individual and collective doses from cosmic radiation in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Colgan, P A; Synnott, H; Fenton, D

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the individual and collective doses in Ireland due to cosmic radiation. Information on the exposure to cosmic radiation at ground level is reviewed and published data on the frequency of routes flown by Irish residents is used to calculate the dose due to air travel. Occupational exposure of aircrew is also evaluated. Experimental data on cosmic radiation exposure at ground level is in good agreement with international estimates and the average individual dose is calculated as 300 microSv annually. Published data on international air travel by Irish residents shows a 50% increase in the number of flights taken between 2001 and 2005. This increase is primarily on short-haul flights to Europe, but there have been significant percentage increases in all long-haul flights, with the exception of flights to Africa. The additional per capita dose due to air travel is estimated to be 45 muSv, of which 51% is accumulated on European routes and 34% on routes to the United States. Exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation is now controlled by legislation and all airlines holding an Air Operator's Certificate issued by the Irish Aviation Authority are required to report annually the doses received by their employees in the previous year. There has been a 75% increase in the number of aircrew receiving doses >1 mSv since 2002. In 2004 and 2005 the average individual doses received by Irish aircrew were 1.8 and 2.0, mSv, respectively. The corresponding per caput dose for the entire population is <3 muSv. While this is low compared with the per caput doses from other sources of cosmic radiation, aircrew exposure represents a higher collective dose than any other identified group of exposed workers in Ireland.

  5. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Martin A.; Foo, Kerwyn; Haworth, Annette; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Kennedy, Angel; Joseph, David J.; Denham, James W.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  6. Radiation Resistance Study of Semi-Insulating GaAs-Based Radiation Detectors to Extremely High Gamma Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly Anh, T.; Perd'ochová, A.; Nečas, V.; Pavlicová, V.

    2006-01-01

    In our previous paper [V. Nečas et al.: Nucl. Inst. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 348-351] we reported on the study on radiation stability of semi-insulating (SI) LEG GaAs detectors to doses of photons from 60Co up to 19.2 kGy. Later we presented a study, which covered radiation hardness to the same doses on the base of detector material itself, where strong dependence has been proved [T. Ly Anh et al., Proceedings of the XII th International Conference on Semiconducting and Insulating Materials (SIMC-XII-2002). Smolenice Castle, Slovakia (2002) 292-295 (0-7803-7418-5)]. In this paper we present both the key electrical and detection characteristics of SI GaAs radiation detectors prepared using substrates from four various supplies and two different types of contacts, which were exposed to several gamma doses from 60Co up to the integral dose of about 1 MGy. The obtained results show that SI LEG GaAs detectors provide good spectroscopic performances and even their slight improvement after low to middle gamma irradiation doses (3 -10 kGy) was observed. Further dose exposure caused the degradation of detection properties with an extreme and following improvement depending on detector material properties. SI GaAs detector still retains its working capabilities even after very high doses applied, up to 1 MGy.

  7. Increased occupational radiation doses: nuclear fuel cycle.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Kryuchkov, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The increased occupational doses resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident that occurred in Ukraine in April 1986, the reactor accident of Fukushima that took place in Japan in March 2011, and the early operations of the Mayak Production Association in Russia in the 1940s and 1950s are presented and discussed. For comparison purposes, the occupational doses due to the other two major reactor accidents (Windscale in the United Kingdom in 1957 and Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979) and to the main plutonium-producing facility in the United States (Hanford Works) are also covered but in less detail. Both for the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the routine operations at Mayak, the considerable efforts made to reconstruct individual doses from external irradiation to a large number of workers revealed that the recorded doses had been overestimated by a factor of about two.Introduction of Increased Occupational Exposures: Nuclear Industry Workers. (Video 1:32, http://links.lww.com/HP/A21).

  8. Occupational radiation doses among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea, 1996-2006.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil; Ha, Mina; Jin, Young-Woo; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Lee, Seung Won; Lee, Hyun Koo; Lee, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Hyeog Ju

    2009-08-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses of occupational radiation among diagnostic radiation workers by using the national dose registry between 1996 and 2006 by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Dose measurements were collected quarterly by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter personal monitors. A total of 61 732 workers were monitored, including 18 376 radiologic technologists (30 %), 13 762 physicians (22 %), 9858 dentists (16 %) and 6114 dental hygienists (9.9 %). The average annual effective doses of all monitored workers decreased from 1.75 to 0.80 mSv over the study period. Among all diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists received both the highest effective and collective doses. Male radiologic technologists aged 30-49 y composed the majority of workers receiving more than 5 mSv in a quarter. More intensive monitoring of occupational radiation exposure and investigation into its health effects on diagnostic radiation workers are required in South Korea.

  9. Effect of radiation protraction on BED in the case of large fraction dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, V. Y.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiation protraction on biologically effective dose (BED) in the case when dose per fraction is significantly greater than the standard dose of 2 Gy.Methods: By using the modified linear-quadratic model with monoexponential repair, the authors investigate the effect of long treatment times combined with dose escalation.Results: The dependences of the protraction factor and the corresponding BED on fraction time were determined for different doses per fraction typical for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In the calculations, the authors consider changes in the BED to the normal tissue under the condition of fixed BED to the target.Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrate that simultaneous increase in fraction time and dose per fraction can be beneficial for SRS and SBRT because of the related decrease in BED to normal structures while BED to the target is fixed.

  10. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  11. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  12. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  13. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  14. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  15. Effect of bismuth breast shielding on radiation dose and image quality in coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Elliston, Carl D; Groves, Daniel W; Cheng, Bin; Wolff, Steven D; Pearson, Gregory D N; Robert Peters, M; Johnson, Lynne L; Bokhari, Sabahat; Johnson, Gary W; Bhatia, Ketan; Pozniakoff, Theodore; Brenner, David J

    2012-02-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is associated with high radiation dose to the female breasts. Bismuth breast shielding offers the potential to significantly reduce dose to the breasts and nearby organs, but the magnitude of this reduction and its impact on image quality and radiation dose have not been evaluated. Radiation doses from CCTA to critical organs were determined using metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors positioned in a customized anthropomorphic whole-body dosimetry verification phantom. Image noise and signal were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) including the coronary arteries. With bismuth shielding, breast radiation dose was reduced 46%-57% depending on breast size and scanning technique, with more moderate dose reduction to the heart, lungs, and esophagus. However, shielding significantly decreased image signal (by 14.6 HU) and contrast (by 28.4 HU), modestly but significantly increased image noise in ROIs in locations of coronary arteries, and decreased contrast-to-noise ratio by 20.9%. While bismuth breast shielding can significantly decrease radiation dose to critical organs, it is associated with an increase in image noise, decrease in contrast-to-noise, and changes tissue attenuation characteristics in the location of the coronary arteries.

  16. Radiation dose assessment of exposure to depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Gerstmann, Udo C; Höllriegl, Vera; Szymczak, Wilfried; Roth, Paul; Hoeschen, Christoph; Oeh, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is claimed to contribute to human health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and the Balkan Syndrome. Quantitative radiation dose is required to estimate the health risk of DU materials. The influences of the solubility parameters in the human alimentary tract and the respiratory tract systems and the aerosol particles size on the radiation dose of DU materials were evaluated. The dose conversion factor of daily urinary excretion of DU is provided. The retention and excretion of DU in the human body after a contamination at a wound site were predicted. Dose coefficients of DU after ingestion and inhalation were calculated using the solubility parameters of the DU corrosion products in simulated gastric and simulated lung fluid, which were determined in the Helmholtz Zentrum München. (238)U is the main radiation dose contributor per 1 Bq of DU materials. The dose coefficients of DU materials were estimated to be 3.5 x 10(-8) and 2.1 x 10(-6) Sv Bq(-1) after ingestion and inhalation for members of the public. The ingestion dose coefficient of DU materials is about 75% of the natural uranium value. The inhalation dose coefficient of DU material is in between those for Type M and Type S according to the category for inhaled materials defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Radiation dose possibly received from DU materials can directly be estimated by using the dose conversion factor provided in this study, if daily urinary excretion of DU is measured.

  17. Radiation dose detection by imaging response in biological targets.

    PubMed

    Jakob, B; Durante, M

    2012-04-01

    Imaging was one of the earliest techniques to quantify radiation dose. While films and active fluorescent detectors are still commonly used in physical dosimetry, biological imaging is emerging as a new method to visualize and quantify radiation dose in biological targets. Methods for biological imaging are normally based on molecular fluorescent probes, labeling chromatin-conjugated molecules or specific repair proteins. Examples are chromatin-binding coumarin compounds, which become fluorescent under irradiation, or the H2AX histone, which is rapidly phosphorylated at sites of DNA double-strand breaks and can be visualized by immunostaining. Many other DNA repair proteins can be expressed with fluorescent targets, such as green fluorescent protein, thus becoming visible for dose estimation in vivo. The possibility to visualize radiation damage in living biological targets is particularly important for repair kinetic studies, for estimating individual radiation response, and for remote control of living samples exposed to radiation, for instance in robotic space missions. In vivo dose monitoring in particle therapy exploits the production of positron emitters by nuclear interaction of the incident beam in the patient's body. Positron emission tomography (PET) can then be used to visualize and quantify the particle dose in the patient, and it can in principle also be used for radiotherapy with high-energy X rays. Alternatively, prompt γ rays or scattered secondary particles are under study for in vivo dosimetry of ion beams in therapy.

  18. Radiation dose reduction in the invasive cardiovascular laboratory: implementing a culture and philosophy of radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Mathew, Verghese; Lennon, Ryan; Bell, Malcolm R; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S

    2012-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sustained practice and x-ray system technical changes on the radiation dose administered to adult patients during invasive cardiovascular procedures. It is desirable to reduce radiation dose associated with medical imaging to minimize the risk of adverse radiation effects to both patients and staff. Several clinical practice and technical changes to elevate radiation awareness and reduce patient radiation dose were implemented under the guidance of a cardiovascular invasive labs radiation safety committee. Practice changes included: intraprocedure radiation dose announcements; reporting of procedures for which the air-kerma exceeded 6,000 mGy, including procedure air-kerma in the clinical report; and establishing compulsory radiation safety training for fellows. Technical changes included establishing standard x-ray imaging protocols, increased use of x-ray beam spectral filters, reducing the detector target dose for fluoroscopy and acquisition imaging, and reducing the fluoroscopy frame rate to 7.5 s(-1). Patient- and procedure-specific cumulative skin dose was calculated from air-kerma values and evaluated retrospectively over a period of 3 years. Data were categorized to include all procedures, percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary angiography, noncardiac vascular angiography and interventions, and interventions to treat structural heart disease. Statistical analysis was based on a comparison of the cumulative skin dose for procedures performed during the first and last quarters of the 3-year study period. A total of 18,115 procedures were performed by 27 staff cardiologists and 65 fellows-in-training. Considering all procedures, the mean cumulative skin dose decreased from 969 to 568 mGy (40% reduction) over 3 years. This work demonstrates that a philosophy of radiation safety, implemented through a collection of sustained practice and x-ray system changes, can result in a significant decrease in the radiation dose

  19. Head and Neck Radiation Dose and Radiation Safety for Interventional Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth; Schueler, Beth; Grams, Michael; Sturchio, Glenn; Bell, Malcolm; Gulati, Rajiv

    2017-03-13

    The first aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation dose to tissues of the head and neck of physicians performing x-ray-guided interventional procedures. The second aim was to assess protection of tissues of the head offered by select wearable radiation safety devices. Radiation dose to tissues of the head and neck is of significant interest to practicing interventional physicians. However, methods to estimate radiation dose are not generally available, and furthermore, some of the available research relating to protection of these tissues is misleading. Using a single representative geometry, scatter radiation dose to a humanoid phantom was measured using radiochromic film and normalized by the radiation dose to the left collar of the radioprotective thorax apron. Radiation protection offered by leaded glasses and by a radioabsorbent surgical cap was measured. In the test geometry, average radiation doses to the unprotected brain, carotid arteries, and ocular lenses were 8.4%, 17%, and 50% of the dose measured at the left collar, respectively. Two representative types of leaded glasses reduced dose to the ocular lens on the side of the physician from which the scatter originates by 27% to 62% but offered no protection to the contralateral eye. The radioabsorbent surgical cap reduced brain dose by only 3.3%. A method by which interventional physicians can estimate dose to head and neck tissues on the basis of their personal dosimeter readings is described. Radiation protection of the ocular lenses by leaded glasses may be incomplete, and protection of the brain by a radioabsorbent surgical cap was minimal. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of radiation dose in cerebral CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Fukutomi, Yukimi; Oomoto, Kenji; Murase, Kenya; Miki, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate radiation dose in cerebral perfusion studies with a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner on various voltage and current settings by using a human head phantom. Following the CT perfusion study protocol, continuous cine scans (1 sec/rotation x60 sec) consisting of four 5-mm-thick contiguous slices were performed three times at variable tube voltages of 80 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV with the same tube current setting of 200 mA and on variable current settings of 50 mA, 100 mA, 150 mA, and 200 mA with the same tube voltage of 80 kV. Radiation doses were measured using a total of 41 theroluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed in the human head phantom. Thirty-six TLDs were inside and three were on the surface of the slice of the X-ray beam center, and two were placed on the surface 3 cm caudal assuming the lens position. Average radiation doses of surface, inside, and lens increased in proportion to the increases of tube voltage and tube current. The lowest inside dose was 87.6+/-15.3 mGy, and the lowest surface dose was 162.5+/-6.7 mGy at settings of 80 kV and 50 mA. The highest inside dose was 1,591.5+/-179.7 mGy, and the highest surface dose was 2,264.6+/-123.7 mGy at 140 kV-200 mA. At 80 kV-50 mA, the average radiation dose of lens was the lowest at 5.5+/-0.0 mGy. At 140 kV-200 mA the radiation dose of lens was the highest at 127.2+/-0.6 mGy. In cerebral CT perfusion study, radiation dose can vary considerably. Awareness of the patient's radiation dose is recommended.

  1. Photon: the minimum dose of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntola, Tuomo

    2005-08-01

    A radio engineer can hardly think about smaller amount of electromagnetic radiation than given by a single oscillation cycle of a unit charge in a dipole. When solved from Maxwell's equations for a dipole of one wavelength, the energy of the emitted radiation cycle obtains the form Eλ = 2/3 hf, where the Planck constant h can be expressed in terms of the unit charge, e, the vacuum permeability, μ0, the velocity of light, c, and a numerical factor as h = 1.1049*2π3e2μ0c=6.62607*10-34 [kgm2/s]. A point emitter like an atom can be regarded as a dipole in the fourth dimension. The length of such dipole is measured in the direction of the line element cdt, which in one oscillation cycle means the length of one wavelength. For a dipole in the fourth dimension, three space directions are in the normal plane which eliminates the factor 2/3 from the energy expression thus leading to Planck's equation Eλ = hf for the radiation emitted by a single electron transition in an atom. The expression of the Planck constant obtained from Maxwell's equations leads to a purely numerical expression of the fine structure constant α=1/(1.1049*4π3) = 1/137 and shows that the Planck constant is directly proportional to the velocity of light. When applied to Balmer's formula, the linkage of the Planck constant to the velocity of light shows, that the frequency of an atomic oscillator is directly proportional to the velocity of light. This implies that the velocity of light is observed as constant in local measurements. Such an interpretation makes it possible to convert relativistic spacetime with variable time coordinates into space with variable clock frequencies in universal time, and thus include relativistic phenomena in the framework of quantum mechanics.

  2. Radiation Dose Testing on Juno High Voltage Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Kirkham, Harold; Kim, Wousik; McAlpine, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter will have a highly elliptical orbit taking the spacecraft through the radiation belts surrounding the planet. During these passes through the radiation belts, the spacecraft will be subject to high doses of radiation from energetic electrons and protons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 1 GeV. While shielding within the spacecraft main body will reduce the total absorbed dose to much of the spacecraft electronics, instruments and cables on the outside of the spacecraft will receive much higher levels of absorbed dose. In order to estimate the amount of degradation to two such cables, testing has been performed on two coaxial cables intended to provide high voltages to three of the instruments on Juno. Both cables were placed in a vacuum of 5x10-6 torr and cooled to -50 C prior to exposure to the radiation sources. Measurements of the coaxial capacitance per unit length and partial discharge noise floor indicate that increasing levels of radiation make measurable but acceptably small changes to the F EP Teflon utilized in the construction of these cables. In addition to the radiation dose testing, observations were made on the internal electrostatic charging characteristics of these cables and multiple discharges were recorded.

  3. Radiation Dose Testing on Juno High Voltage Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Kirkham, Harold; Kim, Wousik; McAlpine, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter will have a highly elliptical orbit taking the spacecraft through the radiation belts surrounding the planet. During these passes through the radiation belts, the spacecraft will be subject to high doses of radiation from energetic electrons and protons with energies ranging from 10 keV to 1 GeV. While shielding within the spacecraft main body will reduce the total absorbed dose to much of the spacecraft electronics, instruments and cables on the outside of the spacecraft will receive much higher levels of absorbed dose. In order to estimate the amount of degradation to two such cables, testing has been performed on two coaxial cables intended to provide high voltages to three of the instruments on Juno. Both cables were placed in a vacuum of 5x10(exp -6) torr and cooled to -50(deg)C prior to exposure to the radiation sources. Measurements of the coaxial capacitance per unit length and partial discharge noise floor indicate that increasing levels of radiation make measurable but acceptably small changes to the F EP Teflon utilized in the construction of these cables. In addition to the radiation dose testing, observations were made on the internal electrostatic charging characteristics of these cables and multiple discharges were recorded.

  4. Do changes in biomarkers from space radiation reflect dose or risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A.

    . Following low-LET radiation exposure, the biological response often does not increase as a linear function of dose. Thus, the RBE and the subsequent risk predicted is dependent on the dose where the two radiation types are compared. To avoid this problem the standard procedure is to use the dose and dose-rate response and compare the linear components of the two r diation exposures. Important riska comparisons are often done at very low doses, where the reference radiation may either increase or decrease as a function of dose. Since the low-LET exposure often does not produce a significant change above the background level of damage, the derived RBE factors can become very large.Studies using micronuclei as biomarkers following exposure to mono-energetic neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays delivered at very low doses (up to 0.10 Gy) demonstrated the differences in the shape of each dose-response relationship and the problems associated with the RBE. These studies show that RBE may not accurately reflect the hazards or risk associated with space radiation exposure. As additional measures of biological change are developed, it may become possible to base risk on biological change and not on changes in radiation doses. Research funded through grants # DE-FG03-99ER62787 from DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research and RO1 CA74053-01 from NIH/NASA to Washington State University Tri-Cities.

  5. A standard dose of radiation for microscopic disease is not appropriate

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, L.B. )

    1990-12-15

    Elective irradiation of sites of potential occult tumor spread is often part of a patient's radiation therapy program. The required radiation dose (D) depends on the probability that occult disease exists (P(occ)), the number of sites at risk (A), the number of tumor clonogens present (Ni), their radiation sensitivity, and the desired control rate. An exponential model of cell survival is used to quantify the importance of these factors. Control Probability = (1 - Pocc x (1 - e-Ni x (SF2)D/2))A; SF2 = surviving fraction after 2 Gy. Implications for clinical radiation therapy include: 1. Since the number of clonogens in an occult site may vary from 10 degrees to 10(8), Ni is the major determinant of the required dose. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of the clonogens (SF2) is also extremely important in determining the dose. Other factors are less influential since they vary less. 2. The variability of Ni (8 logs) is larger than the variation in cell number seen with gross disease (1 cm3 versus 1000 cm3, 3 logs). When Ni approximately 10(8), the required dose approaches that needed for small volume gross disease (10(9) cells, 1 cm3). 3. The dose prescribed to elective sites should reflect the risk of occult disease based on the primary tumor site, stage, and grade. 4. Regions where clinicoradiologic evaluation is difficult (e.g., pelvis and obese neck) require higher doses because macroscopic tumor deposits may exist. 5. Relatively low doses (10 to 30 Gy) are often thought to be inadequate for microscopic tumor. However, similar doses have been reported to sterilize microscopic tumor in ovarian, rectal, bladder, breast, and head and neck carcinomas. Relatively low doses should not be discounted since they may be useful in select cases when normal tissue tolerances and/or previous irradiation treatment limit the radiation dose.

  6. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-27

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications.

  7. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications. PMID:28134809

  8. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2011-09-19

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  9. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  10. Analysis of Radiation Impact on White Mice through Radiation Dose Mapping in Medical Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutikno, Madnasri; Susilo; Arya Wijayanti, Riza

    2016-08-01

    A study about X-ray radiation impact on the white mice through radiation dose mapping in Medical Physic Laboratory is already done. The purpose of this research is to determine the minimum distance of radiologist to X-ray instrument through treatment on the white mice. The radiation exposure doses are measured on the some points in the distance from radiation source between 30 cm up to 80 with interval of 30 cm. The impact of radiation exposure on the white mice and the effects of radiation measurement in different directions are investigated. It is founded that minimum distance of radiation worker to radiation source is 180 cm and X-ray has decreased leukocyte number and haemoglobin and has increased thrombocyte number in the blood of white mice.

  11. Equivalent dose and effective dose from stray radiation during passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phillip; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Jordan, Thomas; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-03-01

    Proton therapy reduces the integral therapeutic dose required for local control in prostate patients compared to intensity-modulated radiotherapy. One proposed benefit of this reduction is an associated decrease in the incidence of radiogenic secondary cancers. However, patients are also exposed to stray radiation during the course of treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify the stray radiation dose received by patients during proton therapy for prostate cancer. Using a Monte Carlo model of a proton therapy nozzle and a computerized anthropomorphic phantom, we determined that the effective dose from stray radiation per therapeutic dose (E/D) for a typical prostate patient was approximately 5.5 mSv Gy-1. Sensitivity analysis revealed that E/D varied by ±30% over the interval of treatment parameter values used for proton therapy of the prostate. Equivalent doses per therapeutic dose (HT/D) in specific organs at risk were found to decrease with distance from the isocenter, with a maximum of 12 mSv Gy-1 in the organ closest to the treatment volume (bladder) and 1.9 mSv Gy-1 in the furthest (esophagus). Neutrons created in the nozzle predominated effective dose, though neutrons created in the patient contributed substantially to the equivalent dose in organs near the proton field. Photons contributed less than 15% to equivalent doses.

  12. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with [sup 144]Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to [sup 60]Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  13. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ``paints`` to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with {sup 144}Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to {sup 60}Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  14. Protracted low-dose radiation priming and response of liver to acute gamma and proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Mao, X W; Cao, J D; Bayeta, E J M; Pecaut, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated liver from C57BL/6 mice irradiated with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays (0.01 Gy, 0.03 cGy/h), with and without subsequent exposure to acute 2 Gy gamma or proton radiation. Analyses were performed on day 56 post-exposure. Expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes were strikingly different among irradiated groups compared with 0 Gy (p < 0.05). Two genes were affected in the Gamma group, whereas 10 were modified in the LDR + Gamma group. In Proton and LDR + Proton groups, there were six and 12 affected genes, respectively. Expression of genes in the Gamma (Traf3) and Proton (Bak1, Birc2, Birc3, Mcl1) groups was no longer different from 0 Gy control group when mice were pre-exposed to LDR γ-rays. When each combined regimen was compared with the corresponding group that received acute radiation alone, two genes in the LDR + Gamma group and 17 genes in the LDR + Proton group were modified; greatest effect was on Birc2 and Nol3 (> 5-fold up-regulated by LDR + Protons). Oxygen radical production in livers from the LDR + Proton group was higher in LDR, Gamma, and LDR + Gamma groups (p < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy), but there were no differences in phagocytosis of E. coli. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) suggested more inflammation, with and without necrosis, in some irradiated groups. The data demonstrate that response to acute radiation is dependent on radiation quality and regimen and that some LDR γ-ray-induced modifications in liver response were still evident nearly 2 months after exposure.

  15. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  16. Radiation dose to personnel during percutaneous renal calculus removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.H.; Jones, D.; Brannen, G.E.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation dose to the radiologist and other personnel was measured during 102 procedures for percutaneous removal of renal calculi from the upper collecting system. A mobile C-arm image intensifier was used to guide entrance to the kidney and stone removal. Average fluoroscopy time was 25 min. Exposure to personnel was monitored by quartz-fiber dosimeters at the collar level above the lead apron. Average radiation dose to the radiologist was 10 mrem (0.10 mSv) per case; to the surgical nurse, 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per case; to the radiologic technologist, 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per case; and to the anesthesiologist, 3 mrem (0.03 mSv) per case. Radiation dose to the uroradiologic team during percutaneous nephrostolithotomy is similar to that from other interventional fluoroscopic procedures and is within acceptable limits for both physicians and assisting personnel.

  17. A molecular fraction method for measuring personnel radiation doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, M. A.; Khalil, W. A.; Krodja, R. P.; Sheta, N.; Abd El-Baset, M. S.

    1987-02-01

    This work represents a development in fast and albedo neutron and gamma ray dosimetry, using cellulose nitrate, as a tissue equivalent material, in which radiation damage was registered. The changes in molecular fractions of the polymer were measured after irradiation with neutron fluences from a 252Cf source in the range 10 5-10 10 n/cm 2 and gamma doses in the range 10 -4-10 -1 Gy through the use of gel filtration chromatography. Effects of irradiation on phantom, phantom to dosimeter distance, phantom thickness and storage at extreme environmental conditions were studied on the detector response and readout. The results showed that main chain scission followed by formation of new molecular configurations is the predominant effect of radiation on the polymer. The method enables measurements of neutron fluences and gamma doses in mixed radiation fields. Empirical formulae for calculating the absorbed dose from the measured changes in molecular fraction intensities are given.

  18. Radiation dose and radiation protection principle awareness: a survey among Nigerian paediatricians.

    PubMed

    Famurewa, O C; Obiajunwa, P O; Elusiyan, J B; Ibitoye, B O

    2014-03-01

    This study is aimed at determining the knowledge of Paediatricians in Nigeria about the basic principle of radiation protection ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) and their knowledge of the radiation doses that children receive during some common radiological procedures. Two hundred and fifty questionnaires were circulated among paediatricians at the 2012 annual Paediatricians' Association of Nigeria Conference. The questionnaires contain 10 questions designed to asses the pediatricians' general knowledge on : ionising radiation and the risks, doses children receive during some common radiological procedures and awareness of the radiation protection principle, ALARA ( As Low As Reasonably Achievable). Of the 162 Paediatricians that participated, 69% named at least one non medical source of ionising radiation, 54.9% would not recommend CXR to screen an apparently healthy child for tuberculosis and 87% believe that children are at greater risk of adverse effects of ionising radiation. For dose estimation, 51.9% and 51.2% of the paediatricians underestimated doses received during Cranial and abdominal computerised tomography respectively while 13.6% and 37% respectively erroneously believed that abdominal ultrasound and brain magnetic resonance imaging utilise ionising radiation. 13.6% gave the correct meaning of the Acronym ALARA. The Paediatricians' knowledge about the basic principle of radiation protection ALARA and the doses that children receive during some common radiological procedures is poor. There is need to ensure adequate training on radiation hazards and protection at all levels of medical education.

  19. Radiation as an immunological adjuvant: current evidence on dose and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation to a cancer site has the ability to convert the irradiated tumor in an immunogenic hub. However, radiation is a complex modifier of the tumor microenvironment and, by itself, is seldom sufficient to induce a therapeutically significant anti-tumor immune response, since it can also activate immune suppressive pathways. While several combinations of local radiation and immunotherapy have been shown in pre-clinical models to induce powerful anti-tumor immunity, the optimal strategy to achieve this effect remains to be defined. When used in vivo, radiation effects on tumors depend on the dose per fraction applied, the number of fractions used, and the total dose. Moreover, the interplay of these three variables is contingent upon the tumor setting studied, both in pre-clinical and clinical applications. To enable repair of the collateral damage to the normal tissue, radiation is usually given in multiple fractions, usually of 2 Gy. Generally, the use of larger fractions is limited to stereotactic applications, whereby optimal immobilization reduces inter- and intrafraction movement and permits a very conformal delivery of dose to the target, with optimal exclusion of normal tissue. Translation of the partnership of radiation and immunotherapy to the clinic requires a careful consideration of the radiation regimens used. To date, little is known on whether different dose/fractionation regimens have a specific impact on the anti-tumor immune response. Most experiments combining the two modalities were conducted with single fractions of radiotherapy. However, there is at least some evidencethat when combined with some specific immunotherapy approaches, the ability of radiation to promote anti-tumor immunity is dependent on the dose and fractionation employed. We critically review the available in vitro and in vivo data on this subject and discuss the potential impact of fractionation on the ability of radiation to synergize with immunotherapy.

  20. Radiation as an immunological adjuvant: current evidence on dose and fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation to a cancer site has the ability to convert the irradiated tumor in an immunogenic hub. However, radiation is a complex modifier of the tumor microenvironment and, by itself, is seldom sufficient to induce a therapeutically significant anti-tumor immune response, since it can also activate immune suppressive pathways. While several combinations of local radiation and immunotherapy have been shown in pre-clinical models to induce powerful anti-tumor immunity, the optimal strategy to achieve this effect remains to be defined. When used in vivo, radiation effects on tumors depend on the dose per fraction applied, the number of fractions used, and the total dose. Moreover, the interplay of these three variables is contingent upon the tumor setting studied, both in pre-clinical and clinical applications. To enable repair of the collateral damage to the normal tissue, radiation is usually given in multiple fractions, usually of 2 Gy. Generally, the use of larger fractions is limited to stereotactic applications, whereby optimal immobilization reduces inter- and intrafraction movement and permits a very conformal delivery of dose to the target, with optimal exclusion of normal tissue. Translation of the partnership of radiation and immunotherapy to the clinic requires a careful consideration of the radiation regimens used. To date, little is known on whether different dose/fractionation regimens have a specific impact on the anti-tumor immune response. Most experiments combining the two modalities were conducted with single fractions of radiotherapy. However, there is at least some evidencethat when combined with some specific immunotherapy approaches, the ability of radiation to promote anti-tumor immunity is dependent on the dose and fractionation employed. We critically review the available in vitro and in vivo data on this subject and discuss the potential impact of fractionation on the ability of radiation to synergize with immunotherapy. PMID

  1. Study of UV radiation dose received by the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gurrea, Gonzalo; Cañada, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Excess exposure to UV radiation can affect our health by causing sunburn, skin cancer, etc. It is therefore useful to determine the UV dosage received by people as a way of protecting them from the possible negative effects that this kind of radiation can cause. In this work, the personal outdoor percentage, which shows the time spent in outdoor activities, as well as personal UV doses, has been calculated by means of global UV radiation on a horizontal plane. A database of average daily UVB radiation on the horizontal plane given by the National Institute of Meteorology has been used. In this work we evaluate the standard erythema dose of the Spanish population throughout the year.

  2. Radiation Dose and Safety in Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Thomas C; Kantor, Birgit; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis As a result of the changes in utilization of imaging procedures that rely on ionizing radiation, the collective dose has increased by over 700% and the annual per-capita dose, by almost 600% over recent years. It is certainly possible that this growing use may have significant effects on public health. Although there are uncertainties related to the accuracy of calculated radiation exposure and the estimated biologic risk, there are measures that can be taken to reduce any potential risks while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. This article will review the existing data regarding biological hazards of radiation exposure associated to medical diagnostic testing, the methodology used to estimate radiation exposure and the measures that can be taken to effectively reduce it. PMID:19766923

  3. Radiation dose in 320-slice multidetector cardiac CT: a single center experience of evolving dose minimization.

    PubMed

    Tung, Matthew K; Cameron, James D; Casan, Joshua M; Crossett, Marcus; Troupis, John M; Meredith, Ian T; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2013-01-01

    Minimization of radiation exposure remains an important subject that occurs in parallel with advances in scanner technology. We report our experience of evolving radiation dose and its determinants after the introduction of 320-multidetector row cardiac CT within a single tertiary cardiology referral service. Four cohorts of consecutive patients (total 525 scans), who underwent cardiac CT at defined time points as early as 2008, are described. These include a cohort just after scanner installation, after 2 upgrades of the operating system, and after introduction of an adaptive iterative image reconstruction algorithm. The proportions of nondiagnostic coronary artery segments and studies with nondiagnostic segments were compared between cohorts. Significant reductions were observed in median radiation doses in all cohorts compared with the initial cohort (P < .001). Median dose-length product fell from 944 mGy · cm (interquartile range [IQR], 567.3-1426.5 mGy · cm) to 156 mGy · cm (IQR, 99.2-265.0 mGy · cm). Although the proportion of prospectively triggered scans has increased, reductions in radiation dose have occurred independently of distribution of scan formats. In multiple regression that combined all groups, determinants of dose-length product were tube output, the number of cardiac cycles scanned, tube voltage, scan length, scan format, body mass index, phase width, and heart rate (adjusted R(2) = 0.85, P < .001). The proportion of nondiagnostic coronary artery segments was slightly increased in group 4 (2.9%; P < .01). While maintaining diagnostic quality in 320-multidetector row cardiac CT, the radiation dose has decreased substantially because of a combination of dose-reduction protocols and technical improvements. Continued minimization of radiation dose will increase the potential for cardiac CT to expand as a cardiac imaging modality. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  5. Radiation Dose Reduction Efficiency of Buildings after the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55±0.04, 0.15±0.02, and 0.19±0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites. PMID:24999992

  6. Radiation Dose from Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesse G.A; Mills, Christopher N.; Mogensen, Monique A.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. Methods We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. Results The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Conclusion Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure. PMID:22900113

  7. Radiation dose from medical imaging: a primer for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jesse G A; Mills, Christopher N; Mogensen, Monique A; Lee, Christoph I

    2012-05-01

    Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  8. Changes in biomarkers from space radiation may reflect dose not risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Antone L.; Lei, Xingye C.; Rithidech, Kanokporn

    This presentation evaluates differences between radiation biomarkers of dose and risk and demonstrates the consequential problems associated with using biomarkers to do risk calculations following radiation exposures to the complex radiation environment found in deep space. Dose is a physical quantity, while risk is a biological quantity. Dose does not predict risk. This manuscript discusses species sensitivity factors, tissue weighting factors, and radiation quality factors derived from relative biological effectiveness (RBE). These factors are used to modify dose to make it a better predictor of risk. At low doses, where it is not possible to measure changes in risk, biomarkers have been used incorrectly as an intermediate step in predicting risk. Examples of biomarkers that do not predict risk are reviewed. Species sensitivity factors were evaluated using the Syrian hamster and the Wistar rat. Although the frequency of chromosome damage is very similar in these two species, the Wistar rat is very sensitive to radiation-induced lung cancer while the Syrian hamster is very resistant. To illustrate problems involved in using tissue weighting factors, rat trachea and deep lung tissues were compared. The similar level of chromosome damage observed in these two tissues would predict that the risk for cancer induction would be the same. However, even though large numbers of deep lung tumors result from inhaled radon, under the same exposure conditions there has never been a tracheal tumor observed. Finally, the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) used to generate "quality factors" that convert exposure and dose from different types of radiation to a single measure of risk, is discussed. Important risk comparisons are done at very low doses, where the response to the reference radiation has been shown to either increase or decrease as a function of dose. Thus, the RBE and the subsequent risk predicted is more dependent on the background response of the endpoint and

  9. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in parasinus CT by spectral shaping.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias S; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael M; Sedlmair, Martin; Allmendinger, Thomas; Uder, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Spectral shaping aims to narrow the X-ray spectrum of clinical CT. The aim of this study was to determine the image quality and the extent of radiation dose reduction that can be achieved by tin prefiltration for parasinus CT. All scans were performed with a third generation dual-source CT scanner. A study protocol was designed using 100 kV tube voltage with tin prefiltration (200 mAs) that provides image noise levels comparable to a low-dose reference protocol using 100 kV without spectral shaping (25 mAs). One hundred consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to the study or control group. All patients signed written informed consent. The study protocol was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and applies to the HIPAA. Subjective and objective image quality (attenuation values, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) were assessed. Radiation exposure was assessed as volumetric CT dose index, and effective dose was estimated. Mann-Whitney U test was performed for radiation exposure and for image noise comparison. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Image noise in air, in the retrobulbar fat, and in the eye globe was comparable between both groups (all p > 0.05). CNReye globe/air did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.7). Radiation exposure (1.7 vs. 2.1 mGy, p < 0.01) and effective dose (0.055 vs. 0.066 mSv, p < 0.01) were significantly reduced in the study group. Radiation dose can be further reduced by 17% for low-dose parasinus CT by tin prefiltration maintaining diagnostic image quality.

  11. Radiation dose required for the vulcanization of natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, M. E.; Dafader, N. C.; Akhtar, F.; Ahmad, M. U.

    1996-10-01

    The radiation dose required for the vulcanization of natural rubber latex was optimized. To enhance the crosslinking, several sensitizers were used. Among the sensitizers, n-butyl acrylate ( n-BA) alone was found to be the best one. The effects of concentration of n-Ba, mixing and standing time of latex with n-BA on the tensile properties of latex film were investigated. 12 kGy radiation dose, 5 phr n-BA and 30-40 min of mixing time were found to be the optimum conditions for irradiation.

  12. Justification of permissible doses of radiation during prolonged space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryev, Y. G.; Abel, K.; Varteres, V.; Nilolov, N.; Karpfel, Z.; Prislichka, M.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible radiation doses for astronauts are reported based on chronic radiation experiments with dogs and actual measurements during space flights. Observed were clinical conditions, peripheral blood and marrow, the state of the cardiovascular system, higher nervous activity, the state of the vestibular analyzer, the organ of vision, spermatogenic function and the ability to reproduce, the state of immunity and a number of biological indices in blood and tissues. The following maximum permissible doses are determined as preliminary values: 1 year of flight - 200 rem; 2 years of flight - 250 rem; 3 years of flight - 275 rem.

  13. Space Radiation Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Human Phantom Torso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Yang, T.; Atwell, W.

    2000-01-01

    The flight of a human phantom torso with head that containing active dosimeters at 5 organ sites and 1400 TLDs distributed in 34 1" thick sections is described. Experimental dose rates and quality factors are compared with calculations for shielding distributions at the sites using the Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model. The measurements were complemented with those obtained from other instruments. These results have provided the most comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human and to assess the accuracy of radiation transport models and astronaut radiation risk.

  14. Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  15. Cell-oriented alternatives to dose, quality factor, and dose equivalent for low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the tissue cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) to different radiations and normalizing to equal numbers of responses produced by each radiation should define its radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose equivalent, both of which are confounded when applied to low-level irradiations. Similar cell response probability functions calculated from different experimental data are presented.

  16. Cell-oriented alternatives to dose, quality factor, and dose equivalent for low-level radiation.

    PubMed

    Sondhaus, C A; Bond, V P; Feinendegen, L E

    1990-07-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the tissue cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) to different radiations and normalizing to equal numbers of responses produced by each radiation should define its radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose equivalent, both of which are confounded when applied to low-level irradiations. Similar cell response probability functions calculated from different experimental data are presented.

  17. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Yang Jee; Ha, Sung Whan; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts. PMID:26633443

  18. A comparison of depth dependence of dose and linear energy transfer spectra in aluminum and polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    A set of four tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), with their detector heads at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 7 and 9-inch-diameter aluminum spheres, were flown on Shuttle flight STS-89. Five such detectors at the centers of polyethylene spheres were flown 1 year earlier on STS-81. The results of dose-depth dependence for the two materials convincingly show the merits of using material rich in hydrogen to decrease the radiation exposure to the crew. A comparison of the calculated galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates using the radiation transport code HZETRN with nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 and the measured GCR absorbed dose rates and dose-equivalent rates shows that they agree within root mean square (rms) error of 12.5 and 8.2%, respectively. However, there are significant depth-dependent differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. A comparison for trapped protons using the proton transport code BRYNTRN and the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model shows a systematic bias, with the model underpredicting dose and dose-equivalent rates. These results show the need for improvements in the radiation transport and/or fragmentation models.

  19. A comparison of depth dependence of dose and linear energy transfer spectra in aluminum and polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    A set of four tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), with their detector heads at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 7 and 9-inch-diameter aluminum spheres, were flown on Shuttle flight STS-89. Five such detectors at the centers of polyethylene spheres were flown 1 year earlier on STS-81. The results of dose-depth dependence for the two materials convincingly show the merits of using material rich in hydrogen to decrease the radiation exposure to the crew. A comparison of the calculated galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates using the radiation transport code HZETRN with nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 and the measured GCR absorbed dose rates and dose-equivalent rates shows that they agree within root mean square (rms) error of 12.5 and 8.2%, respectively. However, there are significant depth-dependent differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. A comparison for trapped protons using the proton transport code BRYNTRN and the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model shows a systematic bias, with the model underpredicting dose and dose-equivalent rates. These results show the need for improvements in the radiation transport and/or fragmentation models.

  20. Occupational radiation dose estimation for Finnish aircraft cabin attendants.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Katja; Aspholm, Rafael; Auvinen, Anssi

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for assessing dose radiation on the basis of individual flight history and to estimate whether this method is applicable for cabin attendants without flight log data. Questionnaire data were collected to determine attendants' flight history covering up to three decades. Finnair timetables and an expert panel of pilots were used to determine one to four representative flights in five route categories. The cumulative career and annual doses were calculated on the basis of the flight histories and route-specific exposure data. Questionnaire data were obtained from 544 flight attendants. The mean number of active workyears was 10.5 (range 0-30) years, and the mean cosmic radiation dose was 3.2 (range 0-9.5) mSv per active workyear. The mean cumulative career dose for all the cabin attendants was 34.0 (range 0-156.8) mSv. If no flight log data are available, survey data are needed for individual dose estimation when possible radiation effects on cabin crew are evaluated in epidemiologic studies. This method provides a crude procedure for assessing cosmic radiation exposure among attendants when survey data are missing.

  1. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Schaetzing, R

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment.

  2. Impact of physician practice on patient radiation dose during CT guided biopsy procedures.

    PubMed

    Weir, Victor J; Zhang, Jie; Bruner, Angela P

    2014-01-01

    Patient radiation dose during Computed Tomography (CT) guided biopsy procedures is determined by both acquisition technical parameters and physician practice. The potential effect of the physician practice is of concern. This study is to investigate the effects of those intangibles on patient radiation dose. Patient radiation dose from 252 patients who underwent CT guided biopsy from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. Ten physicians who used conventional intermittent shots, low mA dose saving feature, or both were included in the study. The patient dose reports were retrieved and the total dose length products (DLPs) were analyzed. Linear regression analysis performed between various variables and reported dose. Patient detriment index (PDI) was developed, which sets threshold (standard of practice) for comparing physician practice with their peers. Odds ratio was calculated to determine odds of a group of patients receiving dose above threshold when compared to another group. Median DLP among ten physicians was 1194 mGy-cm. There was a significant difference (p< 0.01) between reported DLPs doses when physicians used dose saving feature vs. when feature not used (539.8 ± 169.4 mGy-cm vs. 1269.7 ± 659.0 mGy-cm). In general, physicians who used dose saving feature had lower relative PDIs (< 1) compared to the PDIs (> 1) without the dose feature. Odds ratio estimate of 7.7 at 95% confidence level indicates that the odds of a group receiving a high dose depends on practitioner. Adjustments of practice habits, use of dose saving features or both may be needed to improve patient care for CT biopsy.

  3. Radiation dose to physicians’ eye lens during interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahruddin, N. A.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.; Bakar, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    The demand of interventional radiology has increased, leading to significant risk of radiation where eye lens dose assessment becomes a major concern. In this study, we investigate physicians' eye lens doses during interventional procedures. Measurement were made using TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) dosimeters and was recorded in equivalent dose at a depth of 0.07 mm, Hp(0.07). Annual Hp(0.07) and annual effective dose were estimated using workload estimation for a year and Von Boetticher algorithm. Our results showed the mean Hp(0.07) dose of 0.33 mSv and 0.20 mSv for left and right eye lens respectively. The highest estimated annual eye lens dose was 29.33 mSv per year, recorded on left eye lens during fistulogram procedure. Five physicians had exceeded 20 mSv dose limit as recommended by international commission of radiological protection (ICRP). It is suggested that frequent training and education on occupational radiation exposure are necessary to increase knowledge and awareness of the physicians’ thus reducing dose during the interventional procedure.

  4. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  5. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E. Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age {>=}18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function.

  6. Alanine Dosimetry Accurately Determines Radiation Dose in Nonhuman Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    b) utility of CIP in managing postirradiation infection related to bacterial translocation from the alimentary canal, and (c) side effects of...sequelae seen after these ra- diation doses and prior to death (and at post mortem) is infection , generally of an endog- enous origin arising from...promised situations, can result in opportu- nistic infections . Radiation dose selection Taken together, these data support the use of 6.5 Gy cobalt-60

  7. Dose-dependent microRNA expression in human fibroblasts after LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Olivier Charles; An, Jin; Wu, Honglu; Wang, Eugenia; Sarojini, Harshini

    Humans are exposed to various levels of radiation during spaceflight voyages. In cells, exposure to linear energy transfer (LET) radiation causes cellular damage and triggers responses controlled by unique gene-directed signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ( 22- nucleotide) non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression generally by either degrading the messager RNA or inhibiting translation. Their implication in specific cellular response pathways is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of radiation-dependent changes in miRNA expression patterns after low (0.1 Gy) and high (2.0 Gy) doses of X-ray exposure in human fibroblasts, and correlated their predicted targets with the cells' genomics and proteomics profiles. A differential miRNA expression pattern was observed between low and high doses of irradiation, with early (0.5 and 2 hrs) significant changes mostly after a high dose and, late (6 and 24 hrs) significant changes after both low and high doses of irradiation. The results suggest that miRNAs may act as ‘hub' regulators of signaling pathways initially to derepress their target genes for cellular responses such as DNA repair, followed by up-regulation to suppress apoptosis, and finally down-regulation to reestablish cellular normalcy. Functional attributions are made to key microRNAs, potentially regulating known radiation biomarkers as well as radiation-responsive mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, proliferation and apoptosis. In summary, radiation-responsive miRNAs may have functional roles in the regulation of cell death or survival, and may become biodosimeters for radiation dose exposure. Specific microRNAs may exert a hormetic effect after low-dose radiation, and prove useful in future applications for radiation adaptive therapy and in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. The confirmation of specific miRNAs as biodosimetry markers with therapeutic applications will be necessary in future functional

  8. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  9. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  10. Efficacy of high-pitch CT protocols for radiation dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Guberina, N; Lechel, U; Forsting, M; Ringelstein, A

    2016-12-01

    Various strategies have been developed to reduce radiation exposure of patients in CT examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high pitch in representative CT protocols examining lung embolism. We performed thermoluminescence measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom exposing it to CT algorithms for lung embolism in a 128-multislice, dual-source CT scanner: a standard CT protocol (sCT) and a CT protocol with a high pitch (+ F). Radiation doses for both CT algorithms were compared and the dose reduction potential of high pitch for individual organs was evaluated. As expected, the  +F mode reduced the effective dose and organ doses in the primary beam of radiation (namely, lung, bone marrow, heart, breast, skin and skeleton) compared with sCT by up to 52% for an equivalent image quality. On the contrary, for organs at the margin of the primary beam (thymus, thyroid, liver, pancreas, kidneys, colon and small intestine), the  +F mode reduced effective radiation doses by only 0-30%, compared with sCT. The dose reduction potential of the  +F mode greatly depends on the position of the organ in the scan field. While for organs in the primary beam  + F leads to a considerable dose reduction, it is less effective for tissues at the margin of the scanned area.

  11. Use of radiation protraction to escalate biologically effective dose to the treatment target

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, V. Y.; Spradlin, G. S.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate how simultaneously increasing fraction time and dose per fraction affect biologically effective dose for the target (BED{sub tar}) while biologically effective dose for the normal tissue (BED{sub nt}) is fixed. Methods: In this investigation, BED{sub tar} and BED{sub nt} were studied by assuming mono-exponential repair of sublethal damage with tissue dependent repair half-time. Results: Our results demonstrate that under certain conditions simultaneously increasing fraction time and dose per fraction result in increased BED{sub tar} while BED{sub nt} is fixed. The dependence of biologically effective dose on fraction time is influenced by the dose rate. In this investigation we analytically determined time-varying dose rate R-tilde which minimizes BED. Changes in BED with fraction time were compared for constant dose rate and for R-tilde. Conclusions: A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that slow delivery of radiation (known as radiation protraction) leads to reduced therapeutic effect because of increased repair of sublethal damage. In contrast, our analysis shows that under certain conditions simultaneously increasing fraction time and dose per fraction are radiobiologically advantageous.

  12. Dose build up correction for radiation monitors in high-energy bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Nair, Haridas G; Nayak, M K; Dev, Vipin; Thakkar, K K; Sarkar, P K; Sharma, D N

    2006-01-01

    Conventional radiation monitors have been found to underestimate the personal dose equivalent in the high-energy bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields encountered near electron storage rings. Depth-dose measurements in a water phantom were carried out with a radiation survey meter in the bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields from a 450 MeV electron storage ring to find out the magnitude of the underestimation. Dose equivalent indicated by the survey meter was found to build up with increase in thickness of water placed in front of the meter up to certain depth and then reduce with further increase in thickness. A dose equivalent build up factor was estimated from the measurements. An absorbed dose build up factor in a water phantom was also estimated from calculations performed using the Monte Carlo codes, EGS-4 and EGSnrc. The calculations are found to be in very good agreement with the measurements. The studies indicate inadequacy of commercially available radiation monitors for radiation monitoring within shielded enclosures and in streaming high-energy photon radiation fields from electron storage rings, and the need for proper correction for use in such radiation fields.

  13. Changing Attitude Toward Radiation Carcinogenesis and Prospects for Novel Low-Dose Radiation Treatments.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Welsh, James S

    2016-12-01

    All procedures involving ionizing radiation, whether diagnostic or therapeutic, are subject to strict regulation, and public concerns have been raised about even the low levels of radiation exposures involved in diagnostic imaging. During the last 2 decades, there are signs of more balanced attitude to ionizing radiation hazards, as opposed to the historical "radiophobia." The linear no-threshold hypothesis, based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans, is increasingly debated. In particular, the recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the linear no-threshold hypothesis predictions at low doses (that International Commission on Radiological Protection itself has used and continues to use) are "speculative, unproven, undetectable, and 'phantom'." Moreover, numerous experimental, ecological, and epidemiological studies suggest that low doses of ionizing radiation may actually be beneficial to human health. Although these advances in scientific understanding have not yet yielded significant changes in radiation regulation and policy, we are hopeful such changes may happen in the relatively near future. This article reviews the present status of the low-dose radiation hazard debate and outlines potential opportunities in the field of low-dose radiation therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Compelling Issues Compounding the Understanding of Low Dose Radiation Effects: But Do They Matter?

    PubMed

    Morgan, William F

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in low dose radiation research have raised a number of compelling issues that have compounded the understanding of low dose radiation effects. Here some of them are outlined: the linear no-threshold model for predicting effects at low radiation doses, dose rate effectiveness factor, attributability, and public perception of low dose radiation effects. The impact of changes in any of these hotly debated issues on radiation protection is considered.

  15. Detecting ionizing radiation with optical fibers down to biomedical doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; D'Avino, V.; Giorgini, A.; Pacelli, R.; Liuzzi, R.; Cella, L.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report on a passive ionizing radiation sensor based on a fiber-optic resonant cavity interrogated by a high resolution interferometric technique. After irradiation in clinical linear accelerators, we observe significant variations of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient. Exploiting this effect, we demonstrate an ultimate detection limit of 160 mGy with an interaction volume of only 6 × 10-4 mm3. Thanks to its reliability, compactness, and sensitivity at biomedical dose levels, our system lends itself to real applications in radiation therapy procedures as well as in radiation monitoring and protection in medicine, aerospace, and nuclear power plants.

  16. Ambient dose and dose rate measurements in the vicinity of Elekta Precise accelerators for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zutz, H; Hupe, O

    2014-12-01

    In radiation therapy, commercially available medical linear accelerators (LINACs) are used. At high primary beam energies in the 10-MeV range, the leakage dose of the accelerator head and the backscatter from the room walls, the air and the patient become more important. Therefore, radiation protection measurements of photon dose rates in the treatment room and in the maze are performed to quantify the radiation field. Since the radiation of the LINACs is usually pulsed with short radiation pulse durations in the microsecond range, there are problems with electronic dose (rate) meters commonly used in radiation protection. In this paper measurements with ionisation chambers are presented and electronic dosemeters are used for testing at selected positions. The measured time-averaged dose rate ranges from a few microsieverts per hour in the maze to some millisieverts per hour in the vicinity of the accelerator head and up to some sieverts per hour in the blanked primary beam and several hundred sieverts per hour in the direct primary beam.

  17. Assessment of radiation protection awareness and knowledge about radiological examination doses among Italian radiographers.

    PubMed

    Paolicchi, F; Miniati, F; Bastiani, L; Faggioni, L; Ciaramella, A; Creonti, I; Sottocornola, C; Dionisi, C; Caramella, D

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate radiation protection basic knowledge and dose assessment for radiological procedures among Italian radiographers A validated questionnaire was distributed to 780 participants with balanced demographic characteristics and geographic distribution. Only 12.1 % of participants attended radiation protection courses on a regular basis. Despite 90 % of radiographers stating to have sufficient awareness of radiation protection issues, most of them underestimated the radiation dose of almost all radiological procedures. About 5 % and 4 % of the participants, respectively, claimed that pelvis magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal ultrasound exposed patients to radiation. On the contrary, 7.0 % of the radiographers stated that mammography does not use ionising radiation. About half of participants believed that radiation-induced cancer is not dependent on age or gender and were not able to differentiate between deterministic and stochastic effects. Young radiographers (with less than 3 years of experience) showed a higher level of knowledge compared with the more experienced radiographers. There is a substantial need for radiographers to improve their awareness of radiation protection issues and their knowledge of radiological procedures. Specific actions such as regular training courses for both undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as for working radiographers must be considered in order to assure patient safety during radiological examinations. • Radiographers should improve their knowledge on radiation protection issues. • Only 12.1 % of participants attended radiation protection courses on a regular basis. • Specific actions must be considered in order to increase knowledge and awareness.

  18. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  19. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A.

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  20. Accelerated tests for bounding the low dose rate radiation response of lateral PNP bipolar junction transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, S.C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.; Schmidt, D.M.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Pease, R.L.; Coombs, W.E.; Suehle, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Low dose rate gain degradation of lateral pnp bipolar transistors can be simulated by accelerated irradiations performed at approximately 135 degrees C. Degradation enhancement is explained by temperature- dependent radiation-induced interface trap formation above the transistor`s base.

  1. Role of AKT and ERK pathways in controlling sensitivity to ionizing radiation and adaptive response induced by low-dose radiation in human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Sun; You, Ga Eun; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji Young; An, Sungkwan; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Lim, Young-Khi; Nam, Seon Young

    2015-12-01

    Despite many studies of the effect of ionizing radiation, biological mechanisms of action might differ greatly depend on dose, dose rate, and cell type. This study was performed to explore the effects of low- and high-dose radiation in human immune cell lines. We examined cell sensitivity after irradiation with 0.05, 0.1, or 2Gy in two normal cell lines and three tumor cell lines. Low-dose radiation of 0.05 and 0.1Gy had no effect on cell survival in any tested cell line, with the exception of IM-9 cells, whose viability was transiently increased. However, IM-9 and C1R-sB7 cells were very sensitive to high-dose radiation-induced cell death, whereas Jurkat and JM1 cells showed moderate sensitivity, and THP-1 cells were completely resistant. This radiosensitivity was correlated with basal AKT activation, which is induced by phosphorylation. In radiosensitive IM-9 cells, priming with chronic low-dose irradiation blocked cell death induced by high-dose radiation challenge via inhibition of caspase activation and PARP cleavage. AKT phosphorylation was not altered in IM-9 cells, but ERK phosphorylation was greatly elevated immediately after chronic low-dose irradiation. Taken together, our results suggest that the different responses of normal and tumor cells to low-dose and high-dose radiation depend on AKT activation, which is regulated by protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A). In radiosensitive normal cells lacking basal AKT activity, chronic low-dose radiation increases activation of the ERK pathway, which plays an important role in the adaptive response to radiation, providing a very important insight into understanding the effects of ionizing radiation on health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis

  3. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis

  4. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  5. Radiation effect in mouse skin: Dose fractionation and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Mou, X.D.; Fisher, D.R.; Taylor, J.M.; Withers, H.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Radiation induced dermal injury was measured by the gain in the physical strength of healing wounds in mouse skin. A sigmoid dose response for the inhibition of wound healing 14 days after surgery was found for single doses of X rays. The sparing of dermal damage from fractionation of the X-ray dose was quantified in terms of the alpha/beta ratio in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, at a wide range of doses per fraction reaching as low as about 1 Gy. The fit and the appropriateness of the LQ model for the skin wound healing assay was examined with the use of the Fe-plot in which inverse total dose is plotted versus dose per fraction for wound strength isoeffects. The alpha/beta ratio of the skin was about 2.5 Gy (95% confidence of less than +/- 1 Gy) and was appropriate over a dose range of 1 Gy to about 8 Gy. The low alpha/beta value is typical for a late responding tissue. This assay, therefore, has the advantage of measuring and forecasting late radiation responses of the dermis within a short time after irradiation.

  6. Radiation Doses and Associated Risk From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    The magnitude of dose due to the Fukushima Daiichi Accident was estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2013 report published in April 2014. Following this, the UNSCEAR white paper, which comprises a digest of new information for the 2013 Fukushima report, was published in October 2015. Another comprehensive report on radiation dose due to the accident is the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report on the Fukushima Daiichi Accident published in August 2015. Although the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications well summarize doses received by residents, they review only literature published before the end of December 2014 and the end of March 2015, respectively. However, some studies on dose estimation have been published since then. In addition, the UNSCEAR 2013 report states it was likely that some overestimation had been introduced generally by the methodology used by the Committee. For example, effects of decontamination were not considered in the lifetime external dose estimated. Decontamination is in progress for most living areas in Fukushima Prefecture, which could reduce long-term external dose to residents. This article mainly reviews recent English language articles that may add new information to the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications. Generally, recent articles suggest lower doses than those presented by the UNSCEAR 2013 report.

  7. Radiation doses in interventional radiology procedures: the RAD-IR study: part I: overall measures of dose.

    PubMed

    Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Cole, Patricia E; Lu, Hollington T; Schueler, Beth A; Geisinger, Michael; Berenstein, Alejandro; Albert, Robin; Georgia, Jeffrey D; Noonan, Patrick T; Cardella, John F; St George, James; Russell, Eric J; Malisch, Tim W; Vogelzang, Robert L; Miller, George L; Anderson, Jon

    2003-06-01

    To determine patient radiation doses for interventional radiology and neuroradiology procedures, to identify procedures associated with higher radiation doses, and to determine the effects of various parameters on patient doses. A prospective observational study was performed at seven academic medical centers. Each site contributed demographic and radiation dose data for subjects undergoing specific procedures in fluoroscopic suites equipped with built-in cumulative dose (CD) and dose-area-product (DAP) measurement capability compliant with International Electrotechnical Commission standard 60601-2-43. The accuracy of the dosimetry was confirmed by comprehensive measurements and by frequent consistency checks performed over the course of the study. Data were collected on 2,142 instances of interventional radiology procedures, 48 comprehensive physics evaluations, and 581 periodic consistency checks from the 12 fluoroscopic units in the study. There were wide variations in dose and statistically significant differences in fluoroscopy time, number of images, DAP, and CD for different instances of the same procedure, depending on the nature of the lesion, its anatomic location, and the complexity of the procedure. For the 2,142 instances, observed CD and DAP correlate well overall (r = 0.83, P <.000001), but correlation in individual instances is poor. The same is true for the correlation between fluoroscopy time and CD (r = 0.79, P <.000001). The correlation between fluoroscopy time and DAP (r = 0.60, P <.000001) is not as good. In 6% of instances (128 of 2,142), which were principally embolization procedures, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedures, and renal/visceral artery stent placements, CD was greater than 5 Gy. Most procedures studied can result in clinically significant radiation dose to the patient, even when performed by trained operators with use of dose-reducing technology and modern fluoroscopic equipment. Embolization procedures

  8. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy{sup −1}) and β (Gy{sup −2}) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different

  9. HOSPITAL PHYSICS: Patient radiation doses from diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.

    1996-03-01

    X-ray examinations may be of great benefit but they also carry a slight risk. This article explains how doses to patients are measured and describes how different techniques expose patients to differing amounts of ionizing radiation. These figures are compared with other natural and man-made sources.

  10. Integrated Worker Radiation Dose Assessment for the K Basins

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, J.V.

    1999-10-27

    This report documents an assessment of the radiation dose workers at the K Basins are expected to receive in the process of removing spent nuclear fuel from the storage basins. The K Basins (K East and K West) are located in the Hanford 100K Area.

  11. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION DOSE AND AMPHIBIAN DISTRIBUTIONS IN NATIONAL PARKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet Radiation Dose and Amphibian Distributions in National Parks. Diamond, S. A., Detenbeck, N. E., USEPA, Duluth, MN, USA, Bradford, D. F., USEPA, Las Vegas, NV, USA, Trenham, P. C., University of California, Davis, CA., USA, Adams, M. J., Corn, P. S., Hossack, B., USGS,...

  12. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION DOSE AND AMPHIBIAN DISTRIBUTIONS IN NATIONAL PARKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet Radiation Dose and Amphibian Distributions in National Parks. Diamond, S. A., Detenbeck, N. E., USEPA, Duluth, MN, USA, Bradford, D. F., USEPA, Las Vegas, NV, USA, Trenham, P. C., University of California, Davis, CA., USA, Adams, M. J., Corn, P. S., Hossack, B., USGS,...

  13. Estimated ultraviolet radiation doses in wetlands in six national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, S.A.; Trenham, P.C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hossack, B.R.; Knapp, R.A.; Stark, L.; Bradford, D.; Corn, P.S.; Czarnowski, K.; Brooks, P.D.; Fagre, D.B.; Breen, B.; Dentenbeck, N.E.; Tonnessen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–320-nm wavelengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands in six national parks: Acadia (Acadia), Glacier (Glacier), Great Smoky Mountains (Smoky), Olympic (Olympic), Rocky Mountain (Rocky), and Sequoia/Kings Canyon (Sequoia). Estimates were made using ground-based UV-B data (Brewer spectrophotometers), solar radiation models, GIS tools, field characterization of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates were made for the summer solstice, at a depth of 1 cm in each wetland. The mean dose across all wetlands and parks was 19.3 W-h m−2 (range of 3.4–32.1 W-h m−2). The mean dose was lowest in Acadia (13.7 W-h m−2) and highest in Rocky (24.4 W-h m−2). Doses were significantly different among all parks. These wetland doses correspond to UV-B flux of 125.0 μW cm−2 (range 21.4–194.7 μW cm−2) based on a day length, averaged among all parks, of 15.5 h. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a key determinant of water-column UV-B flux, ranged from 0.6 (analytical detection limit) to 36.7 mg C L−1 over all wetlands and parks, and reduced potential maximal UV-B doses at 1-cm depth by 1%–87 %. DOC concentration, as well as its effect on dose, was lowest in Sequoia and highest in Acadia (DOC was equivalent in Acadia, Glacier, and Rocky). Landscape reduction of potential maximal UV-B doses ranged from zero to 77% and was lowest in Sequoia. These regional differences in UV-B wetland dose illustrate the importance of considering all aspects of exposure in evaluating the potential impact of UV-B on aquatic organisms.

  14. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1990-01-01

    A future goal of the U.S. space program is a commitment to the manned exploration and habitation of Mars. An important consideration of such missions is the exposure of crew members to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation from high-energy galactic cosmic ray fluxes and solar proton flares. The crew will encounter the most harmful radiation environment in transit to Mars from which they must be adequately protected. However, once on the planet's surface, the Martian environment should provide a significant amount of protection from free-space radiative fluxes. In current Mars scenario descriptions, the crew flight time to Mars is estimated to be anywhere from 7 months to over a year each way, with stay times on the surface ranging from 20 days to 2 years. To maintain dose levels below established astronaut limits, dose estimates need to be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations on the surface anticipated, the characterization of the Mars radiation environment is important in assessing all radiation protection requirements. This synopsis focuses on the probable doses incurred by surface inhabitants from the transport of galactic cosmic rays and solar protons through the Mars atmosphere.

  15. Scattered radiation doses to some critical organs during pediatric radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Agard, E T; Ehlers, G; Kirchberg, S

    1985-04-01

    The levels of scattered radiation doses imparted to the eyes, thyroid and gonads of pediatric patients treated with orthovoltage radiation (300 kVp, 2.0 mmCu HVL) and with a 4-MV linear accelerator, were determined by making thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in three paraffin phantoms of different sizes. These phantoms were made from molds of mannequins used for store display, of approximate heights 30", 40" and 50", representing children of ages 1-2, 4-5 and 8-10 yr, respectively. The sites chosen for irradiation were (1) the whole brain, (2) the chest, (3) the kidney bed, (4) the whole abdomen and (5) the spinal column. These sites are normally treated in such pediatric malignancies as medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma and Wilms' tumor. Some of the doses measured are less than 10 rad for an entire treatment regimen, and would therefore be categorized as low-level doses. Where radiation was the only mode of treatment for long-term survivors of such malignancies, especially those treated 20-30 yr ago with orthovoltage radiation, useful data may be extracted for contributing to our knowledge about the long-term effects of low levels of radiation.

  16. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  17. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hatano, Kazuo; Uchino, Yoshio; Itami, Makiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa; Hara, Ryusuke

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  18. [Fetus radiation doses from nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures. Potential risks and radiation protection instructions].

    PubMed

    Markou, Pavlos

    2007-01-01

    Although in pregnancy it is strongly recommended to avoid diagnostic nuclear medicine and radiology procedures, in cases of clinical necessity or when pregnancy is not known to the physician, these diagnostic procedures are to be applied. In such cases, counseling based on accurate information and comprehensive discussion about the risks of radiation exposure to the fetus should follow. In this article, estimations of the absorbed radiation doses due to nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures during the pregnancy and their possible risk effects to the fetus are examined and then discussed. Stochastic and detrimental effects are evaluated with respect to other risk factors and related to the fetus absorbed radiation dose and to the post-conception age. The possible termination of a pregnancy, due to radiation exposure is discussed. Special radiation protection instructions are given for radiation exposures in cases of possible, confirmed or unknown pregnancies. It is concluded that nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures, if not repeated during the pregnancy, are rarely an indication for the termination of pregnancy, because the dose received by the fetus is expected to be less than 100 mSv, which indicates the threshold dose for having deterministic effects. Therefore, the risk for the fetus due to these diagnostic procedures is low. However, stochastic effects are still possible but will be minimized if the radiation absorbed dose to the fetus is kept as low as possible.

  19. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-08-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 × 10-3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing.

  20. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  1. High dose bystander effects in spatially fractionated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Butterworth, Karl T.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Prise, Kevin M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional radiotherapy of bulky tumors has certain limitations. Spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are examples of advanced modulated beam therapies that help in significant reductions in normal tissue damage. GRID refers to the delivery of a single high dose of radiation to a large treatment area that is divided into several smaller fields, while IMRT allows improved dose conformity to the tumor target compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. In this review, we consider spatially fractionated radiotherapy approaches focusing on GRID and IMRT, and present complementary evidence from different studies which support the role of radiation induced signaling effects in the overall radiobiological rationale for these treatments. PMID:24246848

  2. Trans-Atlantic Comparison of CT Radiation Doses in the Era of Radiation Dose-Tracking Software.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Anushri; Euler, Andre; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this study is to compare diagnostic reference levels from a local European CT dose registry, using radiation-tracking software from a large patient sample, with preexisting European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Data (n = 43,761 CT scans obtained over the course of 2 years) for the European local CT dose registry were obtained from eight CT scanners at six institutions. Means, medians, and interquartile ranges of volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), size-specific dose estimate, and effective dose values for CT examinations of the head, paranasal sinuses, thorax, pulmonary angiogram, abdomen-pelvis, renal-colic, thorax-abdomen-pelvis, and thoracoabdominal angiogram were obtained using radiation-tracking software. Metrics from this registry were compared with diagnostic reference levels from Canada and California (published in 2015), the American College of Radiology (ACR) dose index registry (2015), and national diagnostic reference levels from local CT dose registries in Switzerland (2010), the United Kingdom (2011), and Portugal (2015). Our local registry had a lower 75th percentile CTDIvol for all protocols than did the individual internationally sourced data. Compared with our study, the ACR dose index registry had higher 75th percentile CTDIvol values by 55% for head, 240% for thorax, 28% for abdomen-pelvis, 42% for thorax-abdomen-pelvis, 128% for pulmonary angiogram, 138% for renal-colic, and 58% for paranasal sinus studies. Our local registry had lower diagnostic reference level values than did existing European and North American diagnostic reference levels. Automated radiation-tracking software could be used to establish and update existing diagnostic reference levels because they are capable of analyzing large datasets meaningfully.

  3. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    1986-01-01

    The dose and dose-equivalent estimates that astronauts might be expected to receive in space were assessed for the development of new radiation protection guidelines, considering several space mission scenarios. These scenarios included a 90-day LEO mission at 450 km altitude with orbital inclinations appropriate for NASA's Space Station (28.5, 57, and 90 deg), a 15-day sortie to GEO, and a 90-day lunar mission. All the missions contemplated would present space travelers with dose equivalents between 5 and 10 rem to the blood-forming organs, assuming no encounter with a large solar particle event; a large particle event could add considerable exposure for all scenarios except for the one at 28.5 orbital inclination. Adequate shielding must be included to guard against the radiation produced by such events.

  4. The Monte Carlo calculation of integral radiation dose in xeromammography.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R

    1980-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program has been developed for the computation of integral radiation dose to the breast in xeromammography. The results are given in terms of the integral dose per unit area of the breast per unit incident exposure. The calculations have been made for monoenergetic incident photons and the results integrated over a variety of X-ray spectra from both tungsten and molybdenum targets. This range incorporates qualities used in conventional and xeromammography. The program includes the selenium plate used in xeroradiography; the energy absorbed in this detector has also been investigated. The latter calculations have been used to predict relative values of exposure and of integral dose to the breast for xeromammograms taken at various radiation qualities. The results have been applied to recent work on the reduction of patient exposure in xeromammography by the addition of aluminium filters to the X-ray beam.

  5. Dose and volume impact on radiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Luca; Salvi, Giovanna; Caiazza, Adolfo; Di Rienzo, Luigi; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Murino, Paola; Macchia, Gabriella

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia consists in the chronic dryness of the mouth caused by parotid gland irradiation. Parotid glands produce approximately 60% of saliva while the rest is secreted by submandibular and accessory salivary glands. Methods of measuring the salivary output are essentially represented by 99mTc-pertechnate scintigraphy or simpler albeit less accurate methods in stimulated or unstimulated saliva. There are subjective and objective criteria of classification and grading of the secretion of saliva. Radiation-induced xerostomia, namely the residual salivary gland function is evidently associated with the mean dose absorbed. The salivary output tends to decrease after the end of radiotherapy. The partial dose-volume is substantially correlated with the mean dose to the whole gland. As for ipsilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer, conformal RT or IMRT allow to spare the contralateral parotid gland without increasing the risk of contralateral nodal recurrences. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  6. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  7. PET/CT-guided interventions: personnel radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E Ronan; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T; Solomon, Stephen B

    2013-08-01

    To quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures. In this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound). The median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06). The operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  8. Radiation-thermal degradation of PE and PVC: Mechanism of synergism and dose rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    Polyethylene insulation and polyvinyl chloride jacketing materials that had been in use in a nuclear application were recently found to be substantially deteriorated. The damage had occurred under conditions where both the total estimated dose (about 2.5 Mrad) and the operating temperatures (about 43°C average) seemed relatively moderate. These results prompted us to initiate a program to study polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene degradation under conditions of combined γ-radiation and elevated temperature environments. A number of interesting aging effects were observed, including 1) a striking synergism between radiation and temperature and 2) strong dose-rate dependent effects which occur over a wide range of dose rates. The aging effects are explained in terms of a chain branching degradation mechanism involving thermally induced breakdown of peroxides which are formed in reactions initiated by the radiation. Evidence for this mechanism is derived from infrared spectra, from sequential radiation-elevated temperature experiments including experiments under inert atmosphere, from activation energy estimates and from a new technique involving treatment of intact samples with PH 3 for chemical reduction of peroxides. The results of our studies raise significant doubts about the utility of earlier compilations which purportedly serve as radiation life expectancy guides by indicating "tolerable radiation doses" for a variety of polymers.

  9. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  10. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices. 1985 supplement. Volume 2, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, K. E.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.; Dantas, A. R. V.; Price, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data, are provided in graphic format for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. The data were generated by JPL for various NASA space programs. This volume provides data on integrated circuits. The data are presented in graphic, tabular, and/or narrative format, depending on the complexity of the integrated circuit. Most tests were done using the JPL or Boeing electron accelerator (Dynamitron) which provides a steady-state 2.5 MeV electron beam. However, some radiation exposures were made with a Cobalt-60 gamma ray source, the results of which should be regarded as only an approximate measure of the radiation damage that would be incurred by an equivalent electron dose.

  11. Radiation Dose to the Brain and Subsequent Risk of Developing Brain Tumors in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef; Simon, S. L.; Land, C. E.; Miller, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose to the brain and subsequent lifetime risk of diagnosis of radiation-related brain tumors were estimated for pediatric patients undergoing intracranial embolization. Average dose to the whole brain was calculated using dosimetric data from the Radiation Doses in Interventional Radiology Study for 49 pediatric patients who underwent neuroradiological procedures, and lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain tumors was estimated using published algorithms based on A-bomb survivor data. The distribution of absorbed dose within the brain can vary significantly depending on field size and movement during procedures. Depending on the exposure conditions and age of the patient, organ-averaged brain dose was estimated to vary from 6 to 1600 mGy. The lifetime risk of brain tumor diagnosis was estimated to be increased over the normal background rates (57 cases per 10,000) by 3 to 40% depending on the dose received, age at exposure, and gender. While significant uncertainties are associated with these estimates, we have quantified the range of possible dose and propagated the uncertainty to derive a credible range of estimated lifetime risk for each subject. Collimation and limiting fluoroscopy time and dose rate are the most effective means to minimize dose and risk of future induction of radiation-related tumors. PMID:18959462

  12. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Haron, M. R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDIw, DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts.

  13. Radiation dose-reduction strategies for neuroradiology CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Smith, A B; Dillon, W P; Gould, R; Wintermark, M

    2007-10-01

    Within the past 2 decades, the number of CT examinations performed has increased almost 10-fold. This is in large part due to advances in multidetector-row CT technology, which now allows faster image acquisition and improved isotropic imaging. The increased use, along with multidetector technique, has led to a significantly increased radiation dose to the patient from CT studies. This places increased responsibility on the radiologist to ensure that CT examinations are indicated and that the "as low as reasonably achievable" concept is adhered to. Neuroradiologists are familiar with factors that affect patient dose such as pitch, milliamperes, kilovolt peak (kVp), collimation, but with increasing attention being given to dose reduction, they are looking for additional ways to further reduce the radiation associated with their CT protocols. In response to increasing concern, CT manufacturers have developed dose-reduction tools, such as dose modulation, in which the tube current is adjusted along with the CT acquisition, according to patient's attenuation. This review will describe the available techniques for reducing dose associated with neuroradiologic CT imaging protocols.

  14. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  15. Biological impact of low dose-rate simulated solar particle event radiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, P Y; Doppalapudi, R; Bakke, J; Wang, A; Menda, S; Davis, Z

    2010-08-01

    C57Bl6-lacZ animals were exposed to a range of low dose-rate simulated solar particle event (sSPE) radiation at the NASA-sponsored Research Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Peripheral blood was harvested from animals from 1 to 12 days after total body irradiation (TBI) to quantify the level of circulating reticulocytes (RET) and micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) as an early indicator of radiation-induced genotoxicity. Bone marrow lymphocytes and hippocampal tissues from each animal were collected at 12 days and up to two months, to evaluate dose-dependent late effects after sSPE exposure. Early hematopoietic changes show that the % RET was reduced up to 3 days in response to radiation exposure but recovered at 12 days postirradiation. The % MN-RET in peripheral blood was temporally regulated and dependant on the total accumulated dose. Total chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes increased linearly with dose within a week after radiation and remained significantly higher than the control values at 4 weeks after exposure. The level of aberrations in the irradiated animals returned to control levels by 8 weeks postirradiation. Measurements of chromosome 2 and 8 specific aberrations indicate that, consistent with conventional giemsa-staining methods, the level of aberrations is also not significantly higher than in control animals at 8 weeks postirradiation. The hippocampus was surveyed for differential transcriptional regulation of genes known to be associated with neurogenesis. Our results showed differential expression of neurotrophin and their associated receptor genes within 1 week after sSPE exposure. Progressive changes in the profile of expressed genes known to be involved in neurogenic signaling pathways were dependent on the sSPE dose. Our results to date suggest that radiation-induced changes in the hematopoietic system, i.e., chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes, are transient and do not persist past 4 weeks after radiation

  16. Dose and Spatial Effects in Long-Distance Radiation Signaling In Vivo: Implications for Abscopal Tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Giardullo, Paola; Leonardi, Simona; Pasquali, Emanuela; Casciati, Arianna; De Stefano, Ilaria; Tanori, Mirella; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose and spatial dependence of abscopal radiation effects occurring in vivo in the mouse, along with their tumorigenic potential in the central nervous system (CNS) of a radiosensitive mouse model. Methods and Materials: Patched1 (Ptch1){sup +/−} mice, carrying a germ-line heterozygous inactivating mutation in the Ptch1 gene and uniquely susceptible to radiation damage in neonatal cerebellum, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation (1, 2, or 3 Gy of x-rays) or treated in a variety of partial-body irradiation protocols, in which the animals' head was fully protected by suitable lead cylinders while the rest of the body was exposed to x-rays in full or in part. Apoptotic cell death was measured in directly irradiated and shielded cerebellum shortly after irradiation, and tumor development was monitored in lifetime groups. The same endpoints were measured using different shielding geometries in mice irradiated with 3 or 10 Gy of x-rays. Results: Although dose-dependent cell death was observed in off-target cerebellum for all doses and shielding conditions tested, a conspicuous lack of abscopal response for CNS tumorigenesis was evident at the lowest dose of 1 Gy. By changing the amount of exposed body volume, the shielding geometry could also significantly modulate tumorigenesis depending on dose. Conclusions: We conclude that interplay between radiation dose and exposed tissue volume plays a critical role in nontargeted effects occurring in mouse CNS under conditions relevant to humans. These findings may help understanding the mechanisms of long-range radiation signaling in harmful effects, including carcinogenesis, occurring in off-target tissues.

  17. Absorbed dose dependence of the correction factors for ionization chamber cable irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Campos, L L; Caldas, L V

    1991-03-01

    A simple method was developed, for possible use by hospital physicists, to evaluate the irradiation effects on cables and connectors during large-radiation-field dosimetry with ionization chambers and to determine correction factors for the used system or geometry. This method was based on the absorbed dose dependence of the correction factor.

  18. Radiation dose of cone-beam computed tomography compared to conventional radiographs in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Luca; Patcas, Raphael; Peltomäki, Timo; Schätzle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine radiation doses of different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan modes in comparison to a conventional set of orthodontic radiographs (COR) by means of phantom dosimetry. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips (3 × 1 × 1 mm) were used on an adult male tissue-equivalent phantom to record the distribution of the absorbed radiation dose. Three different scanning modes (i.e., portrait, normal landscape, and fast scan landscape) were compared to CORs [i.e., conventional lateral (LC) and posteroanterior (PA) cephalograms and digital panoramic radiograph (OPG)]. The following radiation levels were measured: 131.7, 91, and 77 μSv in the portrait, normal landscape, and fast landscape modes, respectively. The overall effective dose for a COR was 35.81 μSv (PA: 8.90 μSv; OPG: 21.87 μSv; LC: 5.03 μSv). Although one CBCT scan may replace all CORs, one set of CORs still entails 2-4 times less radiation than one CBCT. Depending on the scan mode, the radiation dose of a CBCT is about 3-6 times an OPG, 8-14 times a PA, and 15-26 times a lateral LC. Finally, in order to fully reconstruct cephalograms including the cranial base and other important structures, the CBCT portrait mode must be chosen, rendering the difference in radiation exposure even clearer (131.7 vs. 35.81 μSv). Shielding radiation-sensitive organs can reduce the effective dose considerably. CBCT should not be recommended for use in all orthodontic patients as a substitute for a conventional set of radiographs. In CBCT, reducing the height of the field of view and shielding the thyroid are advisable methods and must be implemented to lower the exposure dose.

  19. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  20. Follow-Up Study on Fetal CT Radiation Dose in Japan: Validating the Decrease in Radiation Dose.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Sawai, Hideaki; Yamada, Takahiro; Murotsuki, Jun; Nishimura, Gen

    2017-04-01

    In 2011, we collected data on fetal CT radiation dose to determine the diagnostic reference level (DRL); however, continuous evaluation of the DRL is necessary. The hypothesis of this study is that the fetal CT radiation dose has decreased, and we predict a widespread use of iterative reconstruction (IR). We also predict that the national decrease in exposure is because of the DRL reported as a result of the previous national study. Various testing protocols from each site were summarized as part of the study results. The minimum, one-fourth (25th percentile), median, three-fourths (75th percentile), and maximum values were obtained for volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and scan length of 120 fetal CT examinations. The trends for IR usage and tube voltage were also investigated. Compared to the results of the 2011 study (n = 119), the minimum, 25th percentile, median, and 75th percentile values for CTDIvol and DLP have decreased for the tabulated results in 2015 (n = 120). The 75th percentile value for CTDIvol was 4.9 mGy, which is 43% of the previous value. IR was used in 70% of the sites. The radiation dose was significantly lower among groups that used IR. Four years passed between our initial survey on DRL and the present follow-up survey, and it appears that the previous report sufficiently fulfilled its objective and role in contributing to the decrease in DRL observed in this follow-up study.

  1. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Atwell, W; Beever, R; Hardy, A

    1986-01-01

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5 degrees, 57 degrees and 90 degrees) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5 degrees orbital inclination.

  2. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-15

    .4 mSv was measured, respectively. Using kilovoltage or megavoltage radiation to obtain cone beam computed tomography scans led to an additional dose of 8-46 mSv. For treatment verification images performed once per week using double exposure technique, an additional effective dose of up to 18 mSv was measured. Conclusions: Daily setup imaging using kilovoltage planar images or TomoTherapy megavoltage fan beam CT imaging can be used as a standard procedure in clinical routine. Daily kilovoltage and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography setup imaging should be applied on an individual or indication based protocol. Depending on the imaging scheme applied, image-guided radiation therapy can be administered without increasing the dose outside of the treated volume compared to therapies without image guidance.

  3. Global real-time dose measurements using the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, D.; Smart, D.; Shea, M.; Bailey, J.; Didkovsky, L.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Jones, B.; Hong, S.; Yoon, K.

    2016-11-01

    The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) program has successfully deployed a fleet of six instruments measuring the ambient radiation environment at commercial aircraft altitudes. ARMAS transmits real-time data to the ground and provides quality, tissue-relevant ambient dose equivalent rates with 5 min latency for dose rates on 213 flights up to 17.3 km (56,700 ft). We show five cases from different aircraft; the source particles are dominated by galactic cosmic rays but include particle fluxes for minor radiation periods and geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The measurements from 2013 to 2016 do not cover a period of time to quantify galactic cosmic rays' dependence on solar cycle variation and their effect on aviation radiation. However, we report on small radiation "clouds" in specific magnetic latitude regions and note that active geomagnetic, variable space weather conditions may sufficiently modify the magnetospheric magnetic field that can enhance the radiation environment, particularly at high altitudes and middle to high latitudes. When there is no significant space weather, high-latitude flights produce a dose rate analogous to a chest X-ray every 12.5 h, every 25 h for midlatitudes, and every 100 h for equatorial latitudes at typical commercial flight altitudes of 37,000 ft ( 11 km). The dose rate doubles every 2 km altitude increase, suggesting a radiation event management strategy for pilots or air traffic control; i.e., where event-driven radiation regions can be identified, they can be treated like volcanic ash clouds to achieve radiation safety goals with slightly lower flight altitudes or more equatorial flight paths.

  4. High-dose radiation sensor with wireless optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapkiewicz, Paweł; Augustyniak, Izabela; Sareło, Katarzyna; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We present a miniature silicon-glass MEMS sensor for measurement of high doses of ionizing radiation (above 10 kGy) using a novel wireless optical detection method. The radiation sensor is a miniaturized version of the so-called hydrogen dosimeter. An amount of high-density polyethylene, located inside the MEMS sensor, degrades under ionizing radiation, releasing gaseous hydrogen. The increasing pressure deflects the thin silicon membrane. The sensor’s destructive and proportional modes of work are also proposed. In the destructive mode, sensors provide in situ information on excessive and discrete levels of radiation. The optical detection method is based on an optical head consisting of a moving membrane and a silicon screen with a matrix of micro-holes. Laser light is reflected from the membrane and scattered when the membrane is deflected, in the process illuminating the holes on the silicon screen. The number of illuminated holes is a function of the degree of membrane deflection; the transformation of the holes to the deflection allows for the calculation of pressure and eventually the dose of ionizing radiation.

  5. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  6. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for 18F-BPA PET.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuzuru; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Yasui, Naoko; Honda, Naoki; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a molecular radiation therapy approach based on the (10)B (n, α) (7)Li nuclear reaction in cancer cells. In BNCT, delivery of (10)B in the form of 4-borono-phenylalanine conjugated with fructose (BPA-fr) to the cancer cells is important. The PET tracer 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) has been used to predict the accumulation of BPA-fr before BNCT. Purpose To determine the biodistribution and dosimetric parameters in 18F-BPA PET/CT studies. Material and Methods Human biokinetic data were obtained during clinical 18F-BPA PET studies between February and June 2015 at one institution. Nine consecutive patients were studied prospectively. The internal radiation dose was calculated on the basis of radioactivity data from blood, urine, and normal tissue of the heart, liver, spleen, kidney, and other parts of the body at each time point using OLINDA/EXM1.1 program. We compared our calculations with published 18F-FDG data. Results Adult patients (3 men, 3 women; age range, 28-68 years) had significantly smaller absorbed doses than pediatric patients (3 patients; age range, 5-12 years) ( P = 0.003). The mean effective dose was 57% lower in adult patients compared with pediatric patients. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were 25% lower than those for 18F-FDG presented in International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) publication 106. Conclusion We found significant differences in organ absorbed doses for 18F-BPA against those for 18F-FDG presented in ICRP publication 106. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were smaller than those for 18F-FDG in the publication by 0.5-38% (mean difference, 25%).

  7. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  8. Dose and dose rate dependency of lipid peroxide formation in rat tissues by low level contamination with tritiated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisoi, N.; Petcu, I.

    1999-01-01

    The changes in peroxide level in different tissues (liver, kidney, small intestine, spleen, bone marrow) of rats exposed to low levels of tritiated water were investigated in relation to tissue radiosensitivity, the irradiation dose and the dose rate domain. The radiation exposure was performed by internal contamination of rats with tritiated water, in the 0 50cGy dose domain, with dose rates in the range of 0.01 2cGy/day. For the lower dose rates (< 0.35cGy/day) the peroxide levels did not increase for doses up to 10cGy, while a dose rate of 1 1.75cGy/day induced an increase in peroxide levels starting at 5cGy. The increases were more significant for the tissues with higher radiosensitivity: spleen, small intestine and bone marrow. For the 4.2 7cGy dose domain and very low dose rates, up to 0.1cGy/day, the peroxide level seemed to have an inverse dose rate dependency. Nous avons étudié la modification du niveau des peroxydes lipidiques pour des tissus ayant des radiosensibilités différentes (foie, rein, rate, intestin grêle, moelle osseuse) après irradiation de rats par contamination interne à l'eau tritiée dans le domaine des faibles doses (0 - 50 cGy) et faibles débits de doses (0,01 - 2 cGy/jour). L'irradiation au débit de dose inférieure à 0,35 cGy/jour, n'augmente le niveau de peroxydation que pour des doses supérieures à 10 cGy. Par contre, le débit de 1-1.75 cGy/jour induit une augmentation significative du paramètre étudié à partir de la dose de 5 cGy. Cette augmentation est plus accentuée pour la rate, l'intestin grêle et la moelle osseuse. Aux doses de 4,2-7 cGy et débits de doses très faibles (< 0.1 cGy), le niveau de peroxydation montre une dépendance inverse par rapport au débit de dose.

  9. Radiation dose in cardiac SPECT/CT: An estimation of SSDE and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Shiri, Isaac; Salimi, Yazdan; Sarebani, Maghsoud; Mehdinia, Reza; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi; Sohrabi, Ahmad; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    The dose levels for Computed Tomography (CT) localization and attenuation correction of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are limited and reported as Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLP). This work presents CT dose estimation from Cardiac SPECT/CT based on new American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Size Specific Dose Estimation (SSDE) parameter, effective dose, organ doses and also emission dose from nuclear issue. Myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT for 509 patients was included in the study. SSDE, effective dose and organ dose were calculated using AAPM guideline and Impact-Dose software. Data were analyzed using R and SPSS statistical software. Spearman-Pearson correlation test and linear regression models were used for finding correlations and relationships among parameters. The mean CTDIvol was 1.34 mGy±0.19 and the mean SSDE was 1.7 mGy±0.16. The mean±SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5±1.4, 0.49±0.11 and 12.67±1.73 (mSv) respectively. The mean±SD of effective dose from emission, CT and total dose were 11.5±1.4, 0.49±0.11 and 12.67±1.73 (mSv) respectively. The spearman test showed that correlation between body size and organ doses is significant except thyroid and red bone marrow. CTDIvol was strongly dependent on patient size, but SSDE was not. Emission dose was strongly dependent on patient weight, but its dependency was lower to effective diameter. The dose parameters including CTDIvol, DLP, SSDE, effective dose values reported here are very low and below the reference level. This data suggest that appropriate CT acquisition parameters in SPECT/CT localization and attenuation correction are very beneficial for patients and lowering cancer risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Problems in evaluating radiation dose via terrestrial and aquatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, B E; Soldat, J K; Schreckhise, R G; Watson, E C; McKenzie, D H

    1981-12-01

    This review is concerned with exposure risk and the environmental pathways models used for predictive assessment of radiation dose. Exposure factors, the adequacy of available data, and the model subcomponents are critically reviewed from the standpoint of absolute error propagation. Although the models are inherently capable of better absolute accuracy, a calculated dose is usually overestimated by from two to six orders of magnitude, in practice. The principal reason for so large an error lies in using "generic" concentration ratios in situations where site specific data are needed. Major opinion of the model makers suggests a number midway between these extremes, with only a small likelihood of ever underestimating the radiation dose. Detailed evaluations are made of source considerations influencing dose (i.e., physical and chemical status of released material); dispersal mechanisms (atmospheric, hydrologic and biotic vector transport); mobilization and uptake mechanisms (i.e., chemical and other factors affecting the biological availability of radioelements); and critical pathways. Examples are shown of confounding in food-chain pathways, due to uncritical application of concentration ratios. Current thoughts of replacing the critical pathways approach to calculating dose with comprehensive model calculations are also shown to be ill-advised, given present limitations in the comprehensive data base. The pathways models may also require improved parametrization, as they are not at present structured adequately to lend themselves to validation. The extremely wide errors associated with predicting exposure stand in striking contrast to the error range associated with the extrapolation of animal effects data to the human being.

  11. Biological detection of low radiation doses with integrated photothermal assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Viegas, Mark; Soderberg, Lee S. F.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this paper was to evaluate the diagnostic value of integrated photothermal (PT) assay with additional fluorescent and photoacoustic (PA) modules to assess both the "safety limit" of exposure to ionizing γ-radiation and optimal therapeutic doses for cancer treatment. With this assay, the influences of γ irradiation on cancer cells (pancreatic-AR42J and hepatocytes-hepG2) and healthy cells (mouse lymphocytes and erythrocytes) was examined as a function of exposure dose (0.6-5 Gy) and time after irradiation, in vitro and in vivo. Independent verification of data obtained with conventional assays revealed that integrated PT assay allowed us to detect the different stages of radiation impact, including changes in cell metabolism at low dose, or stages related to cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) at high doses with a threshold sensitivity of at least three orders of magnitude better than existing assays. Also, PT assay was capable of quantitatively differentiating the biological action of γ irradiation alone and in combination with drug and nicotine impact. Finally, we demonstrated on an animal model that IPT assay has the potential for use in routine rapid evaluation of biological consequences of low-dose exposure a few days after irradiation.

  12. Occupational doses in radiation oncology in Manitoba--1980 to 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, W.; Bews, J.; Sourkes, A.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The province of Manitoba (population of 1.0 million) has two radiotherapy centers employing a number of people, of whom about 60 are exposed to radiation during the course of their work. The individual and collective radiation doses to these workers, as recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeter plaques, were reviewed for the period 1980 to 1986. Whole-body doses to radiotherapy technologists responsible for operating the treatment machines and brachytherapy afterloading procedures ranged from 0.5 to 2.5 mSv y-1, whereas the corresponding doses to nursing staff working on a hospital brachytherapy ward were about 1.0 mSv y-1. The collective occupational dose from radiotherapy in Manitoba was approximately 70 person-mSv. Trends show individual operator and collective doses to be increasing at a higher rate than the number of patients undergoing radiotherapy. Occupational exposure in radiotherapy in this province was found to be comparable to that encountered in nuclear medicine in Manitoba and greater than that in diagnostic radiology.

  13. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    PubMed

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3.

  14. Radiation dose of cardiac CT--what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Hatem

    2009-06-01

    Current evidence and most pertinent literature on the radiation dose of cardiac computed tomography (CT) for the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease are reviewed. The various means for adjusting CT protocols to lower the radiation to a level that is as low as reasonably achievable are discussed. It is shown that for the target population of cardiac CT, the direct visualization of the heart and coronary arteries outweighs the hypothetical risk of the investigation, provided that indications are prudent and the protocols appropriate.

  15. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin.

    PubMed

    Kendall, G M; Fell, T P

    2011-09-01

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200  µSv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100  µSv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  16. Radiation dose reduction in CT myocardial perfusion imaging using SMART-RECON.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinsheng; Speidel, Michael A; Francois, Christopher J; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-08-30

    In this work, a newly developed statistical model based image reconstruction (referred to as Simultaneous Multiple Artifacts Reduction in Tomographic RECONstruction (SMARTRECON) [1]) is applied to low dose computer tomography (CT) myocardial perfusion imaging (CT-MPI). This method uses the nuclear norm of the spatial-temporal image matrix of the CTMPI images as a regularizer, rather than a conventional spatial regularizer that incorporates image smoothness, edge preservation, or spatial sparsity into the reconstruction. In addition to providing the needed noise reduction for low-dose CT-MPI, SMART-RECON provides images with spatial resolution and noise power spectrum (NPS) properties which are independent of contrast and dose level. Both numerical simulations and in vivo animal studies were performed to validate the proposed method. In these studies, it was found that: (1) Quantitative accuracy of perfusion maps in CT-MPI was well maintained for radiation dose level as low as 10 mAs per image frame, compared with the reference standard of 200 mAs for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP); (2) Flow-occluded myocardium in the porcine heart was well delineated by SMART-RECON at 10 mAs per frame when compared with MBIR using spatial total variation (TV) as the regularizer (referred to as TV-SIR) or Spatial-Temporal TV (ST-TV-SIR); The CT-MPI results were confirmed with PET imaging; (3) Image sharpness in SMARTRECON images was nearly independent of image contrast level and radiation dose level, in stark contrast to TV-SIR and STTV- SIR which displayed a strong dependence on both image contrast and radiation dose level; (4) The structure of the dosenormalized NPS for the SMART-RECON method did not depend on dose, while the TV-SIR and ST-TV-SIR NPS structure was dose-dependent.

  17. Radiation doses from Hanford Site releases to the atmosphere and the Columbia River.

    PubMed

    Farris, W T; Napier, B A; Ikenberry, T A; Shipler, D B

    1996-10-01

    Radiation doses to individuals were estimated for the years 1944-1992 as part of the Hanford Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR). The dose estimates were based on the radioactive releases to the atmosphere and Columbia River from the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State. Conceptual models, computer codes, and previously published dose estimates were used to reconstruct doses. The most significant exposure pathway was found to be the consumption of cow's milk containing 131I. The median cumulative dose estimates to the thyroid of children ranged from < 0.7 mGy to 2.3 Gy throughout the study area, depending upon residence location. The highest estimated cumulative dose to a child ranged from 0.6-8.4 Gy (5th and 95th percentiles) with a median of 2.3 Gy based on 100 Monte Carlo realizations. The geographic distribution of the dose levels was directly related to the pattern of 131I deposition and was affected by the distribution of commercial milk and leafy vegetables. For the atmospheric pathway, the highest cumulative effective dose equivalent to an adult was estimated to be 12 mSv at Ringold, Washington, for the period 1944-1992. For the Columbia River pathway, cumulative effective dose equivalent estimates ranged from < 5 mSv to 15 mSv cumulative dose to maximally exposed adults downriver from the Hanford Site for the years 1944-1992. The most significant river exposure pathway was consumption of resident fish containing 32P and 65Zn.

  18. Radiation doses from Hanford site releases to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation doses to individuals were estimated for the years 1944-1992. The dose estimates were based on the radioactive-releases from the Hanford Site in south central Washington. Conceptual models and computer codes were used to reconstruct doses through the early 1970s. The published Hanford Site annual environmental data were used to complete the does history through 1992. The most significant exposure pathway was found to be the consumption of cow`s milk containing iodine-131. For the atmospheric pathway, median cumulative dose estimates to the thyroid of children ranged from < 0.1 to 235 rad throughout the area studied. The geographic distribution of the dose levels was directly related to the pattern of iodine-131 deposition and was affected by the distribution of commercial milk and leafy vegetables. For the atmospheric pathway, the-highest estimated cumulative-effective-dose-equivalent (EDE) to an adult was estimated to be 1 rem at Ringold, Washington for the period 1944-1992. For the Columbia River pathway, cumulative EDE estimates ranged from <0.5 to l.5 rem cumulative dose to maximally exposed adults downriver from the Hanford Site for the years 1944-1992. The most significant river exposure pathway was consumption of resident fish containing phosphorus-32 and zinc-65.

  19. Estimation of radiation exposure of different dose saving techniques in 128-slice computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Fenchel, Michael; Buchgeister, Markus; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Kaempf, Michael; Syha, Roland; Claussen, Claus D; Heuschmid, Martin

    2012-02-01

    To estimate the effective dose of cardiac CT with different dose saving strategies dependent on varying heart rates. For dose measurements, an Alderson-Rando-phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 103. Exposure was performed on a 128-slice single source scanner providing a rotation time of 0.30s and standard protocols with 120 kV and 160 mAs/rot. Protocols were evaluated without ECG-pulsing, with two different ECG-pulsing techniques, and automated exposure control with a simulated heart rate of 60 and 100 beats per minute. Depending on different dose saving techniques and heart rate, the effective whole-body dose of a cardiac scan ranged from 2.8 to 9.5 mSv and from 4.3 to 16.0 mSv for males and females, respectively. The radiation-sensitive breast tissue in the primary scan range results in an increased female dose of 66.7 ± 6.0%. Prospective triggering has the greatest potential to reduce the effective dose to 27.8%, compared to a comparable scan protocol with retrospective ECG-triggering with no ECG-pulsing. Furthermore, the heart rate influences the radiation exposure by increasing significantly at lower heart rates. Due to this broad variability in radiation exposure of a cardiac CT, the radiologist and the CT technician should be aware of the different dose reduction strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  1. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  2. Therapeutic doses of radiation alter proliferation and attachment of osteoblasts to implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Sampair, Christopher; Nazmul-Hossain, Abu N M; Khurana, Neerja; Nerness, Andrew; Wutticharoenmongkol, Patcharaporn

    2008-09-15

    Osseointegration of implants in irradiated bone is inadequate. The effect of radiation on cell-implant material interaction has not been adequately studied. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiationon the proliferation, differentiation, and attachment of osteoblasts to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) were irradiated either before or after plating in tissue culture (TC) dishes with or without cpTi disks. Radiation was single dose of 10 cGy, 25 cGy, 50 cGy, 1 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy or 8 Gy. Cell proliferation was determined by counting trypsinized cells on 7 days after irradiation. Attachment of irradiated hFOB was measured indirectly by counting cells 2 and 6 h after plating. Differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity. Compared with nonirradiated sham controls, higher doses of radiation significantly reduced cell attachment and proliferation. Both proliferation and attachment were significantly lower on cpTi compared with TC. Attachment decreased based on the length of postirradiation period. Although differentiation was significantly enhanced by a dose of 8 Gy, proliferation was lowest. These initial studies show that effects of therapeutic doses of radiation on osteoblasts varied depending on the surface, time-elapsed, and amount of radiation.

  3. Main Sources and Doses of Space Radiation during Mars Missions and Total Radiation Risk for Cosmonauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrikas, Victor; Aleksandr, Shafirkin; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav

    This work contains calculation data of generalized doses and dose equivalents in critical organs and tissues of cosmonauts produces by galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar cosmic rays (SCR) and the Earth’s radiation belts (ERB) that will impact crewmembers during a flight to Mars, while staying in the landing module and on the Martian surface, and during the return to Earth. Also calculated total radiation risk values during whole life of cosmonauts after the flight are presented. Radiation risk (RR) calculations are performed on the basis of a radiobiological model of radiation damage to living organisms, while taking into account reparation processes acting during continuous long-term exposure at various dose rates and under acute recurrent radiation impact. The calculations of RR are performed for crewmembers of various ages implementing a flight to Mars over 2 - 3 years in maximum and minimum of the solar cycle. The total carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic RR and possible life-span shortening are estimated on the basis of a model of the radiation death probability for mammals. This model takes into account the decrease in compensatory reserve of an organism as well as the increase in mortality rate and descent of the subsequent lifetime of the cosmonaut. The analyzed dose distributions in the shielding and body areas are applied to making model calculations of tissue equivalent spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms.

  4. Radiation leakage dose from Elekta electron collimation system.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2016-09-08

    This study provided baseline data required for a greater project, whose objective was to design a new Elekta electron collimation system having significantly lighter electron applicators with equally low out-of field leakage dose. Specifically, off-axis dose profiles for the electron collimation system of our uniquely configured Elekta Infinity accelerator with the MLCi2 treatment head were measured and calculated for two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate and document the out-of-field leakage dose in the patient plane and 2) to validate the dose distributions calculated using a BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) model for out-of-field dose profiles. Off-axis dose profiles were measured in a water phantom at 100 cm SSD for 1 and 2 cm depths along the in-plane, cross-plane, and both diagonal axes using a cylindrical ionization chamber with the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators and 7, 13, and 20 MeV beams. Dose distributions were calculated using a previously developed BEAMnrc MC model of the Elekta Infinity accelerator for the same beam energies and applicator sizes and compared with measurements. Measured results showed that the in-field beam flatness met our acceptance criteria (± 3% on major and ±4% on diagonal axes) and that out-of-field mean and maximum percent leakage doses in the patient plane met acceptance criteria as specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Cross-plane out-of-field dose profiles showed greater leakage dose than in-plane profiles, attributed to the curved edges of the upper X-ray jaws and multileaf collimator. Mean leakage doses increased with beam energy, being 0.93% and 0.85% of maximum central axis dose for the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators, respectively, at 20 MeV. MC calculations predicted the measured dose to within 0.1% in most profiles outside the radiation field; however, excluding model-ing of nontrimmer applicator components led to calculations exceeding measured data by as much as 0.2% for some regions

  5. Radiation dose to the pediatric cardiac catheterization and intervention patient.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Ohno, Tadayuki; Kakizaki, Shuhei; Takegawa, Mika; Yuuki, Hiroko; Nakada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2010-11-01

    The radiation dose from cardiac catheterization is particularly relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. Moreover, cardiac catheterization is being used increasingly for interventional radiology procedures, possibly resulting in higher patient radiation doses. This article reports the radiation doses and related factors, such as fluoroscopy time, for children who underwent cardiac catheterization and children who underwent other interventional radiology procedures. We evaluated 239 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (n = 205) or another interventional radiology procedure (n = 34) for which the dose-area product (DAP) was measured. The number of cine runs and fluoroscopic time for each procedure and the body mass index and body weight of each patient were recorded. We also used the double product combined with body weight, which is the weight- fluoroscopic time product. The average DAP ± SD of cardiac catheterization and of an interventional radiology procedure was 1,702.6 ± 2,110.1 cGy × cm² and 2,242.2 ± 2,509.4 cGy × cm², respectively. The average fluoroscopic time ± SD of cardiac catheterization and of an interventional radiology procedure was 24.1 ± 16.8 minutes and 37.2 ± 20.0 minutes. For children who underwent cardiac catheterization and those who underwent an interventional radiology procedure, a strong correlation was seen between the DAP and weight-fluoroscopic time product (cardiac catheterization, r = 0.906; interventional radiology procedure, r = 0.885) and a good correlation was detected between the DAP and weight (r = 0.819 and 0.895, respectively). There was a good correlation between the DAP and weight and between DAP and weight-fluoroscopic time product for children who underwent cardiac catheterization or an interventional radiology procedure. Therefore, body weight is important for determining radiation dose to children undergoing cardiac catheterization or

  6. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K{sub a,r}) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K{sub a,r} exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K{sub a,r} exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and

  7. Quantitative estimation of UV light dose concomitant to irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Vladislav G.; Morozov, Ivan I.; Kim, Jin Kyu; Semkina, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for biological estimation of UV light dose concomitant to ionizing radiation was suggested. This approach was applied to determine the dependency of equivalent UV light dose accompanied by 100 Gy of ionizing radiation on energy of sparsely ionizing radiation and on volume of the exposed cell suspension. It was revealed that the relative excitation contribution to the total lethal effect and the value of UV dose was greatly increased with an increase in energy of ionizing radiation and volume of irradiated suspensions. It is concluded that these observations are in agreement with the supposition that Čerenkov emission is responsible for the production of UV light damage and the phenomenon of photoreactivation observed after ionizing exposure of bacterial and yeast cells hypersensitive to UV light. A possible synergistic interaction of the damages produced by ionizations and excitations as well as a probable participation of UV component of ionizing radiation in the mechanism of hormesis and adaptive response observed after ionizing radiation exposure is discussed.

  8. Local factors modify the dose dependence of 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz; Yu, Shaohua

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure from a number of terrestrial sources is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence establishing whether high-LET radiation has similar effects has been lacking. We recently demonstrated that 600 MeV/n 56Fe induces atherosclerosis as well. Ten-week old male apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, a well-characterized atherosclerosis animal model, were exposed to 0 (control) 2, or 5Gy 56Fe targeted to the chest and neck. In these mice, 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis was similar in character to that induced by X-rays in the same mouse model and to that resulting from therapeutic radiation in cancer patients. Atherosclerosis was exacerbated by 56Fe only in targeted areas, however, suggesting a direct effect of the radiation on the arteries themselves. This is in contrast to some other risk factors, such as high cholesterol or tobacco use, which have systemic effects. The radiation dose required to accelerate development of atherosclerotic plaques, however, differed depending on the vessel that was irradiated and even the location within the vessel. For example, atherosclerosis in the aortic arch was accelerated only by the highest dose (5 Gy), while the carotid arteries and the aortic root showed effects at 2 Gy (a dose four- to eight-fold lower than the dose of X-rays that produces similar effects in this model). Since shear stress is disrupted in the area of the aortic root, it is likely that at least part of the site-specificity is due to additive or synergistic effects of radiation and local hydrodynamics. Other factors, such as local oxidative stress or gene expression may also have been involved. Since the pro-atherogenic effects of 56Fe depend on additional local factors, this suggests that radiation exposure, when unavoidable, might be mitigated by modification of factors unrelated to the radiation itself.

  9. Optimization of radiation dose reduction in cardiac computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Entrikin, Daniel W; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Carr, J Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has evolved at an unprecedented pace over the past decade, during which time it has proven to be an accurate and effective tool for imaging of the heart in a growing list of clinical applications. However, the rapid growth in the use of CT imaging in general has prompted appropriate concerns regarding increasing medical radiation exposure to patients, particularly with regard to potential long-term risks of radiation-induced malignancy on both individual and population levels. As with all medical imaging modalities, imaging the heart with CCTA should be performed in a manner that achieves diagnostic image quality while maintaining patient radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (As Low As Reasonably Achievable [ALARA] principle). The goal of this article is to provide the reader with a wide-ranging review of both primary and secondary techniques that are currently available to minimize patient radiation exposure. Some of the techniques described in this article are universal, whereas others may be scanner specific. By gaining a thorough understanding of the various tools and methodologies employed for reduction of radiation exposure, the cardiac imager should be able to formulate CCTA protocols appropriate for their equipment and their clinical applications, in a manner that optimally preserves diagnostic image quality and minimizes patient radiation dose.

  10. The consequence of day-to-day stochastic dose deviation from the planned dose in fractionated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhadip; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the important treatment procedures of cancer. The day-to-day delivered dose to the tissue in radiation therapy often deviates from the planned fixed dose per fraction. This day-to-day variation of radiation dose is stochastic. Here, we have developed the mathematical formulation to represent the day-to-day stochastic dose variation effect in radiation therapy. Our analysis shows that that the fixed dose delivery approximation under-estimates the biological effective dose, even if the average delivered dose per fraction is equal to the planned dose per fraction. The magnitude of the under-estimation effect relies upon the day-to-day stochastic dose variation level, the dose fraction size and the values of the radiobiological parameters of the tissue. We have further explored the application of our mathematical formulation for adaptive dose calculation. Our analysis implies that, compared to the premise of the Linear Quadratic Linear (LQL) framework, the Linear Quadratic framework based analytical formulation under-estimates the required dose per fraction necessary to produce the same biological effective dose as originally planned. Our study provides analytical formulation to calculate iso-effect in adaptive radiation therapy considering day-to-day stochastic dose deviation from planned dose and also indicates the potential utility of LQL framework in this context.

  11. Non linear processes modulated by low doses of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Alloni, Daniele; Babini, Gabriele; Morini, Jacopo; Baiocco, Giorgio

    The perturbation induced by radiation impinging on biological targets can stimulate the activation of several different pathways, spanning from the DNA damage processing to intra/extra -cellular signalling. In the mechanistic investigation of radiobiological damage this complex “system” response (e.g. omics, signalling networks, micro-environmental modifications, etc.) has to be taken into account, shifting from a focus on the DNA molecule solely to a systemic/collective view. An additional complication comes from the finding that the individual response of each of the involved processes is often not linear as a function of the dose. In this context, a systems biology approach to investigate the effects of low dose irradiations on intra/extra-cellular signalling will be presented, where low doses of radiation act as a mild perturbation of a robustly interconnected network. Results obtained through a multi-level investigation of both DNA damage repair processes (e.g. gamma-H2AX response) and of the activation kinetics for intra/extra cellular signalling pathways (e.g. NFkB activation) show that the overall cell response is dominated by non-linear processes - such as negative feedbacks - leading to possible non equilibrium steady states and to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Together with experimental data of radiation perturbed pathways, different modelling approaches will be also discussed.

  12. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  13. Recent Updates to Radiation Organ Dose Estimation Tool PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Wiarda, Dorothea; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    A computational phantom with moving arms and legs and an accompanying graphical user interface, PIMAL, was previously developed to enable radiation dose estimation for different postures in a user-friendly manner. This initial version of the software was useful in adjusting the posture, generating the corresponding MCNP input file, and performing the radiation transport simulations for dose calculations using MCNP5 or MCNPX. However, it only included one mathematical phantom model (hermaphrodite) and allowed only isotropic point sources. Recently, the software was enhanced by adding two more mathematical phantom models, a male and female, and the source features were enhanced significantly by adding internal and external source options in a pull-down menu. Although the initial version of the software included only a mathematical hermaphrodite phantom, the features and models in the software are constantly being enhanced by adding more phantoms as well as other options to enable dose assessment for different configurations/cases in a user-friendly manner. In this latest version of the software, ICRP's recently released reference male and female voxel phantoms are included in a pull-down menu. The male and female models are described using 7 and 14 million voxels, respectively. Currently, the software is being modified further to include the International Commission on Radiation Protection's (ICRP) reference male and female voxel phantoms. Additionally, some case studies are being implemented and included in a library of input files. This paper describes recent updates to the software.

  14. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-11-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age.

  15. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  16. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM02, or about 7.509M02 ≈ 6.268 × 1076(M0/Msolar)2, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M02 ≈ 1.254 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2, and then decreases back down to 4πM02 = 1.049 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2.

  17. Radiation dose estimate in small animal SPECT and PET.

    PubMed

    Funk, Tobias; Sun, Mingshan; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2004-09-01

    Calculations of radiation dose are important in assessing the medical and biological implications of ionizing radiation in medical imaging techniques such as SPECT and PET. In contrast, radiation dose estimates of SPECT and PET imaging of small animals are not very well established. For that reason we have estimated the whole-body radiation dose to mice and rats for isotopes such as 18F, 99mTc, 201Tl, (111)In, 123I, and 125I that are used commonly for small animal imaging. We have approximated mouse and rat bodies with uniform soft tissue equivalent ellipsoids. The mouse and rat sized ellipsoids had a mass of 30 g and 300 g, respectively, and a ratio of the principal axes of 1:1:4 and 0.7:1:4. The absorbed fractions for various photon energies have been calculated using the Monte Carlo software package MCNP. Using these values, we then calculated MIRD S-values for two geometries that model the distribution of activity in the animal body: (a) a central point source and (b) a homogeneously distributed source, and compared these values against S-value calculations for small ellipsoids tabulated in MIRD Pamphlet 8 to validate our results. Finally we calculated the radiation dose taking into account the biological half-life of the radiopharmaceuticals and the amount of activity administered. Our calculations produced S-values between 1.06 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s and 2.77 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for SPECT agents, and 15.0 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for the PET agent 18F, assuming mouse sized ellipsoids with uniform source distribution. The S-values for a central point source in an ellipsoid are about 10% higher than the values obtained for the uniform source distribution. Furthermore, the S-values for mouse sized ellipsoids are approximately 10 times higher than for the rat sized ellipsoids reflecting the difference in mass. We reviewed published data to obtain administered radioactivity and residence times for small animal imaging. From these values and our computed S-values we estimated

  18. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    PubMed

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  19. Ionizing Radiation Dose Due to the Use of Agricultural Fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umisedo, Nancy K.; Okuno, Emico; Colacioppo, Sérgio; Medina, Nilberto H.; Hiodo, Francisco Y.

    2008-08-01

    The transference of radionuclides from the fertilizers to/and from soils to the foodstuffs can represent an increment in the internal dose when the vegetables are consumed by the human beings. This work evaluates the contribution of fertilizers to the increase of radiation level in the environment and of dose to the people. Samples of fertilizers, soils and vegetables produced in farms located in the neighbourhood of São Paulo city in the State of São Paulo, Brazil were analysed through gamma spectroscopy. The values of specific activity of 40K, 238U and 232Th show that there is no significant transference of natural radionuclides from fertilizers to the final product of the food chain. The annual committed effective dose due to the ingestion of 40K contained in the group of consumed vegetables analysed in this work resulted in the very low value of 0.882 μSv.

  20. Ionizing Radiation Dose Due to the Use of Agricultural Fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Umisedo, Nancy K.; Okuno, Emico; Medina, Nilberto H.; Colacioppo, Sergio; Hiodo, Francisco Y.

    2008-08-07

    The transference of radionuclides from the fertilizers to/and from soils to the foodstuffs can represent an increment in the internal dose when the vegetables are consumed by the human beings. This work evaluates the contribution of fertilizers to the increase of radiation level in the environment and of dose to the people. Samples of fertilizers, soils and vegetables produced in farms located in the neighbourhood of Sao Paulo city in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil were analysed through gamma spectroscopy. The values of specific activity of {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th show that there is no significant transference of natural radionuclides from fertilizers to the final product of the food chain. The annual committed effective dose due to the ingestion of {sup 40}K contained in the group of consumed vegetables analysed in this work resulted in the very low value of 0.882 {mu}Sv.

  1. Estimation of Radiation Dose for a Sitting Phantom Using PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    To assess the radiation dose in different configurations when needed (e.g., occupational exposure or public exposure in a radiologically significant event), the mathematical phantom has recently been revised to enable freely moving abilities for arms and legs. The revised phantom is called PIMAL: Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs. Additionally, a graphical user interface has been developed to assist the analyst with input preparation and output manipulation. To investigate the impact of the phantom configuration on the estimated organ doses, PIMAL has been used in a different posture than the standard vertical-upright position. In this paper, the estimated organ and effective dose values for a representative posture, the phantom in a sitting position, compared with those for the phantom in standing position, are presented.

  2. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  3. Shuttle radiation dose measurements in the International Space Station orbits.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Gautam D

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is now a reality with the start of a permanent human presence on board. Radiation presents a serious risk to the health and safety of the astronauts, and there is a clear requirement for estimating their exposures prior to and after flights. Predictions of the dose rate at times other than solar minimum or solar maximum have not been possible, because there has been no method to calculate the trapped-particle spectrum at intermediate times. Over the last few years, a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) has been flown at a fixed mid-deck location on board the Space Shuttle in 51.65 degrees inclination flights. These flights have provided data that cover the expected changes in the dose rates due to changes in altitude and changes in solar activity from the solar minimum to the solar maximum of the current 23rd solar cycle. Based on these data, a simple function of the solar deceleration potential has been derived that can be used to predict the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rates to within +/-10%. For altitudes to be covered by the ISS, the dose rate due to the trapped particles is found to be a power-law function, rho(-2/3), of the atmospheric density, rho. This relationship can be used to predict trapped dose rates inside these spacecraft to +/-10% throughout the solar cycle. Thus, given the shielding distribution for a location inside the Space Shuttle or inside an ISS module, this approach can be used to predict the combined GCR + trapped dose rate to better than +/-15% for quiet solar conditions.

  4. Chernobyl Doses. Volume 1. Analysis of Forest Canopy Radiation Response from Multispectral Imagery and the Relationship to Doses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    AD-A284 746 Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 DNA-TR-92-37-V1 Chernobyl Doses Volume 1-Analysis of Forest Canopy Radiation Response...REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 940901 Technical 870929- 930930 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Chernobyl Doses Volume 1-Analysis of...volume of the report Chernobyl Doses presents details of a new, quantitative method for remotely sensing ionizing radiation dose to vegetation

  5. Physical dependence potential of daily tramadol dosing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Bigelow, George E.; Strain, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Tramadol is an atypical, mixed-mechanism analgesic involving both opioid and catecholamine processes that appears to have low abuse potential and may be useful as a treatment for opioid dependence. Objectives The current study assessed the level of physical dependence and opioid blockade efficacy produced by daily maintenance on oral tramadol. Methods Nine residential opioid-dependent adults were maintained on two doses of daily oral tramadol (200 and 800 mg) for approximately 4-week intervals in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. The acute effects of intramuscular placebo, naloxone (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg), and hydromorphone (1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 mg) were tested under double-blind, randomized conditions. Outcomes included observer- and subject-rated measures and physiologic indices. Results Challenge doses of naloxone resulted in significantly higher mean peak withdrawal scores compared to pla