Science.gov

Sample records for radiation fields encountered

  1. Frequency of encounter of aircraft in a random horizontal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, J. D.; Smith, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations were made of the frequency of encounter as a function of azimuth of encounter of a passing aircraft with the aircraft in a random planar horizontal field. All the field aircraft moved at a constant speed but in random directions. These calculations included the total frequency of encounter with the aircraft of the field and the frequency of encounter with those aircraft of the field which were encountered in the fore quadrant, in the lateral quadrants, and in the rear quadrant; the calculations were made for various speed ratios of the field aircraft and the passing aircraft.

  2. Jupiter radiation test levels and their expected impact on an encounter mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The upper limit, of electron and proton fluences for a thermoelectric outer planet spacecraft mission in a near-Jupiter environment, for use as radiation design restraints, were extracted from a model of the Jovian trapped radiation belts. Considerations of radiation effects in semiconductor devices were employed to construct simplified radiation test levels based on the design restraints. Corresponding levels, based on the nominal belt models, are one to three orders of magnitude smaller. In terms of expected radiation-induced degradation in semiconductor devices, an encounter with an environment as severe as the design restraints would require hardening the system in order to guarantee high reliability. On the other hand, the nominal levels would only necessitate care in the selection of components and the avoidance of certain semiconductor components.

  3. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  4. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  5. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  6. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  7. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  8. Small fields: Nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Ding, George X.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields {>=}4x4 cm{sup 2}, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams.

  9. Development and Characterization of a High Throughput Screen to investigate the delayed Effects of Radiations Commonly Encountered in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. F.

    Astronauts based on the space station or on long-term space missions will be exposed to high Z radiations in the cosmic environment In order to evaluate the potentially deleterious effects of exposure to radiations commonly encountered in space we have developed and characterized a high throughput assay to detect mutation deletion events and or hyperrecombination in the progeny of exposed cells This assay is based on a plasmid vector containing a green fluorescence protein reporter construct We have shown that after stable transfection of the vector into human or hamster cells this construct can identify mutations specifically base changes and deletions as well as recombination events e g gene conversion or homologous recombination occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation Our focus has been on those events occurring in the progeny of an irradiated cell that are potentially associated with radiation induced genomic instability rather than the more conventional assays that evaluate the direct immediate effects of radiation exposure Considerable time has been spent automating analysis of surviving colonies as a function of time after irradiation in order to determine when delayed instability is induced and the consequences of this delayed instability The assay is now automated permitting the evaluation of potentially rare events associated with low dose low dose rate radiations commonly encountered in space

  10. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-03-01

    Application is made of two different generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalizations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance.

  11. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  12. Gravitational radiative corrections from effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Ross, Andreas

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we construct an effective field theory (EFT) that describes long wavelength gravitational radiation from compact systems. To leading order, this EFT consists of the multipole expansion, which we describe in terms of a diffeomorphism invariant point particle Lagrangian. The EFT also systematically captures 'post-Minkowskian' corrections to the multipole expansion due to nonlinear terms in general relativity. Specifically, we compute long distance corrections from the coupling of the (mass) monopole moment to the quadrupole moment, including up to two mass insertions. Along the way, we encounter both logarithmic short distance (UV) and long wavelength (IR) divergences. We show that the UV divergences can be (1) absorbed into a renormalization of the multipole moments and (2) resummed via the renormalization group. The IR singularities are shown to cancel from properly defined physical observables. As a concrete example of the formalism, we use this EFT to reproduce a number of post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational wave energy flux from nonrelativistic binaries, including long distance effects up to 3 post-Newtonian (v{sup 6}) order. Our results verify that the factorization of scales proposed in the NRGR framework of Goldberger and Rothstein is consistent up to order 3PN.

  13. Place as a social space: fields of encounter relating to the local sustainability process.

    PubMed

    Dumreicher, Heidi; Kolb, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    The paper shows how sustainability questions relate to the local space. The local place is not a static entity, but a dynamic one, undergoing constant changes, and it is the rapid social and material processes within the given local situation that is a challenge for the Chinese villages and their integrity. The following article considers the cohesion between the dwellers' emotional co-ownership of their local space and the sustainability process as a driving force in social, economic and ecological development. We bring together the classification of the seven fields of encounter, which were developed out of the empirical data of the Chinese case study villages, and sustainability oriented management considerations for all levels of this concept. We do not pretend to know the solutions, but describe a set of interrelated fields that can be anchor points for placing the solutions and show in which fields action and intervention is possible. In our concept of sustainability, every spatial field has its special meaning, needs special measures and policies and has different connotations to concepts like responsibility, family values or communication systems. We see the social sustainability process as a support for the empowerment of the local dwellers, and the SUCCESS research has encouraged the villages to find suitable sustainability oriented solutions for their natural and societal situation. Before entering the discussion about the chances and potential of a sustainability approach for the Chinese villages, it is first necessary to accept the fact that rural villages play a primordial role in Chinese society and that their potential can strengthen future pathways for China.

  14. Binary-Encounter-Bethe ionisation cross sections for simulation of DNA damage by the direct effect of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Plante, I; Cucinotta, F A

    2015-09-01

    DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionising radiation. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) cross sections was developed. The differential cross sections for ionisation of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates are calculated using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of each orbital as parameters. The resulting cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use for Monte-Carlo codes that randomly sample the energy loss occurring during an ionisation event. We also describe an algorithm to simulate the interactions of electrons with DNA in the radiation transport code RITRACKS using the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates.

  15. Semianalytical estimates of scattering thresholds and gravitational radiation in ultrarelativistic black hole encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Hinderer, Tanja; Lemos, Madalena; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-05-15

    Ultrarelativistic collisions of black holes are ideal gedanken experiments to study the nonlinearities of general relativity. In this paper we use semianalytical tools to better understand the nature of these collisions and the emitted gravitational radiation. We explain many features of the energy spectra extracted from numerical relativity simulations using two complementary semianalytical calculations. In the first calculation we estimate the radiation by a 'zero-frequency limit' analysis of the collision of two point particles with finite impact parameter. In the second calculation we replace one of the black holes by a point particle plunging with arbitrary energy and impact parameter into a Schwarzschild black hole, and we explore the multipolar structure of the radiation paying particular attention to the near-critical regime. We also use a geodesic analogy to provide qualitative estimates of the dependence of the scattering threshold on the black hole spin and on the dimensionality of the spacetime.

  16. The response of survey meters to pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1987-11-01

    The response of most survey meters to steady radiation fields is fairly well known and documented. However, hardly any data is available in the literature regarding the response of these instruments to pulsed radiation. Pulsed radiation fields are encountered, e.g., in the vicinity of linear electron accelerators or klystrons. An instrument that ordinarily responds well to the average dose rate spread out evenly in time may not be able to cope with such a high dose rate. Instruments which have long dead times such as Geiger Mueller and proportional counters tend to become saturated in such fields and only count repetition rate. Ionization chambers are less influenced, however, they must be operated with adequate voltage to overcome recombination losses. Scintillation survey meters may become non-linear at higher dose rates for pulsed radiation because the photomultiplier cannot handle the instantaneous currents that are required. Because of the need to test the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed fields, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built (I/sub p/87). A brief description of this facility is given along with tests of several different instruments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  18. Radiated fields from an electromagnetic pulse simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, M.; Delisle, G. Y.; Kashyap, S.

    Simulators of electromagnetic pulses allow generation within a limited time of very high-intensity fields such as those produced in a nuclear explosion. These fields can be radiated out of the test zone at a lower but nevertheless significant level; if the intensity of these fields is sufficiently high, damage to humans and electronic equipment can result. An evaluation of the potential danger of these simulator emissions requires knowledge of the amplitude, duration, and the energy of the radiated impulses. A technique is presented for calculating the fields radiated by a parallel-plane electromagnetic pulse simulator. The same method can also be applied to a rhombic type simulator. Sample numerical results are presented along with the calculations of the energy and power density and a discussion of the formation of the field in the frequency domain.

  19. Planktonic encounter rates in homogeneous isotropic turbulence: the case of predators with limited fields of sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D M

    2003-05-07

    It is a well-established fact that encounter rates between different species of planktonic microorganism, either swimming, or passively advected by the flow, are enhanced in the presence of turbulence. However, due to the complexity of the various calculations involved, current encounter rate theories are based on a number of simplifying approximations, which do not reflect reality. In particular, a typical planktonic predator is usually assumed to have perfect 'all round vision', i.e. it can perceive a prey particle at any relative orientation, provided it lies within some given contact radius R. Unfortunately, there is a wide body of experimental evidence that this is not the case. In this study the encounter problem for a predator with a limited field of sensory perception, swimming in a turbulent flow, is examined from first principles and a number of new modelling ideas proposed. A wide range of kinematic simulations are also undertaken to test these predictions. Particular attention is paid to the swimming strategy such a predator might undertake to enhance its encounter rate. It turns out that the predicted optimum swimming strategies differ radically from the results of previous work. Empirical evidence is also presented which appears to support these new findings.

  20. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-03-25

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention.

  1. Modeling of the increase of the electric field in the encounter between a negative and a positive streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihaddadene, K. M. A.; Celestin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The encounter between negative and positive streamers has recently been suggested to be a plausible mechanism explaining the production of X-rays by discharges in air [Cooray et al., JASTP, 71,1890, 2009; Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 45, 425202, 2012]. Moreover, encounters between streamers of different polarities are very common. Indeed, during the formation of a new leader step, the negative streamer zone around the tip of a negative leader and the positive streamers initiated from the positive part of a bidirectional space leader strongly interact. In laboratory experiments, when streamers are approaching a sharp electrode, streamers with the opposite polarity are initiated from the electrode and collide with the former streamers. Given that positive and negative streamers respectively carry positive and negative charges at their fronts, it is reasonable to consider that the electric field between a negative and a positive streamer would increase as the two streamers are approaching each other. However, this is a non-linear problem that depends on the dynamics of both streamers. Indeed, an increase of the electric field above the conventional breakdown threshold field will increase the electron density, and therefore the conductivity, at this location, which in turn, will tend to reduce the electric field. In this work, we will simulate numerically encounters between negative and positive streamers in order to examine the behavior of the maximum electric field that can be reached. We will quantify whether and how such collisions between streamers can increase the electric field up to sufficient magnitudes to produce thermal runaway electrons and the associated X-rays.

  2. The radiation field in multilayer media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viik, T.

    In the atmospheres of planets and stars there may exist sufficiently thick plane-parallel layers in which the optical properties of the medium, e.g. the albedo of single scattering, the phase function etc., are nearly constant. If we use finite difference, differential or integral methods to find the radiation field in such a layer, we have to integrate the radiative transfer equation in short steps due to the inner nature of these methods.

  3. Age as a risk factor for the disruption of cognitive performance by exposure to the types of radiation encounted on exploratory class missions to other planets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to the types of radiation encountered in space (particles of high energy and charge [HZE particles]) produces changes in neurocognitive performance similar to those observed in the aged organism. As such, it is possible that there would be an interaction between the effects of exposure to ...

  4. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  5. Quantum phenomena and the zeropoint radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, L.; Cetto, A. M.

    1994-06-01

    The stationary solutions for a bound electron immersed in the random zeropoint radiation field of stochastic electrodynamics are studied, under the assumption that the characteristic Fourier frequencies of these solutions are not random. Under this assumption, the response of the particle to the field is linear and does not mix frequencies, irrespectively of the form of the binding force; the fluctuations of the random field fix the scale of the response. The effective radiation field that supports the stationary states of motion is no longer the free vacuum field, but a modified form of it with new statistical properties. The theory is expressed naturally in terms of matrices (or operators), and it leads to the Heisenberg equations and the Hilbert space formalism of quantum mechanics in the radiationless approximation. The connection with the poissonian formulation of stochastic electrodynamics is also established. At the end we briefly discuss a few important aspects of quantum mechanics which the present theory helps to clarify.

  6. Radiation reaction in high-intensity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-10-01

    Since the development of a radiating electron model by Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model of the so-called "radiation reaction". Recently, this effect has become important in ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a way of stabilizing the radiation reaction by quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum fluctuation [K Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014); K. Seto, Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. On the other hand, the modification of the radiated field by highly intense incoming laser fields should be taken into account when the laser intensity is higher than 10^{22} W/cm2, which could be achieved by next-generation ultra-short-pulse 10 PW lasers, like the ones under construction for the ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose a running charge-mass method for the description of the QED-based synchrotron radiation by high-intensity external fields with stabilization by the QED vacuum fluctuation as an extension from the model by Dirac.

  7. Formation of secondary radiation fields at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, G.; Paraipan, M.

    2009-09-01

    The crucial points of a radiation shielding design for a relativistic heavy ion accelerator are the source term problem, neutron fluence and dose attenuation characteristics of the shielding. Simulations of the radiation shielding for JINR's Nuclotron-Based Ion Facility (NICA) project were carried out using the GEANT4 code. Some regularities in the secondary neutron field generation at the 4.5 GeV/n uranium beam interaction with thick targets are discussed. Neutron attenuation by the ordinary concrete shielding of NICA was considered as well.

  8. Challenges Social Work Students Encounter in International Field Placements and Recommendations for Responsible Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Lenore E.; Lough, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Social work students often face personal and institutional challenges prior to, during, and after international field placements. If not managed, these challenges may compromise students' professional development and hinder their meaningful contribution to placements abroad, which is of particular concern when students from the Global North are…

  9. Radiation Effects on Current Field Programmable Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; LaBel, K.; Wang, J. J.; Cronquist, B.; Koga, R.; Penzin, S.; Swift, G.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturers of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAS) take different technological and architectural approaches that directly affect radiation performance. Similar y technological and architectural features are used in related technologies such as programmable substrates and quick-turn application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). After analyzing current technologies and architectures and their radiation-effects implications, this paper includes extensive test data quantifying various devices total dose and single event susceptibilities, including performance degradation effects and temporary or permanent re-configuration faults. Test results will concentrate on recent technologies being used in space flight electronic systems and those being developed for use in the near term. This paper will provide the first extensive study of various configuration memories used in programmable devices. Radiation performance limits and their impacts will be discussed for each design. In addition, the interplay between device scaling, process, bias voltage, design, and architecture will be explored. Lastly, areas of ongoing research will be discussed.

  10. Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This essay, which is the fifth in the series “Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology”, is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes. PMID:24885471

  11. Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Ingvar

    2014-05-02

    This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

  12. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  13. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Jones, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  14. The Stellar Extreme-Ultraviolet Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John

    1998-04-01

    The local extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation field from stellar sources has been determined by combining the EUV spectra of 54 stars, taken with the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. The resultant spectrum over the range 70-730 Å is estimated to be 95% complete above 400 Å and 90% complete above 200 Å. The flux contributed by two B stars and three hot white dwarfs dominate the spectrum except at the shortest wavelengths, where an assortment of EUV source types contribute. The high electron densities measured toward nearby stars can be accounted for by photoionization from this radiation field, but the spectrum is too soft to explain the overionization of helium with respect to hydrogen recently measure in the Local Cloud.

  15. Radiative instabilities in sheared magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure and growth rate of the radiative instability in a sheared magnetic field B have been calculated analytically using the Braginskii fluid equations. In a shear layer, temperature and density perturbations are linked by the propagation of sound waves parallel to the local magnetic field. As a consequence, density clumping or condensation plays an important role in driving the instability. Parallel thermal conduction localizes the mode to a narrow layer where K(parallel) is small and stabilizes short wavelengths k larger-than(c) where k(c) depends on the local radiation and conduction rates. Thermal coupling to ions also limits the width of the unstable spectrum. It is shown that a broad spectrum of modes is typically unstable in tokamak edge plasmas and it is argued that this instability is sufficiently robust to drive the large-amplitude density fluctuations often measured there.

  16. Modelling microscopic features of streamer encounters, electric fields, electron beams and X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, C.; Kochkin, P.; Ebert, U.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms emit terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), beams of photons with quantum energies ofup to 40 MeV. Likewise electric discharges in the laboratory, mimicing lightning on a small spatial andenergetic scale, emit X-rays whose energies are limited by the available potential difference betweenthe two electrodes. For a maximal available difference of 1 MV and a gap distance of 1 m between the twoelectrodes, we will present the energy and spatial distribution of generated X-rays.For that we have followed the motion of preaccelerated, monoenergetic and monodirectional electronbeams with energies between 100 keV and the maximal available energy of 1 MeV for different electricfield configurations using a particle Monte Carlo code. Omitting any field, we present the subsequent energy and spatial distribution of X-raysand analyse how the photon number depends on the initial electron energy. Fig. 1 shows the position and energy of photons generated by Bremsstrahlung after 0.3 ns by beams of 500 000 electrons with initial energies of 1 MeV moving in the zdirection in STP air. The electrons have generated electron avalanches and all have cooleddown and attached to oxygen after 0.3 ns. Every cross represents one photon projected onto the xz plane; the photon energies Eγ are color coded. We see that photons with energies of approx. 1 MeV can be produced and that the high-energy tail of X-rays is beamedtowards the direction of the initial electron beam whereas low-energy photons show a more isotropicbehaviour. Analysing the cross sections of photons interacting with air we conclude that photons travelseveral meters in air and can reach detectors several meters from the position of the discharge. Byestimating the electric field ahead of the discharge corona and by simulating the motion of electronbeams in these fields, we exclude that electrons travel as far as photons and disturb the measured X-raysignal.

  17. Cellular response to modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge Mackonis, E.; Suchowerska, N.; Zhang, M.; Ebert, M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Jackson, M.

    2007-09-01

    Cell survival following exposure to spatially modulated beams, as created by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is investigated. In vitro experiments were performed using malignant melanoma cells (MM576) exposed to a therapeutic megavoltage photon beam. We compared cell survival in modulated fields with cell survival in uniform control fields. Three different spatial modulations of the field were used: a control 'uniform' field in which all cells in a flask were uniformly exposed; a 'quarter' field in which 25% of cells at one end of the flask were exposed and a 'striped' field in which 25% of cells were exposed in three parallel stripes. The cell survival in both the shielded and unshielded regions of the modulated fields, as determined by a clonogenic assay, were compared to the cell survival in the uniform field. We have distinguished three ways in which cell survival is influenced by the fate of neighbouring cells. The first of these (type I effect) is the previously reported classical Bystander effect, where cell survival is reduced when communicating with irradiated cells. We find two new types of Bystander effect. The type II effect is an observed increase in cell survival when nearby cells receive a lethal dose. The type III effect is an increase in the survival of cells receiving a high dose of radiation, when nearby cells receive a low dose. These observations of the Bystander effects emphasize the need for improved radiobiological models, which include communicated effects and account for the effects of modulated dose distribution.

  18. Limited-field radiation for bifocal germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lafay-Cousin, Lucie . E-mail: lucie.lafay-cousin@sickkids.ca; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mabbott, Donald; Spiegler, Brenda; Drake, Jim; Bartels, Ute; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of bifocal germinomas treated with chemotherapy followed by focal radiation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria included radiologic diagnosis of bifocal germinoma involving the pineal and neurohypophyseal region, no evidence of dissemination on spinal MRI, negative results from cerebrospinal fluid cytologic evaluation, and negative tumor markers. Results: Between 1995 and 2004, 6 patients (5 male, 1 female; median age, 12.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All had symptoms of diabetes insipidus at presentation. On MRI, 4 patients had a pineal and suprasellar mass, and 2 had a pineal mass associated with abnormal neurohypophyseal enhancement. All patients received chemotherapy followed by limited-field radiation and achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. The radiation field involved the whole ventricular system (range, 2,400-4,000 cGy) with or without a boost to the primary lesions. All patients remain in complete remission at a median follow-up of 48.1 months (range, 9-73.4 months). Conclusions: This experience suggests that bifocal germinoma can be considered a locoregional rather than a metastatic disease. Chemotherapy and focal radiotherapy might be sufficient to provide excellent outcomes. Staging refinement with new diagnostic tools will likely increase the incidence of the entity.

  19. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program`s capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure.

  20. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  1. Excitation of magnetization using a modulated radiation damping field.

    PubMed

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2006-10-12

    In this work, pulsed-field gradients are used to modulate the radiation damping field generated by the detection coil in an NMR experiment in order that spins with significantly different chemical shifts can affect one another via the radiation damping field. Experiments performed on solutions of acetone/water and acetone/DMSO/water demonstrate that spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength can still be coupled by modulating the radiation damping field. Implications for applications in high-field NMR and for developing sensitive magnetization detectors are discussed.

  2. Temperature field for radiative tomato peeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccurullo, G.; Giordano, L.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays peeling of tomatoes is performed by using steam or lye, which are expensive and polluting techniques, thus sustainable alternatives are searched for dry peeling and, among that, radiative heating seems to be a fairly promising method. This paper aims to speed up the prediction of surface temperatures useful for realizing dry-peeling, thus a 1D-analytical model for the unsteady temperature field in a rotating tomato exposed to a radiative heating source is presented. Since only short times are of interest for the problem at hand, the model involves a semi-infinite slab cooled by convective heat transfer while heated by a pulsating heat source. The model being linear, the solution is derived following the Laplace Transform method. A 3D finite element model of the rotating tomato is introduced as well in order to validate the analytical solution. A satisfactory agreement is attained. Therefore, two different ways to predict the onset of the peeling conditions are available which can be of help for proper design of peeling plants. Particular attention is paid to study surface temperature uniformity, that being a critical parameter for realizing an easy tomato peeling.

  3. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian; Gu, Yu-qiu

    2017-04-01

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  4. Electromagnetic field radiation model for lightning strokes to tall structures

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, H.; Janischewskyj, W.; Hussein, A.M.; Chisholm, W.A.; Chang, J.S.; Rusan, R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes observation and analysis of electromagnetic field radiation from lightning strokes to tall structures. Electromagnetic field waveforms and current waveforms of lightning strokes to the CN Tower have been simultaneously measured since 1991. A new calculation model of electromagnetic field radiation is proposed. The proposed model consists of the lightning current propagation and distribution model and the electromagnetic field radiation model. Electromagnetic fields calculated by the proposed model, based on the observed lightning current at the CN Tower, agree well with the observed fields at 2km north of the tower.

  5. Polarization of radiation of electrons in highly turbulent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosekin, A. Yu.; Kelner, S. R.; Aharonian, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the polarization properties of the jitter and synchrotron radiation produced by electrons in highly turbulent anisotropic magnetic fields. The net polarization is provided by the geometry of the magnetic field the directions of which are parallel to a certain plane. Such conditions may appear in the relativistic shocks during the amplification of the magnetic field through the so-called Weibel instability. While the polarization properties of the jitter radiation allows extraction of direct information on the turbulence spectrum as well as the geometry of magnetic field, the polarization of the synchrotron radiation reflects the distribution of the magnetic field over its strength. For the isotropic distribution of monoenergetic electrons, we found that the degree of polarization of the synchrotron radiation is larger than the polarization of the jitter radiation. For the power-law energy distribution of electrons the relation between the degree of polarization of synchrotron and jitter radiation depends on the spectral index of the distribution.

  6. Radiation burst from a single {gamma}-photon field

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhmuratov, R. N.; Vagizov, F.; Kocharovskaya, O.

    2011-10-15

    The radiation burst from a single {gamma}-photon field interacting with a dense resonant absorber is studied theoretically and experimentally. This effect was discovered for the fist time by P. Helisto et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2037 (1991)] and it was named the ''gamma echo''. The echo is generated by a 180 Degree-Sign phase shift of the incident radiation field, attained by an abrupt change of the position of the absorber with respect to the radiation source during the coherence time of the photon wave packet. Three distinguishing cases of the gamma echo are considered; i.e., the photon is in exact resonance with the absorber, close to resonance (on the slope of the absorption line), and far from resonance (on the far wings of the resonance line). In resonance the amplitude of the radiation burst is two times larger than the amplitude of the input radiation field just before its phase shift. This burst was explained by Helisto et al. as a result of constructive interference of the coherently scattered field with the phase-shifted input field, both having almost the same amplitude. We found that out of resonance the scattered radiation field acquires an additional component with almost the same amplitude as the amplitude of the incident radiation field. The phase of the additional field depends on the optical thickness of the absorber and resonant detuning. Far from resonance this field interferes destructively with the phase-shifted incident radiation field and radiation quenching is observed. Close to resonance the three fields interfere constructively and the amplitude of the radiation burst is three times larger than the amplitude of the input radiation field.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation environment encountered by a biochip during a space mission to Mars.

    PubMed

    Le Postollec, A; Incerti, S; Dobrijevic, M; Desorgher, L; Santin, G; Moretto, P; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O; Coussot, G; Dartnell, L; Nieminen, P

    2009-04-01

    Simulations with a Monte Carlo tool kit have been performed to determine the radiation environment a specific device, called a biochip, would face if it were placed into a rover bound to explore Mars' surface. A biochip is a miniaturized device that can be used to detect organic molecules in situ. Its specific detection part is constituted of proteins whose behavior under cosmic radiation is completely unknown and must be investigated to ensure a good functioning of the device under space conditions. The aim of this study is to define particle species and energy ranges that could be relevant to investigate during experiments on irradiation beam facilities. Several primary particles have been considered for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar energetic particle (SEP) contributions. Ionizing doses accumulated in the biochip and differential fluxes of protons, alphas, neutrons, gammas, and electrons have been established for both the Earth-Mars transit and the journey at Mars' surface. Neutrons and gammas appear as dominant species on martian soil, whereas protons dominate during the interplanetary travel. Depending on solar event occurrence during the mission, an ionizing dose of around a few Grays (1 Gy = 100 rad) is expected.

  8. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-02-12

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape.

  9. Self-consistent undulator radiation via Lienard-Wiechert fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Luis R.; Tecimer, Musit; Kimel, Isidoro

    1995-09-01

    Using Lienard-Wiechert fields and the Lorentz Force relation we present self consistent 3D radiation studies of electron beams moving through periodic electromagnetic structures such as those present in synchrotrons and free-electron laser undulators. Besides providing an economical means of calculating 3D vector radiation fields, our approach yields new insights into individual electron motion as it is driven by both, the velocity fields (Coulomb Fields) and the radiation fields generated by other electrons. We present results of electron beam compression resulting from longitudinal radiation forces competing in opposition with repulsive velocity field forces. We discuss results of noiseless 3D Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission in the X-Ray region resulting from the interaction of a filamentary electron beam with a circularly polarized magnetic undulator.

  10. Radiation field associated with Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accuracy of dosimetric estimates can determine the value of the atomic bomb survivor experience in establishing radiation risks. The status of a major revision of this dosimetry, initiated in 1980, is assessed. 3 references, 6 figures.

  11. Radiation reaction in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Atsushi

    2002-11-01

    We investigate radiation-reaction effects for a charged scalar particle accelerated by an external potential realized as a space-dependent mass term in quantum electrodynamics. In particular, we calculate the position shift of the final-state wave packet of the charged particle due to radiation at lowest order in the fine structure constant α and in the small ħ approximation. We show that it disagrees with the result obtained using the Lorentz-Dirac formula for the radiation-reaction force, and that it agrees with the classical theory if one assumes that the particle loses its energy to radiation at each moment of time according to the Larmor formula in the static frame of the potential. However, the discrepancy is much smaller than the Compton wavelength of the particle. We also point out that the electromagnetic correction to the potential has no classical limit.

  12. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOEpatents

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  13. Revisiting thermal radiation in the near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Thermal radiation is generally assumed to be both spatially and temporally incoherent. In this paper, we challenge this idea. It is possible to design incandescent sources that are directional and spectrally selective by taking advantage of surface waves. We also report the discovery of the enhancement by several orders of magnitude of the energy density close to an interface at a particular frequency as well as the enhancement of the radiative flux between two interfaces when surface phonon polaritons can be excited. These results lead to the design of a novel class of infrared incandescent sources with potential applications in spectroscopy and thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Near-field radiative thermal transport: From theory to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bai Fiorino, Anthony; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Radiative thermal transport via the fluctuating electromagnetic near-field has recently attracted increasing attention due to its fundamental importance and its impact on a range of applications from data storage to thermal management and energy conversion. After a brief historical account of radiative thermal transport, we summarize the basics of fluctuational electrodynamics, a theoretical framework for the study of radiative heat transfer in terms of thermally excited propagating and evanescent electromagnetic waves. Various approaches to modeling near-field thermal transport are briefly discussed, together with key results and proposals for manipulation and utilization of radiative heat flow. Subsequently, we review the experimental advances in the characterization of both near-field heat flow and energy density. We conclude with remarks on the opportunities and challenges for future explorations of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale.

  15. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  16. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; Wishart, James F.; Hao, Yufeng; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. Here, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. We believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.

  17. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; ...

    2016-10-11

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally,more » we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.« less

  18. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; Wishart, James F.; Hao, Yufeng; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2016-10-11

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally, we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.

  19. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  20. Radiation tolerant silicon nitride insulated gate field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Metal-Insulated-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor /MISFET/ device uses a silicon nitride passivation layer over a thin silicon oxide layer to enhance the radiation tolerance. It is useful in electronic systems exposed to space radiation environment or the effects of nuclear weapons.

  1. About the National Center for Radiation Field Operations (NCRFO)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Center for Radiation Field Operations (NCRFO) is an essential component of EPA’s Radiological Emergency Response Team (RERT) and is key to EPA's response to radiological emergencies and accidents nationwide.

  2. Hawking radiation of a vector field and gravitational anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Keiju; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2007-10-15

    Recently, the relation between Hawking radiation and gravitational anomalies has been used to estimate the flux of Hawking radiation for a large class of black objects. In this paper, we extend the formalism, originally proposed by Robinson and Wilczek, to the Hawking radiation of vector particles (photons). It is explicitly shown, with the Hamiltonian formalism, that the theory of an electromagnetic field on d-dimensional spherical black holes reduces to one of an infinite number of massive complex scalar fields on 2-dimensional spacetime, for which the usual anomaly-cancellation method is available. It is found that the total energy emitted from the horizon for the electromagnetic field is just (d-2) times that for a scalar field. The results support the picture that Hawking radiation can be regarded as an anomaly eliminator on horizons. Possible extensions and applications of the analysis are discussed.

  3. School Facilities and Electric and Magnetic Field Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that electric and magnetic field radiation poses a health hazard should be recognized during the planning and designing of a school. A preconstruction assessment of possible exposure should be evaluated before the start of construction. (MLF)

  4. Stretched exponential survival statistics for microorganisms in radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, Andrzej; Bogus, Wlodzimierz

    1999-11-01

    The so-called concave or tailed survival curves are reported both for multi and single species bacterial populations. Taking as an example Bacillus pumilus, frequently encountered in decontamination studies, it is shown that the tailed survival curves are adequately described by stretched (0< α<1) exponential SF=exp[-( D/ D0) α], where SF denotes the fraction of species surviving the irradiation dose D, D0 is the effective dose, and α is the dispersion parameter interpreted phenomenologically in terms of radiation sensivity distribution for single species population under the given experimental conditions.

  5. Thermal Diodes Based on Near-Field Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2015-0163 THERMAL DIODES BASED ON NEAR-FIELD RADIATION Michal Lipson Cornell University OCTOBER 2015...BASED ON NEAR-FIELD RADIATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-14-1-7406 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61101E 6. AUTHOR(S) Michal...45433-7320 Air Force Materiel Command United States Air Force Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 675 North Randolph Street Arlington, VA

  6. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  7. Radiation from Relativistic Shocks with Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, K.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Niemiec, J.; Mizuno, A.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Oka, M.; Fishman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked region. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. New recent calculation of spectra with various different Lorentz factors of jets (two electrons) and initial magnetic fields. New spectra based on small simulations will be presented.

  8. The Geomagnetic Field and Radiation in Near-Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    This report shows, in detail, how the geomagnetic field interacts with the particle flux of the radiation belts to create a hazard to spacecraft and humans in near-Earth orbit. It illustrates the geometry of the geomagnetic field lines, especially around the area where the field strength is anomalously low in the South Atlantic Ocean. It discusses how the field will probably change in the future and the consequences that may have on hazards in near space.

  9. Voyager: Neptune Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Voyager encounter data are presented in computer animation (CA) and real (R) animation. The highlights include a view of 2 full rotations of Neptune. It shows spacecraft trajectory 'diving' over Neptune and intercepting Triton's orbit, depicting radiation and occulation zones. Also shown are a renegade orbit of Triton and Voyager's encounter with Neptune's Magnetopause. A model of the spacecraft's complex maneuvers during close encounters of Neptune and Triton is presented. A view from Earth of Neptune's occulation experiment is is shown as well as a recreation of Voyager's final pass. There is detail of Voyager's Image Compensation technique which produces Voyager images. Eighteen images were produced on June 22 - 23, 1989, from 57 million miles away. A 68 day sequence which provides a stroboscopic view - colorization approximates what is seen by the human eye. Real time images recorded live from Voyager on 8/24/89 are presented. Photoclinometry produced the topography of Triton. Three images are used to create a sequence of Neptune's rings. The globe of Neptune and 2 views of the south pole are shown as well as Neptune rotating. The rotation of a scooter is frozen in images showing differential motion. There is a view of rotation of the Great Dark Spot about its own axis. Photoclinometry provides a 3-dimensional perspective using a color mosaic of Triton images. The globe is used to indicate the orientation of Neptune's crescent. The east and west plumes on Triton are shown.

  10. Normal mode sound field of a directional radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Zhu, B.

    1987-12-01

    In this paper, the sound field of a general type of directional radiator in a stratified medium is treated, and the concept of directivity is applied to calculation of the normal modes. The result shows that the normal mode field of a directional radiator can be obtained by supplementing the normal mode expression of an omnidirectional point source with the directional excitation function, which is dependent on the position and directivity of the radiator. In addition, the normal mode fields of radiators with vertical-symmetrical, vertical-antisymmetrical, single-sided and sharp directivities are calculated, respectively. For a vertical line array in a homogeneous water layer, if the source distribution is proportional to the eigenfunction of some normal mode, the zeros of the directional excitation function correspond precisely to the directions of the eigenrays of other normal modes.

  11. Two-field radiation hydrodynamics in n spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larecki, Wieslaw; Banach, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The two-field radiation hydrodynamics in n spatial dimensions is derived from the kinetic theory of radiation. Both the full-moment (frequency-independent) and spectral (frequency-dependent) formulations of radiation hydrodynamics are considered. The derivation is based on the entropy principle of extended thermodynamics of gases. In the case of the full-moment hydrodynamics, the formulation of the entropy principle introduced by Boillat and Ruggeri (1997 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 9 205) is adapted and this suffices to determine the radiation pressure tensor. In the full-moment formulation, the equations of radiation hydrodynamics take the same form for all possible types of radiation statistics. In the spectral formulation, the different radiation pressure tensors are assigned to Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, and consequently the different hydrodynamic equations are obtained for each of those statistics types. In order to derive the equations of the spectral radiation hydrodynamics, the relations for the radiation pressure tensor implied by the entropy principle must be supplemented by the additional conditions. Considering the limit of small heat flux, we arrive at the linearized equations of radiation hydrodynamics which assume the same form in both the full-moment and spectral formulations.

  12. Electron trajectories in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Einwohner, T.; Lippmann, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    The work reported here analyzes the dynamical behavior of an electron, initially at rest, when subjected to a radiation pulse of arbitrary, but integrable, shape. This is done by a general integration procedure that has been programmed in VAXIMA. Upon choosing a specific shape for the pulse, VAXIMA finds both the space-time trajectory and the four-momentum of the electron. These are obtained in analytic or numerical form - or both - at the choice of the user. Several examples of analytical and numerical solutions, for different pulse shapes, are given.

  13. Wayward Field Lines Challenge Solar Radiation Models

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video compares the two models for particle distribution over the course of just three hours after an SEP event. The white line represents a magnetic field line, the general path that the SEPs ...

  14. Fission Product Transmutation in Mixed Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Burgett, Erick; Starovoitova, Valeriia; Tsveretkov, Pavel

    2015-01-15

    Work under this grant addressed a part of the challenge facing the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle; reducing the radiotoxicity of lived fission products (LLFP). It was based on the possibility that partitioning of isotopes and accelerator-based transmutation on particular LLFP combined with geological disposal may lead to an acceptable societal solution to the problem of management. The feasibility of using photonuclear processes based on the excitation of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) by bremsstrahlung radiation as a cost effective transmutation method was accessed. The nuclear reactions of interest: (γ,xn), (n,γ), (γ,p) can be induced by bremsstrahlung radiation produced by high power electron accelerators. The driver of these processes would be an accelerator that produces a high energy and high power electron beam of ~ 100 MeV. The major advantages of such accelerators for this purpose are that they are essentially available “off the shelf” and potentially would be of reasonable cost for this application. Methods were examined that used photo produced neutrons or the bremsstrahlung photons only, or use both photons and neutrons in combination for irradiations of selected LLFP. Extrapolating the results to plausible engineering scale transmuters it was found that the energy cost for 129I and 99Tc transmutation by these methods are about 2 and 4%, respectively, of the energy produced from 1000MWe.

  15. Adaptive radiations: From field to genomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Scott A.; Derieg, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  16. Spherical-wave expansions of piston-radiator fields.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, R C; Yaghjian, A D

    1991-09-01

    Simple spherical-wave expansions of the continuous-wave fields of a circular piston radiator in a rigid baffle are derived. These expansions are valid throughout the illuminated half-space and are useful for efficient numerical computation in the near-field region. Multipole coefficients are given by closed-form expressions which can be evaluated recursively.

  17. The Voyager 2 Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1989-01-01

    The findings made by the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter are reviewed. Data on the bowshock, magnetic field, magnetosphere, rings, plasma sheet, aurora, moons, and dust of Neptune are discussed. Findings made concerning Triton are summarized.

  18. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  19. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  20. The dielectric response to the magnetic field of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shouvik; Mukhopadhyay, Sourabh; Datta, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Light–matter interaction in transparent dielectrics is revisited, including the magnetic force on bound charges in the Lorentz oscillator model. The parameter ranges of incident radiation and the medium on which the magnetic field of the electromagnetic radiation will have a significant effect are traced using Floquet theory. The analysis reveals that the threshold intensity for a significant response of the magnetic field of the radiation at the second harmonic of the incident radiation can be reduced to {10}12 {{W}}{{cm}}-2 for off resonant and even lower for resonant interaction. This phenomenon has already been observed indirectly in experiments [1, 2]. Induced magnetizing current due to the magnetic force is shown to originate from a modified dielectric response, which may be useful in future magneto-optic devices, solar energy harvesting, and studying the ultrafast dynamics in doped dielectrics.

  1. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-06-15

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma}. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  2. IAEA programme in the field of radiation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    Radiation technologies applying gamma sources and electron accelerators for material modification are well-established processes. There are over 160 gamma industrial irradiators and 1300 electron industrial accelerators in operation worldwide. A new advancement in the field of radiation sources engineering is the development of high power direct e-/X conversion sources based on electron accelerators. Technologies to be developed beside environmental applications could be nanomaterials, structure engineered materials (sorbents, composites, ordered polymers, etc.) and natural polymers' processing. New products based on radiation-processed polysaccharides have already been commercialised in many countries of the East Asia and Pacific Region, especially in those being rich in natural polymers. Very important and promising applications concern environmental protection-radiation technology, being a clean and environment friendly process, helps to curb pollutants' emission as well. Industrial plants for flue gas treatment have been constructed in Poland and China. The pilot plant in Bulgaria using this technology has just started its operation. The Polish plant is equipped with accelerators of over 1 MW power, a breakthrough in radiation technology application. The industrial plant for wastewater treatment is under development in Korea and a pilot plant for sewage sludge irradiation has been in operation in India for many years. Due to recent developments, the Agency has restructured its programme and organized a Technical Meeting (TM) on "Emerging Applications of Radiation Technology for the 21st Century" at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, in April 2003, to review the present situation and possible developments of radiation technology to contribute to a sustainable development. This meeting provided the basic input to launch others in the most important fields of radiation technology applications: "Advances in Radiation Chemistry of Polymers" (Notre Dame, USA

  3. Pion Production from Proton Synchrotron Radiation in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field. In this study we find that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ˜ 1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ˜ 104-105. Then, we present the resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths.

  4. Cosmological fluctuations of a random field and radiation fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Moss, Ian G.; Ramos, Rudnei O. E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br

    2014-05-01

    A generalization of the random fluid hydrodynamic fluctuation theory due to Landau and Lifshitz is applied to describe cosmological fluctuations in systems with radiation and scalar fields. The viscous pressures, parametrized in terms of the bulk and shear viscosity coefficients, and the respective random fluctuations in the radiation fluid are combined with the stochastic and dissipative scalar evolution equation. This results in a complete set of equations describing the perturbations in both scalar and radiation fluids. These derived equations are then studied, as an example, in the context of warm inflation. Similar treatments can be done for other cosmological early universe scenarios involving thermal or statistical fluctuations.

  5. Conformation change of enzyme molecules in laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshenyuk, N. S.; Prigun, M. V.; Apanasevitsh, E. E.; Kruglik, G. S.

    2007-06-01

    As a result of an analysis of macromolecules properties in the coherent optical radiation field and with allowance for the experimentally obtained unique data on the interaction of lazer radiation with biomolecules (dependence of the interaction efficiency on the coherence length, presence of the effect in the spectra region far from the absorption band), a mechanism of wave interaction is developed. Using this mathematical model, the calculations of a change in the macromolecules oscillatory energy in the coherent radiation field are performed. It is shown that the increase of macromolecules oscillatory energy depends strongly on the coherence length of radiation. On exposure to noncoherent radiation, the biomolecules oscillatory energy practically does not change, whereas on exposure to laser radiation (coherence length ~3 cm), energy of oscillations of atoms increases by an order of 2÷4, which results in a change in the conformation of biomolecules and activity of enzymes. Recently a lot of data are received concerning the change of lysosomal enzymes activity in blood plasma under action of laser radiation.

  6. Influence of Hydroponically Grown Hoyt Soybeans and Radiation Encountered on Mars Missions on the Yield and Quality of Soymilk and Tofu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lester A.

    2005-01-01

    Soybeans were chosen for hmar and planetary missions due to their nutritive value and ability to produce oil and protein for further food applications. However, soybeans must be processed into foods prior to crew consumption. Wilson et al. (2003) raised questions about (1) the influence of radiation (on germination and functional properties) that the soybeans would be exposed to during bulk storage for a Mars mission, and (2) the impact of using hydroponically grown versus field grown soybeans on the yield and quality of soyfoods. The influence of radiation can be broken down into two components: (A) affect of surface pasteurization to ensure the astronauts safety from food-borne illnesses (a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point), and (B) affect of the amount of radiation the soybeans receive during a Mars mission. Decreases in the amount of natural antioxidants and free radical formation and oxidation induced changes in the soybean (lipid, protein, etc.) will influence the nutritional value, texture, quality, and safety of soyfoods made from them. The objectives of this project are to (1) evaluate the influence of gamma and electron beam radiation on bulk soybeans (HACCP, CCP) on the microbial load, germination, ease of processing, and quality of soymilk and tofu; (2) provide scale up and mass balance data for Advanced Life Support subsystems including Biomass, Solid Waste Processing, and Water Recovery Systems; and (3) to compare Hoyt field grown to hydroponically grown Hoyt soybeans for soymilk and tofu production. The soybean cultivar Hoyt, a small standing, high protein cultivar that could grow hydroponically in the AIMS facility on Mars) was evaluated for the production of soymilk and tofu. The quality and yield of the soymilk and tofu from hydroponic Hoyt, was compared to Vinton 81 (a soyfood industry standard), field Hoyt, IA 2032LS (lipoxygenase-free), and Proto (high protein and antioxidant potential). Soymilk and tofu were produced using the Japanese

  7. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-24

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  8. Topological magnetoelectric effects in microwave far-field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, M.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2016-07-01

    Similar to electromagnetism, described by the Maxwell equations, the physics of magnetoelectric (ME) phenomena deals with the fundamental problem of the relationship between electric and magnetic fields. Despite a formal resemblance between the two notions, they concern effects of different natures. In general, ME-coupling effects manifest in numerous macroscopic phenomena in solids with space and time symmetry breakings. Recently, it was shown that the near fields in the proximity of a small ferrite particle with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations have the space and time symmetry breakings and the topological properties of these fields are different from the topological properties of the free-space electromagnetic fields. Such MDM-originated fields—called magnetoelectric (ME) fields—carry both spin and orbital angular momenta. They are characterized by power-flow vortices and non-zero helicity. In this paper, we report on observation of the topological ME effects in far-field microwave radiation based on a small microwave antenna with a MDM ferrite resonator. We show that the microwave far-field radiation can be manifested with a torsion structure where an angle between the electric and magnetic field vectors varies. We discuss the question on observation of the regions of localized ME energy in far-field microwave radiation.

  9. STABILITY OF THE TOROIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN STELLAR RADIATION ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, Alfio; Urpin, Vadim E-mail: vadim.urpin@uv.es

    2012-03-10

    The stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for mixing, angular momentum transport, etc. We consider the stability properties of a star containing a predominant toroidal field in spherical geometry by means of a linear stability in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. We calculate the growth rate of instability and analyze in detail the effects of stable stratification and heat transport. We argue that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones. However, the stable stratification can essentially decrease the growth rate of instability.

  10. AfricaArray International Geophysics Field School: Applications of Near Surface Geophysics to challenges encountered in mine planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. J.; Jones, M. Q.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nyblade, A.; Snyman, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Hard rock exploration and mining presents many opportunities for the effective use of near surface geophysics. For over 10 years the AfricaArray international geophysics field school has been hosted at a variety of mines in South Africa. While the main objective of the field school is practical training for the next generation of geophysicists, being hosted at a mine has allowed us to investigate applications of near surface geophysics in the early stages of mine planning and development as geophysics is often cheaper and faster than drilling. Several applications include: detailed delineation of dykes and stringer dykes, physical property measurements on drill core for modeling and marker horizons, determination of overburden thickness, locations of water and faults. Dolerite dykes are usually magnetic and are associated with loss of ground (i.e. where the dyke replaces the ore and thus reduces the amount of ore available) and safety/stability concerns. Thus the accurate mapping of dykes and narrow stringers that are associated with them are crucial to the safe planning of a mine. We have acquired several case studies where ground magnetic surveys have greatly improved on the resolution and detail of airborne magnetic surveys in regions of complicated dyke swarms. In many cases, thin stringer dykes of less than 5 cm have been detected. Physical property measurements of these dykes can be used to distinguish between different ages of dykes. It is important to accurately determine overburden thickness when planning an open pit mine as this directly affects the cost of development. Depending on the nature of the overburden, both refraction seismic and or DC resistivity can provide continuous profiling in the area of interest that fills in gaps between boreholes. DC resistivity is also effective for determining water associated with dykes and structures that may affect mine planning. The field school mainly addresses the training of a variety of students. The core

  11. Extended-field radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Podczaski, E.; Stryker, J.A.; Kaminski, P.; Ndubisi, B.; Larson, J.; DeGeest, K.; Sorosky, J.; Mortel, R. )

    1990-07-15

    The survival of cervical carcinoma patients with paraaortic/high common iliac nodal metastases was evaluated by retrospective chart review during a 13-year interval. Thirty-three patients with cervical carcinoma and surgically documented nodal metastases received primary, extended-field radiation therapy. Overall 2-year and 5-year actuarial survival rates after diagnosis were 37% and 31%, respectively. Survival was analyzed in terms of the variables patient age, clinical stage, tumor histologic type, the presence of enlarged paraaortic/high common iliac lymph nodes, the extent of nodal involvement (microscopic versus macroscopic), the presence of intraperitoneal disease, and whether intracavitary brachytherapy was administered. The use of intracavitary radiation therapy was associated with improved local control and survival (P = 0.017). None of the other variables were statistically related to patient survival. Twenty-two of the patients died of cervical cancer and five are surviving without evidence of cancer. Four patients died of intercurrent disease. Two patients developed bowel-related radiation complications; both patients received chemotherapy concurrent with the radiation therapy. One of the two patients died of radiation enteritis. The use of extended-field radiation therapy does benefit a small group of patients and may result in extended patient survival.

  12. Bound and Radiation Fields in the Rindler Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, T.

    2001-07-01

    The energy-momentum tensor of the Liénard-Wiechert field is split into bound and emitted parts in the Rindler frame by generalizing the reasoning of Teitelboim applied in the inertial frame [see C. Teitelboim, Phys. Rev. D1 (1970), 1572]. Our analysis proceeds by invoking the concept of ``energy'' defined with respect to the Killing vector field attached to the frame. We obtain the radiation formula in the Rindler frame (the Rindler version of the Larmor formula), and it is found that the radiation power is proportional to the square of the acceleration αμm of the charge relative to the Rindler frame. This result leads us to split the Liénard-Wiechert field into a part II, which is linear in αμ, and a part I, which is independent of αμ. By using these, we split the energy-momentum tensor into two parts. We find that these are properly interpreted as the emitted and bound parts of the tensor in the Rindler frame. In our identification of radiation, a charge radiates neither in the case that the charge is fixed in the Rindler frame, nor in the case that the charge satisfies the equation αμ=0. We then investigate this equation. We consider four gedanken experiments related to the observer dependence of the concept of radiation.

  13. Radiation-reaction trapping of electrons in extreme laser fields.

    PubMed

    Ji, L L; Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-04-11

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  14. Thermal radiation field of low-temperature sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łakomy, T.

    1989-05-01

    The asymmetric thermal radiation field of heat sources existing in industry and in the building of apartments has been determined in this work. A description was realised by vector radiant and mean radiant temperatures ( VRT, TMR) obtaining their statistic reciprocal relationships at summer and winter terms.

  15. [Dynamics of biomacromolecules in coherent electromagnetic radiation field].

    PubMed

    Leshcheniuk, N S; Apanasevich, E E; Tereshenkov, V I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that induced oscillations and periodic displacements of the equilibrium positions occur in biomacromolecules in the absence of electromagnetic radiation absorption, due to modulation of interaction potential between atoms and groups of atoms forming the non-valence bonds in macromolecules by the external electromagnetic field. Such "hyperoscillation" state causes inevitably the changes in biochemical properties of macromolecules and conformational transformation times.

  16. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the possible encounter of Comet Halley's tail in 1910 inferred from mid-latitude geomagnetic field disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, T.; Araki, T.

    Geomagnetic disturbances from the period April to June 1910 are analyzed to detect the possible effects of the Comet Halley on the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. Data from six midlatitude geomagnetic observatories are used to calculate the longitudinally symmetric (i.e., Dst) and asymmetric fields. An application of a linear prediction filter to separate the solar wind dynamic pressure effect on the disturbances from that of the ring current, suggests that there exists a compressional variation in the Dst on May 18 which is around or slightly earlier than the time of estimated cometary tail encounter. The normal-run magnetogram from Agincourt on the dayside and that from Lu-Kia-Pang on the nightside, also indicate rather strong (i.e., 30-40 nT) compressional variation. The disturbances characteristic to the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction under the southward IMF condition and that of the ring current development are seen during the period. These results suggest that the earth's magnetosphere had been affected by a dense cometary plasma tail with high dynamic pressure, though the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction typically observed under the southward IMF condition had been taking place during the encounter.

  17. Dynamics of Cometary Dust Particles in Electromagnetic Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranen, Joonas; Markkanen, Johannes; Penttilä, Antti; Muinonen, Karri

    2016-10-01

    The formation of cometary dust tails and comae is based on solar radiation pressure. The pressure effects of electromagnetic radiation were originally conceptualized in Kepler's observations of the tails of comets and formulated mathematically by Maxwell in 1873. Today, the dynamics of cometary dust are known to be governed by gravity, electromagnetic forces, drag, solar wind, and solar radiation pressure.Solar radiation pressure has its roots in absorption, emission, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation. Due to modern advances in so-called integral equation methods in electromagnetics, a new approach of studying the effect of radiation pressure on cometary dust dynamics can be constructed. We solve the forces and torques due to radiation pressure for an arbitrarily shaped dust particle using volume integral equation methods.We then present a framework for solving the equations of motion of cometary dust particles due to radiative interactions. The solution is studied in a simplified cometary environment, where the radiative effects are studied at different orbits. The rotational and translational equations of motion are solved directly using a quaternion-based integrator. The rotational and translational equations of motion affect dust particle alignment and concentration. This is seen in the polarization of the coma. Thus, our direct dynamical approach can be used in modelling the observed imaging photo-polarimetry of the coma.In future studies, the integrator can be further extended to an exemplary comet environment, taking into account the drag, and the electric and magnetic fields. This enables us to study the dynamics of a single cometary dust particle based on fundamental physics.Acknowledgments. Research supported, in part, bythe European Research Council (ERC, grant Nr. 320773).

  18. Nanodosimetric Characterization of Mixed Radiation Fields: Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Reinhard; Bashkirov, Vladimir; Casiraghi, Margherita

    The nanodosimetric characterization of mixed radiation fields containing variable fluences of charged particles, neutrons, and photons with stochastic quantities related to the number of ionizations in biological targets of nanometric size is an active area of research and development. Applications include measurements in low-dose radiation environments, including outer space, for radiation protection as well as characterization of mixed radiation therapy fields present in particle therapy with protons, light ions, or neutrons. Approaches for the nanodosimetric characterization of mixed radiation fields should consist of balance of theoretical Monte Carlo simulations and experimental studies that can inform each other. The former should be carefully benchmarked with the latter, usually employing detectors filled with low-pressure gas in which nanodosimetric studies are possible. Research in experimental nanodosimetry has exploited the principle of low-pressure-gas scaling of mean interaction distances between energy transfer points up to a million-fold, thus allowing to collect single charges (ions or electrons) generated in cylindrical volumes equivalent to a short segment of DNA. When combined with arrival-time selection, position resolution of down to 5 nm, has been achieved for experimental track structure studies. The results of these experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo codes will be summarized. More recently, we have studied a new principle of 2D low-energy ion detection by impact ionization in a hole-pattern detector in combination with a low-pressure time projection chamber. First proof-of-principle and performance studies with this track-imaging detector and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations will be presented. The full potential of nanometric quantities in characterizing radiation quality for dosimetry of ionizing radiation is yet to be explored. The most significant signature of radiation quality may be the size and

  19. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  20. The Pioneer of the Group Encounter Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Thomas; Treadwell, Jean

    The purpose of this paper was to (1) identify the Pioneer of the Group Encounter Movement, and (2) expose and clarify some of the ambiguities, contradictions and backbiting evident in the Group Encounter Field. The origins of the group encounter movement are examined with a particularly strong emphasis on J. L. Moreno and his introduction of…

  1. Electrical integrity of oxides in a radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1996-04-01

    In the absence of an applied electric field, irradiation generally produces a decrease in the permanent (beam-off) electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators. However, in the past 6 years several research groups have reported a phenomenon known as radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED), which produces significant permanent increases in the electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators irradiated with an applied electric field. RIED has been reported to occur at temperatures between 420 and 800 K with applied electric fields as low as 20 V/mm.

  2. Quantum driven dissipative parametric oscillator in a blackbody radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-15

    We consider the general open system problem of a charged quantum oscillator confined in a harmonic trap, whose frequency can be arbitrarily modulated in time, that interacts with both an incoherent quantized (blackbody) radiation field and with an arbitrary coherent laser field. We assume that the oscillator is initially in thermodynamic equilibrium with its environment, a non-factorized initial density matrix of the system and the environment, and that at t = 0 the modulation of the frequency, the coupling to the incoherent and the coherent radiation are switched on. The subsequent dynamics, induced by the presence of the blackbody radiation, the laser field, and the frequency modulation, is studied in the framework of the influence functional approach. This approach allows incorporating, in analytic closed formulae, the non-Markovian character of the oscillator-environment interaction at any temperature as well the non-Markovian character of the blackbody radiation and its zero-point fluctuations. Expressions for the time evolution of the covariance matrix elements of the quantum fluctuations and the reduced density-operator are obtained.

  3. A characteristic scale in radiation fields of fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiscombe, W.; Cahalan, R.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A.

    1996-04-01

    The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine stratocumulus cloud shows a scale break when plotted on a double log plot. We offer an explanation of this scale break in terms of smoothing by horizontal radiative fluxes, which is parameterized and incorporated into an improved pixel approximation. We compute the radiation fields emerging from cloud models with horizontally variable optical depth fractal models. We use comparative spectral and multifractal analysis to qualify the validity of the independent pixel approximation at the largest scales and demonstrate it`s shortcomings on the smallest scales.

  4. Anomalous Radiative Trapping in Laser Fields of Extreme Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonoskov, A.; Bashinov, A.; Gonoskov, I.; Harvey, C.; Ilderton, A.; Kim, A.; Marklund, M.; Mourou, G.; Sergeev, A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate that charged particles in a sufficiently intense standing wave are compressed toward, and oscillate synchronously at, the antinodes of the electric field. We call this unusual behavior anomalous radiative trapping (ART). We show using dipole pulses, which offer a path to increased laser intensity, that ART opens up new possibilities for the generation of radiation and particle beams, both of which are high energy, directed, and collimated. ART also provides a mechanism for particle control in high-intensity quantum-electrodynamics experiments.

  5. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  6. Radiation hydrodynamics of triggered star formation: the effect of the diffuse radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Harries, Tim J.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect of including diffuse field radiation when modelling the radiatively driven implosion of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere (BES). Radiation-hydrodynamical calculations are performed by using operator splitting to combine Monte Carlo photoionization with grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamics that includes self-gravity. It is found that the diffuse field has a significant effect on the nature of radiatively driven collapse which is strongly coupled to the strength of the driving shock that is established before impacting the BES. This can result in either slower or more rapid star formation than expected using the on-the-spot approximation depending on the distance of the BES from the source object. As well as directly compressing the BES, stronger shocks increase the thickness and density in the shell of accumulated material, which leads to short, strong, photoevaporative ejections that reinforce the compression whenever it slows. This happens particularly effectively when the diffuse field is included as rocket motion is induced over a larger area of the shell surface. The formation and evolution of 'elephant trunks' via instability is also found to vary significantly when the diffuse field is included. Since the perturbations that seed instabilities are smeared out elephant trunks form less readily and, once formed, are exposed to enhanced thermal compression.

  7. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  8. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-08

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  9. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M -band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  10. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  11. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  12. Ionizing Radiation Effects on Graphene Based Field Effects Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos

    Graphene, first isolated in 2004 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, is an atomically thin two-dimensional layer of hexagonal carbon that has been extensively studied due to its unique electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. Its vast potential has led to the development of a wide variety of novel devices such as, transistors, solar cells, batteries and sensors that offer significant advantages over the conventional microelectronic ones. Although graphene-based devices show very promising performance characteristics, limited has been done in order to evaluate how these devices operate in a radiation harsh environment. Undesirable phenomena such as total dose effects, single event upsets, displacement damage and soft errors that silicon-based devices are prone to, can have a detrimental impact on performance and reliability. Similarly, the significant effects of irradiation on carbon nanotubes indicate the potential for related radiation induced defects in carbon-based materials, such as graphene. In this work, we fabricate graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) and systematically study the various effects of ionizing radiation on the material and device level. Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) along with standard lithographic and shadow masking techniques, was used for the transistor fabrication. GFETs were subjected to different radiation sources, such as, beta particles (electron radiation), gamma (photons) and ions (alpha, protons and Fe particles) under various radiation doses and energies. The effects on graphene's crystal structure, transport properties and doping profile were examined by using a variety of characterization tools and techniques. We demonstrate not only the mechanisms of ionized charge build up in the substrate and displacement damage effects on GFET performance, but also that atmospheric adsorbents from the surrounding environment can have a significant impact on the radiation hardness of graphene. We

  13. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterial thin films.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumyadipta; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate near-field radiative heat transfer between two thin films made of metamaterials. The impact of film thickness on magnetic and electric surface polaritons (ESPs) is analyzed. It is found that the strength as well as the location of magnetic resonance does not change with film thickness until the film behaves as semi-infinite for the dielectric function chosen in this study. When the film is thinner than vacuum gap, both electric and magnetic polaritons contribute evenly to near-field radiative heat transfer. At larger film thicknesses, ESPs dominate heat transfer due to excitation of a larger number of modes. Results obtained from this study will facilitate applications of metamaterials as thin-film coatings for energy systems.

  14. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  15. Analysis of the radiated information in spinning sound fields.

    PubMed

    Carley, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The information content of a spinning sound field is analyzed using a combination of exact and asymptotic results, in order to set limits on how accurately source identification can be carried out. Using a transformation of the circular source to an exactly equivalent set of line source modes, given by Chebyshev polynomials, it is found that the line source modes of order greater than the source wavenumber generate exponentially small fields. Asymptotic analysis shows that the remaining, lower order, modes radiate efficiently only into a region around the source plane, with this region shrinking as the mode order is increased. The results explain the ill-conditioning of source identification methods; the successful use of low order models in active noise control; and the low radiation efficiency of subsonic jets.

  16. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M.; Trompier, François; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Matthiä, Daniel; Ploc, Ondrej; Santen, Nicole; Wirtz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR). Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  17. Radiation engineering of optical antennas for maximum field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Seok, Tae Joon; Jamshidi, Arash; Kim, Myungki; Dhuey, Scott; Lakhani, Amit; Choo, Hyuck; Schuck, Peter James; Cabrini, Stefano; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Bokor, Jeffrey; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2011-07-13

    Optical antennas have generated much interest in recent years due to their ability to focus optical energy beyond the diffraction limit, benefiting a broad range of applications such as sensitive photodetection, magnetic storage, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. To achieve the maximum field enhancement for an optical antenna, parameters such as the antenna dimensions, loading conditions, and coupling efficiency have been previously studied. Here, we present a framework, based on coupled-mode theory, to achieve maximum field enhancement in optical antennas through optimization of optical antennas' radiation characteristics. We demonstrate that the optimum condition is achieved when the radiation quality factor (Q(rad)) of optical antennas is matched to their absorption quality factor (Q(abs)). We achieve this condition experimentally by fabricating the optical antennas on a dielectric (SiO(2)) coated ground plane (metal substrate) and controlling the antenna radiation through optimizing the dielectric thickness. The dielectric thickness at which the matching condition occurs is approximately half of the quarter-wavelength thickness, typically used to achieve constructive interference, and leads to ∼20% higher field enhancement relative to a quarter-wavelength thick dielectric layer.

  18. Conservation of ζ with radiative corrections from heavy field

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, we address a possible impact of radiative corrections from a heavy scalar field χ on the curvature perturbation ζ. Integrating out χ, we derive the effective action for ζ, which includes the loop corrections of the heavy field χ. When the mass of χ is much larger than the Hubble scale H, the loop corrections of χ only yield a local contribution to the effective action and hence the effective action simply gives an action for ζ in a single field model, where, as is widely known, ζ is conserved in time after the Hubble crossing time. Meanwhile, when the mass of χ is comparable to H, the loop corrections of χ can give a non-local contribution to the effective action. Because of the non-local contribution from χ, in general, ζ may not be conserved, even if the classical background trajectory is determined only by the evolution of the inflaton. In this paper, we derive the condition that ζ is conserved in time in the presence of the radiative corrections from χ. Namely, we show that when the dilatation invariance, which is a part of the diffeomorphism invariance, is preserved at the quantum level, the loop corrections of the massive field χ do not disturb the constant evolution of ζ at super Hubble scales. In this discussion, we show the Ward-Takahashi identity for the dilatation invariance, which yields a consistency relation for the correlation functions of the massive field χ.

  19. Radiation from electrons in graphene in strong electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Yokomizo, N.

    2014-12-15

    We study the interaction of electrons in graphene with the quantized electromagnetic field in the presence of an applied uniform electric field using the Dirac model of graphene. Electronic states are represented by exact solutions of the Dirac equation in the electric background, and amplitudes of first-order Feynman diagrams describing the interaction with the photon field are calculated for massive Dirac particles in both valleys. Photon emission probabilities from a single electron and from a many-electron system at the charge neutrality point are derived, including the angular and frequency dependence, and several limiting cases are analyzed. The pattern of photon emission at the Dirac point in a strong field is determined by an interplay between the nonperturbative creation of electron–hole pairs and spontaneous emission, allowing for the possibility of observing the Schwinger effect in measurements of the radiation emitted by pristine graphene under DC voltage.

  20. Measurement of Radiation - Light Field Congruence using a Photodiode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderson, Michael J.

    Improved treatment techniques in radiation therapy provide incentive to reduce treatment margins, thereby increasing the necessity for more accurate geometrical setup of the linear accelerator and accompanying components. In this thesis, we describe the development of a novel device that enables precise and automated measurement of radiation-light field congruence of medical linear accelerators for the purpose of improving setup accuracy, and standardizing repeated quality control activities. The device consists of a silicon photodiode array, an evaluation board, a data acquisition card, and a laptop. Using the device, we show that the radiation-light field congruence for both 6 and 15 MV beams is within 2 mm on a Varian Clinac 21 EX medical linear accelerator. Because measurements are automated, ambiguities resulting from observer variability are removed, greatly improving the reproducibility of measurements over time and across observers. We expect the device to be useful in providing consistent measurements on linear accelerators used for stereotactic radiosurgery, during the commissioning of new linear accelerators, and as an alternative to film or other commercially available devices for performing monthly or annual quality control checks.

  1. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  2. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  3. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-31

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS’s requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time and reach back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron’s identiFINDER™, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18-cm x 2.54-cm cylinders) as gamma detector, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack™ that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity (comparable to that of a 7.62-cm x 7.62-cm sodium iodide crystal at low gamma energy ranging from 30 keV to 3,000 keV), better resolution (< 3.0 percent at 662 keV), faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets

  4. Field-deployable gamma-radiation detectors for DHS use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2007-09-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS' requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER TM, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack TM that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field1. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant spectral data and

  5. Radiation-like scalar field and gauge fields in cosmology for a theory with dynamical time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisty, David; Guendelman, E. I.

    2016-09-01

    Cosmological solutions with a scalar field behaving as radiation are obtained, in the context of gravitational theory with dynamical time. The solution requires the spacial curvature of the universe k, to be zero, unlike the standard radiation solutions, which do not impose any constraint on the spatial curvature of the universe. This is because only such k = 0 radiation solutions pose a homothetic Killing vector. This kind of theory can be used to generalize electromagnetism and other gauge theories, in curved spacetime, and there are no deviations from standard gauge field equation (like Maxwell equations) in the case there exist a conformal Killing vector. But there could be departures from Maxwell and Yang-Mills equations, for more general spacetimes.

  6. Radiative corrections from heavy fast-roll fields during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2015-06-09

    We investigate radiative corrections to the inflaton potential from heavy fields undergoing a fast-roll phase transition. We find that a logarithmic one-loop correction to the inflaton potential involving this field can induce a temporary running of the spectral index. The induced running can be a short burst of strong running, which may be related to the observed anomalies on large scales in the cosmic microwave spectrum, or extend over many e-folds, sustaining an effectively constant running to be searched for in the future. We implement this in a general class of models, where effects are mediated through a heavy messenger field sitting in its minimum. Interestingly, within the present framework it is a generic outcome that a large running implies a small field model with a vanishing tensor-to-scalar ratio, circumventing the normal expectation that small field models typically lead to an unobservably small running of the spectral index. An observable level of tensor modes can also be accommodated, but, surprisingly, this requires running to be induced by a curvaton. If upcoming observations are consistent with a small tensor-to-scalar ratio as predicted by small field models of inflation, then the present study serves as an explicit example contrary to the general expectation that the running will be unobservable.

  7. Radiative corrections from heavy fast-roll fields during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sandora@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2015-06-01

    We investigate radiative corrections to the inflaton potential from heavy fields undergoing a fast-roll phase transition. We find that a logarithmic one-loop correction to the inflaton potential involving this field can induce a temporary running of the spectral index. The induced running can be a short burst of strong running, which may be related to the observed anomalies on large scales in the cosmic microwave spectrum, or extend over many e-folds, sustaining an effectively constant running to be searched for in the future. We implement this in a general class of models, where effects are mediated through a heavy messenger field sitting in its minimum. Interestingly, within the present framework it is a generic outcome that a large running implies a small field model with a vanishing tensor-to-scalar ratio, circumventing the normal expectation that small field models typically lead to an unobservably small running of the spectral index. An observable level of tensor modes can also be accommodated, but, surprisingly, this requires running to be induced by a curvaton. If upcoming observations are consistent with a small tensor-to-scalar ratio as predicted by small field models of inflation, then the present study serves as an explicit example contrary to the general expectation that the running will be unobservable.

  8. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  9. Mariner 10 mercury encounter.

    PubMed

    Dunne, J A

    1974-07-12

    Mariner 10's closet approach to Mercury on 29 March 1974 occurred on the dark side of the planet at a range of approximately 700 kilometers. The spacecraft trajectory passed through the shadows of both the sun and Earth. Experiments conducted included magnetic fields, plasma and charged particle studies of the solar wind interaction region, television photography, extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of the atmosphere, the detection of infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and a dual-frequency radio occultation in search of an ionosphere.

  10. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer: Towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-03-30

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized, whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO{sub 2} that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68 °C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. Far-field thermal radiation experiments are proposed to back the results presented.

  11. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  12. Novel properties of the q-analogue quantized radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    The 'classical limit' of the q-analog quantized radiation field is studied paralleling conventional quantum optics analyses. The q-generalizations of the phase operator of Susskind and Glogower and that of Pegg and Barnett are constructed. Both generalizations and their associated number-phase uncertainty relations are manifestly q-independent in the n greater than g number basis. However, in the q-coherent state z greater than q basis, the variance of the generic electric field, (delta(E))(sup 2) is found to be increased by a factor lambda(z) where lambda(z) greater than 1 if q not equal to 1. At large amplitudes, the amplitude itself would be quantized if the available resolution of unity for the q-analog coherent states is accepted in the formulation. These consequences are remarkable versus the conventional q = 1 limit.

  13. Quantum phenomena and the zeropoint radiation field. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, L.; Cetto, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    A previous paper was devoted to the discussion of a new version of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) and to the study of the conditions under which quantum mechanics can be derived from it, in the radiationless approximation. In this paper further effects on matter due to the zeropoint field are studied, such as atomic stability, radiative transitions, the Lamb shift, etc., and are shown to be correctly described by the proposed version of SED. Also, a detailed energy-balance condition and a fluctuation-dissipation relation are established; it is shown in particular that equilibrium is attained only with a field spectrum ˜Ω 3. The proposed approach is shown to suggest an understanding of quantum mechanics as a kind of limitcycle theory. Finally, a brief discussion is included about the nonchaotic behavior of the (bounded) SED system in the quantum regime, as measured by Lyapunov exponents.

  14. A simple method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect

    Du Weiliang; Yang, James; Luo Dershan; Martel, Mary

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computerized method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter. Three types of graticules were included in this study: Megavoltage (MV) mechanical graticule, MV electronic portal imaging device digital graticule, and kilovoltage (kV) on-board imaging digital graticule. Methods: A metal ball bearing (BB) was imaged with MV and kV x-ray beams in a procedure similar to a Winston-Lutz test. The radiation fields, graticules, and BB were localized in eight portal images using Hough transform-based computer algorithms. The center of the BB served as a static reference point in the 3D space so that the distances between the graticule centers and the radiation field centers were calculated. The radiation isocenter was determined from the radiation field centers at different gantry angles. Results: Misalignments of MV and kV portal imaging graticules varied with the gantry or x-ray source angle as a result of mechanical imperfections of the linear accelerator and its imaging system. While the three graticules in this study were aligned to the radiation field centers and the radiation isocenter within 2.0 mm, misalignments of 1.5-2.0 mm were found at certain gantry angles. These misalignments were highly reproducible with the gantry rotation. Conclusions: A simple method was developed to quantify the alignments of portal image graticules directly against the radiation field centers or the radiation isocenter. The advantage of this method is that it does not require the BB to be placed exactly at the radiation isocenter through a precalibrated surrogating device such as room lasers or light field crosshairs. The present method is useful for radiation therapy modalities that require high-precision portal imaging such as image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy.

  15. Development of a Characterized Radiation Field for Evaluating Sensor Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.M.; Coggins, T.L.; Marsh, J.; Mann, St.D.; Waggoner, Ch.A.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous efforts are funded by US agencies (DOE, DoD, DHS) for development of novel radiation sensing and measurement systems. An effort has been undertaken to develop a flexible shielding system compatible with a variety of sources (beta, X-ray, gamma, and neutron) that can be highly characterized using conventional radiation detection and measurement systems. Sources available for use in this system include americium-beryllium (AmBe), plutonium-beryllium (PuBe), strontium-90 (Sr-90), californium-252 (Cf-252), krypton-85 (Kr-85), americium-241 (Am-241), and depleted uranium (DU). Shielding can be varied by utilization of materials that include lexan, water, oil, lead, and polyethylene. Arrangements and geometries of source(s) and shielding can produce symmetrical or asymmetrical radiation fields. The system has been developed to facilitate accurately repeatable configurations. Measurement positions are similarly capable of being accurately re-created. Stand-off measurement positions can be accurately re-established using differential global positioning system (GPS) navigation. Instruments used to characterize individual measurement locations include a variety of sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) (3 x 3 inch, 4 x 4 x 16 inch, Fidler) and lithium iodide (LiI(Eu)) detectors (for use with multichannel analyzer software) and detectors for use with traditional hand held survey meters such as boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}), helium-3 ({sup 3}He), and Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes. Also available are Global Dosimetry thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), CR39 neutron chips, and film badges. Data will be presented comparing measurement techniques with shielding/source configurations. The system is demonstrated to provide a highly functional process for comparison/characterization of various detector types relative to controllable radiation types and levels. Particular attention has been paid to use of neutron sources and measurements. (authors)

  16. Effect of superconductivity on near-field radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Králík, Tomáš; Musilová, Věra; Fořt, Tomáš; Srnka, Aleš

    2017-02-01

    Near-field (NF) radiative heat transfer (RHT) over vacuum space between bodies can exceed the far-field (FF) heat transfer by orders of magnitude. A large portion of the heat flux transferred between metals in NF is at very low frequencies, much lower than in FF. Thus a strong effect of superconductivity on NF RHT can be expected even at radiation temperatures above the superconducting critical temperature, where nearly no effect in FF is observed. We have examined experimentally the RHT between plane-parallel surfaces of niobium. Up to a fivefold decrease in NF heat flux was observed when the colder sample passed from the normal to the superconducting state. We found that a maximum decrease occurs at sample spacings ten times shorter than the spacing of crossover between the NF and FF heat flux, being ≈1000/T (μm). Applying Polder's and Van Hove's relations for NF RHT and BCS theory of superconductivity, we explain this effect and show the roles of transversal electric and magnetic modes in the steep decrease of heat flux below the critical temperature and the subsequent flux saturation at low temperatures.

  17. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  18. Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 16. Airborne E-field radiation measurements of electromagnetic-pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, K.L.

    1985-09-01

    Airborne measurements of the absolute vertical electric field (E-field) of the radiated electromagnetic pulse were attempted for Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Instrumentation included calibrated vertical whip antennas, wideband magnetic tape recorders, and photographs of oscilloscope traces. One instrumented aircraft participated in Little Feller II (C-131F); two aircraft participated in Small Boy (a C-131F and an A-3A). No detectable signals were recorded for either event. It is concluded that the vertical E-field intensities encountered were below the calibrated levels of the instrumentation or the method of instrumentation and calibration was inadequate for nonrepetitive pulse signals.

  19. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidt, S.; Randall, J.; Webster, S. C.; Lake, K.; Webb, A. E.; Cohen, I.; Navickas, T.; Lekitsch, B.; Retzker, A.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  20. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields.

    PubMed

    Weidt, S; Randall, J; Webster, S C; Lake, K; Webb, A E; Cohen, I; Navickas, T; Lekitsch, B; Retzker, A; Hensinger, W K

    2016-11-25

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  1. Angry Birds Space Encounter

    NASA Video Gallery

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, a grand opening celebration was held for the new Angry Birds Space Encounter, March 22. Finland-based Rovio Entertainment, the creator of ...

  2. High-resolution optical telescope for ultraviolet /UV/ radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Design techniques are discussed for all-reflecting optics from first-order system considerations and applications currently utilized in the field of astronomical optics. The solution of the Dall-Karkham design problem is described, showing the advantage of inexpensive construction as compared with higher order surfaces. The design process reported here is a F/5 collecting system which quickly mates directly with the spectrometer; it is capable of achieving desired high resolution and sensitivity requirements. The theoretical limit of aberration tolerances is achieved with less than 1/8 of a wavelength at final focus (OPD). The design of spectrometer for ultra-violet (UV) radiation and its mechanism is included in this study.

  3. Observations of the diffuse near-UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    The diffuse radiation field from 1650-3100 A has been observed by spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle, and the contributions of the zodiacal light an the diffuse cosmic background to the signal have been derived. Colors ranging from 0.65 to 1.2 are found for the zodiacal light with an almost linear increase in the color with ecliptic latitude. This rise in color is due to UV brightness remaining almost constant while the visible brightnesses drop by almost a factor of two. This is interpreted as evidence that the grains responsible for the UV scattering have much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering. Intensities for the cosmic diffuse background ranging from 300 units to 900 units are found which are not consistent with either a correlation with N(H I) or with spatial isotropy.

  4. Voyager 1: Encounter with Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1980-01-01

    The history of the Voyager Project is reviewed as well as known facts about Saturn and its satellites. Important results of encounters with Jupiter are summarized. Scientific objectives of the flyby of Saturn involve the planet's atmosphere, rings, and magnetic field interactions with the solar wind and satellites. The search for additional satellites, and various aspects of Titan, Rhea, Dione, Mimas, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Enceladas are also of interest. The instruments developed to obtain these goals are described.

  5. Transport in stellar radiation zones with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Zahn, J.-P.

    We examine the interaction between meridian circulation and turbulence in rotating stars with an axisymetric magnetic field. In the same way as Zahn (1992) and Spiegel and Zahn (1992), the turbulence is assumed to be anisotropic, due to the stratification, with stronger transport in the horizontal directions than in the vertical. We keep the 'shellular rotation' hypothesis, but we expand the differential rotation in latitude to higher order, which allow us to treat simultaneously the radiative interior and the tachocline(s). We derive the partial differential equations which govern the transport of magnetic field, temperature, angular momentum and chemical elements with taking into account the non-stationarity of the problem, the mu-gradients, the effect of horizontal turbulence in thermal imbalance and a general equation of state like in Maeder and Zahn (1998). Finally, we apply the beta-viscosity prescription which has been derived from Couette-Taylor experiments (Richard and Zahn (1999)) to the problem of transport in stellar interiors to obtain a new expression for the horizontal component of the turbulent viscosity, nuh, and its companion the horizontal diffusivity, Dh. The next step will be to implement these new equations in existing stellar structure codes, to model the evolution of rotating stars.

  6. Wireless Links in the Radiative Near Field via Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heebl, Jason D.; Ettorre, Mauro; Grbic, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The generation of propagating Bessel beams is typically limited to optical frequencies with bulky experimental setups. Recent works have demonstrated Bessel-beam generation at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies utilizing low-profile, planar, leaky-wave antennas. These studies have assumed a single leaky mode in the antenna. In this work, the rigorous analysis of a planar Bessel-beam launcher supporting multiple modes is presented. By employing the mode-matching technique, a complete electromagnetic solution of the structure, its supported modes, and radiated fields is obtained. Additionally, a coupled system of two planar Bessel launchers is analyzed, and it is shown that the system can both transmit and receive Bessel beams. The energy-transfer characteristics of the coupled system are analyzed and discussed. An analysis of the coupled system's even and odd modes of operation show that efficient power transfer is possible, and that an odd mode is preferred since it yields higher field confinement and power-transfer efficiency.

  7. Extractable proteins from field radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Duclerc F.; Pinto Martins, Carlos Felipe; Collantes, Chirinos H. D.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2005-07-01

    The type I allergy associated with the use of natural rubber latex (NRL) products is caused by the NRL proteins leached by the sweat or other body fluids. Makuuchi's group proposed for the first time the proteins removal by the addition of water-soluble polymers (WSP) on radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL) that is a promising process under development in many countries. In this study, Brazilian field natural rubber was irradiated with a 60Co gamma source to reduce the content of WSP in the final product. WSP was used as additive to improve the extraction of protein. After irradiation the RVNRL was centrifuged to extract the WSP and proteins. The analytical methodology for protein content was based on the modified Lowry method according to ASTM D5712. Protein determination was carried out in serum of latex and in the extracts of the gloves. The concentration of extractable water-soluble proteins in serum of irradiated field NRL (NRL1), not irradiated one (NRL2); of twice centrifuged sample with polymer additive NRL (NRL3) and of the glove manufactured (NRLG) are compared with commercial glove (CG). The irradiation process increases the extractable water-soluble proteins, EP, as reported in the literature. In this study the use of polymeric additive on the bi-centrifugation process to remove protein was successful and the EP of the glove obtained in NRL3 was at around 40% of the commercial glove.

  8. The wave properties of matter and the zeropoint radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, L.; Cetto, A. M.

    1994-05-01

    The origin of the wave properties of matter is discussed from the point of view of stochastic electrodynamics. A nonrelativistic model of a charged particle with an effective structure embedded in the random zeropoint radiation field reveals that the field induces a high-frequency vibration on the particle; internal consistency of the theory fixes the frequency of this jittering at mc2/ħ. The particle is therefore assumed to interact intensely with stationary zeropoint waves of this frequency as seen from its proper frame of reference; such waves, identified here as de Broglie's phase waves, give rise to a modulated wave in the laboratory frame, with de Broglie's wavelength and phase velocity equal to the particle velocity. The time-independent equation that describes this modulated wave is shown to be the stationary Schrödinger equation (or the Klein-Gordon equation in the relativistic version). In a heuristic analysis appled to simple periodic cases, the quantization rules are recovered from the assumption that for a particle in a stationary state there must correspond a stationary modulation. Along an independent and complementary line of reasoning, an equation for the probability amplitude in configuration space for a particle under a general potential V(x) is constructed, and it is shown that under conditions derived from stochastic electrodynamics it reduces to Schrödinger's equation. This equation reflects therefore the dual nature of the quantum particles, by describing simultaneously the corresponding modulated wave and the ensemble of particles.

  9. Recommendations for Improving Consistency in the Radiation Fields Used During Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments for Homeland Security Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pibida, L; Mille, M; Norman, B

    2013-01-01

    Several measurements and calculations were performed to illustrate the differences that can be observed in the determination of exposure rate or ambient dose equivalent rate used for testing radiation detection systems against consensus standards. The large variations observed support our recommendation that better consistency in the test radiation fields can be achieved by specifying the source activity and testing distance instead of the field strength. PMID:26401434

  10. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  11. The clinical encounter revisited.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2014-04-01

    The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes.

  12. Encounter Group Effects of Soccer Team Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magen, Zipora

    1980-01-01

    Suggests that a positive relationship exists between encounter group experience and the soccer team performance--a conclusion worthy of consideration in further research in the fields of psychology and sociology of sports. (Author)

  13. Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Mielnik, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20 guidelines for radiated electromagnetic susceptibility testing in reverberation chambers. Phase 1 of the test procedure utilizes mode-tuned stirrer techniques and E-field probe measurements to validate chamber uniformity, determines chamber loading effects, and defines a radiated susceptibility test process. The test procedure is segmented into numbered operations that are largely software controlled. This document is intended as a laboratory test reference and includes diagrams of test setups, equipment lists, as well as test results and analysis. Phase 2 of development is discussed.

  14. Understanding metropolitan patterns of daily encounters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Axhausen, Kay W; Lee, Der-Horng; Huang, Xianfeng

    2013-08-20

    Understanding of the mechanisms driving our daily face-to-face encounters is still limited; the field lacks large-scale datasets describing both individual behaviors and their collective interactions. However, here, with the help of travel smart card data, we uncover such encounter mechanisms and structures by constructing a time-resolved in-vehicle social encounter network on public buses in a city (about 5 million residents). Using a population scale dataset, we find physical encounters display reproducible temporal patterns, indicating that repeated encounters are regular and identical. On an individual scale, we find that collective regularities dominate distinct encounters' bounded nature. An individual's encounter capability is rooted in his/her daily behavioral regularity, explaining the emergence of "familiar strangers" in daily life. Strikingly, we find individuals with repeated encounters are not grouped into small communities, but become strongly connected over time, resulting in a large, but imperceptible, small-world contact network or "structure of co-presence" across the whole metropolitan area. Revealing the encounter pattern and identifying this large-scale contact network are crucial to understanding the dynamics in patterns of social acquaintances, collective human behaviors, and--particularly--disclosing the impact of human behavior on various diffusion/spreading processes.

  15. An efficient synthesis approach for electromagnetic near- and far-field contoured patterns using alternative narrow-beam field functions transformed from the radiations of linearly excited array antennas with least computational complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsi-Tseng

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an effective scheme to accelerate the computational efficiency in synthesizing the electromagnetic contoured patterns spanned by the radiations of phased array antennas, which is applicable to synthesize both the near- and far-field patterns. The core concept is to adapt/create closed-form and simple formulations with least computational unknowns to be used in the iterative synthesis procedure. The efficiency is assured by avoiding the cumbersome numerical integration/summation for the radiation fields in the synthesis procedure. Thus, the scheme first transforms the conventional field basis functions (FBFs) defined by the radiations of every array elements into a set of global FBFs arising from the radiations of a set of overlapped virtual arrays, where each of the virtual arrays is properly excited by a Gaussian taper to avoid the ray caustic problems encountered in the asymptotic evaluations. The new FBFs (NFBFs) created by this transformation have radiation fields focused in narrow spans in contrast to the wide patterns of conventional FBFs and may reduce the number of FBFs in the computation if a small coverage area is considered. Furthermore, the closed-form formulations of global NFBFs are obtained by asymptotic evaluation and may dramatically reduce the computational time. This approach is implemented with the use of successive projection method, which also provides closed-form formulations to update the excitations in each iterative step, to synthesize the near- and far-field contoured patterns to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency.

  16. Characteristic of the radiation field in low Earth orbit and in deep space.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    The radiation exposure in space by cosmic radiation can be reduced through careful mission planning and constructive measures as example the provision of a radiation shelter, but it cannot be completely avoided. The reason for that are the extreme high energies of particles in this field and the herewith connected high penetration depth in matter. For missions outside the magnetosphere ionizing radiation is recognized as the key factor through its impact on crew health and performance. In absence of sporadic solar particle events the radiation exposure in Low Earth orbit (LEO) inside Spacecraft is determined by the galactic cosmic radiation (protons and heavier ions) and by the protons inside the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), an area where the radiation belt comes closer to the earth surface due to a displacement of the magnetic dipole axes from the Earth's center. In addition there is an albedo source of neutrons produced as interaction products of the primary galactic particles with the atoms of the earth atmosphere. Outside the spacecraft the dose is dominated by the electrons of the horns of the radiation belt located at about 60" latitude in Polar Regions. The radiation field has spatial and temporal variations in dependence of the Earth magnetic field and the solar cycle. The complexity of the radiation field inside a spacecraft is further increased through the interaction of the high energy components with the spacecraft shielding material and with the body of the astronauts. In interplanetary missions the radiation belt will be crossed in a couple of minutes and therefore its contribution to their radiation exposure is quite small, but subsequently the protection by the Earth magnetic field is lost, leaving only shielding measures as exposure reduction means. The report intends to describe the radiation field in space, the interaction of the particles with the magnetic field and shielding material and give some numbers on the radiation exposure in low earth

  17. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, James R.; Anand, Aman

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators.Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size.Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm.Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed.

  18. Violin f-hole contribution to far-field radiation via patch near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George; Williams, Earl G; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2007-06-01

    The violin radiates either from dual ports (f-holes) or via surface motion of the corpus (top+ribs+back), with no clear delineation between these sources. Combining "patch" near-field acoustical holography over just the f-hole region of a violin with far-field radiativity measurements over a sphere, it was possible to separate f-hole from surface motion contributions to the total radiation of the corpus below 2.6 kHz. A0, the Helmholtz-like lowest cavity resonance, radiated essentially entirely through the f-holes as expected while A1, the first longitudinal cavity mode with a node at the f-holes, had no significant f-hole radiation. The observed A1 radiation comes from an indirect radiation mechanism, induced corpus motion approximately mirroring the cavity pressure profile seen for violinlike bowed string instruments across a wide range of sizes. The first estimates of the fraction of radiation from the f-holes F(f) indicate that some low frequency corpus modes thought to radiate only via surface motion (notably the first corpus bending modes) had significant radiation through the f-holes, in agreement with net volume changes estimated from experimental modal analysis. F(f) generally trended lower with increasing frequency, following corpus mobility decreases. The f-hole directivity (top/back radiativity ratio) was generally higher than whole-violin directivity.

  19. Vibration analysis and sound field characteristics of a tubular ultrasonic radiator.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhaofeng; Zhou, Guangping; Zhang, Yihui; Li, Zhengzhong; Lin, Shuyu

    2006-12-01

    A sort of tubular ultrasonic radiator used in ultrasonic liquid processing is studied. The frequency equation of the tubular radiator is derived, and its radiated sound field in cylindrical reactor is calculated using finite element method and recorded by means of aluminum foil erosion. The results indicate that sound field of tubular ultrasonic radiator in cylindrical reactor appears standing waves along both its radial direction and axial direction, and amplitudes of standing waves decrease gradually along its radial direction, and the numbers of standing waves along its axial direction are equal to the axial wave numbers of tubular radiator. The experimental results are in good agreement with calculated results.

  20. Voyager's Last Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This video describes Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune. Computer animation and actual data convey Voyager's discoveries such as turbulent storms and dark spots in Neptune's atmosphere, six new moons, Neptune's three rings, and the presence of frozen methane on Triton, as researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory describe Voyager's achievements.

  1. Galileo's Encounter with Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Anderson, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Galileo's last science periapsis encounter with Jupiter before impact was on orbit 34. One of the main scientific goals of this encounter was a close, targeted flyby of the satellite Amalthea. Although two-way Doppler tracking was lost near closest approach, one-way data were obtained throughout the encounter. Together with solid two-way data before and after the encounter period, there is enough information to constrain the mass of the satellite. Together with previously determined shape and volume information these data yield a useful value for the density of this highly non-spherical moon. Preliminary analyses have been presented indicating a bulk density near 1 gm/cc, considerably lower than was expected from the satellite's dark albedo and anticipated rocky composition. Low-density rock or rock/ice mixtures combined with a high porosity, similar to that inferred from recent small asteroid data, are suggested as the most likely explanation. Refined estimates of mass and density as well as uncertainties will be presented and the implications for Amalthea's composition and porosity discussed.

  2. A Lakatosian Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations," by Imre Lakatos. It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning process, where…

  3. Deformation field validation and inversion applied to adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Olteanu, Luiza A. M.; Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Berwouts, Dieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Development and implementation of chronological and anti-chronological adaptive dose accumulation strategies in adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. An algorithm based on Newton iterations was implemented to efficiently compute inverse deformation fields (DFs). Four verification steps were performed to ensure a valid dose propagation: intra-cell folding detection finds zero or negative Jacobian determinants in the input DF; inter-cell folding detection is implemented on the resolution of the output DF; a region growing algorithm detects undefined values in the output DF; DF domains can be composed and displayed on the CT data. In 2011, one patient with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer selected from a three phase adaptive DPBN study was used to illustrate the algorithms implemented for adaptive chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation. The patient received three 18F-FDG-PET/CTs prior to each treatment phase and one CT after finalizing treatment. Contour propagation and DF generation between two consecutive CTs was performed in Atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS). Deformable image registration based dose accumulations were performed on CT1 and CT4. Dose propagation was done using combinations of DFs or their inversions. We have implemented a chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation algorithm based on DF inversion. Algorithms were designed and implemented to detect cell folding.

  4. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  5. Feasibility of EBT Gafchromic films for comparison exercises among standard beta radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J A; Meira-Belo, L C; Reynaldo, S R; da Silva, T A

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of using radiochromic films to verify the metrological coherence among standard beta radiation fields was evaluated. Exercises were done between two Brazilian metrology laboratories in beta fields from (90)Sr/(90)Y, (85)Kr and (147)Pm radiation sources. Results showed that the radiochromic film was useful for field mapping aiming uniformity and alignment verification and it was not reliable for absorbed dose measurements only for (147)Pm beta field.

  6. Magnetic field instability of a plasma in a beam of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1980-04-01

    A beam of electromagnetic radiation can generate magnetic fields in plasmas. It is shown that those fields grow significantly when the incident radiation is sufficiently strong. We obtain expressions for the characteristic time of the growth of the fields as well as for their spatial distribution and point out a possible mechanism, which can lead to the formation of a quasi-stationary state. The maximum value of the magnetic field strength is estimated.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  3. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in... reduce the capability of the airplane or the ability of the flightcrew to respond to an adverse...

  5. Effects of Source Correlations on the Spectrum of Radiated Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    paraxial approximation, with a known result for far-zone radiant intensity of Gaussian Schell - model sources3. Spectral changes on propagation of...33 2.2 The radiation efficiency of planar Gaussian Schell - model sources ............ 34...increase in the source correlation length. Page 40. Figure 2.5: The radiation efficiency of Gaussian Schell - model sources as a function of the rms

  6. Estimating the Reliability of Electronic Parts in High Radiation Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everline, Chester; Clark, Karla; Man, Guy; Rasmussen, Robert; Johnston, Allan; Kohlhase, Charles; Paulos, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Radiation effects on materials and electronic parts constrain the lifetime of flight systems visiting Europa. Understanding mission lifetime limits is critical to the design and planning of such a mission. Therefore, the operational aspects of radiation dose are a mission success issue. To predict and manage mission lifetime in a high radiation environment, system engineers need capable tools to trade radiation design choices against system design and reliability, and science achievements. Conventional tools and approaches provided past missions with conservative designs without the ability to predict their lifetime beyond the baseline mission.This paper describes a more systematic approach to understanding spacecraft design margin, allowing better prediction of spacecraft lifetime. This is possible because of newly available electronic parts radiation effects statistics and an enhanced spacecraft system reliability methodology. This new approach can be used in conjunction with traditional approaches for mission design. This paper describes the fundamentals of the new methodology.

  7. Quantum radiation produced by the entanglement of quantum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Satoshi; Oshita, Naritaka; Tatsukawa, Rumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Sen

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the quantum radiation produced by an Unruh-De Witt detector in a uniformly accelerating motion coupled to the vacuum fluctuations. Quantum radiation is nonvanishing, which is consistent with the previous calculation by Lin and Hu [Phys. Rev. D 73, 124018 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.124018]. We infer that this quantum radiation from the Unruh-De Witt detector is generated by the nonlocal correlation of the Minkowski vacuum state, which has its origin in the entanglement of the state between the left and the right Rindler wedges.

  8. Classical connection between near-field interactions and far-field radiation and the relevance to quantum photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peatross, Justin; Corson, John P.; Tarbox, Grayson

    2013-05-01

    Interference in the far-field radiation pattern emitted from a classical current distribution implies near-field work between different spatial portions of the distribution. We examine this relationship and the essential role of system geometry for the case of two oscillating dipoles and for a Gaussian current distribution. This analysis offers a compelling argument as to why the radiation from a large single-electron quantum wave packet should not exhibit the same destructive interference as that associated with a comparable classical charge density. Our discussion draws attention to the ad hoc heuristics motivating the original derivation of a quantum electron's radiation profile.

  9. Computation of radiative fields in opposed-flow flame spread in a microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaraza, Jeanie Ray P.

    The purpose of this thesis is to perform radiation computations in opposed-flow flame spread in a microgravity environment. In this work, the flame spread simulations consider a thermally thin, PMMA fuel in a quiescent, microgravity environment or facing low opposed-flow velocities at ambient conditions of 1 atm and 50-50 volumetric mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The flame spread model, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, is used for numerical simulations in combination with a radiation model. The CFD code is written in FORTRAN language, and a Matlab code is developed for plotting results. The temperature and species fields from CFD computations are used as inputs into the radiation model. Radiative quantities are calculated by using a global balance method along with the total transmittance non-homogeneous model. Radiation effect on thermocouple temperature measurement is investigated. Although this topic is well known, performing radiation correction calculations usually considers surface radiation only and not gas radiation. The inclusion of gas radiation is utilized in predicting the gas temperature that a thermocouple would measure. A narrow bed radiation model is used to determine the average incident radiative flux at a specified location from which a thermocouple temperature measurement is predicted. This study focuses on the quiescent microgravity environment only. The effect of parameters such as thermocouple surface emissivity and bead diameter are also studied. For the main part of this thesis, the effect of gas radiation on the mechanism of flame spread over a thermally thin, solid fuel in microgravity is investigated computationally. Generated radiative fields including thermal and species fields are utilized to investigate the nature of the influence of gas radiation on flame structure as well as its role in the mechanism of opposed-flow flame spread. The opposed-flow configuration considers low flow velocities including a quiescent

  10. Normal tissue toxicity after small field hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Michael T; Constine, Louis S; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) is an emerging tool in radiation oncology in which the targeting accuracy is improved via the detection and processing of a three-dimensional coordinate system that is aligned to the target. With improved targeting accuracy, SBRT allows for the minimization of normal tissue volume exposed to high radiation dose as well as the escalation of fractional dose delivery. The goal of SBRT is to minimize toxicity while maximizing tumor control. This review will discuss the basic principles of SBRT, the radiobiology of hypofractionated radiation and the outcome from published clinical trials of SBRT, with a focus on late toxicity after SBRT. While clinical data has shown SBRT to be safe in most circumstances, more data is needed to refine the ideal dose-volume metrics. PMID:18976463

  11. Sparse Matrix Motivated Reconstruction of Far-Field Radiation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Transform (DCT). The algorithm was evaluated by using 3 antennas modeled with the high-frequency structural simulator (HFSS): a half-wave dipole, a Vivaldi...and a pyramidal horn. The 2-D radiation pattern was reconstructed for each antenna using less than 44% of the total number of measurements with low...The 3-D radiation patterns of a pyramidal horn antenna was reconstructed by using only 13% of the total number of measurements. By using the

  12. Near-field radiative thermal control with graphene covered on different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ao; Zheng, Zhiheng; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Based on the structure of double-layer parallel plates, this paper demonstrates that thermal radiation in near field is greatly enhanced due to near-field effects, exceeding Planck‧s blackbody radiation law. To study the effect of graphene on thermal radiation in near field, the authors add graphene layer into the structure and analyze the ability of graphene to control near-field thermal radiation with different materials. The result indicates that the graphene layer effectively suppresses the near-field thermal radiation between metal plates or polar-dielectric plates, having good ability of thermal insulation. But for doped-silicon plates, depending on the specific models, graphene has different control abilities, suppressing or enhancing, and the control abilities mainly depend on the material graphene is attached to. The authors also summarize some common rules about the different abilities of graphene to control the near-field thermal radiation. In consideration of the thickness of 0.34 nm of monolayer graphene, this paper points out that graphene plays a very important role in controlling the near-field thermal radiation.

  13. [Formation of optimum dose fields in contact radiation therapy of malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Klepper, L Ia

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the homogeneity of a dose field in the contact radiation therapy for malignant tumors is introduced. The mathematical interpretation of problems in the formation of optimum dose fields, to which the maximum homogeneity of a dose field at the site of lesion corresponds, is presented. It is shown that the problems in the formation of optimum dose fields may be divided into two subsets in relation to whether the sources of radiation are located at the site of lesion or adjacent to the latter (application techniques of radiation). An analytical method for solving a problem in the formation of an optimal dose field in the ring circle by means of one ring source of radiation (the first type of problems). The investigation was conducted with the support of the Russian Fund of Fundamental Investigations (RFFI 01-01-00137).

  14. Voyager Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The following are presented: computer animation of trajectories for both Voyagers 1 and 2; view of Jupiter during one orbit of Ganymede; computer animation of Voyager 2's encounter with Jupiter and its satellites; time lapse of the planet's rotation and its satellites; stroboscopic sequence of selected frames; cloud motion; Jupiter's Great Red Spot (4/25 - 5/24, 1979) through a violet filter; and the Great Red Spot through a blue filter by Voyager 1. The dynamics of Jupiter's clouds are shown - the whole planet is shown first, then two closer looks are repeated several times. Also included are pans of stills of Jupiter's satellites and a computer simulation tour of Saturn system from POV just behind Voyager, made of 116 images of Saturn through a green filter and of 516 images taken by Voyager 1 (9/12 - 9/14, 1980). Frames are enhanced to show the motion of features in Saturn's rings. Pans of stills of Saturn's satellites are shown. There is computer animation of the planet's system, rings, and Sigma Sagittari. Images on January 14, 1986 are through an orange filter. Uranus's satellites are shown as is computer animation of an August 1989 encounter.

  15. Voyager encounter highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-06-01

    The following are presented: computer animation of trajectories for both Voyagers 1 and 2; view of Jupiter during one orbit of Ganymede; computer animation of Voyager 2's encounter with Jupiter and its satellites; time lapse of the planet's rotation and its satellites; stroboscopic sequence of selected frames; cloud motion; Jupiter's Great Red Spot (4/25 - 5/24, 1979) through a violet filter; and the Great Red Spot through a blue filter by Voyager 1. The dynamics of Jupiter's clouds are shown - the whole planet is shown first, then two closer looks are repeated several times. Also included are pans of stills of Jupiter's satellites and a computer simulation tour of Saturn system from POV just behind Voyager, made of 116 images of Saturn through a green filter and of 516 images taken by Voyager 1 (9/12 - 9/14, 1980). Frames are enhanced to show the motion of features in Saturn's rings. Pans of stills of Saturn's satellites are shown. There is computer animation of the planet's system, rings, and Sigma Sagittari. Images on January 14, 1986 are through an orange filter. Uranus's satellites are shown as is computer animation of an August 1989 encounter.

  16. Russian investigations in the field of atmospheric radiation in 2011-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Yu. M.; Shul'gina, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    A short survey prepared by the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation contains the most significant results of work in the field of atmospheric-radiation studies performed in 2011-2014. It is part of the Russian National Report on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences prepared for the International Association on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences (IAMAS)1. During this period, the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation, jointly with the concerned departments and organizations, organized two International Symposiums on Radiation and Dynamics (ISARD-2011 and ISARD-2013). At these conferences, the central problems in modern atmospheric physics were discussed: radiative transfer (RT) and atmospheric optics; greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols; remote methods of measurements; and new measurement data. This survey presents six directions covering the whole spectrum of investigations performed in the field of atmospheric radiation.

  17. Russian investigations in the field of atmospheric radiation in 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Yu. M.; Shul'gina, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    A short survey prepared by the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation contains the most significant results of works in the field of atmospheric-radiation studies performed in 2007-2010. It is part of the Russian National Report on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences prepared for the International Association on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences (IAMAS). During this period, the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation, jointly with concerned departments and organizations, ran the conference "Physics and Education," dedicated to the 75th anniversary of the Department of Physics at St. Petersburg State University (2007); the International Symposium of CIS Countries "Atmospheric Radiation and Dynamics" (2009); and the 5th International Conference "Atmospheric Physics, Climate, and Environment" (2010). At the conferences, central problems in modern atmosphere physics were discussed: radiative transfer and atmospheric optics; greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols; remote methods of measurements; and new measurement data. This survey presents five directions covering the whole spectrum of investigations performed in the field of atmospheric radiation.

  18. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  19. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  20. Radiation fields from neutron generators shielded with different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Blackburn, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around a DT neutron generator numerical modeling has been performed to assess neutron and photon dose profiles for a variety of shield materials ranging from 1 to 100 cm thick. In agreement with accepted radiation safety practices high-Z materials such as bismuth and lead have been found to be ineffective biological shield materials, owing in part to the existence of (n,2n) reaction channels available with 14.1 MeV DT neutrons, while low-Z materials serve as effective shields for these sources. Composite materials such as a mixture of polyethylene and bismuth, or regular concrete, are ideal shield materials for neutron generator radiation because of their ability to attenuate internally generated photon radiation resulting from neutron scattering and capture within the shields themselves.

  1. Quantum radiation of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field in nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum radiation properties of nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black hole is investigated using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The locations of horizons and the temperature of the thermal radiation as well as the maximum energy of the nonthermal radiation are derived. It is found that the surface gravity and the Hawking temperature depend on both time and different angles. An extra coupling effect is obtained in the thermal radiation spectrum of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations which is absent in the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Further, the chemical potential derived from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particle has been found to be equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of the scalar particle in the nonthermal radiation for KdS black hole. It is also shown that the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation produces a constant term in the expression of the surface gravity and Hawking temperature.

  2. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: The nature of spontaneous radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Vitalii L.

    1983-08-01

    The nature of spontaneous radiation is discussed in its technical and historical aspects. The point of view encountered in the literature according to which spontaneous radiation is induced radiation produced by the zero-point (vacuum) oscillations of the electromagnetic field is criticized. Spontaneous radiation is not a purely quantum effect since it occurs also in the classical region (and in this case it is described by classical electrodynamics).

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Comments on 'Cellular response to modulated radiation fields'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. K.; Klassen, N. V.

    2009-03-01

    The authors of a recent paper (Claridge Mackonis et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 5469-82) measured cell survival in spatially modulated radiation fields. They claim to have identified two new types of radiation-induced bystander effect. We conclude that their claims are not supported by their data.

  4. RHrFPGA Radiation-Hardened Re-programmable Field-Programmable Gate Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, A. B.; LaBel, K. A.; McCabe, J. F.; Gardner, G. A.; Lintz, J.; Ross, C.; Golke, K.; Burns, B.; Carts, M. A.; Kim, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the development of the Radiation-Hardened Re-programmable Field-Programmable Gate Array (RHrFPGA) are presented. The topics include: 1) Radiation Test Suite; 2) Testing Interface; 3) Test Configuration; 4) Facilities; 5) Test Programs; 6) Test Procedure; and 7) Test Results. A summary of heavy ion and proton testing is also included.

  5. Analytical formulation of the radiation field of printed antennas in the presence of artificial magnetic superstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Hussein; Yousefi, Leila; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the cavity model of a microstrip patch antenna in conjunction with the reciprocity theorem is used to develop a fast analytical solution for the radiation field of a microstrip patch antenna loaded with a novel artificial magnetic superstrate and to investigate the effect of the engineered superstrate layer on the directivity and radiation pattern of the printed patch antenna.

  6. Wave field synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jens; Spors, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    An approach to the synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties in wave field synthesis is presented. The approach exploits the fact that any stationary sound source of finite spatial extent radiates spherical waves at sufficient distance. The angular dependency of the radiation properties of the source under consideration is reflected by the amplitude and phase distribution on the spherical wave fronts. The sound field emitted by a uniformly moving monopole source is derived and the far-field radiation properties of the complex virtual source under consideration are incorporated in order to derive a closed-form expression for the loudspeaker driving signal. The results are illustrated via numerical simulations of the synthesis of the sound field of a sample moving complex virtual source.

  7. Teacher Educators Using Encounter Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Danné E.; Kellinger, Janna Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Many prospective teachers are unaware of the encounters that Black, heterosexual women or White lesbians face. Here, we present encounter stories--individual narratives of poignant encounters and interactions that we have experienced with people unlike us--to identify with and ultimately draw on their experiences. Subsequently, the narratives…

  8. Effects of external radiation fields on line emission—application to star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzikos, Marios; Ferland, G. J.; Williams, R. J. R.; Porter, Ryan; Van Hoof, P. A. M.

    2013-12-20

    A variety of astronomical environments contain clouds irradiated by a combination of isotropic and beamed radiation fields. For example, molecular clouds may be irradiated by the isotropic cosmic microwave background, as well as by a nearby active galactic nucleus. These radiation fields excite atoms and molecules and produce emission in different ways. We revisit the escape probability theorem and derive a novel expression that accounts for the presence of external radiation fields. We show that when the field is isotropic the escape probability is reduced relative to that in the absence of external radiation. This is in agreement with previous results obtained under ad hoc assumptions or with the two-level system, but can be applied to complex many-level models of atoms or molecules. This treatment is in the development version of the spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. We examine the spectrum of a Spitzer cloud embedded in the local interstellar radiation field and show that about 60% of its emission lines are sensitive to background subtraction. We argue that this geometric approach could provide an additional tool toward understanding the complex radiation fields of starburst galaxies.

  9. Polarization of atomic radiation in stochastic plasma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenko, V.I.; Fisch, N.J.

    1997-05-12

    When a laser pulse of certain polarization or an electron beam excites atoms in a plasma, the atomic spectrum of the radiation emitted by the atoms exhibits differently polarized line core and line wings. This unusual effect, which is predicted to occur under a variety of conditions, can be accompanied by the appearance of the forbidden component in the spectrum, with polarization opposite to that of the exciting laser pulse.

  10. Criteria for Personal Dosimetry in Mixed Radiation Fields in Space,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-16

    of neutrons has not been reported on any manned mussion. Only limited data on thermal neutrons recorded with activation f9 ils and on a small section...the center. The bottom graph shows the distribution for neutron recoil protons from thermal fission of U-235 as reported by Kronenberg and Murphy (3...an equilibrium spectrum is established. For neutrons of galactic radiation, the equilibrium spectrum is a wide continuum extending from thermal to

  11. Potential scattering of electrons in a quantized radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergou, J.; Ehlotzky, F.

    1986-05-01

    Potential scattering of electrons in a strong laser field is reconsidered. The laser beam is described by a quantized single-mode plane-wave field with a finite number of quanta in the mode. The scattering amplitude is expanded in powers of the potential, and the first two Born terms are considered. It is shown that in the limit of an infinite number of field quanta, the Kroll-Watson approximation is recovered. Additional insight is gained into the validity of this low-frequency theorem. The approach rests on the introduction of electron-dressed quantized-field states. Relations to earlier work are indicated.

  12. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  13. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  14. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  15. SU-E-T-361: Energy Dependent Radiation/light-Field Misalignment On Truebeam Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, N; Tanny, S; Parsai, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying the co-incidence of the radiation and light field is recommended by TG-142 for monthly and annual checks. On a digital accelerator, it is simple to verify that beam steering settings are consistent with accepted and commissioned values. This fact should allow for physicists to verify radiation-light-field co-incidence for a single energy and accept that Result for all energies. We present a case where the radiation isocenter deviated for a single energy without any apparent modification to the beam steering parameters. Methods: The radiation isocenter was determined using multiple Methods: Gafchromic film, a BB test, and radiation profiles measured with a diode. Light-field borders were marked on Gafchromic film and then irradiated for all photon energies. Images of acceptance films were compared with films taken four months later. A phantom with a radio-opaque BB was aligned to isocenter using the light-field and imaged using the EPID for all photon energies. An unshielded diode was aligned using the crosshairs and then beam profiles of multiple field sizes were obtained. Field centers were determined using Omni-Pro v7.4 software, and compared to similar scans taken during commissioning. Beam steering parameter files were checked against backups to determine that the steering parameters were unchanged. Results: There were no differences between the configuration files from acceptance. All three tests demonstrated that a single energy had deviated from accepted values by 0.8 mm in the inline direction. The other two energies remained consistent with previous measurements. The deviated energy was re-steered to be within our clinical tolerance. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that radiation-light-field coincidence is an energy dependent effect for modern linacs. We recommend that radiation-light-field coincidence be verified for all energies on a monthly basis, particularly for modes used to treat small fields, as these may drift without

  16. Modeling of cloud liquid water structure and the associated radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Wiscombe, W.

    1995-09-01

    A 0.5{degrees}C global warming should result from every 1% decrease in global albedo. It is therefore necessary to accurately quantify the cloud radiation interaction. Most radiation calculations are one-dimensional and attempt to deal with horizontal variability using a horizontally-averaged optical depth. This study presents detailed scale-by-scale statistical analysis of the cloud liquid water content (LWC) field. The aim is to use this information to provide radiation calculations with more adequate information about inhomogeneity in cloud fields. The radiation community needs to carefully specify the minimum requirements which GCMs must include in order to treat cloud-radiation interaction correctly. This may involve GCMs predicting not only mean cloud quantities but also cloud variability. 3 figs.

  17. Basic theory for polarized, astrophysical maser radiation in a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Fundamental alterations in the theory and resulting behavior of polarized, astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field have been asserted based on a calculation of instabilities in the radiative transfer. I reconsider the radiative transfer and find that the relevant instabilities do not occur. Calculational errors in the previous investigation are identified. In addition, such instabilities would have appeared -- but did not -- in the numerous numerical solutions to the same radiative transfer equations that have been presented in the literature. As a result, all modifications that have been presented in a recent series of papers (Elitzur 1991, 1993) to the theory for polarized maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field are invalid. The basic theory is thus clarified.

  18. Heat flux splitter for near-field thermal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, P.; Belarouci, A.; Frechette, L.; Biehs, S.-A.

    2015-08-03

    We demonstrate the possibility to efficiently split the near-field heat flux exchanged between graphene nano-disks by tuning their doping. This result paves the way for the development of an active control of propagation directions for heat fluxes exchanged in the near field throughout integrated nanostructured networks.

  19. WE-EF-BRA-08: Cell Survival in Modulated Radiation Fields and Altered DNA-Repair at Field Edges

    SciTech Connect

    Bartzsch, S; Oelfke, U; Eismann, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tissue damage prognoses in radiotherapy are based on clonogenic assays that provide dose dependent cell survival rates. However, recent work has shown that apart from dose, systemic reactions and cell-cell communication crucially influence the radiation response. These effects are probably a key in understanding treatment approaches such as microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In this study we tried to quantify the effects on a cellular level in spatially modulated radiation fields. Methods: Pancreas carcinoma cells were cultured, plated and irradiated by spatially modulated radiation fields with an X-ray tube and at a synchrotron. During and after treatment cells were able to communicate via the intercellular medium. Afterwards we stained for DNA and DNA damage and imaged with a fluorescence microscope. Results: Intriguingly we found that DNA damage does not strictly increase with dose. Two cell entities appear that have either a high or a low amount of DNA lesions, indicating that DNA damage is also a cell stress reaction. Close to radiation boundaries damage-levels became alike; they were higher than expected at low and lower than expected at high doses. Neighbouring cells reacted similarly. 6 hours after exposure around 40% of the cells resembled in their reactions neighbouring cells more than randomly chosen cells that received the same dose. We also observed that close to radiation boundaries the radiation induced cell-cycle arrest disappeared and the size of DNA repair-centres increased. Conclusion: Cell communication plays an important role in the radiation response of tissues and may be both, protective and destructive. These effects may not only have the potential to affect conventional radiotherapy but may also be exploited to spare organs at risk by intelligently designing irradiation geometries. To that end intensive work is required to shed light on the still obscure processes in cell-signalling and radiation biology.

  20. Synchro-curvature radiation of charged particles in the strong curved magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kelner, S. R.; Prosekin, A. Yu.; Aharonian, F. A. E-mail: Anton.Prosekin@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that the radiation of relativistic particles in a curved magnetic field proceeds in either the synchrotron or the curvature radiation modes. In this paper we show that in strong curved magnetic fields a significant fraction of the energy of relativistic electrons can be radiated away in the intermediate, the so-called synchro-curvature regime. Because of the persistent change of the trajectory curvature, the radiation varies with the frequency of particle gyration. While this effect can be ignored in the synchrotron and curvature regimes, the variability plays a key role in the formation of the synchro-curvature radiation. Using the Hamiltonian formalism, we find that the particle trajectory has the form of a helix wound around the drift trajectory. This allows us to calculate analytically the intensity and energy distribution of prompt radiation in the general case of magnetic bremsstrahlung in the curved magnetic field. We show that the transition to the limit of the synchrotron and curvature radiation regimes is determined by the relation between the drift velocity and the component of the particle velocity perpendicular to the drift trajectory. The detailed numerical calculations, which take into account the energy losses of particles, confirm the principal conclusions based on the simplified analytical treatment of the problem, and allow us to analyze quantitatively the transition between different radiation regimes for a broad range of initial pitch angles. These calculations demonstrate that even very small pitch angles may lead to significant deviations from the spectrum of the standard curvature radiation when it is formally assumed that a charged particle moves strictly along the magnetic line. We argue that in the case of realization of specific configurations of the electric and magnetic fields, the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar magnetospheres can be dominated by the component radiated in the synchro-curvature regime.

  1. Coherent regime and far-to-near-field transition for radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurimaki, Yoichiro; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao; Vaillon, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite parallel media is analyzed in the transition zone between the near-field and the classical macroscopic, i.e. incoherent far-field, regimes of thermal radiation, first for model gray materials and then for real metallic (Al) and dielectric (SiC) materials. The presence of a minimum in the flux-distance curve is observed for the propagative component of the radiative heat transfer coefficient, and in some cases for the total coefficient, i.e. the sum of the propagative and evanescent components. At best this reduction can reach 15% below the far-field limit in the case of aluminum. The far-to-near-field regime taking place for the distance range between the near-field and the classical macroscopic regime involves a coherent far-field regime. One of its limits can be practically defined by the distance at which the incoherent far-field regime breaks down. This separation distance below which the standard theory of incoherent thermal radiation cannot be applied anymore is found to be larger than the usual estimate based on Wien's law and varies as a function of temperature. The aforementioned effects are due to coherence, which is present despite the broadband spectral nature of thermal radiation, and has a stronger impact for reflective materials.

  2. Two encounters with the flank low-latitude boundary layer - Further evidence for closed field topology and investigation of the internal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, D. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the flank low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is examined through differential energy spectra and particle angular anisotropies for traversals of the dawn flank (December 19, 1977) and dusk flank (July 7, 1978) during periods of predominantly northward magnetosheath field orientation. Spectra are presented that were obtained from combined ISEE 1 low-energy-proton and electron-differential-energy-analyzer and medium-energy-particle-instrument data extending over the 200-eV/q to 2-MeV energy range for the plasma sheet, stagnation region, outer LLBL, and magnetosheath regions. The stagnation region and the outer LLBL are each a mixture of plasma-sheet and magnetosheath populations, but the stagnation region contains a relatively higher fraction of plasma sheet particles, consistent with its placement earthward of the outer LLBL. Evidence for energization of thermal electrons appears during the dusk flank crossing. Bidirectional field-aligned ion distributions are observed with typically 5-to-1 enhancement of the flux along the magnetic field during certain portions of the dusk flank crossing.

  3. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  4. Use of an electric field in an electrostatic liquid film radiator.

    PubMed

    Bankoff, S G; Griffing, E M; Schluter, R A

    2002-10-01

    Experimental and numerical work was performed to further the understanding of an electrostatic liquid film radiator (ELFR) that was originally proposed by Kim et al.(1) The ELFR design utilizes an electric field that exerts a normal force on the interface of a flowing film. The field lowers the pressure under the film in a space radiator and, thereby, prevents leakage through a puncture in the radiator wall. The flowing film is subject to the Taylor cone instability, whereby a cone of fluid forms underneath an electrode and sharpens until a jet of fluid is pulled toward the electrode and disintegrates into droplets. The critical potential for the instability is shown to be as much as an order of magnitude higher than that used in previous designs.(2) Furthermore, leak stoppage experiments indicate that the critical field is adequate to stop leaks in a working radiator.

  5. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  6. Involved field radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma: The actual dose to breasts in close proximity

    SciTech Connect

    Dabaja, Bouthaina; Wang Zhonglo; Stovall, Marilyn; Baker, Jamie S.; Smith, Susan A.; Khan, Meena; Ballas, Leslie; Salehpour, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    To decrease the risk of late toxicities in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) (HL), involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) has largely replaced the extended fields. To determine the out-of-field dose delivered from a typical IFRT to surrounding critical structures, we measured the dose at various points in an anthropomorphic phantom. The phantom is divided into 1-inch-thick slices with the ability to insert TLDs at 3-cm intervals grid spacing. Two treatment fields were designed, and a total of 45 TLDs were placed (equally spaced) at the margin of the each of the 2 radiation fields. After performing a computed tomography simulation, 2 treatment plans targeting the mediastinum, a typical treatment field in patients with early stage HL, were generated. A total dose of 3060 cGy was delivered to the gross tumor volume for each field consecutively. The highest measured dose detected at 1 cm from the field edge in the planning target volume was 496 cGy, equivalent to 16% of the isocentric dose. The dose dropped significantly with increasing distance from the field edge. It ranged from 1.1-3.9% of the isocentric dose at a distance of 3.2-4 cm to <1.6% at a distance of >6 cm. Although the computer treatment planning system (CTPS) frequently underestimated the dose delivered, the difference in dose between measured and generated by CTPS was <2.5% in 90 positions measured. The collateral dose of radiation to breasts from IFRT is minimal. The out-of-field dose, although mildly underestimated by CTPS, becomes insignificant at >3 cm from the field edge of the radiation field.

  7. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  8. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  9. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  10. Hybrid antenna sources for radiating high-power impulsive fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenauer, C. Jerald; Marek, J. Raley

    1995-09-01

    The transmission of impulsive signals through baluns and feed lines, between high-power, fast-risetime pulse generators and impulse-radiating antennas, leads to degraded system performance and increased pulse risetime due to transit-time dispersion, skin and dielectric losses, and electrical breakdown effects. These loss mechanisms are greatly reduced in system designs that eliminate feed lines and baluns by combining the antenna and generator in a single hybrid device that is compact, simple, and robust. This paper describes generators in which the antenna itself is pulse charged to hundreds of kV and subsequently shorted at the feed point by an oil spark switch. These Hertzian generators maintain conical symmetry to within a few millimeters of the feed-point switch, thus providing conditions for launching near-ideal spherical TEM step waves for driving impulse-radiating, focused-aperture antennas. Careful attention to symmetry, optical principles, and precise methods of measurement has yielded subnanosecond pulse risetimes that are more than ten times faster than predictions from spark- switch scaling laws.

  11. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals in Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Biomass Burning Region in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guo-Yong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol amount in clear regions of a cloudy atmosphere is a critical parameter in studying the interaction between aerosols and clouds. Since the global cloud cover is about 50%, cloudy scenes are often encountered in any satellite images. Aerosols are more or less transparent, while clouds are extremely reflective in the visible spectrum of solar radiation. The radiative transfer in clear-cloudy condition is highly three- dimensional (3D). This paper focuses on estimating the 3D effects on aerosol optical thickness retrievals using Monte Carlo simulations. An ASTER image of cumulus cloud fields in the biomass burning region in Brazil is simulated in this study. The MODIS products (i-e., cloud optical thickness, particle effective radius, cloud top pressure, surface reflectance, etc.) are used to construct the cloud property and surface reflectance fields. To estimate the cloud 3-D effects, we assume a plane-parallel stratification of aerosol properties in the 60 km x 60 km ASTER image. The simulated solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere is compared with plane-parallel calculations. Furthermore, the 3D cloud radiative effects on aerosol optical thickness retrieval are estimated.

  12. Analysis of the failures and corrective actions for the LHC cryogenics radiation tolerant electronics and its field instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Balle, Christoph; Casas, Juan; Vauthier, Nicolas

    2014-01-29

    The LHC cryogenic system radiation tolerant electronics and their associated field instruments have been in nominal conditions since before the commissioning of the first LHC beams in September 2008. This system is made of about 15’000 field instruments (thermometers, pressure sensors, liquid helium level gauges, electrical heaters and position switches), 7’500 electronic cards and 853 electronic crates. Since mid-2008 a software tool has been deployed, this allows an operator to report a problem and then lists the corrective actions. The tool is a great help in detecting recurrent problems that may be tackled by a hardware or software consolidation. The corrective actions range from simple resets, exchange of defective equipment, repair of electrical connectors, etc. However a recurrent problem that heals by itself is present on some channels. This type of fault is extremely difficult to diagnose and it appears as a temporary opening of an electrical circuit; its duration can range from a few minutes to several months. This paper presents the main type of problems encountered during the last four years, their evolution over time, the various hardware or software consolidations that have resulted and whether they have had an impact in the availability of the LHC beam.

  13. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the

  14. Terahertz Radiation from Laser Created Plasma by Applying a Transverse Static Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takuya; Katahira, Koji; Yugami, Noboru; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation, which is emitted in narrow cone in the forward direction from laser created plasma has been observed by N.Yugami et al.. Additionally, Löffler et al. have observed that a significantly increased THz emission intensity in the forward direction when the transverse static electric field is applied to the plasma. The purpose of our study is to derive the mechanism of the THz radiation from laser created plasma by applying the transverse static electric field. To study the radiation mechanism, we conducted 2D-PIC simulation. With the static electric field of 10 kV/cm and gas density of 1020 cm-3, we obtain 1.2 THz single cycle pulse radiation, whose intensity is 1.3 ×105 W/cm2. The magnetic field called ``picket fence mode'' is generated in the laser created plasma. At the boundary surface between the plasma and vacuum, the magnetic field is canceled because eddy current flows. We conclude that the temporal behavior of the magnetic field at the boundary surface radiates the THz wave.

  15. Three Dimensional Radiation Fields in Free Electron Lasers Using Lienard-Wiechert Fields,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-28

    compared to 60 trad for the short pulse. It is possible to think of the resultant radiation as being generated by a long line of phased-array antenas ...cone of angular dimension given approximately by 1/No where No is the number of radiators in the antena . For the FEL, however, No represents the number

  16. [The use of a detector of the extremely weak radiation as a variometer of gravitation field].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, E S; Bondarenko, E G; Shapovalov, S N; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that the detector of extremely weak radiation with selectively increased sensitivity to the nonelectromagnetic, including the gravitational component of the spectrum of active physical fields can be used as the basis for constructing a variometer of gravitational field of a new type.

  17. Radiation from Relativistic Jets in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Niemiec, J.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Mizuno, Y.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    Using our new 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code parallelized with MPI, we have investigated long-term particle acceleration associated with an relativistic electron-positron jet propagating in an unmagnetized ambient electron-positron plasma. The simulations have been performed using a much longer simulation system than our previous simulations in order to investigate the full nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability and its particle acceleration mechanism. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and ambient electrons are accelerated in the resulting shocks. The acceleration of ambient electrons leads to a maximum ambient electron density three times larger than the original value. Behind the bow shock in the jet shock strong electromagnetic fields are generated. These fields may lead to the afterglow emission. We have calculated the time evolution of the spectrum from two electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique.

  18. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  19. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  20. Near Field Radiation Characteristics of Implantable Square Spiral Chip Inductor Antennas for Bio-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The near field radiation characteristics of implantable Square Spiral Chip Inductor Antennas (SSCIA) for Bio-Sensors have been measured. Our results indicate that the measured near field relative signal strength of these antennas agrees with simulated results and confirm that in the near field region the radiation field is fairly uniform in all directions. The effects of parameters such as ground-plane, number of turns and microstrip-gap width on the performance of the SSCIA are presented. Furthermore, the SSCIA antenna with serrated ground plane produce a broad radiation pattern, with a relative signal strength detectable at distances within the range of operation of hand-held devices for self-diagnosis.

  1. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked regions. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields and particle acceleration. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation, which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. We will present detailed spectra for conditions relevant of various astrophysical sites of shock formation via the Weibel instability. In particular we will discuss the application to GRBs and SNRs

  2. Effects of radiation damping on particle motion in pulsar vacuum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, B.; Herold, H.; Ertl, T.; Ruder, H.

    1989-11-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on the motion of charged particles are studied in strong electric and magnetic fields with special attention to the vacuum near-field region of an oblique rotator. For strong radiation damping a local velocity field is derived from the Lorentz-Dirac equation, which efficiently describes the motion of electrons and positrons in the whole range of typical pulsar parameters. The velocity field makes it possible to define regions in the inner magnetosphere, where particle trapping occurs due to the radiation losses. By numerical integration of particle trajectories from the pulsar surface, regions around the magnetic poles are found which are defined by particle emission into the wave zone. The shapes of the escape regions on the pulsar surface are determined to a considerable extent by the presence of the accumulation regions.

  3. Micro Penning Trap for Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring in High Radiation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Javiera; Bollen, Georg; Gulyuz, Kerim; Ringle, Ryan; Bado, Philippe; Dugan, Mark; Lebit Team; Translume Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities for rare isotope beams, like FRIB at MSU, are constructed, there is a need for new instrumentation to monitor magnetic fields in beam magnets that can withstand the higher radiation level. Currently NMR probes, the instruments used extensively to monitor magnetic fields, do not have a long lifespans in radiation-high environments. Therefore, a radiation-hard replacement is needed. We propose to use Penning trap mass spectrometry techniques to make high precision magnetic field measurements. Our Penning microtrap will be radiation resistant as all of the vital electronics will be at a safe distance from the radiation. The trap itself is made from materials not subject to radiation damage. Penning trap mass spectrometers can determine the magnetic field by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with a known mass and charge. This principle is used on the Low Energy Beam Ion Trap (LEBIT) minitrap at NSCL which is the foundation for the microtrap. We have partnered with Translume, who specialize in glass micro-fabrication, to develop a microtrap in fused-silica glass. A microtrap is finished and ready for testing at NSCL with all of the electronic and hardware components setup. DOE Phase II SBIR Award No. DE-SC0011313, NSF Award Number 1062410 REU in Physics, NSF under Grant No. PHY-1102511.

  4. A Numerical Treatment of Anisotropic Radiation Fields Coupled with Relativistic Resistive Magnetofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 × 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 × 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  5. A NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF ANISOTROPIC RADIATION FIELDS COUPLED WITH RELATIVISTIC RESISTIVE MAGNETOFLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  6. Close encounters with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  7. Universalist ethics in extraterrestrial encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Seth D.

    2010-02-01

    If humanity encounters an extraterrestrial civilization, or if two extraterrestrial civilizations encounter each other, then the outcome may depend not only on the civilizations' relative strength to destroy each other but also on what ethics are held by one or both civilizations. This paper explores outcomes of encounter scenarios in which one or both civilizations hold a universalist ethical framework. Several outcomes are possible in such scenarios, ranging from one civilization destroying the other to both civilizations racing to be the first to commit suicide. Thus, attention to the ethics of both humanity and extraterrestrials is warranted in human planning for such an encounter. Additionally, the possibility of such an encounter raises profound questions for contemporary human ethics, even if such an encounter never occurs.

  8. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  9. Stream Lifetimes Against Planetary Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valsecchi, G. B.; Lega, E.; Froeschle, Cl.

    2011-01-01

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the perturbation induced by an encounter with a planet on a meteoroid stream. Our analytical tool is the extension of pik s theory of close encounters, that we apply to streams described by geocentric variables. The resulting formulae are used to compute the rate at which a stream is dispersed by planetary encounters into the sporadic background. We have verified the accuracy of the analytical model using a numerical test.

  10. A Study of High Altitude Hypersonic Flow-Field Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Stephane; Park, Chul; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the works carried out jointly at Stanford University and Ames Research Center under a grant from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) (formerly the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization) to explain and understand the results of the two flight experiments, Bow Shock Ultra-Violet 1 and Bow Shock Ultra-Violet 2, carried out by the Organization. A portion of the material contained in this paper has been reported elsewhere in open literature. However, this paper provides (1) the details of scientific contents not available in those literature, (2) the links among those and the logical order of the efforts involved, and (3) some materials not contained in any open literature. The first author is responsible for execution of the work; the second author directed the work of the first author. In the two flight experiments mentioned above, the spectra of radiation in the ultraviolet wavelength range incident on the stagnation point of a blunt body were measured at the flight speeds of 3.8 and 5.2 km/sec over a wide range of altitudes. The results were compared first with the calculations made using the original version of the NEQAIR/STRAP codes written earlier by the second author. At low altitudes, the calculations agreed with the measurement. However, at high altitudes, the calculations underestimated the intensity of the radiation by several orders of magnitudes. A shock tube experiment was carried out at CALSPAN and a plasma-torch experiment was carried out at Stanford University to produce experimental data to help explain the discrepancy. In addition, the shock tube experiment at Ames Research Center carried out independently of the BMDO was also found to be relevant to this question. In this paper, several theoretical models are developed and calculations using the models were carried out to explain the results not only of the flight experiments but also of the CALSPAN, Stanford, and Ames experiments. The are: (1

  11. Field size dependent mapping of medical linear accelerator radiation leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Veres, Attila; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of a graphics library based model for the assessment of linear accelerator radiation leakage. Transmission through the shielding elements was evaluated using the build-up factor corrected exponential attenuation law and the contribution from the electron guide was estimated using the approximation of a linear isotropic radioactive source. Model parameters were estimated by a fitting series of thermoluminescent dosimeter leakage measurements, achieved up to 100 cm from the beam central axis along three directions. The distribution of leakage data at the patient plane reflected the architecture of the shielding elements. Thus, the maximum leakage dose was found under the collimator when only one jaw shielded the primary beam and was about 0.08% of the dose at isocentre. Overall, we observe that the main contributor to leakage dose according to our model was the electron beam guide. Concerning the discrepancies between the measurements used to calibrate the model and the calculations from the model, the average difference was about 7%. Finally, graphics library modelling is a readily and suitable way to estimate leakage dose distribution on a personal computer. Such data could be useful for dosimetric evaluations in late effect studies.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Asymptotic directional structure of radiative fields in spacetimes with a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtous, Pavel; Podolský, Jirí

    2004-12-01

    We analyse the directional properties of general gravitational, electromagnetic and spin-s fields near conformal infinity \\scri . The fields are evaluated in normalized tetrads which are parallelly propagated along null geodesics which approach a point P of \\scri . The standard peeling-off property is recovered and its meaning is discussed and refined. When the (local) character of the conformal infinity is null, such as in asymptotically flat spacetimes, the dominant term which is identified with radiation is unique. However, for spacetimes with a non-vanishing cosmological constant the conformal infinity is spacelike (for Λ > 0) or timelike (for Λ < 0), and the radiative component of each field depends substantially on the null direction along which P is approached. The directional dependence of asymptotic fields near such de Sitter-like or anti-de Sitter-like \\scri is explicitly found and described. We demonstrate that the corresponding directional structure of radiation has a universal character that is determined by the algebraic (Petrov) type of the field. In particular, when Λ > 0 the radiation vanishes only along directions which are opposite to principal null directions. For Λ < 0 the directional dependence is more complicated because it is necessary to distinguish outgoing and ingoing radiation. Near such anti-de Sitter-like conformal infinity the corresponding directional structures differ, depending not only on the number and degeneracy of the principal null directions at P but also on their specific orientation with respect to \\scri . The directional structure of radiation near (anti-)de Sitter-like infinities supplements the standard peeling-off property of spin-s fields. This characterization offers a better understanding of the asymptotic behaviour of the fields near conformal infinity under the presence of a cosmological constant.

  13. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulation of plasma formed on a surface by a megagauss field.

    PubMed

    Esaulov, A A; Bauer, B S; Makhin, V; Siemon, R E; Lindemuth, I R; Awe, T J; Reinovsky, R E; Struve, K W; Desjarlais, M P; Mehlhorn, T A

    2008-03-01

    Radiation magnetohydrodynamic modeling is used to study the plasma formed on the surface of a cylindrical metallic load, driven by megagauss magnetic field at the 1MA Zebra generator (University of Nevada, Reno). An ionized aluminum plasma is used to represent the "core-corona" behavior in which a heterogeneous Z-pinch consists of a hot low-density corona surrounding a dense low-temperature core. The radiation dynamics model included simultaneously a self-consistent treatment of both the opaque and transparent plasma regions in a corona. For the parameters of this experiment, the boundary of the opaque plasma region emits the major radiation power with Planckian black-body spectrum in the extreme ultraviolet corresponding to an equilibrium temperature of 16 eV. The radiation heat transport significantly exceeds the electron and ion kinetic heat transport in the outer layers of the opaque plasma. Electromagnetic field energy is partly radiated (13%) and partly deposited into inner corona and core regions (87%). Surface temperature estimates are sensitive to the radiation effects, but the surface motion in response to pressure and magnetic forces is not. The general results of the present investigation are applicable to the liner compression experiments at multi-MA long-pulse current accelerators such as Atlas and Shiva Star. Also the radiation magnetohydrodynamic model discussed in the paper may be useful for understanding key effects of wire array implosion dynamics.

  14. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  15. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  16. Entanglement and nonclassicality for multimode radiation-field states

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan, J. Solomon; Chaturvedi, S.; Ercolessi, E.; Marmo, G.; Morandi, G.; Mukunda, N.; Simon, R.

    2011-03-15

    Nonclassicality in the sense of quantum optics is a prerequisite for entanglement in multimode radiation states. In this work we bring out the possibilities of passing from the former to the latter, via action of classicality preserving systems like beam splitters, in a transparent manner. For single-mode states, a complete description of nonclassicality is available via the classical theory of moments, as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions on the photon number distribution. We show that when the mode is coupled to an ancilla in any coherent state, and the system is then acted upon by a beam splitter, these conditions turn exactly into signatures of negativity under partial transpose (NPT) entanglement of the output state. Since the classical moment problem does not generalize to two or more modes, we turn in these cases to other familiar sufficient but not necessary conditions for nonclassicality, namely the Mandel parameter criterion and its extensions. We generalize the Mandel matrix from one-mode states to the two-mode situation, leading to a natural classification of states with varying levels of nonclassicality. For two-mode states we present a single test that can, if successful, simultaneously show nonclassicality as well as NPT entanglement. We also develop a test for NPT entanglement after beam-splitter action on a nonclassical state, tracing carefully the way in which it goes beyond the Mandel nonclassicality test. The result of three-mode beam-splitter action after coupling to an ancilla in the ground state is treated in the same spirit. The concept of genuine tripartite entanglement, and scalar measures of nonclassicality at the Mandel level for two-mode systems, are discussed. Numerous examples illustrating all these concepts are presented.

  17. Technical Note: Response measurement for select radiation detectors in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, M.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose response to applied magnetic fields for ion chambers and solid state detectors has been investigated previously for the anticipated use in linear accelerator–magnetic resonance devices. In this investigation, the authors present the measured response of selected radiation detectors when the magnetic field is applied in the same direction as the radiation beam, i.e., a longitudinal magnetic field, to verify previous simulation only data. Methods: The dose response of a PR06C ion chamber, PTW60003 diamond detector, and IBA PFD diode detector is measured in a longitudinal magnetic field. The detectors are irradiated with buildup caps and their long axes either parallel or perpendicular to the incident photon beam. In each case, the magnetic field dose response is reported as the ratio of detector signals with to that without an applied longitudinal magnetic field. The magnetic field dose response for each unique orientation as a function of magnetic field strength was then compared to the previous simulation only studies. Results: The measured dose response of each detector in longitudinal magnetic fields shows no discernable response up to near 0.21 T. This result was expected and matches the previously published simulation only results, showing no appreciable dose response with magnetic field. Conclusions: Low field longitudinal magnetic fields have been shown to have little or no effect on the dose response of the detectors investigated and further lend credibility to previous simulation only studies.

  18. Simulation studies of wide and medium field of view earth radiation data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    A parameter estimation technique is presented to estimate the radiative flux distribution over the earth from radiometer measurements at satellite altitude. The technique analyzes measurements from a wide field of view (WFOV), horizon to horizon, nadir pointing sensor with a mathematical technique to derive the radiative flux estimates at the top of the atmosphere for resolution elements smaller than the sensor field of view. A computer simulation of the data analysis technique is presented for both earth-emitted and reflected radiation. Zonal resolutions are considered as well as the global integration of plane flux. An estimate of the equator-to-pole gradient is obtained from the zonal estimates. Sensitivity studies of the derived flux distribution to directional model errors are also presented. In addition to the WFOV results, medium field of view results are presented.

  19. Electromagnetic fields radiated from a lightning return stroke - Application of an exact solution to Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Meneghini, R.

    1978-01-01

    A solution is presented for the electromagnetic fields radiated by an arbitrarily oriented current filament over a conducting ground plane in the case where the current propagates along the filament at the speed of light, and this solution is interpreted in terms of radiation from lightning return strokes. The solution is exact in the fullest sense; no mathematical approximations are made, and the governing differential equations and boundary conditions are satisfied. The solution has the additional attribute of being specified in closed form in terms of elementary functions. This solution is discussed from the point of view of deducing lightning current wave forms from measurements of the electromagnetic fields and understanding the effects of channel tortuosity on the radiated fields. In addition, it is compared with two approximate solutions, the traditional moment approximation and the Fraunhofer approximation, and a set of criteria describing their applicability are presented and interpreted.

  20. Radiation reaction and gravitational waves in the effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, Chad R.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    We compute the contribution to the Lagrangian from the leading order (2.5 post-Newtonian) radiation reaction and the quadrupolar gravitational waves emitted from a binary system using the effective field theory (EFT) approach of Goldberger and Rothstein. We use an initial value formulation of the underlying (quantum) framework to implement retarded boundary conditions and describe these real-time dissipative processes. We also demonstrate why the usual scattering formalism of quantum field theory inadequately accounts for these. The methods discussed here should be useful for deriving real-time quantities (including radiation reaction forces and gravitational wave emission) and hereditary terms in the post-Newtonian approximation (including memory, tail and other causal, history-dependent integrals) within the EFT approach. We also provide a consistent formulation of the radiation sector in the equivalent effective field theory approach of Kol and Smolkin.

  1. Edge diffracted caustic fields. [spacecraft antenna radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, W. D.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The fields near a caustic created by an edge diffraction process are computed using the equivalent current concept. These fields are shown to have the property commonly associated with ray optical analysis or the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), e.g., a 90 deg phase shift as the ray passes through the caustic. The present effort is directed toward consideration of the caustic created by an edge diffraction process. Particular attention is focused on electromagnetic excitation. The acoustic excitation for the hard boundary condition is outlined in an appendix. In addition, goal is to establish the extent of the caustic region. This is of particular importance when a ray optical solution involves multiply-diffracted terms in that the minimum size of the body that can be analyzed may be restricted by the extent of the caustic, i.e., the 90 deg phase shift used in ray optical analysis may be introduced only if the caustic is contained on the surface being studied.

  2. The electric field changes and UHF radiations caused by the triggered lightning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Zen-Ichiro; Kanao, Tadashi; Matsuura, Kenji; Nakano, Minoru; Horii, Kenji; Nakamura, Koh-Ichi

    1991-09-01

    The electric field changes, the magnetic field changes, and UHF radiation were observed during the rocket-triggered lightning experiment in winter storms. A remarkable discrepancy is noticed between electromagnetic field changes of flashes triggered with a rocket and an isolated wire that struck a power tower and flashes with a rocket and a grounded wire. Flashes to tower have a distinguishable first pulse of a large amplitude, which, we speculate, occurs at the moment of attachment of a downward leader to the tower. The UHF radiation measurements indicate that the triggered lightning process starts with a pulse series resembling a negative stepped leader. The electric field change records of rockettriggered lightning in winter storms do not show the presence of rapid field variations typical for return strokes in natural cloud-to-ground flashes.

  3. Pioneer 11 Encounter. [with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 11's encounter with Jupiter is discussed in detail. The scientific experiments carried out on the probe are described along with the instruments used. Tables are included which provide data on the times of experiments, encounters, and the distances from Jupiter. Educational study projects are also given.

  4. The mechanism of the effect of a plasma layer with negative permittivity on the antenna radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunsheng Liu, Hui; Jiang, Binhao; Li, Xueai

    2015-06-15

    A model of a plasma–antenna system is developed to study the mechanism of the effect of the plasma layer on antenna radiation. Results show a plasma layer with negative permittivity is inductive, and thus affects the phase difference between electric and magnetic fields. In the near field of antenna radiation, a plasma layer with proper parameters can compensate the capacitivity of the vacuum and enhance the radiation power. In the far field of antenna radiation, the plasma layer with negative permittivity increases the inductivity of the vacuum and reduces the radiation power.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation penetrating vehicle glass: a field based comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, M. G.; Parisi, A. V.

    1999-04-01

    The solar UV transmitted through automobile glass was measured in the field in two cars using a spectroradiometer. The two cars were identical except that one of the cars had all of the windows (except the windshield) tinted. The measured spectral erythemal UV on a horizontal plane with the windows fully closed was reduced in the tinted car by a factor of 42 when compared with the erythemal UV measured in the untinted car. The ambient UVA irradiances at various locations within four different makes of car and a tractor were also measured with a broad band UVA hand-held meter. The average normalized daily UVA exposure (measured with a broad band UVA meter) was 1.3 times higher in a large family sedan when compared with that in a small hatchback and the UVA exposure in a car with tinted windows was 3.8 times less than in a similar untinted car.

  6. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  7. ROTATION AND STABILITY OF THE TOROIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN STELLAR RADIATION ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, Alfio; Urpin, Vadim E-mail: vadim.urpin@uv.es

    2013-03-20

    The stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for mixing and angular momentum transport in the stellar interior. We consider the stability properties of stars containing a predominant toroidal field in spherical geometry by means of a linear stability in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. We calculate the growth rate of instability and analyze in detail the effects of stable stratification and heat transport. We argue that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones. However, the stable stratification can essentially decrease the growth rate of instability.

  8. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from 0.56+/- 0.05 mm (mean  ±  SD) to 0.05+/- 0.05 mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm.

  9. The solar wind interaction with comets: A post encounter view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The recent spacecraft encounters with comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley have led to an enormous increase in our knowledge of comets, including their dust, neutral gas, plasma, and magnetic field environments. The latter has in turn led to better understanding of the nature of the solar wind interaction with the well developed atmosphere of a comet. The post-encounter understanding of this interaction is reviewed, underscoring the differences with pre-encounter reasoning. The problems outstanding in this area are emphasized.

  10. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field.

    PubMed

    Sadeq, Zaheen S; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal "toy" model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  11. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal “toy” model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  12. Defeating radiation damping and magnetic field inhomogeneity with spatially encoded noise.

    PubMed

    Michal, Carl A

    2010-11-15

    A simple NMR experiment capable of providing well resolved spectra under conditions where either radiation damping or static magnetic field inhomogeneity would broaden otherwise high-resolution NMR spectra is introduced. The approach involves using a strong pulsed magnetic field gradient and a selective radio-frequency pulse to encode a predetermined noise pattern into the spatial distribution of magnetization. Following readout in a much smaller field gradient, the noise sequence may be deconvolved from the acquired data and a high-resolution spectrum is obtained, eliminating the effects of either radiation damping or the static field inhomogeneity. In the presence of field inhomogeneity a field map is also obtained from the same single transient. A quasi-two-dimensional version of the experiment eliminates the need for deconvolution and produces improved results with simplified processing, but without requiring a full two-dimensional experiment. Example spectra are shown for both radiation damping and one-dimensional field inhomogeneity with improvement in linewidths of more than a factor of 40.

  13. Theoretical Studies Relating to the Interaction of Radiation with Matter: Atomic Collision Processes Occurring in the Presence of Radiation Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Zener problem (two-level atom subjected to a hyperbolic secant radiation pulse) has been extended to three level systems in which the field couples...well resemble true pulses. It also enables one to solve the two-level part of 2246 E J Robinson the problem analytically (Rosen and Zener 1932, Robiscoe...4Z(1 -Z)]N-2a 2(Z)12 dZ (8) with a 2 given in terms of the variable Z by (Robiscoe 1978, Rosen and Zener 1932) r(--c) 2F (c-a +1,c-b +1,2-c,Z) (9

  14. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  15. Analytic theory for betatron radiation from relativistic electrons in ion plasma channels with magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. C.; Jiang, T. F.

    2010-11-15

    We analytically solve the relativistic equation of motion for an electron in ion plasma channels and calculate the corresponding trajectory as well as the synchrotron radiation. The relativistic effect on a trajectory is strong, i.e., many high-order harmonic terms in the trajectory, when the ratio of the initial transverse velocity (v{sub x0}) to the longitudinal velocity (v{sub z0}) of the electron injected to ion plasma channels is high. Interestingly, these high-order harmonic terms result in a quite broad and intense radiation spectrum, especially at an oblique angle, in contrast to an earlier understanding. As the initial velocity ratio (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}) decreases, the relativistic effect becomes weak; only the first and second harmonic terms remain in the transverse and longitudinal trajectories, respectively, which coincides with the result of Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 65, 056505 (2002)]. Our formalism also allows the description of electron's trajectory in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Critical magnetic fields for cyclotron motions are figured out and compared with semiclassical results. The cyclotron motion leads to more high-order harmonic terms than the trajectory without magnetic fields and causes an immensely broad spectrum with vastly large radiation amplitude for high initial velocity ratios (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}). The radiation from hard x-ray to gamma-ray regions can be generated with a broad radiation angle, thus available for applications.

  16. On Whether Angular Momentum in Electric and Magnetic Fields Radiates to Infinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, Francis X.; Knudsen, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The Feynman Disk experiment and a related thought experiment with a static magnetic field and capacitor are studied. The mechanical torque integrated over time (angular impulse) is related to the angular momentum in the electric/magnetic field. This is not called an electromagnetic field since quasi-static as well as electromagnetic effects are included. The angular momentum in the electric/magnetic field is examined to determine its static and radiative components. This comparison was then examined to see if it clarified the Abraham-Minkowski paradox.

  17. Repulsive gravity induced by a conformally coupled scalar field implies a bouncing radiation-dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, V.; Novello, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work we revisit a model consisting of a scalar field with a quartic self-interaction potential non-minimally (conformally) coupled to gravity (Novello in Phys Lett 90A:347 1980). When the scalar field vacuum is in a broken symmetry state, an effective gravitational constant emerges which, in certain regimes, can lead to gravitational repulsive effects when only ordinary radiation is coupled to gravity. In this case, a bouncing universe is shown to be the only cosmological solution admissible by the field equations when the scalar field is in such broken symmetry state.

  18. The Amplitude Nth-Power Squeezing of Radiation Fields in the Degenerate Raman Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Pan, Jin-Fang; Xu, Lei

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we study the amplitude Nth-power squeezing of radiation fields in the degenerate Raman process by using the modified effective Hamiltonian approach recently suggested by us. We found that if the field is initially in a coherent state it will not get squeezing for any Nth-power; if the field is initially in a squeezed vacuum, it may get Nth-power squeezing. The time evolution of the field fluctuation was discussed. Its dependences on power-order N, mean photon number bar-n, and squeezing angle xi are analyzed.

  19. Radiation force on a spherical object in the field of a focused cylindrical transducer.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Apfel, R E

    1997-05-01

    An exact solution of the radiation force on a spherical object, when positioned on the acoustic axis of a cylindrical transducer, is provided. The solution is valid for any type of sphere of any size. The radiation force function allows the calibration of high-frequency focused ultrasound fields from radiation force measurements and expands the utility of the elastic sphere radiometer developed by Dunn et al. [Acustica 38, 58-61 (1977)]. Numeral results reveal an oscillatory behavior of the radiation force function for small spheres near the transducer surface and this behavior may present an opportunity for particle sorting based on the mechanical properties of the particle and other types of manipulation.

  20. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  1. On Consideration of Radiated Power in RF Field Simulations for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanzhan; Kao, Chien-ping; Collins, Christopher M.; Smith, Michael B.; Yang, Qing X.

    2012-01-01

    In numerical analyses of RF fields for MRI, RF power is often permitted to radiate out of the problem region. In reality, RF power will be confined by the magnet bore and RF screen enclosing the magnet room. We present numerical calculations at different frequencies for various surface and volume coils, with samples from simple spheres to the human body in environments from free space to a shielded RF room. Results for calculations within a limited problem region show radiated power increases with frequency. When the magnet room RF screen is included, nearly all the power is dissipated in the human subject. For limited problem regions, inclusion of a term for radiation loss results in an underestimation of transmit efficiency compared to results including the complete bore and RF screen. If the term for radiated power is not included, calculated coil efficiencies are slightly overestimated compared to the complete case. PMID:22473620

  2. Consideration of the radiation dose delivered away from the treatment field to patients in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael L.; Kron, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Radiation delivery to cancer patients for radiotherapy is invariably accompanied by unwanted radiation to other parts of the patient’s body. Traditionally, considerable effort has been made to calculate and measure the radiation dose to the target as well as to nearby critical structures. Only recently has attention been focused also on the relatively low doses that exist far from the primary radiation beams. In several clinical scenarios, such doses have been associated with cardiac toxicity as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer induction. Out-of-field dose is a result of leakage and scatter and generally difficult to predict accurately. The present review aims to present existing data, from measurements and calculations, and discuss its implications for radiotherapy. PMID:21731221

  3. Field Dynamics of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Using a Direct Numerical Solution of Maxwell's Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    We present and discuss the properties of the coherent electromagnetic fields of a very short, ultrarelativistic bunch in a rectangular vacuum chamber inside a bending magnet. The analysis is based on the results of a direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations. We use a new dispersion-free time-domain algorithm which employs a more efficient use of finite element mesh techniques and, hence, produces self-consistent and stable solutions for very short bunches. We investigate the fine structure of the coherent synchrotron radiation fields. We also discuss coherent edge radiation. We present a clear picture of the field using the electric field lines constructed from the numerical solutions. This method should be useful in the study of existing and future concepts of particle accelerators and ultrafast coherent light sources, where high peak currents and very short bunches are envisioned.

  4. Radiative widths and splitting of cyclotron lines in superstrong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Bezchastnov, V. G.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The radiative line widths of the Landau levels in a superstrong magnetic field are calculated and simple analytic expressions and fits are given for these which are valid over a wide range of the principal quantum number and the magnetic field strength. If QED corrections are not taken into account, all levels but the first are doubly degenerate, corresponding to the two possible spin projections. However, the interaction with the QED vacuum removes this degeneracy, leading to an energy splitting of each level which exceeds the radiative linewidth for low Landau levels if the magnetic field is not too large (B is less than approximately 10 exp 13 G). Estimations are presented of the splitting in various limits as a function of field strength and Landau number. The possibility of observing this splitting in accreting X-ray pulsars and in gamma-ray bursters is discussed.

  5. Assessment of the ultraviolet radiation field in ocean waters from space-based measurements and full radiative-transfer calculations.

    PubMed

    Vasilkov, Alexander P; Herman, Jay R; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Kahru, Mati; Mitchell, B Greg

    2005-05-10

    Quantitative assessment of the UV effects on aquatic ecosystems requires an estimate of the in-water radiation field. Actual ocean UV reflectances are needed for improving the total ozone retrievals from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the ozone monitoring instrument (OMI) flown on NASA's Aura satellite. The estimate of underwater UV radiation can be done on the basis of measurements from the TOMS/OMI and full models of radiative transfer (RT) in the atmosphere-ocean system. The Hydrolight code, modified for extension to the UV, is used for the generation of look-up tables for in-water irradiances. A look-up table for surface radiances generated with a full RT code is input for the Hydrolight simulations. A model of seawater inherent optical properties (IOPs) is an extension of the Case 1 water model to the UV. A new element of the IOP model is parameterization of particulate matter absorption based on recent in situ data. A chlorophyll product from ocean color sensors is input for the IOP model. Verification of the in-water computational scheme shows that the calculated diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd is in good agreement with the measured Kd.

  6. On the electromagnetic fields, Poynting vector, and peak power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial radiation fields, Poynting vector, and total electromagnetic power that a vertical return stroke radiates into the upper half space have been computed when the speed of the stroke, nu, is a significant fraction of the speed of light, c, assuming that at large distances and early times the source is an infinitesimal dipole. The initial current is also assumed to satisfy the transmission-line model with a constant nu and to be perpendicular to an infinite, perfectly conducting ground. The effect of a large nu is to increase the radiation fields by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -1, where beta = nu/c and theta is measured from the vertical, and the Poynting vector by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -2.

  7. Radiative transfer equations in broad-band, time-varying fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Zoller, P.

    1984-01-01

    A derivation of the equation of transfer is obtained by starting with Maxwell's equations in the 'slowly varying envelope' form. Particular attention is paid to characterizing the intensity that is 'seen' by the atom (which is found to be related to a Wigner distribution of the electric field). The equation of transfer is found to be valid for 'broad-band' slowly varying radiation fields.

  8. Delineation of electric and magnetic field effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.J.; Skowronski, W.J.; Mullins, J.M.; Nardone, R.M.; Penafiel, M.; Meister, R. )

    1991-01-31

    The relative effects of the electric and magnetic field components of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation (ELF) on transcription were examined in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Delineation of the individual field contributions was achieved by irradiating cells in separate concentric compartments of a culture dish within a solenoid chamber. This exposure system produced a homogeneous magnetic field with a coincident electric field whose strength varied directly with distance from the center of the culture dish. Irradiation of HL-60 cells with sine wave ELF at 60 Hz and a field strength of 10 Gauss produced a transient increase in the transcriptional rates which reached a maximum of 50-60% enhancement at 30-120 minutes of irradiation and declined to near basal levels by 18 hours. Comparison of transcription responses to ELF of cells in different concentric compartments revealed that the transcriptional effects were primarily the result of the electric field component with little or no contribution from the magnetic field.

  9. Quasinormal modes, scattering, and Hawking radiation of Kerr-Newman black holes in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, K. D.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2011-01-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of proper oscillations (quasinormal modes), transmission/reflection coefficients, and Hawking radiation for a massive charged scalar field in the background of the Kerr-Newman black hole immersed in an asymptotically homogeneous magnetic field. There are two main effects: the Zeeman shift of the particle energy in the magnetic field and the difference of values of an electromagnetic potential between the horizon and infinity, i.e. the Faraday induction. We have shown that 'turning on' the magnetic field induces a stronger energy-emission rate and leads to 'recharging' of the black hole. Thus, a black hole immersed in a magnetic field evaporates much quicker, achieving thereby an extremal state in a shorter period of time. Quasinormal modes are moderately affected by the presence of a magnetic field which is assumed to be relatively small compared to the gravitational field of the black hole.

  10. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High... that performs a function whose failure would significantly reduce the capability of the airplane or...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High... performs a function whose failure would significantly reduce the capability of the rotorcraft or...

  12. An analysis of the radiation field beneath a bank of tubular quartz lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    Equations governing the incident heat flux distribution beneath a lamp-reflector system were developed. Analysis of a particular radiant heating facility showed good agreement between theory and experiment when a lamp power loss correction was used. In addition, the theory was employed to estimate thermal disruption in the radiation field caused by a protruding probe.

  13. BINARY ASTEROID ENCOUNTERS WITH TERRESTRIAL PLANETS: TIMESCALES AND EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-15

    Many asteroids that make close encounters with terrestrial planets are in a binary configuration. Here, we calculate the relevant encounter timescales and investigate the effects of encounters on a binary's mutual orbit. We use a combination of analytical and numerical approaches with a wide range of initial conditions. Our test cases include generic binaries with close, moderate, and wide separations, as well as seven well-characterized near-Earth binaries. We find that close approaches (<10 Earth radii) occur for almost all binaries on 1-10 million year timescales. At such distances, our results suggest substantial modifications to a binary's semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination, which we quantify. Encounters within 30 Earth radii typically occur on sub-million year timescales and significantly affect the wider binaries. Important processes in the lives of near-Earth binaries, such as tidal and radiative evolution, can be altered or stopped by planetary encounters.

  14. Star Formation in the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, A.; McKee, C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV radiation field, and the effect of this Field on the star-forming interstellar medium. Following previous researchers such as Habing (1968), we calculate the average interstellar radiation field at the Solar Circle of the Galaxy. However, our new calculations follow more closely the time dependence of the field at any point. We show that there is a significant difference between the mean field and the median field, and that there are substantial fluctuations of the field (on timescales of order 100 million years) at a given point. Far Ultraviolet Radiation (FUV, photon energies of 6 eV - 13.6 eV) has been recognized as the main source of heating of the neutral interstellar gas. Given the pressure of the interstellar medium (ISM) the FUV field determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold (T approximately 50 - 100 K) clouds (CNM), warm (T about 10,000 K) (WNM), for a combination of the two (the two phase ISM) We present results for the time history of the FUV field for points in the local ISM of the Milky Way Galaxy. The presence of this fluctuating heating rate converts CNM to WNM and vice versa. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the CNM and WNM when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties (i.e. mean density and composition) and on the FUV-sources (i.e. the star formation rate, or the IMF, or the size distribution of associations) is a basic step in building any detailed model of the large scale behavior of the ISM and the mutual relation between the ISM and the SFR.

  15. Voyager Saturn encounter press briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The briefing reviewed the mission planning of the Voyager project. The near encounter trajectories of both Voyager spacecraft were examined. The Saturn system is discussed with particular emphasis on Saturn's moons.

  16. Voyager Encounters Saturn: Scientific Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Observations generated by Voyager 1's encounter with Saturn are disclosed. Atmospheric conditions, the rings, new moons and the five inner moons are described. Titan, Hyperion and Iapetus are discussed in detail, as is Saturn's magnetosphere.

  17. Evaluation of Breast Sentinel Lymph Node Coverage by Standard Radiation Therapy Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, Rachel Ballonoff, Ari; Newman, Francis M.S.; Finlayson, Christina

    2008-04-01

    Background: Biopsy of the breast sentinel lymph node (SLN) is now a standard staging procedure for early-stage invasive breast cancer. The anatomic location of the breast SLN and its relationship to standard radiation fields has not been described. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of radiotherapy treatment planning data sets was performed in patients with breast cancer who had undergone SLN biopsy, and those with a surgical clip at the SLN biopsy site were identified. The location of the clip was evaluated relative to vertebral body level on an anterior-posterior digitally reconstructed radiograph, treated whole-breast tangential radiation fields, and standard axillary fields in 106 data sets meeting these criteria. Results: The breast SLN varied in vertebral body level position, ranging from T2 to T7 but most commonly opposite T4. The SLN clip was located below the base of the clavicle in 90%, and hence would be excluded from standard axillary radiotherapy fields where the inferior border is placed at this level. The clip was within the irradiated whole-breast tangent fields in 78%, beneath the superior-posterior corner multileaf collimators in 12%, and outside the tangent field borders in 10%. Conclusions: Standard axillary fields do not encompass the lymph nodes at highest risk of containing tumor in breast cancer patients. Elimination of the superior-posterior corner MLCs from the tangent field design would result in inclusion of the breast SLN in 90% of patients treated with standard whole-breast irradiation.

  18. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing. Methods In this study, we present an analytical and numerical approach for evaluation of the rounded leaf end effect on penumbra characteristics. Based on the rule of half-value layer, algorithms for leaf position calculation and radiation field offset correction were developed, which were advantageous particularly in dealing with large radius leaf end. Computer simulation was performed based on the Monte Carlo codes of EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, with groups of leaf end radii and source sizes. Data processing technique of curve fitting was employed for deriving penumbra width and radiation field offset. Results Results showed that penumbra width increased with source size. Penumbra width curves for large radius leaf end were U-shaped. This observation was probably related to the fact that radiation beams penetrated through the proximal and distal leaf sides. In contrast, source size had negligible impact on radiation field offset. Radiation field offsets were found to be constant both for analytical method and numerical simulation. However, the overall resulting values of radiation field offset obtained by analytical method were slightly smaller compared with Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusions The method we proposed could provide insight into the investigation of rounded leaf end effects on penumbra characteristics. Penumbra width and radiation field offset calibration should be carefully performed to commission multileaf collimator for intensity modulated radiotherapy. PMID:26401137

  19. Evaluating a radiation monitor for mixed-field environments based on SRAM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiligiannis, G.; Dilillo, L.; Bosio, A.; Girard, P.; Pravossoudovitch, S.; Todri, A.; Virazel, A.; Mekki, J.; Brugger, M.; Wrobel, F.; Saigne, F.

    2014-05-01

    Instruments operating in particle accelerators and colliders are exposed to radiations that are composed of particles of different types and energies. Several of these instruments often embed devices that are not hardened against radiation effects. Thus, there is a strong need for monitoring the levels of radiation inside the mixed-field radiation areas, throughout different positions. Different metrics exist for measuring the radiation damage induced to electronic devices, such as the Total Ionizing Dose (TID), the Displacement Damage (DD) and of course the fluence of particles for estimating the error rates of the electronic devices among other applications. In this paper, we propose an SRAM based monitor, that is used to define the fluence of High Energy Hadrons (HEH) by detecting Single Event Upsets in the memory array. We evaluated the device by testing it inside the H4IRRAD area of CERN, a test area that reproduces the radiation conditions inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel and its shielded areas. By using stability estimation methods and presenting experimental data, we prove that this device is proper to be used for such a purpose.

  20. Polarization Radiation with Turbulent Magnetic Fields from X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2017-02-01

    We study the properties of polarized radiation in turbulent magnetic fields from X-ray binary jets. These turbulent magnetic fields are composed of large- and small-scale configurations, which result in the polarized jitter radiation when the characteristic length of turbulence is less than the non-relativistic Larmor radius. On the contrary, the polarized synchrotron emission occurs, corresponding to a large-scale turbulent environment. We calculate the spectral energy distributions and the degree of polarization for a general microquasar. Numerical results show that turbulent magnetic field configurations can indeed provide a high degree of polarization, which does not mean that a uniform, large-scale magnetic field structure exists. The model is applied to investigate the properties of polarized radiation of the black-hole X-ray binary Cygnus X-1. Under the constraint of multiband observations of this source, our studies demonstrate that the model can explain the high polarization degree at the MeV tail and predict the highly polarized properties at the high-energy γ-ray region, and that the dominant small-scale turbulent magnetic field plays an important role for explaining the highly polarized observation at hard X-ray/soft γ-ray bands. This model can be tested by polarization observations of upcoming polarimeters at high-energy γ-ray bands.

  1. Improvement of terahertz field effect transistor detectors by substrate thinning and radiation losses reduction.

    PubMed

    Coquillat, Dominique; Marczewski, Jacek; Kopyt, Pawel; Dyakonova, Nina; Giffard, Benoit; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-01-11

    Phenomena of the radiation coupling to the field effect transistors based terahertz (THz) detectors are studied. We show that in the case of planar metal antennas a significant portion of incoming radiation, instead of being coupled to the transistors, is coupled to an antenna substrate leading to responsivity losses and/or cross-talk effects in the field effect based THz detector arrays. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the responsivity versus substrate thickness are performed. They clearly show how to minimize the losses by the detector/ array substrate thinning. In conclusion simple quantitative rules of losses minimization by choosing a proper substrate thickness of field effect transistor THz detectors are presented for common materials (Si, GaAs, InP, GaN) used in semiconductor technologies.

  2. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. Wang, F.; Cao, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  3. Electrically tunable near-field radiative heat transfer via ferroelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2014-12-15

    We explore ways to actively control near-field radiative heat transfer between two surfaces that relies on electrical tuning of phonon modes of ferroelectric materials. Ferroelectrics are widely used for tunable electrical devices, such as capacitors and memory devices; however, their tunable properties have not yet been examined for heat transfer applications. We show via simulations that radiative heat transfer between two ferroelectric materials can be enhanced by over two orders of magnitude over the blackbody limit in the near field, and can be tuned as much as 16.5% by modulating the coupling between surface phonon polariton modes at the two surfaces via varying external electric fields. We then discuss how to maximize the modulation contrast for tunable thermal devices using the studied mechanism.

  4. Gamma-Gamma Absorption in the Broad Line Region Radiation Fields of Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Els, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The expected level of γγ absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of γ-ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) is evaluated as a function of the location of the γ-ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the γγ opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to γγ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the γ-ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the central engine and drops below unity for locations within the BLR. For locations outside the BLR, the BLR radiation energy density required for the production of GeV γ-rays rapidly increases beyond observational constraints, thus making the EC-BLR mechanism implausible. Therefore, in order to avoid significant γγ absorption by the BLR radiation field, the γ-ray emission region must therefore be located near the outer boundary of the BLR.

  5. The spectrum of particles radiating in cylindrical and filament magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, F. W.

    1988-11-01

    Particle trajectories, and the energy distribution and frequency spectrum for an initially power-law distribution of particle energies, are calculated for particles radiating in cylindrical and filament magnetic fields. If there is a continuous supply of particles to the fields, the spectrum develops two "breaks". For the filament field the spectral index changes from -α at low frequencies to -α - 0.875 at high frequencies. There is also a cutoff to the spectrum. The results are applied to Cas A and the Crab Nebula.

  6. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-03-12

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  7. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  8. Polarized Radiation Diagnostics for Measuring the Magnetic Field of the Outer Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2012-12-01

    The basic idea of optical pumping, for which Alfred Kastler received the 1966 Nobel Prize in physics, is that the absorption and scattering of light that is near-resonant with an optical transition can produce large population imbalances among the magnetic sublevels of atomic ground states as well as in excited states. The degree of this radiatively-induced atomic level polarization, which is very sensitive to the presence of magnetic fields, can be determined by observing the polarization of the scattered or transmitted spectral line radiation. Probably, the most important point for solar physics is that the outer solar atmosphere is indeed an optically pumped vapor and that the polarization of the emergent spectral line radiation can be exploited for detecting magnetic fields that are too weak and/or too tangled so as to produce measurable Zeeman polarization signals. In this talk we review some recent radiative transfer simulations of the polarization produced by optical pumping in selected IR, FUV and EUV spectral lines, showing that their sensitivity to the Hanle effect is very suitable for magnetic field measurements in the outer solar atmosphere. We argue that solar magnetometry using the spectral lines of optically pumped atoms in the chromosphere, transition region and corona should be a high-priority goal for large aperture solar telescopes, such as ATST, EST and SOLAR-C.

  9. Upper limits to near-field radiative heat transfer: generalizing the blackbody concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Owen D.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2016-09-01

    For 75 years it has been known that radiative heat transfer can exceed far-field blackbody rates when two bodies are separated by less than a thermal wavelength. Yet an open question has remained: what is the maximum achievable radiative transfer rate? Here we describe basic energy-conservation principles that answer this question, yielding upper bounds that depend on the temperatures, material susceptibilities, and separation distance, but which encompass all geometries. The simple structures studied to date fall far short of the bounds, offering the possibility for significant future enhancement, with ramifications for experimental studies as well as thermophotovoltaic applications.

  10. Development of a proposed international standard for certification of aircraft to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel B.

    1993-01-01

    Avionic systems performing critical functions in modern aircraft are potentially susceptible to the hazards of electromagnetic radiation from ground and airborne transmitters. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested that the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) coordinate the development of procedures and guidance material which can be used during the aircraft certification process to ensure adequate protection against high intensity radiated fields (HIRF). This paper addresses both the technical challenge of drafting a certification procedure and guidance standard as well as the management process used by the SAE subcommittee AE4R to converge a diverse range of opinions by its international membership in the shortest possible time.

  11. Radiation reaction from electromagnetic fields in the neighborhood of a point charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2017-03-01

    From the expression for the electromagnetic field in the neighborhood of a point charge, we determine the rate of electromagnetic momentum flow, calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor, across a surface surrounding the charge. From that we derive for a "point" charge the radiation reaction formula, which turns out to be proportional to the first time-derivative of the acceleration of the charge, identical to the expression for the self-force, hitherto obtained in the literature from the detailed mutual interaction between constituents of a small charged sphere. We then use relativistic transformations to arrive at a generalized formula for radiation reaction for a point charge undergoing relativistic motion.

  12. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications. PMID:23864818

  13. Guest-Host Encounters in Diaspora-Heritage Tourism: The Taglit-Birthright Israel Mifgash (Encounter)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Theodore; Mittelberg, David; Hecht, Shahar; Saxe, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    More than 300,000 diaspora Jewish young adults and tens of thousands of their Israeli peers have participated in structured, cross-cultural encounters--"mifgashim"--in the context of an experiential education program known as Taglit-Birthright Israel. Drawing on field observations, interviews, and surveys, the formal and informal…

  14. Would Larger Radiation Fields Lead to a Faster Onset of Pain Relief in the Palliation of Bone Metastases?

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward Makhani, Leila; Culleton, Shaelyn; Makhani, Nadiya; Davis, Lori; Campos, Sarah; Sinclair, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Hemibody irradiation has been shown to relieve bony metastatic pain within 24-48 hours of treatment, whereas for local external beam radiation, onset of pain relief is 1-4 weeks after radiation. The primary objective of this study is to examine whether there is a relationship between the areas of radiation treatment and onset of pain relief. Methods and Materials: From Jan 1999 to Jan 2002, a total of 653 patients with symptomatic bone metastases were treated with external beam radiation. Pain scores and analgesic consumption were recorded at baseline and Weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The areas of radiation treatment for all patients were calculated, then correlated with the response and analyzed in various ways. We first compared pain score alone with mean radiation field size. Second, we combined pain score and analgesic consumption. Last, we implemented the International Consensus end points for pain score and analgesic intake. Results: Assessment of 653 patients showed no significant correlation comparing pain scores alone with radiation field area, with the exception of Week 4 for partial responders. Again, no significant correlation was found when combining both analgesic intake and pain score against radiation field size. Even when implementing the International Consensus end point definitions for radiation response, the only significant correlation between radiation field size and response was observed in Week 2 for partial response. Conclusion: There was no statistical significance between mean areas of radiation treatment with the onset of pain relief.

  15. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers.

  16. Radiation-Hydromagnetic Models of a Z-Pinch Implosion with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Terry, R.; Davis, J.; Velikovich, A. L.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental results on a 1MA pulser suggest that axial magnetic fields can stabilize z-pinch implosions and enhance the compression ratio(S. Sorokin and S. Chaikovsky, Dense Z-Pinches, AIP Conf. Proc. 299, p.83 (1993).). The present theoretical work calculates the effects of an axial magnetic field on the plasma and field profiles in an imploding z-pinch. The initial mass configuration is an annular shell of krypton. The 1-D simulation model includes: resistive diffusion (skin effect) for both the azimuthal and axial fields, ionization dynamics, and non-LTE radiation transport. Unlike the constant pulser current of self-similar models for the screw-pinch, a transmission line is used to model the circuit of a realistic ~10MA pulser. The implosion dynamics resulting from an axial field generated by a twisted return current cage will be compared with results due to an initial field from external Helmholtz coils. The dependence of the radiative performance on compression ratio, which in turn is a function of inital field strength or cage twist, will be discussed.

  17. A new multistack radiation boundary condition for FDTD based on self-teleportation of fields

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Rodolfo E.; Scherbatko, Igor . E-mail: igor_s@asu.edu

    2005-02-10

    In [Electromagnetics 23 (2003) 187], a technique for injecting perfect plane waves into finite regions of space in FDTD was reported. The essence of the technique, called Field Teleportation, is to invoke the principle of equivalent sources using FDTDs discrete definition of the curl to copy any field propagating in one FDTD domain to a finite region of another domain. In this paper, we apply this technique of Field Teleportation to the original domain itself to create a transparent boundary across which any outward traveling FDTD field produces an exact negative copy of itself. When this copied field is teleported one cell ahead and one cell forward in time it causes significant self-cancelation of the original field. Illustrative experiments in two-dimensions show that a two-layer (10-cell thick) multi-stack Radiation Boundary Condition (RBC) with a simplest Huygens's termination readily yields reflection coefficients of the order of -80 dB up to grazing incidence for all the fields radiated by a harmonic point source ({lambda} = 30 cells) in free space located 20 cells away from the boundary. Similarly low levels of artificial reflection are demonstrated for a case in which the RBC cuts through five different magnetodielectric materials.

  18. Complex Scattered Radiation Fields And Multiple Magnetic Fields In The Protostellar Cluster In NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KWON, Jungmi; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Nakamura, F.; Nagayama, T.; Nagata, T.; Hough, J. H.; Werner, M. W.; Teixeira, P. S.

    2012-05-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and Ks bands has been carried out for the protostellar cluster region around NGC 2264 IRS 2 in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud. Various infrared reflection nebula clusters (IRNCs) associated with NGC 2264 IRS 2 and the IRAS 12 S1 core, as well as local infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe), were detected. The illuminating sources of the IRNe were identified with known or new near- and mid-infrared sources. In addition, 314 point-like sources were detected in all three bands and their aperture polarimetry was studied. Using a color-color diagram, reddened field stars and diskless pre-main-sequence stars were selected to trace the magnetic field structure of the molecular cloud. The mean polarization position angle of the point-like sources is 80 degrees in the cluster core, and 60 degrees in the perimeter of the cluster core, which is interpreted as the projected direction on the sky of the magnetic field in the observed region of the cloud. The Chandrasekhar-Fermi method gives a rough estimate of the magnetic field strength to be about 100 micro-Gauss. A comparison with recent numerical simulations of the cluster formation implies that the cloud dynamics is controlled by the relatively strong magnetic field. The local magnetic field direction is well associated with that of CO outflow for IRAS 12 S1 and consistent with that inferred from submillimeter polarimetry. In contrast, the local magnetic field direction runs roughly perpendicular to the Galactic magnetic field direction.

  19. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S; Moteabbed, Maryam; A Adams, Judith; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I

    2012-10-07

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  20. Bacterial encountering with oil droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Molaei, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Encountering of microorganisms with rising oil droplets in aqueous environments is the first and one of the critical steps in the biodegradation of crude oil. Several factors such as droplet sizes, rising velocity, surfactant, and motility of bacteria are expected to affect the encounter rate. We establish well controlled microfluidic devices by applying layer-by-layer technique that allows us to produce horizontal micro droplets with different sizes. The encounter rates of passive particles, motile and non-motile bacteria with these droplets are measured by high speed microscopy. The effects of mobility and motility of these particles on encounter rates are assessed quantitatively. Meanwhile, we visualize reorientation of the particle due to flow filed around the oil droplet. Results show that the motile bacteria have higher probabilities to interact with an oil droplet compare to the passive particles. Ongoing analyses focus on the effect of shear rates, angular dispersion, curvatures of streamlines, and the swimming velocity of bacteria. The ratios of the encounter area to the entire droplet surface at various flow regimes will also been measured. GoMRI.

  1. The electric field changes and UHF radiations caused by the triggered lightning in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, Zen-Ichiro; Kanao, Tadashi; Matsuura, Kenji; Nakano, Minoru; Horii, Kenji; Nakamura, Koichi

    1991-01-01

    In the rocket triggered lightning experiment of fiscal 1989, researchers observed electromagnetic field changes and UHF electromagnetic radiation accompanying rocket triggered lightning. It was found that no rapid changes corresponding to the return stroke of natural lightning were observed in the electric field changes accompanying rocket triggered lightning. However, continuous currents were present. In the case of rocket triggered lightning to the tower, electromagnetic field changes corresponding to the initiation of triggered lightning showed a bipolar pulse of a relatively large amplitude. In contrast, the rocket triggered lightning to the ground did not have such a bipolar pulse. The UHF radiation accompanying the rocket triggered lightning preceded the waveform portions corresponding to the first changes in electromagnetic fields. The number of isolated pulses in the UHF radiation showed a correlation with the time duration from rocket launching up to triggered lightning. The time interval between consecutive isolated pulses tended to get shorter with the passage of time, just like the stepped leaders of natural lightning.

  2. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation, which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. New spectra based on simulations will be presented.

  3. Particle Acceleration and Radiation associated with Magnetic Field Generation from Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  4. Impact of an external radiation field on handheld XRF measurements for nuclear forensics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Mertz, Carol J.; Finck, Martha R.; Engelstad, Gary; Carney, Kevin P.; Chamberlain, David B.

    2015-03-28

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is an attractive technique for nuclear forensics applications. We evaluated a handheld, portable XRF device by applying an external radiation field (10 mR/h to 17 R/h) using two types of radiography sources: a 60Co radiography camera to observe effects from high-energy gamma emissions and an 192Ir radiography camera to observe effects from several low-energy gamma (0.604, 0.468, and 0.317 MeV) and decay daughter x-ray emissions. External radiation tests proved that radiation, in general, has a significant effect on the dead time or background at dose rates over 1 R/hr for both the 192Ir and 60Co sources.

  5. Performance analysis of a filtered wide field-of-view radiometer for earth radiation budget measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. E.; Luther, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    The proposed Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS) of the 1980's will include a wide field-of-view (WFOV) fixed axes earth radiator discriminator consisting of a shortwave channel and a total (unfiltered) channel. The broadband spectral isolation required for the shortwave channel is achieved by use of a hemispherical fused silica (Suprasil W) dome filter placed in front of a wire wound thermopile radiation detector. A description is presented of the thermal response of the single-fused silica dome filter in the ERBSS WFOV shortwave channel conceptual design and the impact of that response on the channel measurement. Results from design definition and performance analysis studies are included. Problems associated with achieving the desired levels of confidence in a high accuracy filtered, WFOV radiometer are discussed. Design approaches, ground calibration, and data reduction techniques which minimize measurement uncertainties are explained.

  6. Study of high speed complex number algorithms. [for determining antenna for field radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of evaluating the radiation integral on the curved surface of a reflecting antenna is presented. A three dimensional Fourier transform approach is used to generate a two dimensional radiation cross-section along a planer cut at any angle phi through the far field pattern. Salient to the method is an algorithm for evaluating a subset of the total three dimensional discrete Fourier transform results. The subset elements are selectively evaluated to yield data along a geometric plane of constant. The algorithm is extremely efficient so that computation of the induced surface currents via the physical optics approximation dominates the computer time required to compute a radiation pattern. Application to paraboloid reflectors with off-focus feeds in presented, but the method is easily extended to offset antenna systems and reflectors of arbitrary shapes. Numerical results were computed for both gain and phase and are compared with other published work.

  7. Radiation hardening of MOS devices by boron. [for stabilizing gate threshold potential of field effect device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchenko, V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for radiation hardening of MOS devices and specifically for stabilizing the gate threshold potential at room temperature of a radiation subjected MOS field-effect device with a semiconductor substrate, an insulating layer of oxide on the substrate, and a gate electrode disposed on the insulating layer. The boron is introduced within a layer of the oxide of about 100 A-300 A thickness immediately adjacent the semiconductor-insulator interface. The concentration of boron in the oxide layer is preferably maintained on the order of 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. The technique serves to reduce and substantially annihilate radiation induced positive gate charge accumulations.

  8. Effects of radiation damping on the dynamics of electrons in ELI intensity laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Christopher; Marklund, Mattias

    2012-07-01

    An electron in the presence of a high intensity laser field, such as that anticipated at ELI, will be accelerated so strongly that its own radiation emission may significantly affect its motion. This opens up the possibility of testing experimentally the classical theory of radiation reaction in such a context. We therefore explore the effects of radiation damping on the dynamics of electrons in optical laser pulses. In the case of high intensities and high initial electron energies, the trajectories and net energy changes of the electrons are found to be significantly altered. These effects are found to become increasingly significant the closer one gets to a directly head on collision between the laser and electrons.

  9. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  10. Intense THz radiation produced in organic salt crystals for high-field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, C.; Ruchert, C.; Hauri, C. P.

    2013-03-01

    Organic stilbazolium salt crystals pumped by intense, ultrashort mid-infrared laser have been investigated for efficient THz generation by optical rectification. In this paper we present our latest results in view of the generation of single-cycle and high-field THz transient in the THz gap (0.1-10 THz). The organic rectifiers like DAST, OH1 and DSTMS combine extremely large optical susceptibility with excellent velocity matching between the infrared pump and the THz radiation. Our simple collinear conversion scheme provides THz beams with excellent focusing properties and single cycle electric field larger than 1.5 MV/cm and magnetic field strength beyond 0.5 Tesla. The source can potentially cover the full THz gap at field strength which is barely provided by other THz sources. The THz pulse is carrier-envelope phase stable and the polarity of the field can be easily inverted.

  11. Radiation sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors and other thin film architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward

    An important contemporary motivation for advancing radiation detection science and technology is the need for interdiction of nuclear and radiological materials, which may be used to fabricate weapons of mass destruction. The detection of such materials by nuclear techniques relies on achieving high sensitivity and selectivity to X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons. To be attractive in field deployable instruments, it is desirable for detectors to be lightweight, inexpensive, operate at low voltage, and consume low power. To address the relatively low particle flux in most passive measurements for nuclear security applications, detectors scalable to large areas that can meet the high absolute detection efficiency requirements are needed. Graphene-based and thin-film-based radiation detectors represent attractive technologies that could meet the need for inexpensive, low-power, size-scalable detection architectures, which are sensitive to X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons. The utilization of graphene to detect ionizing radiation relies on the modulation of graphene charge carrier density by changes in local electric field, i.e. the field effect in graphene. Built on the principle of a conventional field effect transistor, the graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) utilizes graphene as a channel and a semiconducting substrate as an absorber medium with which the ionizing radiation interacts. A radiation interaction event that deposits energy within the substrate creates electron-hole pairs, which modify the electric field and modulate graphene charge carrier density. A detection event in a GFET is therefore measured as a change in graphene resistance or current. Thin (micron-scale) films can also be utilized for radiation detection of thermal neutrons provided nuclides with high neutron absorption cross section are present with appreciable density. Detection in thin-film detectors could be realized through the collection of charge carriers generated within the

  12. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  13. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  14. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  15. Evaluation of the trade-offs encountered in planning and treating locally advanced head and neck cancer: intensity-modulated radiation therapy vs dual-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M; McConnell, D; Romani, M; McAllister, A; Pearce, A; Andronowski, A; Wang, X; Leszczynski, K

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary purpose of this study was to assess the practical trade-offs between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dual-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods For 15 locally advanced HNC data sets, nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT plans and two full-rotation DA-VMAT treatment plans were created in the Pinnacle3 v. 9.0 (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning environment and then delivered on a Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) to a cylindrical detector array. The treatment planning goals were organised into four groups based on their importance: (1) spinal cord, brainstem, optical structures; (2) planning target volumes; (3) parotids, mandible, larynx and brachial plexus; and (4) normal tissues. Results Compared with IMRT, DA-VMAT plans were of equal plan quality (p>0.05 for each group), able to be delivered in a shorter time (3.1 min vs 8.3 min, p<0.0001), delivered fewer monitor units (on average 28% fewer, p<0.0001) and produced similar delivery accuracy (p>0.05 at γ2%/2mm and γ3%/3mm). However, the VMAT plans took more planning time (28.9 min vs 7.7 min per cycle, p<0.0001) and required more data for a three-dimensional dose (20 times more, p<0.0001). Conclusions Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT and DA-VMAT are both capable of meeting the majority of planning goals for locally advanced HNC. The main trade-offs between the techniques are shorter treatment time for DA-VMAT but longer planning time and the additional resources required for implementation of a new technology. Based on this study, our clinic has incorporated DA-VMAT for locally advanced HNC. Advances in knowledge DA-VMAT is a suitable alternative to IMRT for locally advanced HNC. PMID:22806619

  16. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Mizuno, Y.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using our new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated long-term particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet propagating in an unmagnetized ambient electron-positron plasma. The simulations were performed using a much longer simulation system than our previous simulations in order to investigate the full nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability and its particle acceleration mechanism. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and ambient electrons are accelerated in the resulting shocks. Acceleration of ambient electrons leads to a maximum ambient electron density three times larger than the original value as predicted by hydrodynamic compression. Behind the bow shock, in the jet shock, strong electromagnetic fields are generated. These fields may lead to time dependent afterglow emission. In order to go beyond the standard synchrotron model used in astrophysical objects we have used PIC simulations and calculated radiation based on first principles. We calculated radiation from electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. We also used the technique to calculate emission from electrons based on simulations with a small system. We obtain spectra which are consistent with those generated from electrons propagating in turbulent magnetic fields. This turbulent magnetic field is similar to the magnetic field generated at an early nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability. A fully developed shock within a larger system may generate a jitter/synchrotron spectrum.

  17. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  18. A 3D radiative transfer framework . VII. Arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelmann, A. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Baron, E.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: A solution of the radiative-transfer problem in 3D with arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame is presented. The method is implemented in our 3D radiative transfer framework and used in the PHOENIX/3D code. It is tested by comparison to our well-tested 1D co-moving frame radiative transfer code, where the treatment of a monotonic velocity field is implemented in the Lagrangian frame. The Eulerian formulation does not need much additional memory and is useable on state-of-the-art computers, even large-scale applications with 1000's of wavelength points are feasible. Methods: In the Eulerian formulation of the problem, the photon is seen by the atom at a Doppler-shifted wavelength depending on its propagation direction, which leads to a Doppler-shifted absorption and emission. This leads to a different source function and a different Λ^* operator in the radiative transfer equations compared to the static case. Results: The results of the Eulerian 3D spherical calculations are compared to our well-tested 1D Lagrangian spherical calculations, the agreement is, up to vmax = 1 × 103 km s-1 very good. Test calculation in other geometries are also shown.

  19. Radiation tolerant compact image sensor using CdTe photodiode and field emitter array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nagao, Masayoshi; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Ikuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    A growing demand on incident detection is recognized since the Great East Japan Earthquake and successive accidents in Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011. Radiation tolerant image sensors are powerful tools to collect crucial information at initial stages of such incidents. However, semiconductor based image sensors such as CMOS and CCD have limited tolerance to radiation exposure. Image sensors used in nuclear facilities are conventional vacuum tubes using thermal cathodes, which have large size and high power consumption. In this study, we propose a compact image sensor composed of a CdTe-based photodiode and a matrix-driven Spindt-type electron beam source called field emitter array (FEA). A basic principle of FEA-based image sensors is similar to conventional Vidicon type camera tubes, but its electron source is replaced from a thermal cathode to FEA. The use of a field emitter as an electron source should enable significant size reduction while maintaining high radiation tolerance. Current researches on radiation tolerant FEAs and development of CdTe based photoconductive films will be presented.

  20. Modelling emission turbulence-radiation interaction by using a hybrid flamelet/stochastic Eulerian field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    The time-averaged Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) introduces two unclosed terms, known as `absorption Turbulence Radiation Interaction (TRI)' and `emission TRI'. Emission TRI is related to the non-linear coupling between fluctuations of the absorption coefficient and fluctuations of the Planck function and can be described without introduction any approximation by using a transported PDF method. In this study, a hybrid flamelet/ Stochastic Eulerian Field Model is used to solve the transport equation of the one-point one-time PDF. In this formulation, the steady laminar flamelet model (SLF) is coupled to a joint Probability Density Function (PDF) of mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate, and soot quantities and the PDF transport equation is solved by using a Stochastic Eulerian Field (SEF) method. Soot production is modeled by a semi-empirical model and the spectral dependence of the radiatively participating species, namely combustion products and soot, are computed by using a Narrow Band Correlated-k (NBCK) model. The model is applied to simulate an ethylene/methane turbulent jet flame burning in an oxygen-enriched environment. Model results are compared with the experiments and the effects of taken into account Emission TRI on flame structure, soot production and radiative loss are discussed.

  1. EM Modeling of Far-Field Radiation Patterns for Antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-01-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  2. EM modeling of far-field radiation patterns for antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-05-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  3. Advances in Quantifying the Radiative Effects of Aerosol Particles on Climate from Airborne Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Coddington, O.; Bergstrom, R.; Redemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, large uncertainties persist in estimates of climate forcing by aerosol particles. One contributor to this uncertainty is the poorly quantified vertical distribution of solar radiation absorbed by aerosol particles, from the regional to global scale. Another is the spectral and spatial variability of surface albedo, an effect that can dominate the top-of-atmosphere perturbations due to aerosol scattering and absorption, particularly over land. Over the past three years a number of intensive airborne field experiments (ICARTT, MILAGRO, GoMACCS) have contributed significantly to our understanding of the impact of pollution outflow from urban-industrial centers on radiative forcing, using spectrally resolved radiometric measurements and novel observationally-based methods to derive forcing efficiency and flux divergence. We present an overview of some of the most significant advances in direct radiative forcing realized by these studies, and recommendations on where the greatest challenges remain. In addition we present findings from these experiments on the influence of aerosol particles on cloud radiative properties, a potentially greater effect but even more uncertain than direct radiative forcing.

  4. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  5. Minimum radiation force target size for power measurements in focused ultrasonic fields with circular symmetry.

    PubMed

    Beissner, K

    2010-12-01

    The time-averaged ultrasonic power emitted by medical ultrasonic equipment is mostly measured using a radiation force balance, and the question of the necessary target size is of practical importance. The question is answered here by calculations based on a Rayleigh integral algorithm for fields from circular, focusing transducers. This case occurs particularly in the field of high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The calculation yields the necessary size of an absorbing target so that the radiation force is 98% of that exerted on an absorber of infinite lateral size, and this as a function of the transducer-to-target distance, of the transducer radius in comparison with the wavelength and of the focus (half-)angle. Several distributions of the transducer vibration amplitude are considered. The Rayleigh integral strictly applies only to planar transducers, but among the amplitude distributions there is also one that allows the simulation of the spherically curved transducer type often found in practice.

  6. Electron-beam dynamics in a strong laser field including quantum radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, N.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-08-01

    The evolution of an electron beam colliding head on with a strong plane-wave field is investigated in the framework of strong-field QED including radiation-reaction effects due to photon emission. Employing a kinetic approach to describe the electron and the photon distribution it is shown that at a given total laser fluence the final electron distribution depends on the shape of the laser envelope and on the pulse duration, in contrast to the classical predictions of radiation reaction based on the Landau-Lifshitz equation. Finally, it is investigated how the pair-creation process leads to a nonlinear coupled evolution of the electrons in the beam, of the produced charged particles, and of the emitted photons.

  7. Active Thermal Extraction and Temperature Sensing of Near-field Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, D.; Kim, T.; Minnich, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an active thermal extraction (ATX) scheme that enables thermally populated surface phonon polaritons to escape into the far-field. The concept is based on a fluorescence upconversion process that also occurs in laser cooling of solids (LCS). Here, we present a generalized analysis of our scheme using the theoretical framework for LCS. We show that both LCS and ATX can be described with the same mathematical formalism by replacing the electron-phonon coupling parameter in LCS with the electron-photon coupling parameter in ATX. Using this framework, we compare the ideal efficiency and power extracted for the two schemes and examine the parasitic loss mechanisms. This work advances the application of ATX to manipulate near-field thermal radiation for applications such as temperature sensing and active radiative cooling. PMID:27595609

  8. Far-ultraviolet studies. VII - The spectrum and latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.; Anderson, R. C.; Fastie, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A direct measurement has been made of the spectrum (1180-1680 A) and Gould-latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field, over about one-third of the sky. The result is corrected to give expected values for the entire sky. The average local 1180-1680 A energy density is 5.8 x 10 to the -17th ergs/cu cm A. The surface brightness falls off toward high latitudes much more steeply than published models predict.

  9. On the relativistic classical motion of a radiating spinning particle in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Arnab; Rajeev, S. G.

    2011-04-01

    We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment, taking radiation reaction into account. This generalizes the Landau-Lifshitz equations for the spinless case. In the special case of spin-polarized motion in a constant magnetic field (synchrotron motion) we verify that the particle does lose energy. Previous proposals did not predict dissipation of energy and also suffered from runaway solutions analogous to those of the Lorentz-Dirac equations of motion.

  10. Depth-of-field effects in wiggler radiation sources: Geometrical versus wave optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed analysis is carried out of the optical properties of synchrotron radiation emitted by multipole wigglers, concentrating on the effective source size and brightness and the so-called "depth of field" effects, concerning which there has been some controversy in the literature. By comparing calculations made with both geometrical optics and wave optics methods we demonstrate that the two approaches are not at variance, and that the wave optics results tend towards those of geometrical optics under well-defined conditions.

  11. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance non-linear electrostatic stucture called Time Domain Structures (TDS). One of the type of TDS is electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). Observed DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bi-directional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV (rarely up to tens of keV). We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e. due to reflections from DL potential humps. Due to this interaction some fraction of electrons is scattered into the loss cone. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher energy electrons.

  12. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism, electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher-energy electrons. It is shown that the Fermi mechanism can result in scattering into the loss cone of up to several tenths of percent of electrons with flux peaking at energies up to several hundred eVs.

  13. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-03-26

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 10(15) G, where n(i, f) similar to 10(12)-10(13), from the results for n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).

  14. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; ...

    2016-03-26

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one canmore » infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 10(15) G, where n(i, f) similar to 10(12)-10(13), from the results for n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  15. Near-field thermal radiation transfer between semiconductors based on thickness control and introduction of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    We numerically investigate the spectral control of near-field thermal radiation transfer using interband absorption in semiconductors and the band-folding effect in photonic crystals (PCs) for highly efficient thermophotovoltaics. We reveal that the near-field coupling between two semiconductors (Si and GaSb) realizes frequency-selective thermal radiation transfer concentrated above their bandgap energy when their thicknesses are optimized considering their absorption coefficient spectra. Moreover, we elucidate the role of PC structures in the near-field thermal radiation transfer and demonstrate that the band-folding effect in PCs can further increase both the radiation power and frequency selectivity of the near-field thermal radiation transfer.

  16. GLOBAL ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POLLUTION: RISK ASSESSMENT FROM FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkopoulou, A. F.; Margaritis, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The extended use of wireless technology throughout the globe in almost all developed and non-developed countries has forced a large number of scientists to get involved in the investigation of the effects. The major issue is that unlike other forms of radiation exposure, this “non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation” was not present throughout the evolution of life in earth and therefore there are no adaptive mechanisms evolved. All organisms are vulnerable to the possible effects of radiation depending on the actual exposure level. “Safety limits” on the power density have been proposed but ongoing research has shown that these limits are not really safe for humans, not mentioning the entire population of living creatures on earth. The so called “Electrosmog Pollution” originating from the numerous radio and TV stations, communication satellite emission, but most importantly from mobile phone mast antennas, are of major concern, because it is gradually increasing at exponential rate. Therefore the key question is, do living organisms react upon their exposure to fields of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation? To have this question answered extensive research is being performed in various laboratories. One approach of our research includes field measurements within houses and classrooms, since a considerable proportion of the population in each country is exposed to the radiation coming from the nearby mast stations, in order to make a risk assessment. The measurements showed that in many cases the actual radiation present was potentially harmful. In other words, although the measured values were below the national safety levels, nevertheless they were above the levels of other countries. Therefore it has been suggested that a new cellular network should be constructed in order to minimize radiation levels in living areas and schools. Our experimental work is focusing on the elucidation of the effects of non-ionizing EMFs on mice exposed to mobile

  17. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2015-05-15

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  18. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2015-05-01

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  19. Thermal management in MoS2 based integrated device using near-field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jiebin; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-09-01

    Recently, wafer-scale growth of monolayer MoS2 films with spatial homogeneity is realized on SiO2 substrate. Together with the latest reported high mobility, MoS2 based integrated electronic devices are expected to be fabricated in the near future. Owing to the low lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer MoS2, and the increased transistor density accompanied with the increased power density, heat dissipation will become a crucial issue for these integrated devices. In this letter, using the formalism of fluctuation electrodynamics, we explored the near-field radiative heat transfer from a monolayer MoS2 to graphene. We demonstrate that in resonance, the maximum heat transfer via near-field radiation between MoS2 and graphene can be ten times higher than the in-plane lattice thermal conduction for MoS2 sheet. Therefore, an efficient thermal management strategy for MoS2 integrated device is proposed: Graphene sheet is brought into close proximity, 10-20 nm from MoS2 device; heat energy transfer from MoS2 to graphene via near-field radiation; this amount of heat energy then be conducted to contact due to ultra-high lattice thermal conductivity of graphene. Our work sheds light for developing cooling strategy for nano devices constructing with low thermal conductivity materials.

  20. Thermal management in MoS{sub 2} based integrated device using near-field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiebin; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-09-28

    Recently, wafer-scale growth of monolayer MoS{sub 2} films with spatial homogeneity is realized on SiO{sub 2} substrate. Together with the latest reported high mobility, MoS{sub 2} based integrated electronic devices are expected to be fabricated in the near future. Owing to the low lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer MoS{sub 2}, and the increased transistor density accompanied with the increased power density, heat dissipation will become a crucial issue for these integrated devices. In this letter, using the formalism of fluctuation electrodynamics, we explored the near-field radiative heat transfer from a monolayer MoS{sub 2} to graphene. We demonstrate that in resonance, the maximum heat transfer via near-field radiation between MoS{sub 2} and graphene can be ten times higher than the in-plane lattice thermal conduction for MoS{sub 2} sheet. Therefore, an efficient thermal management strategy for MoS{sub 2} integrated device is proposed: Graphene sheet is brought into close proximity, 10–20 nm from MoS{sub 2} device; heat energy transfer from MoS{sub 2} to graphene via near-field radiation; this amount of heat energy then be conducted to contact due to ultra-high lattice thermal conductivity of graphene. Our work sheds light for developing cooling strategy for nano devices constructing with low thermal conductivity materials.

  1. L1599B: Cloud Envelope and C+ Emission in a Region of Moderately Enhanced Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Langer, William D.; Liu, Tie; Requena-Torres, Miguel; Ricken, Oliver; Riquelme, Denise

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of an asymmetric radiation field on the properties of a molecular cloud envelope. We employ observations of carbon monoxide (12CO and 13CO), atomic carbon, ionized carbon, and atomic hydrogen to analyze the chemical and physical properties of the core and envelope of L1599B, a molecular cloud forming a portion of the ring at ≃27 pc from the star Λ Ori. The O8 star provides an asymmetric radiation field that produces a moderate enhancement of the external radiation field. Observations of the [C ii] fine structure line with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA indicate a significant enhanced emission on the side of the cloud facing the star, while the [C i], 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 and 2-1, and 12CO J = 3-2 data from the Purple Mountain Observatory and APEX telescopes suggest a relatively typical cloud interior. The atomic, ionic, and molecular line centroid velocities track each other very closely, and indicate that the cloud may be undergoing differential radial motion. The H i data from the Arecibo GALFA survey and the SOFIA/GREAT [C ii] data do not suggest any systematic motion of the halo gas, relative to the dense central portion of the cloud traced by 12CO and 13CO.

  2. Radiative transfer with POLARIS. I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissl, S.; Wolf, S.; Brauer, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We present POLARIS (POLArized RadIation Simulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes. Methods: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the underlying magnetic field morphology. Results: Resulting temperature distributions are consistent with the density and position of radiation sources resulting from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) - collapse simulations. The calculated layers of aligned dust grains in the considered cirumstellar disk models are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Finally, we compute unique patterns in synthetic multi-wavelength polarization maps that are dependent on applied dust-model and grain-alignment theory in analytical cloud models.

  3. An analysis of the radiation field characteristics for extremity dose assessment during maintenance periods at nuclear power plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2012-12-01

    Workers who maintain the water chambers of steam generators during maintenance periods in nuclear power plants (NPPs) have a higher likelihood of high radiation exposure, even if they are exposed for a short period of time. In particular, it is expected that the hands of workers would receive the highest radiation exposure as a consequence of hand contact with radioactive materials. In this study, a characteristic analysis of inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations was conducted using thermoluminescent dosemeters for the whole body and extremities during maintenance periods at Korean NPPs. It was observed that inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations at NPPs were dominated by high-energy photons.

  4. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2013-11-18

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10 nm gap.

  5. Enhancement of terahertz radiation by using circularly polarized two-color laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chao; Chen, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaowei; Lü, Zhihui; Huang, Yindong; Liu, Jinlei; Zhang, Dongwen; Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-09-01

    Terahertz radiation from tunneling ionization of gaseous atoms and molecules in the two-color laser fields with various polarizations has been investigated. We experimentally demonstrate that the efficiency of terahertz emission in the circularly polarized laser fields with the same helicity is 5 times higher than that with linearly polarized two-color femtosecond pulses in high laser intensity. By solving time-dependent Schrödinger equation, this enhancement is well explained based on the analysis of electron tunneling ionization and subsequent dynamics.

  6. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  7. An improved method for the calculation of Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Bin; Maury, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensing and controlling Acoustic Radiation Modes (ARMs) in the near-field of vibrating structures is of great interest for broadband noise reduction or enhancement, as ARMs are velocity distributions defined over a vibrating surface, that independently and optimally contribute to the acoustic power in the acoustic field. But present methods only provide far-field ARMs (FFARMs) that are inadequate for the acoustic near-field problem. The Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes (NFARMs) are firstly studied with an improved numerical method, the Pressure-Velocity method, which rely on the eigen decomposition of the acoustic transfers between the vibrating source and a conformal observation surface, including sound pressure and velocity transfer matrices. The active and reactive parts of the sound power are separated and lead to the active and reactive ARMs. NFARMs are studied for a 2D baffled beam and for a 3D baffled plate, and so as differences between the NFARMS and the classical FFARMs. Comparisons of the NFARMs are analyzed when varying frequency and observation distance to the source. It is found that the efficiencies and shapes of the optimal active ARMs are independent on the distance while that of the reactive ones are distinctly related on.

  8. Star Formation in the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, Antonio; McKee, Christopher H.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV radiation field, and the effect of this field on the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM). There are substantial fluctuations of the UV radiation field in space (scales of 100's of parsecs) and time (time-scales of order 100 million years) at the solar circle. The Far Ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV< hv < 13.6 eV) field and the pressure determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold clouds or warm (T - 10(exp 4) neutral medium. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the cold and warm phases when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties and on the FUV sources is a basic step in building a model of the large scale behavior of the ISM and the mutual relation between the ISM and the star formation rate. Application is made to observations of spiral galaxies which correlate the star formation rate per unit area with the surface density of the gas. We acknowledge support from the NASA Astrophysical Theory program.

  9. Star Formation In the Galaxy and the Fluctuating UV Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Parravano, Antonio; McKee, Christopher H.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the formation of massive stars in the Galaxy, the resultant fluctuating UV (ultraviolet) radiation field, and the effect of this field on the star-forming interstellar medium. There are substantial fluctuations of the UV radiation field in space (scales of 100's of parsecs) and time (time-scales of order 100 million years). The FUV (far ultraviolet) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) field and the pressure determines whether the thermal balance of the neutral gas results in cold clouds or warm (T approx. 10(exp 4) K) neutral medium. We show how to calculate the average fractions of the gas in the cold and warm phases when the interstellar gas is subject to this fluctuating FUV field. The knowledge of how these fractions depend on the gas properties and on the FUV sources is a basic step in building a model of the large scale behavior of the ISM (interstellar medium) and the mutual relation between the ISM and the star formation rate.

  10. A Lakatosian Encounter with Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2010-01-01

    There is much to be learned and pondered by reading "Proofs and Refutations" by Imre Lakatos (Lakatos, 1976). It highlights the importance of mathematical definitions, and how definitions evolve to capture the essence of the object they are defining. It also provides an exhilarating encounter with the ups and downs of the mathematical reasoning…

  11. Control of whistler radiation efficiency of a loop antenna by generation of ambient magnetic field irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Gushchin, M. E.; Korobkov, S. V.; Kostrov, A. V.; Strikovsky, A. V.; Koldanov, V. A.; Zaboronkova, T. M.; Krafft, C.

    2008-05-15

    Electrodynamic means for the control of loop antenna radiation efficiency in plasma is proposed, which can be used in the whistler frequency band. The method is based on the generation, without perturbing the plasma density, of localized ambient magnetic field irregularities in the vicinity of the antenna. In order to produce such irregularities, it is suggested to feed the antenna with additional dc current along with the rf current. Experiments performed in a large laboratory magnetoplasma showed that the generation of localized magnetic field enhancements provides the possibility of increasing the amplitude of the whistlers emitted by the loop antenna. Moreover, experiments have shown that the amplification of the whistlers' signals from the receiving loop antenna fed with additional dc current is observed when a static magnetic field enhancement is generated in the vicinity of the receiver. The experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical results obtained for comparatively weak ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  12. Lyman-{alpha} radiation of a metastable hydrogen beam to measure electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lejeune, A.; Cherigier-Kovacic, L.; Doveil, F.

    2011-10-31

    The interaction between a metastable H(2s) atomic hydrogen beam and an external electric field leads to the emission of the Lyman-{alpha} line. It originates in the Stark mixing of the near-degenerate 2s{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 1/2} levels separated by the Lamb shift. The quenched radiation proportional to the square of the electric field amplitude is recovered in vacuum by using such an atomic probe beam. We observe the strong enhancement of the signal when the field is oscillating at the Lamb shift frequency. This technique is applied in a plasma, offering an alternative way to measure weak electric fields by direct and non-intrusive means.

  13. Radiative accretion shocks along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields in classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Miceli, M.; Matsakos, T.; Stehlé, C.; Ibgui, L.; de Sa, L.; Chièze, J. P.; Lanz, T.

    2013-11-01

    Context. According to the magnetospheric accretion model, hot spots form on the surface of classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) in regions where accreting disk material impacts the stellar surface at supersonic velocity, generating a shock. Aims: We investigate the dynamics and stability of postshock plasma that streams along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields at the impact region of accretion columns. We study how the magnetic field configuration and strength determine the structure, geometry, and location of the shock-heated plasma. Methods: We model the impact of an accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS by 2D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our model considers the gravity, the radiative cooling, and the magnetic-field-oriented thermal conduction (including the effects of heat flux saturation). We explore different configurations and strengths of the magnetic field. Results: The structure, stability, and location of the shocked plasma strongly depend on the configuration and strength of the magnetic field. In the case of weak magnetic fields (plasma β ≳ 1 in the postshock region), a large component of B may develop perpendicular to the stream at the base of the accretion column, which limits the sinking of the shocked plasma into the chromosphere and perturbs the overstable shock oscillations induced by radiative cooling. An envelope of dense and cold chromospheric material may also develop around the shocked column. For strong magnetic fields (β < 1 in the postshock region close to the chromosphere), the field configuration determines the position of the shock and its stand-off height. If the field is strongly tapered close to the chromosphere, an oblique shock may form well above the stellar surface at the height where the plasma β ≈ 1. In general, we find that a nonuniform magnetic field makes the distribution of emission measure vs. temperature of the postshock plasma at T > 106 K lower than when there is uniform magnetic field

  14. Characterisation of bubble detectors for aircrew and space radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Green, A R; Bennett, L G I; Lewis, B J; Tume, P; Andrews, H R; Noulty, R A; Ing, H

    2006-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere acts as a natural radiation shield which protects terrestrial dwellers from the radiation environment encountered in space. In general, the intensity of this radiation field increases with distance from the ground owing to a decrease in the amount of atmospheric shielding. Neutrons form an important component of the radiation field to which the aircrew and spacecrew are exposed. In light of this, the neutron-sensitive bubble detector may be ideal as a portable personal dosemeter at jet altitudes and in space. This paper describes the ground-based characterisation of the bubble detector and the application of the bubble detector for the measurement of aircrew and spacecrew radiation exposure.

  15. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Stovall, Marilyn; White, Allen; Smith, Susan A.; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.

    2010-12-01

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by >=2.5 cm.

  16. Lightning-channel morphology by return-stroke radiation field waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; Le Vine, D. M.; Idone, V. P.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous video and wideband electric field recordings of 32 cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Florida were analyzed to show the formation of new channels to ground can be detected by examination of the return-stroke radiation fields alone. The return-stroke E and dE/dt waveforms were subjectively classified according to their fine structure. Then the video images were examined field by field to identify each waveform with a visible channel to ground. Fifty-five correlated waveforms and channel images were obtained. Of these, all 34 first-stroke waveforms (multiple jagged E peaks, noisy dE/dt), 8 of which were not radiated by the chronologically first stroke in the flash, came from new channels to ground (not previously seen on video). All 18 subsequent-stroke waveforms (smoothly rounded E and quiet dE/dt after initial peak) were radiated by old channels (illuminated by a previous stroke). Two double-ground waveforms (two distinct first-return-stroke pulses separated by tens of microseconds or less) coincided with video fields showing two new channels. One `anomalous-stroke' waveform (beginning like a first stroke and ending like a subsequent) was produced by a new channel segment to ground branching off an old channel. This waveform classification depends on the presence or absence of high-frequency fine structure. Fourier analysis shows that first-stroke waveforms contain about 18 dB more spectral power in the frequency interval from 500 kHz to at least 7 MHz than subsequent-stroke waveforms for at least 13 microseconds after the main peak.

  17. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  18. Analysis of the Radiated Field in an Electromagnetic Reverberation Chamber as an Upset-Inducing Stimulus for Digital Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary data analysis for a physical fault injection experiment of a digital system exposed to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) in an electromagnetic reverberation chamber suggests a direct causal relation between the time profile of the field strength amplitude in the chamber and the severity of observed effects at the outputs of the radiated system. This report presents an analysis of the field strength modulation induced by the movement of the field stirrers in the reverberation chamber. The analysis is framed as a characterization of the discrete features of the field strength waveform responsible for the faults experienced by a radiated digital system. The results presented here will serve as a basis to refine the approach for a detailed analysis of HIRF-induced upsets observed during the radiation experiment. This work offers a novel perspective into the use of an electromagnetic reverberation chamber to generate upset-inducing stimuli for the study of fault effects in digital systems.

  19. Human factors in primary care telemedicine encounters.

    PubMed

    Bulik, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Traditional delivery of primary care takes place in a face-to-face transaction between provider and patient. In telemedicine, however, the transaction is 'filtered' by the distance and technology. The potential problem of filtered communication in a telemedicine encounter was examined from a human factors perspective. Patients with and without experience of telemedicine, and providers who had experience of telemedicine, were asked about patient-provider relationships in interviews and focus groups. Seven themes emerged: initial impressions, style of questions, field of view, physical interaction, social talk, control of encounter and ancillary services. This suggests that communication can be improved and better patient-provider relationships can be developed in a primary care telemedicine encounter if attention is paid to four areas of the interaction: verbal, non-verbal, relational and actions/transactional. The human factors dimension of telemedicine is an important element in delivery of health care at a distance - and is one of few factors over which the provider has direct control.

  20. Supervision Challenges Encountered during Kenyan University Students' Practicum Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathuri-Ogola, Lucy; VanLeeuwen, Charlene; Kabaria-Muriithi, Joan; Weeks, Lori E.; Kieru, Jane; Ndayala, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    There is little published research that examines the supervision experience of field attachment supervisors in Kenya. In this study, we identify the challenges encountered by field supervisors during student field attachments with community organizations. Fifteen organizations that had hosted third year students from the Department of Community…

  1. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  2. Field Comparisons of Direct and Component Measurements of Net Radiation under Clear Skies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchon, Claude E.; Wilk, Gregory E.

    1994-02-01

    applied to simultaneous measurements from the net pyrradiometer, pyranometer, pyrgeometer, and the inner cup temperature, assumed to he at air temperature, to estimate the individual components. Although a substantial difference in shartwave sensitivity was computed using this method, the result was not definitive because of the limited number and the narrow range of longwave observations. Nevertheless, the method can be employed in the field to verify uniform sensitivity of a net pyrradiometer's sensing surfaces to shortwave and longwave radiation. The method may have particular application to Fritschen-type net pyrradiometers of recently improved design after extended field use.

  3. Complex Scattered Radiation Fields and Multiple Magnetic Fields in the Protostellar Cluster in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hough, James H.; Werner, Michael W.; Teixeira, Paula S.

    2011-11-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and Ks bands has been carried out for the protostellar cluster region around NGC 2264 IRS 2 in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud. Various infrared reflection nebula clusters (IRNCs) associated with NGC 2264 IRS 2 and the IRAS 12 S1 core, as well as local infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe), were detected. The illuminating sources of the IRNe were identified with known or new near- and mid-infrared sources. In addition, 314 point-like sources were detected in all three bands and their aperture polarimetry was studied. Using a color-color diagram, reddened field stars and diskless pre-main-sequence stars were selected to trace the magnetic field (MF) structure of the molecular cloud. The mean polarization position angle of the point-like sources is 81° ± 29° in the cluster core, and 58° ± 24° in the perimeter of the cluster core, which is interpreted as the projected direction on the sky of the MF in the observed region of the cloud. The Chandrasekhar-Fermi method gives a rough estimate of the MF strength to be about 100 μG. A comparison with recent numerical simulations of the cluster formation implies that the cloud dynamics is controlled by the relatively strong MF. The local MF direction is well associated with that of CO outflow for IRAS 12 S1 and consistent with that inferred from submillimeter polarimetry. In contrast, the local MF direction runs roughly perpendicular to the Galactic MF direction.

  4. Lightning electromagnetic radiation field spectra in the interval from 0. 2 to 20 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, J.C. ); Bailey, J.C. ); Leteinturier, C. ); Krider, E.P. )

    1990-11-20

    Average energy spectral densities are presented for the fast transitions in most of the components that produce large radiation field impulses from cloud-to-ground lightning; first and subsequent return strokes; stepped, dart-stepped, and 'chaotic' leaders; and 'characteristic' cloud pulses. A disagreement in the previous literature about the spectral energy radiated by return strokes at high frequencies is noted and explained. The authors show that the spectral amplitudes are not seriously distorted by propagation over less than 35 km of seawater, although as much as 45 km of such propagation does appear to produce significant attenuation above about 10 MHz. First and subsequent return strokes produce identical spectra between 0.2 and 20 MHz. The spectra of stepped and dart-stepped leader steps are nearly identical and are very similar to that of characteristic pulses. The spectra of leader steps also match return stroke spectra above 2-3 MHz after the former are increased by about 7 dB. The shapes of individual spectra do not depend on their amplitude, so the shapes of the average spectra are probably not distorted by the trigger thresholds used in the data acquisition. Return strokes are the strongest sources of radiation from cloud-to-ground lightning in the 0.2- to 20-MHz frequency range, although certain intracloud processes are stronger radiators above 8 MHz.

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation effects on two-dimensional MoS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorrow, Julian J.; Cress, Cory D.; Arnold, Heather N.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Schmucker, Scott W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2017-02-01

    Atomically thin MoS2 has generated intense interest for emerging electronics applications. Its two-dimensional nature and potential for low-power electronics are particularly appealing for space-bound electronics, motivating the need for a fundamental understanding of MoS2 electronic device response to the space radiation environment. In this letter, we quantify the response of MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs) to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) total ionizing dose radiation. Single-layer (SL) and multilayer (ML) MoS2 FETs are compared to identify differences that arise from thickness and band structure variations. The measured evolution of the FET transport properties is leveraged to identify the nature of VUV-induced trapped charge, isolating the effects of the interface and bulk oxide dielectric. In both the SL and ML cases, oxide trapped holes compete with interface trapped electrons, exhibiting an overall shift toward negative gate bias. Raman spectroscopy shows no variation in the MoS2 signatures as a result of VUV exposure, eliminating significant crystalline damage or oxidation as possible radiation degradation mechanisms. Overall, this work presents avenues for achieving radiation-hard MoS2 devices through dielectric engineering that reduces oxide and interface trapped charge.

  6. On the effect of a radiation field in modifying the intermolecular interaction between two chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, A.

    2006-01-01

    The change in the mutual energy of interaction between a pair of chiral molecules coupled via the exchange of a single virtual photon and in the presence of an electromagnetic field is calculated using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. The particular viewpoint adopted is one that has an intuitive physical appeal and resembles a classical treatment. It involves the coupling of electric and magnetic dipole moments induced at each center by the incident radiation field to the resonant dipole-dipole interaction tensor. The energy shift is evaluated for fixed as well as random orientations of the molecular pair with respect to the direction of propagation of the field. A complete polarization analysis is carried out for the former situation by examining the effect of incident radiation that is linearly or circularly polarized and traveling in a direction that is parallel or perpendicular to the intermolecular distance vector. After tumble averaging, all polarization dependence of the energy shift vanishes. In both cases the interaction energy is directly proportional to the irradiance of the applied field, and is discriminatory, changing sign when one optically active species is replaced by its enantiomer. The asymptotic behavior of the energy shift at the limits of large and small separations is also studied.

  7. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  8. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  9. Evaluation of detectors for the small field measurements used for clinical radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Miljenko

    Advanced radiation therapy treatments with very small field sizes are complex. Increasingly higher doses delivered in single or few fractions are being commonly used for the treatments of the small target volume. Absolute or relative small field dosimetry is difficult due to radiation transport. Therefore it is very important to understand characteristics of the small field, detector selection as well as correction factors that have to be taken into account for the accurate measurements. Reducing uncertainty in relative dose measurement and modeling dose on treatment planning systems are factors contributing to the accuracy of the small field radiation treatments. Several challenges in small field dosimetry arise because of the lack of lateral charge particle equilibrium as well as the occlusion of the direct photon beam source and collimator settings. Presence of low-density media in irradiation geometry does complicate dosimetry even more. All those conditions are representing the challenge when it comes to dosimetric measurements. Size and construction are crucial when it comes to choice of the detector. Depending on beam energy, resolving the beam profile and penumbra for the small field sizes are a challenge and practically impossible with detectors commonly used in clinics. With decreasing field size and due to changes in particle spectrum, variations in radiological parameters have to be taken into account. To measure percent depth dose, tissue maximum ratios, tissue phantom ratios as well as output factors for the small field size experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to determine appropriate detectors for the measurements. The primary goal of Specific Aim 1 was experimental quantification of the performance parameters for single detectors used for dosimetric verification of the small fields in radiotherapy. The proposed method and qualitative value for appropriate detectors selection defined by field size has been set. The

  10. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-04-15

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  11. Twisted pair of optic fibers for background removal in radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, P Z Y; Suchowerska, N; McKenzie, D R

    2013-08-01

    In many situations in which an optic fiber carries a signal through a radiation field, an unwanted background signal is produced consisting of fluorescent and/or Cerenkov light. This presents a major problem in the measurement of the light signal, for example, in scintillation dosimetry of medical therapeutic beams. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method of measuring and removing the background signal through the use of a twisted pair of optic fibers. The twisted pair consists of a fiber carrying the scintillation signal that is twisted with a second optic fiber to form a double helix. The two twisted fibers will experience the same radiation environment provided the periodicity of the twist is correlated to the dose rate gradient. An expression for the required twist periodicity is presented. A scintillation dosimeter with a twisted pair optic fiber was tested in a megavoltage beam and found to accurately measure its beam characteristics. The twisted pair approach is not restricted to medical applications and can be used in many situations in which optical signals are carried through radiation fields.

  12. Radial vibration and ultrasonic field of a long tubular ultrasonic radiator.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin; Zhiqiang, Fu; Xiaoli, Zhang; Yong, Wang; Jing, Hu

    2013-09-01

    The radial vibration of a metal long circular tube is studied analytically and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. Based on the equivalent circuit, the radial resonance frequency equation is derived. The theoretical relationship between the radial resonance frequency and the geometrical dimensions is studied. Finite element method is used to simulate the radial vibration and the radiated ultrasonic field and the results are compared with those from the analytical method. It is concluded that the radial resonance frequency for a solid metal rod is larger than that for a metal tube with the same outer radius. The radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method are in good agreement with those from the numerical method. Based on the acoustic field analysis, it is concluded that the long metal tube with small wall thickness is superior to that with large wall thickness in producing radial vibration and ultrasonic radiation. Therefore, it is expected to be used as an effective radial ultrasonic radiator in ultrasonic sewage treatment, ultrasonic antiscale and descaling and other ultrasonic liquid handling applications.

  13. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged.

  14. Internal Radiation Field in the Nonlinear Transfer Problem for a One-Dimensional Anisotropic Medium. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that for the nonlinear boundary value problem of determining the radiation field inside a one-dimensional anisotropic medium illuminated from outside at its boundaries on both sides, the formulas for adding layers in semilinear systems of differential equations for radiative transfer, invariant embedding, and total Ambartsumyan invariance can be used to reduce the equations for the problem to separable equations with initial conditions. The fields travelling to the left and right are thereby found independently of one another. In addition, when one of them has been determined, the other can be found directly using an explicit expression. A general equivalence property of operators with respect to a certain mathematical form, expression, or functional is formulated mathematically. New equations, referred to as kinetic equations of equivalency, are derived from the mutual equivalence of the differential operators of the Boltzmann kinetic equation (the equations of radiative transfer) and the functional equation of the Ambartsumian's complete invariance. Besides separability, these new equations also have the property of linearity. Formulas are also introduced for special problems of single sided illumination of a medium that in this case serve as supplementary information in the initial conditions for formulating Cauchy problems.

  15. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  16. Radiation-induced solidification of ionic liquid under extreme electric field.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Kurt J; King, Lyon B; He, Kai; Cumings, John

    2016-09-16

    An extreme electric field on the order of 10(10) V m(-1) was applied to the free surface of an ionic liquid to cause electric-field-induced evaporation of molecular ions from the liquid. The point of ion emission was observed in situ using a TEM. The resulting electrospray emission process was observed to create nanoscale high-aspect-ratio dendritic features that were aligned with the direction of the electric field. Upon removal of the stressing field the features were seen to remain, indicating that the ionic liquid residue was solidified or gelled. Similar electrospray experiments performed in a field-emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the features are created when the high-energy electron beam damages the molecular structure of the ionic liquid. While the electric field does not play a direct role in the fluid modification, the electric stress was critical in detecting the liquid property change. It is only because the electric stress mechanically elongated the fluid during the electrospray process and these obviously non-liquid structures persisted when the field was removed that the damage was evident. This evidence of ionic liquid radiation damage may have significant bearing on electrospray devices where it is possible to produce high-energy secondary electrons through surface impacts of emitted ions downstream of the emitter. Any such impacts that are in close proximity could see reflected secondary electrons impact the emitter causing gelling of the ionic liquid.

  17. Radiation-induced solidification of ionic liquid under extreme electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhune, Kurt J.; King, Lyon B.; He, Kai; Cumings, John

    2016-09-01

    An extreme electric field on the order of 1010 V m-1 was applied to the free surface of an ionic liquid to cause electric-field-induced evaporation of molecular ions from the liquid. The point of ion emission was observed in situ using a TEM. The resulting electrospray emission process was observed to create nanoscale high-aspect-ratio dendritic features that were aligned with the direction of the electric field. Upon removal of the stressing field the features were seen to remain, indicating that the ionic liquid residue was solidified or gelled. Similar electrospray experiments performed in a field-emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the features are created when the high-energy electron beam damages the molecular structure of the ionic liquid. While the electric field does not play a direct role in the fluid modification, the electric stress was critical in detecting the liquid property change. It is only because the electric stress mechanically elongated the fluid during the electrospray process and these obviously non-liquid structures persisted when the field was removed that the damage was evident. This evidence of ionic liquid radiation damage may have significant bearing on electrospray devices where it is possible to produce high-energy secondary electrons through surface impacts of emitted ions downstream of the emitter. Any such impacts that are in close proximity could see reflected secondary electrons impact the emitter causing gelling of the ionic liquid.

  18. Automatic feathering of split fields for step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2003-05-07

    approximately 1 cm from the original. Therefore, it was concluded that the feathering of the split line may be used for reducing the magnitude of hot/cold spots. This method was tested for an oesophageal cancer case. For a six-field arrangement, it was possible to create three field sub-groups with different split lines. The feathering technique developed in this work does not require any modifications of the radiation fields during the course of treatment because only one treatment plan is used to deliver the entire course of radiation treatments. In addition, this method may be more biologically effective because the split line feathering is achieved for every fraction of radiation.

  19. Studies of radiation fields of LCLS-II super conducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana Leitner, M.; Ge, L.; Li, Z.; Xu, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Ross, M.; Carrasco, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be a hard X-ray Free Electron Laser whose linac can deliver a 1.2 MW CW electron beam with bunch rates up to 1 MHz. To efficiently generate such a high power beam, Super-Conducting Radio-Frequency (SCRF) cavities will be installed in the upstream portion of the existing 3 km Linac at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The 9-cell niobium cavities will be cooled at 2K inside 35 cryomodules, each containing a string of eight of those cavities followed by a quadrupole. The strong electromagnetic fields in the SCRF cavities will extract electrons from the cavity walls that may be accelerated. Most such dark current will be deposited locally, although some electrons may reach several neighboring cryomodules, gaining substantial energy before they hit a collimator or other aperture. The power deposited by the field emitted electrons and the associated showers may pose radiation and machine protection issues at the cryomodules and also in other areas of the accelerator. Simulation of these effects is therefore crucial for the design of the machine. The in-house code Track3P was used to simulate field emitted electrons from the LCLS-II cavities, and a sophisticated 3D model of the cryomodules including all cavities was written to transport radiation with the Fluka Monte Carlo code, which was linked to Track3P through custom-made routines. This setup was used to compute power deposition in components, prompt and residual radiation fields, and radioisotope inventories.

  20. Influence of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements: insights from field and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2016-04-01

    A precise knowledge of the surface energy budget, which includes the solar and terrestrial radiation fluxes, is needed to accurately characterize the global energy balance which is largely determining Earth's climate. To this aim national and global monitoring networks for surface radiative fluxes have been established in recent decades. The most prominent among these networks is the so-called Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) (Ohmura et al., 1998). National monitoring networks such as the Austrian RADiation Monitoring Network (ARAD), which has been established in 2010 by a consortium of the Central Agency of Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the University of Graz, the University of Innsbruck, and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), orient themselves on BSRN standards (McArthur, 2005). ARAD comprises to date five sites (Wien Hohe Warte, Graz/University, Innsbruck/University, Kanzelhöhe Observatory and Sonnblick (which is also a BSRN site)) and aims to provide long-term monitoring of radiation budget components at highest accuracy and to capture the spatial patterns of radiation climate in Austria (Olefs et al., 2015). Given the accuracy requirement for the local monitoring of radiative fluxes instrument offsets, triggered by meteorological factors and/or instrumentation, pose a major challenge in radiation monitoring. Within this study we investigate effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems), all of which used in regular operation within the ARAD network. We focus particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation we performed a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as targeted field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. Our results indicate

  1. Active control of near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qimei; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Jiangtao; Yu, Tianbao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials is investigated. The electric surface plasmons (SPs) supported by metamaterials can be coupled with the SPs supported by graphene. The near-field heat transfer between the graphene-covered metamaterials is significantly larger than that between metamaterials because of the strong coupling in our studied frequency range. The relationship between heat flux and chemical potential is studied for different vacuum gaps. Given that the chemical potential of graphene can be tuned by the external electric field, heat transfer can be actively controlled by modulating the chemical potential. The heat flux for certain vacuum gaps can reach a maximum value when the chemical potential is at a particular value. The results of this study are beneficial for actively controlling energy transfer.

  2. Computation of far radiation field of an arbitrarily oriented dipole above layered anisotropic half space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Le; Wei, Bing; Ge, De-Biao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the reciprocity theorem, the far field formulation of an arbitrarily oriented electric dipole located at the interface of layered anisotropic half space is deduced. Then, considering the optical path difference of the direct wave and reflected wave, the formulation of the electric dipole located above the interface of layered anisotropic half space is discussed, and the transmission matrix method for computing the reflection coefficients of anisotropic layered half space is introduced in detail. Finally, numerical examples of the field produced by an electric dipole located above layered anisotropic half space are given. The numerical results show that this method can be used in the fast computation of far radiation field of an arbitrarily oriented dipole above layered anisotropic half space.

  3. Far-field radiation patterns of second harmonic generation from gold nanoparticles under tightly focused illumination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Wang, Xianghui; Chang, Shengjiang; Zeng, Ming; Shen, Si; Zhang, Na

    2016-04-04

    We study far-field angular radiation patterns of second harmonic generation (SHG) from gold nanosphere, nanocube, nanorod, and nanocup illuminated by tightly focused linearly and radially polarized beams, respectively. It is found that under linearly polarized illumination, far-field forward-scattering SHG (FSHG) dominates second harmonic (SH) responses generated by those gold particles. On the contrary, it is amazing that significant backward-scattering SHG (BSHG) can be observed when those gold nanoparticles are excited by a focused radially polarized beam. For the case of gold nanosphere, the effective point dipole systems are developed to reasonably elucidate this interesting difference. Our investigations suggest that for SHG microscopy with backward detection scheme, tightly focused radially polarized beam could be a promising excitation field to improve the backward SH signal.

  4. Silicon field-effect transistors as radiation detectors for the Sub-THz range

    SciTech Connect

    But, D. B. Golenkov, O. G.; Sakhno, N. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Korinets, S. V.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Reva, V. P.; Bunchuk, S. G.

    2012-05-15

    The nonresonance response of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (Si-MOSFETs) with a long channel (1-20 {mu}m) to radiation in the frequency range 43-135 GHz is studied. The transistors are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology with 1-{mu}m design rules. The volt-watt sensitivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) for such detectors are estimated with the calculated effective area of the detecting element taken into account. It is shown that such transistors can operate at room temperature as broadband direct detectors of sub-THz radiation. In the 4-5 mm range of wavelengths, the volt-watt sensitivity can be as high as tens of kV/W and the NEP can amount to 10{sup -11} - 10{sup -12}W/{radical}Hz . The parameters of detectors under study can be improved by the optimization of planar antennas.

  5. Upper limits to the interstellar radiation field between 775 and 1050 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.

    1976-01-01

    A 40-A resolution extreme-ultraviolet spectrometer, sensitive to radiation in the 775-1050 A band, was flown on a Black Brant VC rocket to measure the night sky brightness in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A weak signal above background was recorded in most channels as the spectrometer's field of view scanned the sky in the vicinity of the galactic plane from Monoceros to Andromeda. Because the earth's upper atmosphere may produce some radiation in this wavelength region, the possibility cannot be excluded that some or all of the observed signal is terrestrial in origin. However, observational upper limits can be established at the 95-per cent confidence level for the intensity of an extraterrestrial extreme ultraviolet background which ranges from 6 millionths erg/sq cm/s/sr/A at 1050 A to 4 ten-millionths erg/sq cm/s/sr/A at 775 A. These results are consistent with existing theoretical predictions.

  6. Dosimetry in steep dose-rate gradient radiation fields: A challenge in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massillon-JL, G.

    2010-12-01

    The fundamental goal of radiotherapy is to reduce the damage to normal tissue and optimize the dose to the tumor with an associated high probability of cure. Because of this, an accurate and precise knowledge of the radiation dose distribution delivered around the tumor volume during radiotherapy treatments such as stereotactic radiosurgery, intensity modulated radiotherapy or brachytherapy with low-energy X-ray and beta particle sources is of great importance. However, in each of these radiation fields, there exists a steep dose-rate gradient which makes it very difficult to perform accurate dose measurements. In this work, the physics phenomena involved in the energy absorption for each of these situations are discussed, and a brief revision of what the Medical Physics community is doing is presented.

  7. Evaluation of the radiation field in the future circular collider detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana, M. I.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Riegler, W.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation load on a detector at a 100 TeV proton-proton collider, that is being investigated within the future circular collider (FCC) study, is presented. A first concept of the detector has been modeled and relevant fluence and dose distributions have been calculated using the fluka Monte Carlo code. Distributions of fluence rates are discussed separately for charged particles, neutrons and photons. Dose and 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence, for the accumulated integrated luminosity, are presented. The peak values of these quantities in the different subdetectors are highlighted, in order to define the radiation tolerance requirements for the choice of possible technologies. The effect of the magnetic field is also discussed. Two shielding solutions have been conceived to minimize the backscattering from the forward calorimeters to the muon chambers and the forward tracking stations. The two possible designs are presented and their effectiveness is discussed.

  8. Point-source idealization in classical field theories. II. Mechanical energy losses from electromagnetic radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates, Ronald E.; Rosenblum, Arnold

    1982-05-01

    This paper compares the mechanical energy losses due to electromagnetic radiation reaction on a two-particle, slow-motion system, as calculated from (1) the method of matched asymptotic expansions and (2) the Lorentz-Dirac equation, which assumes point sources. The matching derivation of the preceding paper avoided the assumption of a δ-function source by using Reissner-Nordström matching zones. Despite the differing mathematical assumptions of the two methods, their results are in agreement with each other and with the electromagnetic-field energy losses calculated by the evaluation of flux integrals. Our purpose is eventually to analyze Rosenblum's use of point sources as a possible cause of disagreement between the analogous calculations of gravitational radiation on a slow-motion system of two bodies. We begin with the simpler electromagnetic problem.

  9. Dosimetry in steep dose-rate gradient radiation fields: A challenge in clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Massillon-JL, G.

    2010-12-07

    The fundamental goal of radiotherapy is to reduce the damage to normal tissue and optimize the dose to the tumor with an associated high probability of cure. Because of this, an accurate and precise knowledge of the radiation dose distribution delivered around the tumor volume during radiotherapy treatments such as stereotactic radiosurgery, intensity modulated radiotherapy or brachytherapy with low-energy X-ray and beta particle sources is of great importance. However, in each of these radiation fields, there exists a steep dose-rate gradient which makes it very difficult to perform accurate dose measurements. In this work, the physics phenomena involved in the energy absorption for each of these situations are discussed, and a brief revision of what the Medical Physics community is doing is presented.

  10. Shortwave surface radiation budget network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, B. L.; Kalisch, J.; Macke, A.

    2015-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high spatial density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km x 12 km area) from April to July 2013, to capture the variability in the radiation field at the surface induced by small-scale cloud inhomogeneity. Each of these autonomously operated pyranometer stations was equipped with weather sensors for simultaneous measurements of ambient air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network and the data analysis with initial quality screening procedure we adopted. We also present some exemplary cases consisting of the days with clear, broken cloudy and overcast skies to assess our spatio-temporal observations from the network, and validate their consistency with other collocated radiation measurements available during the HOPE period.

  11. Shortwave surface radiation network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Kalisch, John; Macke, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high-density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km × 12 km area) from April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability of cloud-induced radiation fields at the surface. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network, data processing, quality control, and uncertainty assessment under variable conditions. Some exemplary days with clear, broken cloudy, and overcast skies were explored to assess the spatiotemporal observations from the network along with other collocated radiation and sky imager measurements available during the HOPE period.

  12. Finite dipole model for extreme near-field thermal radiation between a tip and planar SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzembski, Amun; Park, Keunhan

    2017-04-01

    Recent experimental studies have measured the infrared (IR) spectrum of tip-scattered near-field thermal radiation for a SiC substrate and observed up to a 50cm-1 redshift of the surface phonon polariton (SPhP) resonance peak [1,2]. However, the observed spectral redshift cannot be explained by the conventional near-field thermal radiation model based on the point dipole approximation. In the present work, a heated tip is modeled as randomly fluctuating point charges (or fluctuating finite dipoles) aligned along the primary axis of a prolate spheroid, and quasistatic tip-substrate charge interactions are considered to formulate the effective polarizability and self-interaction Green's function. The finite dipole model (FDM), combined with fluctuational electrodynamics, allows the computation of tip-plane thermal radiation in the extreme near-field (i.e., H / R ≲ 1 , where H is the tip-substrate gap distance and R is the tip radius), which cannot be calculated with the point dipole approximation. The FDM provides the underlying physics on the spectral redshift of tip-scattered near-field thermal radiation as observed in experiments. In addition, the SPhP peak in the near-field thermal radiation spectrum may split into two peaks as the gap distance decreases into the extreme near-field regime. This observation suggests that scattering-type spectroscopic measurements may not convey the full spectral features of tip-plane extreme near-field thermal radiation.

  13. Magneto-photon-phonon interaction in a parabolically confined quantum dot in the presence of high magnetic fields and intense terahertz radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Y.; Xu, W.

    2012-07-01

    We present a theoretical study on magneto-photon-phonon interaction in a parabolically confined quantum dot subjected simultaneously to static magnetic field and radiation field. A nonperturbative treatment for electron-photon interaction is proposed by solving analytically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in which the magnetic field and the radiation field are included exactly. We employ the energy-balance equation approach on the basis of the Boltzmann equation to evaluate the energy transfer rate induced by optical transition events. It is found that for relatively low radiation levels, two peaks of the cyclotron resonance (CR) appear at two Kohn's frequencies ω±, and the strength and the width of the CR increase with radiation intensity. The CR at ω+ is more prominent than that at ω-. When the radiation become intense, the splitting of the CR peaks can be observed and the splitting increases with radiation intensity. The physics reasons behind these interesting findings are discussed. This study is pertinent to the application of intense terahertz radiation sources such as free-electron lasers in the investigation into low-dimensional semiconductor systems.

  14. Rapid release of mercury from intertidal sediments exposed to solar radiation: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Canário, João; Vale, Carlos

    2004-07-15

    There is increasing evidence of the primary importance of photochemical reactions and transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere. Although mercury in aquatic sediments is efficiently retained, resuspension and bioturbation in intertidal sediments may expose temporarily anoxic sediments to solar radiation. Field experiments were performed to investigate these processes. Anoxic sediments from two areas in the Tagus estuary with different degrees of Hg contamination (experiments I and II) were homogenized and distributed into two sets of 36 uncovered Petri dishes. The samples were placed on the intertidal sediments and exposed to direct solar radiation and kept under dark (control) for 6-8 h. The decrease rates of acid volatile sulfides (abrupt in the first 3 h) and of pyrite (linear) were the same in sediments under solar radiation and dark. The total Hg concentrations were relatively constant in sediments kept in dark, but decreased from 17.6 to 7.65 and 3.45 to 1.35 nmol g(-1) in experiments I and II, respectively. In those exposed to solar radiation during the period of higher UV intensity. Similar evolutions were found in nonreactive Hg in pore waters (3.00-2.59 and 0.725-0.105 nM). On the contrary, reactive Hg was higher in pore waters of the sediments exposed to solar radiation and increased with time, from 424 to 845 pM and 53 to 193 pM. These results indicate that most mercury released in pore waters was photochemically reduced in a short period of time and escaped rapidly to the atmosphere. Episodes of bottom resuspension and bioturbation in the intertidal sediments enhance the transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere.

  15. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time.

  16. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  17. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  18. Fractionated Wide-Field Radiation Therapy Followed by Fractionated Local-Field Irradiation for Treating Widespread Painful Bone Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Wide-field radiation therapy (WFRT) is an effective treatment for widespread bone metastasis. We evaluated local-field irradiation (LFI) after fractionated WFRT (f-WFRT) for treating the patients with multiple painful bone lesions. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2007, 32 patients with multiple bone metastases were treated with fractionated LFI (f-LFI) after f-WFRT. All patients initially received 15 Gy in 5 fractions to a wide field, followed by LFI (9-15 Gy in 3 Gy fractions). Response was assessed by evaluating the degree of pain relief using a visual analog scale before radiotherapy, after f-WFRT, and after f-LFI. Results: Fractionated LFI following f-WFRT yielded an overall relief rate of 93.8% and a complete relief rate of 43.8%. The rate of the appearance of new disease was 6.3% for the patients with complete relief, 20.5% for the patients with a partial relief, and 50% for the patients with no relief. Conclusion: Fractionated LFI after f-WFRT is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for multiple metastatic bone disease.

  19. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  20. Assessment of magnetic field interactions and radiofrequency-radiation-induced heating of metallic spinal implants in 7 T field.

    PubMed

    Tsukimura, Itsuko; Murakami, Hideki; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Hirooki; Yamabe, Daisuke; Oikawa, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru

    2016-10-21

    The safety of metallic spinal implants in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using ultrahigh fields has not been established. Hence, we examined whether the displacement forces caused by a static magnetic field and the heating induced by radiofrequency radiation are substantial for spinal implants in a 7 T field. We investigated spinal rods of various lengths and materials, a screw, and a cross-linking bridge in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The displacement forces of the metallic implants in static 7 T and 3 T static magnetic fields were measured and compared. The temperature changes of the implants during 15-min-long fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo image acquisition sequences were measured in the 7 T field. The deflection angles of the metallic spinal materials in the 7 T field were 5.0-21.0° [median: 6.7°], significantly larger than those in the 3 T field (1.0-6.3° [2.2°]). Among the metallic rods, the cobalt-chrome rods had significantly larger deflection angles (17.8-21.0° [19.8°]) than the pure titanium and titanium alloy rods (5.0-7.7° [6.2°]). The temperature changes of the implants, including the cross-linked rods, were 0.7-1.0°C [0.8°C] and 0.6-1.0°C [0.7°C] during the fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo sequences, respectively; these changes were slightly larger than those of the controls (0.4-1.1°C [0.5°C] and 0.3-0.9°C [0.6°C], respectively). All of the metallic spinal implants exhibited small displacement forces and minimal heating, indicating that MRI examinations using 7 T fields may be performed safely on patients with these implants. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  1. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  2. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  3. Radiation Therapy Field Extent for Adjuvant Treatment of Axillary Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Ballo, Matthew T.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Ross, Merrick I.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment-related outcomes and toxicity for patients with axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to either the axilla only or both the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (extended field [EF]). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 200 consecutive patients treated with postoperative RT for axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received postoperative hypofractionated RT for high-risk features; 95 patients (48%) received RT to the axilla only and 105 patients (52%) to the EF. Results: At a median follow-up of 59 months, 111 patients (56%) had sustained relapse, and 99 patients (50%) had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 51%, 43%, and 46%, respectively. The 5-year axillary control rate was 88%. There was no difference in axillary control rates on the basis of the treated field (89% for axilla only vs. 86% for EF; p = 0.4). Forty-seven patients (24%) developed treatment-related complications. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, only treatment with EF irradiation was significantly associated with increased treatment-related complications. Conclusions: Adjuvant hypofractionated RT to the axilla only for metastatic malignant melanoma with high-risk features is an effective method to control axillary disease. Limiting the radiation field to the axilla only produced equivalent axillary control rates to EF and resulted in lower treatment-related complication rates.

  4. Near-field sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Gaffney, James; Kingan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The development of a distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is reported. The key objective is to examine a canonical problem: how to predict the pressure field due to a distributed source located near an infinite, rigid cylinder. This canonical problem is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where the distributed source is based on the pressure pattern generated by a spinning duct mode, and the rigid cylinder represents an aircraft fuselage. The radiation of fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes. In this analysis, based on duct modes, theoretical expressions for the near-field acoustic pressures on the cylinder, or at the same locations without the cylinder, have been formulated. Simulations of the near-field acoustic pressures are compared against measurements obtained from a fan rig test. Also, the installation effect is quantified by calculating the difference in the sound pressure levels with and without the adjacent cylindrical fuselage. Results are shown for the blade passing frequency fan tone radiated at a supersonic fan operating condition.

  5. Analysis and design of photobioreactors for microalgae production I: method and parameters for radiation field simulation.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Josué Miguel; Niizawa, Ignacio; Botta, Fausto Adrián; Trombert, Alejandro Raúl; Irazoqui, Horacio Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Having capabilities for the simulation of the radiation field in suspensions of microalgae constitutes a great asset for the analysis, optimization and scaling-up of photobioreactors. In this study, a combined experimental and computational procedure is presented, specifically devised for the assessment of the coefficients of absorption and scattering, needed for the simulation of such fields. The experimental procedure consists in measuring the radiant energy transmitted through samples of suspensions of microalgae of different biomass concentrations, as well as the forward and backward scattered light. At a microscopic level, suspensions of microalgae are complex heterogeneous media and due to this complexity, in this study they are modeled as a pseudocontinuum, with centers of absorption and scattering randomly distributed throughout its volume. This model was tested on suspensions of two algal species of dissimilar cell shapes: Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus quadricauda. The Monte Carlo simulation algorithm developed in this study, when used as a supporting subroutine of a main optimization program based on a genetic algorithm, permits the assessment of the physical parameters of the radiation field model. The Monte Carlo algorithm simulates the experiments, reproducing the events that photons can undergo while they propagate through culture samples or at its physical boundaries.

  6. The analysis of complex mixed-radiation fields using near real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan; Mellor, Matthew P; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2014-10-01

    A new mixed-field imaging system has been constructed at Lancaster University using the principles of collimation and back projection to passively locate and assess sources of neutron and gamma-ray radiation. The system was set up at the University of Manchester where three radiation sources: (252)Cf, a lead-shielded (241)Am/Be and a (22)Na source were imaged. Real-time discrimination was used to find the respective components of the neutron and gamma-ray fields detected by a single EJ-301 liquid scintillator, allowing separate images of neutron and gamma-ray emitters to be formed. (252)Cf and (22)Na were successfully observed and located in the gamma-ray image; however, the (241)Am/Be was not seen owing to surrounding lead shielding. The (252)Cf and (241)Am/Be neutron sources were seen clearly in the neutron image, demonstrating the advantage of this mixed-field technique over a gamma-ray-only image where the (241)Am/Be source would have gone undetected.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Coherent phase control of excitation of atoms by bichromatic laser radiation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, Valerii A.

    2005-06-01

    A new method for coherent phase control of excitation of atoms in a discrete spectrum under the action of bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1:2 is analysed. An important feature of this control method is the presence of a electrostatic field, which removes the parity selection rule for one of the control channels. It is shown that for the phase difference between the monochromatic radiation components, corresponding to the destructive interference between channels, there exists the electrostatic field strength at which the excited atomic transition is 'bleached'. It is proposed to use luminescence at the adjacent atomic transition for detecting the phase dependence of optical excitation.

  8. Modeling the response of thermoluminescence detectors exposed to low- and high-LET radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Olko, Pawel; Bilski, Pawel; Budzanowski, Maciej; Waligórski, Michael Patrick Russell; Reitz, Guenther

    2002-12-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, with different Li composition (Li-6 and Li-7) and various activators (LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P), are widely used for dosimetry in space. The primary radiation field in space is composed of fast electrons, protons and heavy charged particles (HCP). By its interaction with the structures of the spacecraft, this field may be modified inside the crew cabin. Therefore, calibration of TL detectors against a dose of gamma-rays is not sufficient for relating the TL readout to absorbed dose or to quantities relevant in radiation protection, without suitable correction. We introduce and calculate the detection efficiency, eta, relative to gamma-ray dose, of lithium fluoride detectors after proton and heavy charged particle (HCP) irradiation. We calculate eta for MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and for MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) using microdosimetric models. The microdosimetric distributions used in these models (for HCP of charges between Z=1 to Z=8 and in the energy range between 0.3 MeV/amu and 20 MeV/amu) are calculated using an analytical model, based on the results of Monte Carlo simulated charged particle tracks using the MOCA-14 code. The ratio etaMCP-N/etaMTS-N for protons of stopping power (in water) below 10 keV/microm lies in the range between 0.65 and 1.0 and for HCP with Z>1--between 0.3 and 0.6. The stopping power of the particle is found not to be a unique parameter to scale the response of TL detectors. The combination of response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors can be more suitable for a dose correction in space radiation fields.

  9. Application of the planar-scanning technique to the near-field dosimetry of millimeter-wave radiators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianxun; Lu, Hongmin; Deng, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The planar-scanning technique was applied to the experimental measurement of the electric field and power flux density (PFD) in the exposure area close to the millimeter-wave (MMW) radiator. In the near-field region, the field and PFD were calculated from the plane-wave spectrum of the field sampled on a scan plane far from the radiator. The measurement resolution was improved by reducing the spatial interval between the field samples to a fraction of half the wavelength and implementing multiple iterations of the fast Fourier transform. With the reference to the results from the numerical calculation, an experimental evaluation of the planar-scanning measurement was made for a 50 GHz radiator. Placing the probe 1 to 3 wavelengths from the aperture of the radiator, the direct measurement gave the near-field data with significant differences from the numerical results. The planar-scanning measurement placed the probe 9 wavelengths away from the aperture and effectively reduced the maximum and averaged differences in the near-field data by 70.6% and 65.5%, respectively. Applied to the dosimetry of an open-ended waveguide and a choke ring antenna for 60 GHz exposure, the technique proved useful to the measurement of the PFD in the near-field exposure area of MMW radiators.

  10. Radiation reaction dynamics in an electromagnetic wave and constant electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlee Jackson, E.

    1984-05-01

    The relativistic motion of a charged particle is studied when it is acted on simultaneously by a constant electric field and a plane electromagnetic wave, propagating in the direction of the electric field (x axis). The dynamics includes the radiation reaction (self-force) on the particle through a standard approximation of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. The interest is to determine the result of the competition between the average acceleration due to the electromagnetic wave (``radiation pressure'') and the acceleration due to the constant force of the static field. Each of these actions alone of course produce an unbounded particle energy asymptotically in time. However, it is proved first that, when the ``forces'' are in opposite directions, the particle can never accelerate (on the average) indefinitely in the x direction, regardless how weak the electric field (E0) is compared to the amplitude of the wave (A). It is then proved that all solutions converge to a region of zero area in a suitable velocity phase space and, if there exists a periodic solution [in the phase ξ=ω (t-x/c)] in a specified region of this phase space, then all solutions must converge to this solution asymptotically (ξ→+∞). In the case when (E0A2/ω2) has a specified bound (ω: wave frequency), an iterative method is developed which explicitly yields such a periodic solution, showing that the energy remains bounded. The direction of the average drift is determined in terms of (A,E0,ω). When the parameter (E0A2/ω2) is above this bound, a combination of numerical and analytic results are obtained which indicate that this periodic solution persists. These results indicate that all motions tend to states with bounded energy, regardless of the field strengths.

  11. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  12. Dynamic characteristics of far-field radiation of current modulated phase-locked diode laser arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. A.; Hartnett, K.

    1987-01-01

    A versatile and powerful streak camera/frame grabber system for studying the evolution of the near and far field radiation patterns of diode lasers was assembled and tested. Software needed to analyze and display the data acquired with the steak camera/frame grabber system was written and the total package used to record and perform preliminary analyses on the behavior of two types of laser, a ten emitter gain guided array and a flared waveguide Y-coupled array. Examples of the information which can be gathered with this system are presented.

  13. Radiation of electromagnetic waves by a dipole in an external uniform electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaenkov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    Exact solution for the electromagnetic field densities E and H of a dipole of uniformly accelerated point-charges with identical masses is discussed. It is shown that, for any fixed time t and a large distance R between the center of the dipole and the fieldpoint, | E| R -4, | H| R -5, while for large c| t| R, | E| | H| 1/ R as in spherical electromagnetic waves. Nevertheless, any irreversible radiation of electromagnetic waves is absent since the wave zone does not exist.

  14. Photoinduced processes in solid polymer solutions of dyes in an interference field of laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sizykh, A G; Tarakanova, E A

    1998-12-31

    An investigation was made of the relationships governing the photochemical mechanism of formation of light-induced gratings in solid polymer solutions of a dye with a high quantum yield of the triplet states. The combined analysis of the results of real and numerical experiments was made for a solution of eosin K in gelatin. The protonation rate constant of the dye was measured and the dependence of the diffraction efficiency on the duration of irradiation was explained taking diffusion of the dye into account. A method was proposed for determination of the duffusion coefficient in a spatially modified interference field of the laser radiation. The diffusion coefficients were found. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  15. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  16. On radiation forces acting on a transparent nanoparticle in the field of a focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Afanas'ev, A A; Rubinov, A N; Gaida, L S; Guzatov, D V; Svistun, A Ch

    2015-10-31

    Radiation forces acting on a transparent spherical nanoparticle in the field of a focused Gaussian laser beam are studied theoretically in the Rayleigh scattering regime. Expressions are derived for the scattering force and Cartesian components of the gradient force. The resultant force acting on a nanoparticle located in the centre of a laser beam is found. The parameters of the focused beam and optical properties of the nanoparticle for which the longitudinal component of the gradient force exceeds the scattering force are determined. Characteristics of the transverse gradient force are discussed. (nanophotonics)

  17. Effective field theory for large logarithms in radiative corrections to electron proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Radiative corrections to elastic electron proton scattering are analyzed in effective field theory. A new factorization formula identifies all sources of large logarithms in the limit of large momentum transfer, Q2≫me2. Explicit matching calculations are performed through two-loop order. A renormalization analysis in soft-collinear effective theory is performed to systematically compute and resum large logarithms. Implications for the extraction of charge radii and other observables from scattering data are discussed. The formalism may be applied to other lepton-nucleon scattering and e+e- annihilation processes.

  18. Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields in convective regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoCong; Liu, YiMin; Bao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields are explored with the aid of a cloud-resolving model (CRM), which provided cloud geometry as well as cloud micro and macro properties. Large-scale forcing data to drive the CRM are from TRMM Kwajalein Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Research Program's Atlantic Tropical Experiment field campaigns during which abundant convective systems were observed. The investigated overlap assumptions include those that were traditional and widely used in the past and the one that was recently addressed by Hogan and Illingworth (2000), in which the vertically projected cloud fraction is expressed by a linear combination of maximum and random overlap, with the weighting coefficient depending on the so-called decorrelation length Lcf. Results show that both shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcings (SWCF/LWCF) are significantly underestimated under maximum (MO) and maximum-random (MRO) overlap assumptions, whereas remarkably overestimated under the random overlap (RO) assumption in comparison with that using CRM inherent cloud geometry. These biases can reach as high as 100 Wm- 2 for SWCF and 60 Wm- 2 for LWCF. By its very nature, the general overlap (GenO) assumption exhibits an encouraging performance on both SWCF and LWCF simulations, with the biases almost reduced by 3-fold compared with traditional overlap assumptions. The superiority of GenO assumption is also manifested in the simulation of shortwave and longwave radiative heating fields, which are either significantly overestimated or underestimated under traditional overlap assumptions. The study also pointed out the deficiency of constant assumption on Lcf in GenO assumption. Further examinations indicate that the CRM diagnostic Lcf varies among different cloud types and tends to be stratified in the vertical. The new parameterization that takes into account variation of Lcf in the vertical well reproduces such a relationship and

  19. Experimental observation of further frequency upshift from dc to ac radiation converter with perpendicular dc magnetic field

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi; Yugami; Gao; Niiyama; Sasaki; Takahashi; Ito; Nishida

    2000-11-20

    A frequency upshift of a short microwave pulse is generated by the interaction between a relativistic underdense ionization front and a periodic electrostatic field with a perpendicular dc magnetic field. When the dc magnetic field is applied, further frequency upshift of 3 GHz is observed with respect to an unmagnetized case which has typically a GHz range. The radiation frequency depends on both the plasma density and the strength of the dc magnetic field, i.e., the plasma frequency and the cyclotron frequency. The frequency of the emitted radiation is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical values.

  20. Nonlinear polarization response of a gaseous medium in the regime of atom stabilization in a strong radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    The nonlinear polarization response of a quantum system modeling a silver atom in the field of high-intensity radiation in the IR and UV spectral ranges has been studied by direct numerical integration of a nonstationary Schrödinger equation. The domains of applicability of perturbation theory and polarization expansion in powers of the field intensity are determined. The contribution of excited atoms and electrons in a continuum to the atomic polarization response at the field frequency, which arises due to the radiation-induced excitation and photoionization processes, is analyzed. Features of the nonlinear response to an external field under conditions of atom stabilization are considered.

  1. The limitations of using vertical cutoff rigidities determined from the IGRF magnetic field models for computing aircraft radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    Vertical cutoff rigidities derived from the International Geomagnetic Reference Fields (IGRF) are normally used to compute the radiation dose at a specific location and to organize the radiation dose measurements acquired at aircraft altitudes. This paper presents some of the usually ignored limits on the accuracy of the vertical cutoff rigidity models and describes some of the computational artifacts present in these models. It is noted that recent aircraft surveys of the radiation dose experienced along specific flight paths is sufficiently precise that the secular variation of the geomagnetic field is observable.

  2. Generation of 1.5-kW, 1-THz coherent radiation from a gyrotron with a pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Glyavin, M Yu; Luchinin, A G; Golubiatnikov, G Yu

    2008-01-11

    To cover a so-called terahertz gap in available sources of coherent electromagnetic radiation, the gyrotron with a pulsed solenoid producing up to a 40 T magnetic field has been designed, manufactured, and tested. At a 38.5 T magnetic field, the gyrotron generated coherent radiation at 1.022 THz frequency in 50 musec pulses. The microwave power and energy per pulse were about 1.5 kW and 75 mJ, respectively. Details of the gyrotron design, manufacturing, operation and measurements of output radiation are given.

  3. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: Measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Reynaldo, S R; Benavente, J A; Da Silva, T A

    2016-11-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (BSS 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, the reliability of the CDTN BSS2 system was verified through measurements in the (90)Sr/(90)Y and (85)Kr beta radiation fields. Absorbed dose rates and their angular variation were measured with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. The feasibility of using both methods was analyzed.

  4. Predicting age of ovarian failure after radiation to a field that includes the ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W. Hamish B. . E-mail: Hamish.Wallace@ed.ac.uk; Thomson, Angela B.; Saran, Frank; Kelsey, Tom W.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To predict the age at which ovarian failure is likely to develop after radiation to a field that includes the ovary in women treated for cancer. Methods and Materials: Modern computed tomography radiotherapy planning allows determination of the effective dose of radiation received by the ovaries. Together with our recent assessment of the radiosensitivity of the human oocyte, the effective surviving fraction of primordial oocytes can be determined and the age of ovarian failure, with 95% confidence limits, predicted for any given dose of radiotherapy. Results: The effective sterilizing dose (ESD: dose of fractionated radiotherapy [Gy] at which premature ovarian failure occurs immediately after treatment in 97.5% of patients) decreases with increasing age at treatment. ESD at birth is 20.3 Gy; at 10 years 18.4 Gy, at 20 years 16.5 Gy, and at 30 years 14.3 Gy. We have calculated 95% confidence limits for age at premature ovarian failure for estimated radiation doses to the ovary from 1 Gy to the ESD from birth to 50 years. Conclusions: We report the first model to reliably predict the age of ovarian failure after treatment with a known dose of radiotherapy. Clinical application of this model will enable physicians to counsel women on their reproductive potential following successful treatment.

  5. Casimir Friction and Near-field Radiative Heat Transfer in Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO2 substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO2 substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO2 substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO2 substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  6. Field reversal effects on divertor plasmas under radiative and detached conditions in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, N.; Hosogane, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Itami, K.; Shimizu, K.; Shimada, M.

    1996-06-01

    Reversal effects of the toroidal field Bt on the principal divertor plasma parameters were investigated under radiative and detached divertor conditions in L mode discharges. The ion flux to the inboard separatrix strike point decreased before a MARFE occurred, irrespective of the ion Del B drift direction. The local electron temperature, Te, div, decreased to around 10 eV. The maximum fraction of power radiated in the divertor was comparable between the two directions of Bt. With the power flowing into the two divertor fans being slightly larger on the outboard than on the inboard, a nearly symmetric in-out heat load was observed for the ion Del B drift away from the target. This was due to the outboard enhanced asymmetries in the particle flux and radiation loss distributions. From the viewpoint of in-out symmetry in the target heat load and Te, div, operation with the ion Del B drift away from the target plate is desirable as long as the attached divertor condition is maintained. On the contrary, during the MARFE, although deterioration of the energy confinement as well as the increase in the fuelling efficiency were comparable, for the ion Del B drift towards the target the plasma did not detach completely, and the strong in-out asymmetry in the particle recycling was relaxed to a relatively symmetric distribution. From the viewpoint of particle exhaust to the divertor, operation with the ion Del B drift towards the target is favourable

  7. Aerosol Spectral Radiative Forcing Efficiency from Airborne Measurements During Multiple Field Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Leblanc, S. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance in conjunction with measurements of aerosol optical depth are used to determine the direct aerosol radiative forcing for various different regions and missions. To better compare cases with different air masses and solar geometry, we use the concept of top-of-layer and bottom-of-layer relative forcing efficiency. The aerosol layers were sampled from aircraft during several field campaigns, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO, Mexico, 2006); the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS, Alaska and Alberta, 2008), Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex, California, 2010); and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3, central US, 2012). We show that the spectral shape of the relative forcing efficiency is similar for these aerosol layers regardless of the aerosol type. The spectral relative forcing efficiency at any one wavelength for the majority of the cases is constrained within a span of 20% per unit of midvisible aerosol optical depth. Single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo are secondary products for the various methods used to determine aerosol radiative forcing. Using these, we determine the diurnally averaged spectral and broadband top-of-atmosphere and surface radiative forcing efficiency for the various different aerosol types and surface conditions.

  8. Preliminary science results of Voyager 1 Saturn encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bane, D.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary science results of the Voyager 1 encounter of the planet Saturn are reported. On August 22, 1980, the spacecraft was 109 million km (68 million mi) from Saturn. Closest approach to Saturn took place on November 12, at 3:46 p.m. (PDT), when the spacecraft passed 126,000 km (78,000 mi) from the cloud tops. Measurements of the atmosphere, wind speed, radiation, six surrounding rings, and the planet's old and newly found satellites were recorded. The encounter ended December 15, 1980. The spacecraft took more than 17,500 photographs of Saturn and its satellites.

  9. Distributional and regularized radiation fields of non-uniformly moving straight dislocations, and elastodynamic Tamm problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick

    2016-11-01

    This work introduces original explicit solutions for the elastic fields radiated by non-uniformly moving, straight, screw or edge dislocations in an isotropic medium, in the form of time-integral representations in which acceleration-dependent contributions are explicitly separated out. These solutions are obtained by applying an isotropic regularization procedure to distributional expressions of the elastodynamic fields built on the Green tensor of the Navier equation. The obtained regularized field expressions are singularity-free, and depend on the dislocation density rather than on the plastic eigenstrain. They cover non-uniform motion at arbitrary speeds, including faster-than-wave ones. A numerical method of computation is discussed, that rests on discretizing motion along an arbitrary path in the plane transverse to the dislocation, into a succession of time intervals of constant velocity vector over which time-integrated contributions can be obtained in closed form. As a simple illustration, it is applied to the elastodynamic equivalent of the Tamm problem, where fields induced by a dislocation accelerated from rest beyond the longitudinal wave speed, and thereafter put to rest again, are computed. As expected, the proposed expressions produce Mach cones, the dynamic build-up and decay of which is illustrated by means of full-field calculations.

  10. Radiation dose to the lymph drainage area in esophageal cancer with involved-field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenbin; Gao, Hongmei; Zhu, Shuchai; Li, Youmei; Li, Juan; Liu, Zhikun; Su, Jinwei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the radiation dose to the corresponding lymph drainage area in esophageal cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with involvED-field IRradiation (IFI) and to analyze associated factors. A retrospective analysis oF 81 patients with esophageal cancer was conducted. According to the location of the lesions, the lymph drainage area was delineated and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. The 1-, 3-, 5- and 8-year survival rates of the patients were 67.90, 33.33, 20.99 and 11.11%, respectively. Based on the dose-volume histogram in the treatment plan, we calculated the volume percentage of the planning target volume including clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV-N) receiving radiation doses of 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 Gy (VPTV-N30-50). The median values of VPTV-N30-50 were 73, 70, 67, 64 and 58%, respectively. The prescribed dose size exhibited no correlation with VPTV-N30-35, but did exhibit a significant correlation with VPTV-N40-50; the radiation field was not correlated with VPTV-N30-45, but exhibited a significant correlation with VPTV-N50; The length of the lesion on esophageal barium meal X-ray and the PTV were significantly correlated with VPTV-N30-50. The analysis of variance revealed that the VPTV-NX value in the upper thoracic segment was higher compared with that in the middle and lower thoracic segments; VPTV-N30-35 values differed significantly according to the different locations of the lesions, whereas VPTV-N40-50 values exhibited no significant differences. The value of VPTV-NX exerted no significant effect on long-term patient survival. Therefore, the corresponding lymph drainage area of esophageal cancer IS subjected to a certain Radiation dose when patients undergo 3D-CRT with IFI, which may play a role in the prevention of regional nodal metastasis. However, this hypothesis requires confirmation by further clinical studies.

  11. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  12. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Chtcheprov, Pavel E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu; Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only during a

  13. Numerical Simulation of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The numerical results show severe turbulence of similar scale and intensity to that encountered during the test flight. This turbulence is associated with buoyant plumes that penetrate the upper-level thunderstorm outflow. The simulated radar reflectivity compares well with that obtained from the aircraft's onboard radar. Resolved scales of motion as small as 50 m are needed in order to accurately diagnose aircraft normal load accelerations. Given this requirement, realistic turbulence fields may be created by merging subgrid-scales of turbulence to a convective-cloud simulation. A hazard algorithm for use with model data sets is demonstrated. The algorithm diagnoses the RMS normal loads from second moments of the vertical velocity field and is independent of aircraft motion.

  14. On the radiation force fields of fractional-order acoustic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-04-01

    Here we report the creation and observation of acoustic vortices of fractional order. Whilst integer orders are known to produce axisymmetric acoustic fields, fractional orders are shown to break this symmetry and produce a vast array of unexplored field patterns, typically exhibiting multiple closely spaced phase singularities. Here, fractional acoustic vortices are created by emitting ultrasonic waves from an annular array of sources using multiple ramps of phase delay around its circumference. Acoustic radiation force patterns, including multiple concentration points, short straight lines, triangles, squares and discontinuous circles are simulated and experimentally observed. The fractional acoustic vortex leading to two closely spaced phase singularities is used to trap, and by controlling the order, reversibly manipulate two microparticles to a proximity of 0.3 acoustic wavelengths.

  15. A novel coaxial Ku-band transit radiation oscillator without external guiding magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Junpu; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao; Jiang, Tao

    2014-02-01

    A novel coaxial transit radiation oscillator without external guiding magnetic field is designed to generate high power microwave at Ku-band. By using a coaxial structure, the space-charge potential energy is suppressed significantly, that is good for enhancing efficient beam-wave interaction. In order to improve the transmission stability of the unmagnetized intense relativistic electron beam, a Pierce-like cathode is employed in the novel device. By contrast with conventional relativistic microwave generators, this kind of device has the advantages of high stability, non-guiding magnetic field, and high efficiency. Moreover, with the coaxial design, it is possible to improve the power-handing capacity by increasing the radial dimension of the Ku-band device. With a 550 keV and 7.5 kA electron beam, a 1.25 GW microwave pulse at 12.08 GHz has been obtained in the simulation. The power conversion efficiency is about 30%.

  16. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials coated with silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Soumyadipta Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-19

    In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC. By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial, it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonances for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

  17. Mirror effect induced by the dilaton field on the Hawking radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kengo; Okamura, Takashi

    2006-11-03

    A ''stringy particle'' action is naturally derived from Kaluza-Klein compactification of a test string action coupled to the dilaton field in a conformally invariant manner. According to the standard procedure, we perform the second quantization of the stringy particle. As an interesting application, we consider evaporation of a near-extremal dilatonic black hole by Hawking radiation via the stringy particles. We show that a mirror surface which reflects them is induced by the dilaton field outside the the horizon when the size of the black hole is comparable to the Planck scale. As a result, the energy flux does not propagate across the surface, and hence the evaporation of the dilatonic black hole stops just before the naked singularity at the extremal state appears even though the surface gravity is non-zero in the extremal limit.

  18. Enhancement of threshold electric field for relativistic runaway electrons due to magnetic fluctuation and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shucai; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhongyong; Huang, Duwei; Tong, Ruihai

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of relativistic electrons are analyzed using the relativistic Fokker-Planck equation including deceleration due to synchrotron radiation (SR) and radial diffusion loss caused by magnetic fluctuation (MF). Threshold electric field for avalanche growth is enhanced, and the growth rate is reduced by the combined effect of MF and SR as compared to the case with only SR. The threshold electric field is determined by the time scales balance between momentum evolution and radial diffusion loss induced by MF, and increased with level of MF. More importantly, the hysteresis behavior of runaway pointed out by does not exist anymore. This is because the ``seed electrons'' cannot be sustained as a result of diffusion loss. This work was supported by NSFC Grant No. 11305071, and the Ministry of Science and technology of China, under Contract Nos. 2013GB112002, 2015GB111002 and 2015GB111001.

  19. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studying the carcinogenicity of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields and radiation].

    PubMed

    Voĭchuk, S I

    2014-01-01

    Medical and biological aspects of the effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic (EM) fields and radiation on human health are the important issues that have arisen as a result of anthropogenic impact on the biosphere. Safe use of man-made sources of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields and radiation in a broad range of frequencies--static, radio-frequency and microwave--is a subject of discussions and speculations. The main problem is the lack of understanding of the mechanism(s) of reception of EMFs by living organisms. In this review we have analyzed the existing literature data regarding the effects of the electromagnetic radiation on the model eukaryotic organism--yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An attempt was made to estimate the probability of induction of carcinogenesis in humans under the influence of magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation of extremely low frequency, radio frequency and microwave ranges.

  20. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Brett D. Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-15

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., “sub-Larmor scales.” Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  1. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett D.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., "sub-Larmor scales." Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  2. Estimation of synchrotron radiation and limiting energy of high-energy runaway electrons in tokamak stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, J.R.; Sanchez, R.

    2006-01-15

    The increase of synchrotron radiation power emitted by relativistic electrons moving across stochastic magnetic fields in tokamak geometry has been investigated. It will be shown that the guiding-center motion along the magnetic-field lines leads to an enhancement of the electron radiation which, in case of strong turbulence, can dominate the whole radiation process. A threshold stochastic magnetic fluctuation level, b-tilde>({delta}{sub perpendicular}/R){sup 1/2} ({delta}{sub perpendicular} is the perpendicular correlation length of the magnetic-field fluctuations), has been found for turbulence-dominated radiation. The implications that these results can have when estimating the final energy that runaway electron beams confined in tokamaks can reach are also discussed.

  3. Electron-positron pair production from vacuum in the field of high-intensity laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. S.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhnyi, N. B.; Popruzhenko, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The works dealing with the theory of e + e - pair production from vacuum under the action of highintensity laser radiation are reviewed. The following problems are discussed: pair production in a constant electric field E and time-variable homogeneous field E( t); the dependence of the number of produced pairs {N_{{e^ + }{e^ - }}} on the shape of a laser pulse (dynamic Schwinger effect); and a realistic three-dimensional model of a focused laser pulse, which is based on exact solution of Maxwell's equations and contains parameters such as focal spot radius R, diffraction length L, focusing parameter Δ, pulse duration τ, and pulse shape. This model is used to calculate {N_{{e^ + }{e^ - }}} for both a single laser pulse ( n = 1) and several ( n ≥ 2) coherent pulses with a fixed total energy that simultaneously "collide" in a laser focus. It is shown that, at n ≫ 1, the number of pairs increases by several orders of magnitude as compared to the case of a single pulse. The screening of a laser field by the vapors that are generated in vacuum, its "depletion," and the limiting fields to be achieved in laser experiments are considered. The relation between pair production, the problem of a quantum frequency-variable oscillator, and the theory of groups SU(1, 1) and SU(2) is discussed. The relativistic version of the imaginary time method is used in calculations. In terms of this version, a relativistic theory of tunneling is developed and the Keldysh theory is generalized to the case of ionization of relativistic bound systems, namely, atoms and ions. The ionization rate of a hydrogen-like ion with a charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 92 is calculated as a function of laser radiation intensity ( F and ellipticity ρ.

  4. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  5. On the gravitational field of a radiating, isothermal perfect gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a static isotropic self-gravitating perfect gas in the presence of thermal radiation. The gravitational field is specified in terms of the radiation and gas pressures. Assuming that the thermodynamic internal energy is small compared with relativistic rest energy, it is shown that the gas pressure satisfies the Lane-Emden equation; the assumption of dominant intrinsic relativistic rest energy is satisfied by the hottest stars. Six-solutions of the Lane-Enden equation are obtained together with the corresponding gravitational fields. The basis for comparison is the singular solution I decaying like the inverse square of the radius, that is the leading term of the asymptotic solution V. Two semi-linear solutions are obtained using as variables nonlinear functions of the gas pressure, leading to nonlinear second-order differential equations that can be linearized; one solution II holds for small radius and leads to zero, finite or infinite central pressure, and the other solution III holds asymptomatically and exhibits pressure oscillations. The singular solution I for large radius is matched to a power series solution IV for small radius leading to a solution valid for all radii. The asymptotic solutions III and V: (i) coincide in their common domain of validity; (ii) can be truncated with good accuracy leading to the solution VI.

  6. A Systematic Global Mapping of the Radiation Field at Aviation Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Brucker, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents early results from aircraft measurements made by a Low-LET Radiation Spectrometer (LoLRS), as part of a long-range effort to study the complex dynamics of the atmospheric radiation field. For this purpose, a comprehensive data base is being generated to enable a multivariable global mapping (and eventually modeling) of doses and Linear-Energy-Transfer (LET) spectra at aviation altitudes. To accomplish this, a methodical collection of data from the LoLRS (and other instruments), is planned over extended periods of time, in a manner that complements some previous isolated and sporadic measurements by other workers, with the objective to generate a detailed long-range description of the cosmic-ray induced particle environment and to study its variability and dependence on atmospheric thickness, magnetic latitude, L-shell or rigidity, space weather, solar particle events, solar cycle effects, magnetic field variation, diurnal and seasonal effects, and atmospheric weather. Analysis of initial data indicates that the dose is rising with increasing altitude and increasing magnetic latitude. Comparison of total doses with predictions is in good agreement.

  7. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS IN RADIATIVELY COOLED SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Wright, A.

    2015-09-20

    We show that it is possible to measure Alfvénic Mach numbers, defined as the shock velocity in the flow divided by the Alfvén velocity, for low-velocity (V{sub shock} ≲ 100 km s{sup −1}) radiative shocks. The method combines observations of bright forbidden lines with a measure of the size of the cooling zone, the latter typically obtained from spatial separation between the Balmer emission lines and the forbidden lines. Because magnetic fields become compressed as gas in the postshock region cools, even relatively weak preshock magnetic fields can be detected with this method. We derive analytical formulae that explain how the spatial separations relate to emission-line ratios, and compute a large grid of radiatively cooled shock models to develop diagnostic diagrams that can be used to derive Alfvénic Mach numbers in flows. Applying the method to existing data for a bright knot in the HH 111 jet, we obtain a relatively low Alfvénic Mach number of ∼2, indicative of a magnetized jet that has super-magnetosonic velocity perturbations within it.

  8. LiCaAlF6 scintillators in neutron and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Klupák, V.; Vinš, M.; Koleška, M.; Šoltés, J.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, M.

    2016-09-01

    Intentionally doped LiCaAlF6 (LiCAF) single crystals are prospective scintillators, especially for thermal neutron detection through the 6Li(n,t)4He nuclear reaction. Four different LiCAF scintillator samples were tested in various neutron and gamma fields. Two of the tested samples were LiCAF:Eu and LiCAF:Eu,Na single crystals, and another two samples were made of LiCAF:Eu micro crystals dispersed in transparent rubber, with different rubber dimensions. All LiCAF samples contain lithium enriched to6Li. A plutonium-beryllium source was used as a neutron source. The neutron spectrum was modified by moderator and filter to get different ratios between thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The MCNP code was used for calculations of the fluence rates for different configurations. Radionuclides 137Cs and 60Co were applied as gamma radiation sources. The light signal from the scintillator was evaluated with a photomultiplier and a multichannel analyzer. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of LiCAF scintillators, especially the ability to discriminate signals from neutron and gamma radiation, which is the basic scintillator condition for neutron detection in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. Generally, the discrimination can be done by the pulse height and/or the pulse shape of the evaluated signals. Both methods can be used for a LiCAF scintillator. However, only the pulse height discrimination method is discussed in this paper. The possibility of fast neutron detection with LiCAF scintillators was also tested.

  9. Gynogenesis in carp, Cyprinus Carpio L. and tench, Tinca Tinca L. induced by 60Co radiation in highly homogeneous radiating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipota, J.; Linhart, O.

    The paper deals with a method of fertility inactivation of fish spermatozoa by gamma radiation. Spermatozoa motility remained unchanged after irradiation. Irradiated sperm has been utilized to induced gynogenesis by means of retention of the second polar body and of mitotic gynogenesis, realized in carp for the first time. Homogeneity of gamma-rays field was + - 1 %.

  10. Pioneer Saturn Encounter. [Pioneer 11 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Saturn Spacecraft, which began its journey as Pioneer 11, provided the first close view of the rings of Saturn as well as its system of moons. Its payload of 11 operating instruments obtained or confirmed data about the mass, temperature, composition, radiation belts, and atmosphere of the planet and its larger satellite, Titan. It made photometric and polarization measurements of lapetus, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys, as well as discovered additional rings. Scientific highlights of the mission are summarized. Color imagery provided by the photopolarimeter is included along with illustrations of the planet's magnetic field and radiation belts.

  11. Field effects of cadmium contamination in the radiation characteristics of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, B.; Anda, A.

    2012-04-01

    Cadmium is one of the most common toxic heavy metals in our environment. Cadmium is a particularly dangerous element, because it dissolves readily, making it easily available to plants. It is thus able to accumulate in various links in the food chain, finally reaching humans, at the end of the chain. Adverse effects on human body was reported in 1858 at first. If it enters the body, damage to health, cause changes and can also cause cancer. Our study was designated to simulate the effects of cadmium on maize in field conditions, during the 2011 growing season. The impact of cadmium on maize was investigated at the Agro-meteorological Research Station in Keszthely. A Swiss-bred maize hybrid, Sperlona (FAO 340), with a short vegetation period, was sown in the experiments at the plant density (70,000 plants per hectare) widely used under Hungarian climatic conditions for growing grain maize. Effects of cadmium on corn life were studied under two water supplies. Evapotranspirometers of the Thornthwaite type were used for the "ad libitum" treatment and the the rainfed variant was sown in field plots. 0,5 M concentration of cadmium was used, which was sprayed weekly. The aim of the investigation was to simulate impact of atmospheric pollution of traffic origin (low and frequent doses in the field). Plant height was registered weekly similarly to leaf area index (LAI). Albedo was measured by pyranometers of the CMA-11 type (Kipp & Zonen, Vaisala). From this the most important radiative properties were calculated, so the net radiation balance, latent heat, sensible heat and the Bowen ratio. The values of LAI for the cadmium contaminated maize were significantly lower compared to the control maize. The net radiation balance was about the same in both treatments. Cadmium causes the latent heat decreased, while the sensible heat increased compared to the control treatment. The Bowen ratio in the polluted crops was higher, than the cadmium-untreated area. The yield of maize

  12. The radiated fields of focussing air-coupled ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Neild, A; Hutchins, D A; Robertson, T J; Davis, L A J; Billson, D R

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the fields radiated into air by ultrasonic phased arrays under transient excitation. In particular, it includes a theoretical prediction of spatial variations in amplitude throughout the both the near-field and far-field of such arrays. The approach has been used to predict the result of phasing to produce a focus in air, which can be seen to be particularly effective in the near-field of the array. Interesting features are observed, which are then described in terms of the performance of both individual elements and the resulting array. It is shown how some elements of design can be used to improve performance in focussing. The predictions are compared to the results of experiments in air using electrostatic arrays, where good focussing could be achieved provided the appropriate design principles were followed. The approach has been developed specifically for use in air, but the results would also hold for modelling in certain medical arrays where a focussing requirement might be needed close to the array itself.

  13. Near-Field Radiation Between Graphene-Covered Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Richard; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Nanoscale Thermal Radiation Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that at nanometer gap distances, or the near-field, thermal radiation is enhanced over blackbody between hyperbolic metamaterials. It was shown that vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays in the near-field demonstrate exceptional enhancement. In this study, graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite VACNT arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene (μ >= 0.3 eV) is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmons. Increasing doping that shifts the peak spectral heat flux toward higher frequencies attests to the tunable bandgap of graphene. Although graphene covering of VACNT does not offer many magnitudes of near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e. gap distance and doping) that best augments heat transfer to that of VACNT arrays. In addition, this study demonstrates the near-field Poynting vector to determine the energy absorption due to graphene. It is found that graphene, in low frequencies and high chemical potentials, attenuates large penetration depths of hyperbolic modes, thereby increasing the contribution of graphene-graphene surface plasmons. This study has an impact toward designing carbon-based emitters and thermal junctions.

  14. Radiative Processes in Graphene and Similar Nanostructures in Strong Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. P.; Gitman, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Low-energy single-electron dynamics in graphene monolayers and similar nanostructures is described by the Dirac model, being a 2+1 dimensional version of massless QED with the speed of light replaced by the Fermi velocity vF ≃ c/300. Methods of strong-field QFT are relevant for the Dirac model, since any low-frequency electric field requires a nonperturbative treatment of massless carriers in the case it remains unchanged for a sufficiently long time interval. In this case, the effects of creation and annihilation of electron-hole pairs produced from vacuum by a slowly varying and small-gradient electric field are relevant, thereby substantially affecting the radiation pattern. For this reason, the standard QED text-book theory of photon emission cannot be of help. We construct the Fock-space representation of the Dirac model, which takes exact accounts of the effects of vacuum instability caused by external electric fields, and in which the interaction between electrons and photons is taken into account perturbatively, following the general theory (the generalized Furry representation). We consider the effective theory of photon emission in the first-order approximation and construct the corresponding total probabilities, taking into account the unitarity relation.

  15. Generalized reference fields and source interpolation for the difference formulation of radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Thomas; Brooks, Eugene D.; Szőke, Abraham

    2010-03-01

    In the difference formulation for the transport of thermally emitted photons the photon intensity is defined relative to a reference field, the black body at the local material temperature. This choice of reference field combines the separate emission and absorption terms that nearly cancel, thereby removing the dominant cause of noise in the Monte Carlo solution of thick systems, but introduces time and space derivative source terms that cannot be determined until the end of the time step. The space derivative source term can also lead to noise induced crashes under certain conditions where the real physical photon intensity differs strongly from a black body at the local material temperature. In this paper, we consider a difference formulation relative to the material temperature at the beginning of the time step, or in cases where an alternative temperature better describes the radiation field, that temperature. The result is a method where iterative solution of the material energy equation is efficient and noise induced crashes are avoided. We couple our generalized reference field scheme with an ad hoc interpolation of the space derivative source, resulting in an algorithm that produces the correct flux between zones as the physical system approaches the thick limit.

  16. Control of the innermost electron radiation belt by large-scale electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Su, Y.-J.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    Electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer instruments on Van Allen Probes, for kinetic energies ˜100 to 400 keV, show characteristic dynamical features of the innermost (L≲1.3) radiation belt: rapid injections, slow decay, and structured energy spectra. There are also periods of steady or slowly increasing intensity and of fast decay following injections. Local time asymmetry, with higher intensity near dawn, is interpreted as evidence for drift shell distortion by a convection electric field of magnitude ˜0.4 mV/m during geomagnetically quiet times. Fast fluctuations in the electric field, on the drift time scale, cause inward diffusion. Assuming that they are proportional to changes in Kp, the resulting diffusion coefficient is sufficient to replenish trapped electrons lost by atmospheric scattering. Major electric field increases cause injections by inward electron transport. An injection associated with the June 2015 magnetic storm is consistent with an enhanced field magnitude ˜5 mV/m. Subsequent drift echoes cause spectral structure.

  17. Exposures involving perturbations of the EM field have non-linear effects on radiation response and can alter the expression of radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Our recent data suggest there is a physical component to the bystander signal induced by radiation exposure and that alternative medicine techniques such as Reiki and acupuncture or exposures to weak EM fields alter the response of cells to direct irradiation and either altered bystander signal production or altered the response of cells receiving bystander signals. Our proposed mechanism to explain these findings is that perturbation of electromagnetic (EM) fields is central to the induction of low radiation dose responses especially non-targeted bystander effects. In this presentation we review the alternative medicine data and other data sets from our laboratory which test our hypothesis that perturbation of bio-fields will modulate radiation response in the low dose region. The other data sets include exposure to MRI, shielding using lead and or Faraday cages, the use of physical barriers to bystander signal transmission and the use of membrane channel blockers. The data taken together strongly suggest that EM field perturbation can modulate low dose response and that in fact the EM field rather than the targeted deposition of ionizing energy in the DNA may be the key determinant of dose response in a cell or organism The results also lead us to suspect that at least when chemical transmission is blocked, bystander signals can be transmitted by other means. Our recent experiments suggest light signals and volatiles are not likely. We conclude that alternative medicine and other techniques involving electromagnetic perturbations can modify the response of cells to low doses of ionizing radiation and can induce bystander effects similar to those seen in medium transfer experiments. In addition to the obvious implications for mechanistic studies of low dose effects, this could perhaps provide a novel target to exploit in space radiation protection and in optimizing therapeutic gain during radiotherapy.

  18. Interaction of carbon dioxide laser radiation with a nanotube array in the presence of a constant electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykov, N. R.; Scorkin, N. A.

    2012-06-15

    The dependence of the current density on the leading edge width of the alternating (high-frequency) field amplitude is studied at various constant (or unsteady) fields. The dependence of amplified microwaves in the two-millimeter range on a longitudinal coordinate is determined. The problem of submillimeter radiation generation in a system of parallel carbon nanotubes exposed to two-frequency carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} laser) laser radiation in the presence of a constant (or unsteady) field is studied. The possibility of using freely oriented carbon nanotubes parallel to each other is shown.

  19. Dosimetry measurements using Timepix in mixed radiation fields induced by heavy ions; comparison with standard dosimetry methods

    PubMed Central

    Ploc, Ondrej; Kubancak, Jan; Sihver, Lembit; Uchihori, Yukio; Jakubek, Jan; Ambrozova, Iva; Molokanov, Alexander; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Objective of our research was to explore capabilities of Timepix for its use as a single dosemeter and LET spectrometer in mixed radiation fields created by heavy ions. We exposed it to radiation field (i) at heavy ion beams at HIMAC, Chiba, Japan, (ii) in the CERN's high-energy reference field (CERF) facility at Geneva, France/Switzerland, (iii) in the exposure room of the proton therapy laboratory at JINR, Dubna, Russia, and (iv) onboard aircraft. We compared the absolute values of dosimetric quantities obtained with Timepix and with other dosemeters and spectrometers like tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) Hawk, silicon detector Liulin, and track-etched detectors (TEDs).

  20. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  1. Acoustic radiation force in tissue-like solids due to modulated sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsov, Egor V.; Guzina, Bojan B.

    2012-10-01

    The focus of this study is the sustained body force (the so-called acoustic radiation force) in homogeneous tissue-like solids generated by an elevated-intensity, focused ultrasound field (Mach number=O(10-3)) in situations when the latter is modulated by a low-frequency signal. This intermediate-asymptotics problem, which bears relevance to a number of emerging biomedical applications, is characterized by a number of small (but non-vanishing) parameters including the Mach number, the ratio between the modulation and ultrasound frequency, the ratio of the shear to bulk modulus, and the dimensionless attenuation coefficient. On approximating the response of soft tissues as that of a nonlinear viscoelastic solid with heat conduction, the featured second-order problem is tackled via a scaling paradigm wherein the transverse coordinates are scaled by the width of the focal region, while the axial and temporal coordinate are each split into a "fast" and "slow" component with the twin aim of: (i) canceling the linear terms from the field equations governing the propagation of elevated-intensity ultrasound, and (ii) accounting for the effect of ultrasound modulation. In the context of the focused ultrasound analyses, the key feature of the proposed study revolves around the dual-time-scale treatment of the temporal variable, which allows one to parse out the contribution of ultrasound and its modulation in the nonlinear solution. In this way the acoustic radiation force (ARF), giving rise to the mean tissue motion, is exacted by computing the "fast" time average of the germane field equations. A comparison with the existing theory reveals a number of key features that are brought to light by the new formulation, including the contributions to the ARF of ultrasound modulation and thermal expansion, as well as the precise role of constitutive nonlinearities in generating the sustained body force in tissue-like solids by a focused ultrasound beam.

  2. Isotope selective photodissociation of N2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heays, Alan N.; Visser, Ruud; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N 15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to ultraviolet radiation originating from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of more complex N-bearing species and may influence their isotopic composition. Aims: We study the photodissociation rates of 14N 15N by ultraviolet continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of these on the isotopic composition of more complex molecules. Methods: High-resolution theoretical photodissociation cross sections of N2 are used from an accurate and comprehensive quantum-mechanical model of the molecule based on laboratory experiments. A similarly high-resolution spectrum of H2 emission following interactions with cosmic rays has been constructed. The spectroscopic data are used to calculate photodissociation rates which are then input into isotopically differentiated chemical models, describing an interstellar cloud and a protoplanetary disc. Results: The photodissociation rate of 14N 15N in a Draine field assuming 30 K excitation is 1.73 × 10-10 s-1, within 4% of the rate for 14N2, and the rate due to cosmic ray induced photons assuming an H2 ionisation rate of ζ = 10-16 s-1 is about 10-15 s-1, with up to a factor of 10 difference between isotopologues. Shielding functions for 14N15N by 14N2, H2, and H are presented. Incorporating these into an interstellar cloud model, an enhancement of the atomic 15N/14N ratio over the elemental value is obtained due to the self-shielding of external radiation at an extinction of about 1.5 mag. This effect is larger where assumed grain growth has reduced the opacity of dust to ultraviolet radiation. The transfer of photolytic isotopic fractionation of N and N2 to other molecules is demonstrated to be significant in a protoplanetary disc model with grain growth, and

  3. Radiation fields of disk, BLR and torus in quasars and blazars: implications for /γ-ray absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donea, Alina-C.; Protheroe, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The radiation fields external to the jets and originating from within a few parsecs from the black hole, are discussed in this paper. They are the direct radiation from an accretion disk in symbiosis with jets, the radiation field from the broad line region (BLR) surrounding the accretion disk, and the infrared radiation from a dusty torus. The jet/disk symbiosis modifies the energetics in the central parsec of active galactic nuclei (AGN) such that for a given accretion rate, a powerful jet would occur at the expense of the disk luminosity, and consequently the disk would less efficiently ionize the BLR clouds or heat the dust in the torus, thereby affecting potentially important target photon fields for interactions of /γ-rays, accelerated electrons and protons along the jet. Motivated by unification schemes of AGN, we briefly review the evidence for the existence of BLRs and small-scale dust tori in BL Lacs and Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR-I) radio galaxies. We propose that an existing jet-accretion disk symbiosis can be extrapolated to provide a large-scale symbiosis between other important dusty constituents of the blazar/FR-I family. In the present paper, we discuss in the context of this symbiosis interactions of GeV and TeV /γ-rays produced in the jet with the various radiation fields external to the jet in quasars and blazars, taking account the anisotropy of the radiation.

  4. COMET ENCOUNTERS AND CARBON 14

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Mordecai, David

    2012-12-20

    The {sup 14}C production of shock-accelerated particles is calculated in terms of the total energy released in energetic particles. The recently reported 1.2% jump in the {sup 14}C content of the atmosphere in the year C.E. 775, it is found, would require {approx}> 10{sup 34} erg in energetic particles, less than first estimates but far more than any known solar flare on record. It is noted that the superflare from a large comet (comparable to C/Hale-Bopp) colliding with the sun could produce shock-accelerated GeV cosmic rays in the solar corona and/or solar wind, and possibly account for the C.E. 775 event. Several additional predictions of cometary encounters with the sun and other stars may be observable in the future.

  5. Increase in nitric oxide and cyclic GMP of rat cerebellum by radio frequency burst-type electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, M; Takayama, K; Okada, J

    1993-01-01

    1. Using rat cerebellum supernatant, the effects of radio frequency (RF) burst-type electromagnetic (EM) field radiation on the production of cyclic GMP were examined under various conditions. The radiation was generated by a generator coil, and set at a 10 MHz radiation frequency, a 50% burst time, a 10 kHz burst rate and a 5 V peak-to-peak generator voltage. 2. When the cerebellum supernatant was incubated with both exogenous L-arginine (nitric oxide (NO) donor) and NADPH, and irradiated by an RF burst-type EM field, the production of cyclic GMP was increased significantly from a level of 21-22 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 to 25-26 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1. By contrast, such an effect was not found when the cerebellum supernatant was irradiated by an RF volley-type EM field. 3. When neither L-arginine nor NADPH were added to the cerebellum supernatant, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 6 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. When the cerebellum supernatant was chelated with EDTA, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 7 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. 4. Incubation with Methylene Blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, lowered the production of cyclic GMP to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1, and the radiation effect did not occur. On incubation with a NO synthase inhibitor, either NG-methyl-L-arginine or N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 or 5-9 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 respectively, and the radiation effect was not observed. 5. Using electrochemical NO probes, the production of NO in the cerebellum supernatant was detected. The concentration of NO increased gradually after the onset of the EM field radiation. The radiation effect persisted, and reached a maximum after the cessation of the radiation. 6. In an in vivo study, the arterioles of the frog web were dilated by the radiation

  6. Technical Note: A Monte Carlo study of magnetic-field-induced radiation dose effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhongxing; Melancon, Adam D.; Guindani, Michele; Followill, David S.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Hazle, John D.; Court, Laurence E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic fields are known to alter radiation dose deposition. Before patients receive treatment using an MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac), preclinical studies are needed to understand the biological consequences of magnetic-field-induced dose effects. In the present study, the authors sought to identify a beam energy and magnetic field strength combination suitable for preclinical murine experiments. Methods: Magnetic field dose effects were simulated in a mouse lung phantom using various beam energies (225 kVp, 350 kVp, 662 keV [Cs-137], 2 MV, and 1.25 MeV [Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75, 1.5, and 3 T). The resulting dose distributions were compared with those in a simulated human lung phantom irradiated with a 6 or 8 MV beam and orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. Results: In the human lung phantom, the authors observed a dose increase of 45% and 54% at the soft-tissue-to-lung interface and a dose decrease of 41% and 48% at the lung-to-soft-tissue interface for the 6 and 8 MV beams, respectively. In the mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no measurable effect on the 225 or 350 kVp dose distribution. The dose increases with the Cs-137 beam for the 0.75, 1.5, and 3 T magnetic fields were 9%, 29%, and 42%, respectively. The dose decreases were 9%, 21%, and 37%. For the 2 MV beam, the dose increases were 16%, 33%, and 31% and the dose decreases were 9%, 19%, and 30%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 19%, 54%, and 44%, and the dose decreases were 19%, 42%, and 40%. Conclusions: The magnetic field dose effects in the mouse phantom using a Cs-137, 3 T combination or a Co-60, 1.5 or 3 T combination most closely resemble those in simulated human treatments with a 6 MV, 1.5 T MRI-Linac. The effects with a Co-60, 1.5 T combination most closely resemble those in simulated human treatments with an 8 MV, 1.5 T MRI-Linac. PMID:26328998

  7. Technical Note: A Monte Carlo study of magnetic-field-induced radiation dose effects in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Ashley E.; Liao, Zhongxing; Melancon, Adam D.; Followill, David S.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Guindani, Michele; Hazle, John D.; Court, Laurence E.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Magnetic fields are known to alter radiation dose deposition. Before patients receive treatment using an MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac), preclinical studies are needed to understand the biological consequences of magnetic-field-induced dose effects. In the present study, the authors sought to identify a beam energy and magnetic field strength combination suitable for preclinical murine experiments. Methods: Magnetic field dose effects were simulated in a mouse lung phantom using various beam energies (225 kVp, 350 kVp, 662 keV [Cs-137], 2 MV, and 1.25 MeV [Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75, 1.5, and 3 T). The resulting dose distributions were compared with those in a simulated human lung phantom irradiated with a 6 or 8 MV beam and orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. Results: In the human lung phantom, the authors observed a dose increase of 45% and 54% at the soft-tissue-to-lung interface and a dose decrease of 41% and 48% at the lung-to-soft-tissue interface for the 6 and 8 MV beams, respectively. In the mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no measurable effect on the 225 or 350 kVp dose distribution. The dose increases with the Cs-137 beam for the 0.75, 1.5, and 3 T magnetic fields were 9%, 29%, and 42%, respectively. The dose decreases were 9%, 21%, and 37%. For the 2 MV beam, the dose increases were 16%, 33%, and 31% and the dose decreases were 9%, 19%, and 30%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 19%, 54%, and 44%, and the dose decreases were 19%, 42%, and 40%. Conclusions: The magnetic field dose effects in the mouse phantom using a Cs-137, 3 T combination or a Co-60, 1.5 or 3 T combination most closely resemble those in simulated human treatments with a 6 MV, 1.5 T MRI-Linac. The effects with a Co-60, 1.5 T combination most closely resemble those in simulated human treatments with an 8 MV, 1.5 T MRI-Linac.

  8. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  9. Dosimetric effects on small-field beam-modeling for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Woong; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Jung-In; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Min-Joo; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Jong Won

    2015-02-01

    The treatment planning of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires high accuracy of dosimetric data for small radiation fields. The dosimetric effects on the beam-modeling process of a treatment planning system (TPS) were investigated using different measured small-field data sets. We performed small-field dosimetry with three detectors: a CC13 ion chamber, a CC01 ion chamber, and an edge detector. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) and dose profiles for field sizes given by 3 × 3 cm2, 2 × 2 cm2, and 1 × 1 cm2 were obtained for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. Each measured data set was used as data input for a TPS, in which a beam-modeling process was implemented using the collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm for dose calculation. The measured data were used to generate six beam-models based on each combination of detector type and photon energy, which were then used to calculate the corresponding PDDs and dose profiles for various depths and field sizes. Root mean square differences (RMSDs) between the calculated and the measured doses were evaluated for the PDDs and the dose profiles. The RMSDs of PDDs beyond the maximum dose depth were within an accuracy of 0.2-0.6%, being clinically acceptable. The RMSDs of the dose profiles corresponding to the CC13, the CC01, and the edge detector were 2.80%, 1.49%, and 1.46% for a beam energy of 6 MV and 2.34%, 1.15%, and 1.44% for a beam energy of 15 MV, respectively. The calculated results for the CC13 ion chamber showed the most discrepancy compared to the measured data, due to the relatively large sensitive volume of this detector. However, the calculated dose profiles for the detectors were not significantly different from another. The physical algorithm used in the beam-modeling process did not seem to be sensitive to blurred data measured with detectors with large sensitive volumes. Each beam-model was used to clinically evaluate lung and lymphatic node SBRT plans

  10. Experimental verification of isotropic radiation from a coherent dipole source via electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; de Lustrac, André

    2013-09-27

    It has long been conjectured that isotropic radiation by a simple coherent source is impossible due to changes in polarization. Though hypothetical, the isotropic source is usually taken as the reference for determining a radiator's gain and directivity. Here, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that an isotropic radiator can be made of a simple and finite source surrounded by electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials designed by space manipulation. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the first isotropic source with omnidirectional radiation from a dipole source (applicable to all distributed sources), which can open up several possibilities in axion electrodynamics, optical illusion, novel transformation-optic devices, wireless communication, and antenna engineering. Owing to the electric- field-driven LC resonator realization scheme, this principle can be readily applied to higher frequency regimes where magnetism is usually not present.

  11. Emission of terahertz radiation from GaN/AlGaN heterostructure under electron heating in lateral electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalygin, V. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Firsov, D. A.; Sofronov, A. N.; Melentyev, G. A.; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous emission of terahertz radiation from modulation-doped AlGaN/GaN heterostructure under conditions of heating of a two-dimensional electron gas in the lateral electric field has been studied. The experimental data on the field dependence of the integral intensity of THz emission is compared with the theoretical simulation of blackbody-like emission from hot 2D electrons. Complementary transport measurements have been carried out to determine the dependence of effective electron temperature on electric field.

  12. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Oka, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code, we have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. The simulation has been performed using a long simulation system in order to study the nonlinear stages of the Weibel instability, the particle acceleration mechanism, and the shock structure. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic (HD) like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of <_ 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. We discuss the possible implication of our simulation results within the AGN and GRB context. We have calculated the time evolution of the spectrum from two electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. The same technique will be used to calculate radiation from accelerated electrons (positrons) in turbulent magnetic fields generated by Weibel instability.

  13. Modification of far-field radiation pattern by shaping InGaN/GaN nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Q. Q.; Chen, Z. Z.; Feng, Y. L.; Zhang, S.; Li, S. F.; Jiang, S. X.; Li, J. Z.; Chen, Y. F.; Yu, T. J.; Kang, X. N.; Gu, E.; Shen, B.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of "golftee," "castle," and "pillar" shaped InGaN/GaN nanorod light-emitting diode (LED) arrays with a typical rod diameter of 200 nm based on nanoimprint lithography, dry etching, and wet etching. The photoluminescence (PL) integral intensities per active region area for "golftee," "castle," and "pillar" shaped nanorod samples were found to be 2.6, 1.9, and 2.2 times stronger than that of a conventional planar LED. Additionally, the far-field radiation patterns of the three different shaped nanorod samples were investigated based on angular resolved PL (ARPL) measurements. It was found that the sharp lobes appeared at certain angles in the ARPL curve of the "golftee" sample, while broad lobes were observed in the ARPL curves of the "castle" and "pillar" samples. Further analysis suggests that the shorter PL lifetime and smaller spectral width of the "golftee" sample were due to the coupling of photon modes with excitons, which also led to the observed high efficiency and directional emission pattern of the "golftee" sample. Finally, three dimensional finite difference time domain simulations were carried out to study the near-field distribution of the "golftee," "castle," and "pillar" shaped nanorods. The simulation results showed not only a strong enhancement of the electric field in the nanocavities of the three nanorod structures but also a reduction of the guided modes into the nanorod substrate for the "golftee" shaped structure.

  14. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  15. Near field of terahertz radiation transmitted through a lateral non-centrosymmetric grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, E. L.; Petrov, M. I.

    2014-09-01

    The transmission of a terahertz (THz) wave through a grating of metallic strips deposited on a flat surface of a dielectric medium has been considered. It has been assumed that the unit cell of the lateral grating does not have a spatial inversion center and the grating period is small compared to the radiation wavelength. The found amplitudes and phases of the spatial harmonics of the transmitted wave in the near field have been used to calculate the components of the tensor of asymmetry parameters responsible for the generation of photocurrents in a doped quantum well embedded in the non-centrosymmetric system under consideration. It has been found that, at a strip height greater than the skin depth, the parameters of the transmitted spatial harmonics are nearly independent of the height. It has been shown that the metallic grating exhibits strong birefringence, and the radiation polarized either circularly or linearly at an angle of 45° with respect to the principal axes of the lateral grating induces superposition of photocurrents owing to the circular or linear electronic ratchet effects.

  16. Analysis of rat testicular proteome following 30-day exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed

    Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Saeb, Mehdi; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    The use of electromagnetic field (EMF) generating apparatuses such as cell phones is increasing, and has caused an interest in the investigations of its effects on human health. We analyzed proteome in preparations from the whole testis in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 1, 2, or 4 h/day for 30 consecutive days, simulating a range of possible human cell phone use. Subjects were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment and testes fractions were solubilized and separated via high-resolution 2D electrophoresis, and gel patterns were scanned, digitized, and processed. Thirteen proteins, which were found only in sham or in exposure groups, were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Among them, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin-1, and other proteins related to misfolding of proteins and/or stress were identified. These results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency modulated EMFs exposure on proteome, particularly in protein species in the rodent testis, and suggest that a 30-day exposure to EMF radiation induces nonthermal stress in testicular tissue. The functional implication of the identified proteins was discussed.

  17. Cell phone electromagnetic field radiations affect rhizogenesis through impairment of biochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Sharma, Ved Parkash; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Indiscriminate adoption and use of cell phone technology has tremendously increased the levels of electromagnetic field radiations (EMFr) in the natural environment. It has raised the concerns among the scientists regarding the possible risks of EMFr to living organisms. However, not much has been done to assess the damage caused to plants that are continuously exposed to EMFr present in the environment. The present study investigated the biochemical mechanism of interference of 900 MHz cell phone EMFr with root formation in mung bean (Vigna radiata syn. Phaseolus aureus) hypocotyls, a model system to study rhizogenesis in plants. Cell phone EMFr enhanced the activities of proteases (by 1.52 to 2.33 times), polyphenol oxidases (by 1.5 to 4.3 times), and peroxidases (by 1.5 to 2.0 times) in mung bean hypocotyls over control. Further, EMFr enhanced malondialdehyde (an indicator of lipid peroxidation), hydrogen peroxide, and proline content, indicating a reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative damage in hypocotyls. It was confirmed by the upregulation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and glutathione reductase) suggesting their possible role in providing protection against EMFr-induced oxidative damage. The study concluded that cell phone radiations affect the process of rhizogenesis through biochemical alterations that manifest as oxidative damage resulting in root impairment.

  18. Fielding a current idea: exploring the public health impact of electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Genuis, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    Several publications in the scientific literature have raised concern about the individual and public health impact of adverse non-ionizing radiation (a-NIR) from electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure emanating from certain power, electrical and wireless devices commonly found in the home, workplace, school and community. Despite the many challenges in establishing irrefutable scientific proof of harm and the various gaps in elucidating the precise mechanisms of harm, epidemiological analyses continue to suggest considerable potential for injury and affliction as a result of a-NIR exposure. As environmental health has not been emphasized in medical education, some clinicians are not fully aware of possible EMF-related health problems and, as a result, manifestations of a-NIR may remain misdiagnosed and ineffectually managed. It is important for physicians and public health officials to be aware of the fundamental science and clinical implications of EMF exposure. A review of the scientific literature relating to the link between electromagnetic radiation and human health, several public health recommendations, and four case histories are presented for consideration.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Chuck

    2016-07-01

    Every 30–90 days during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the equatorial tropical atmosphere experiences pulses of extraordinarily strong deep convection and rainfall. This phenomenon is referred to as the Madden–Julian Oscillation, or MJO, named after the scientists who identified this cycle. The MJO significantly affects weather and rainfall patterns around the world (Zhang 2013). To improve predictions of the MJO—especially about how it forms and evolves throughout its lifecycle—an international group of scientists collected an unprecedented set of observations from the Indian Ocean and western Pacific region from October 2011 through March 2012 through several coordinated efforts. The coordinated field campaigns captured six distinct MJO cycles in the Indian Ocean. The rich set of observations capturing several MJO events from these efforts will be used for many years to study the physics of the MJO. Here we highlight early research results using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment (AMIE), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility.

  20. General Principles of Radiation Protection in Fields of Diagnostic Medical Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    After the rapid development of medical equipment including CT or PET-CT, radiation doses from medical exposure are now the largest source of man-made radiation exposure. General principles of radiation protection from the hazard of ionizing radiation are summarized as three key words; justification, optimization, and dose limit. Because medical exposure of radiation has unique considerations, diagnostic reference level is generally used as a reference value, instead of dose limits. In Korea, medical radiation exposure has increased rapidly. For medical radiation exposure control, Korea has two separate control systems. Regulation is essential to control medical radiation exposure. Physicians and radiologists must be aware of the radiation risks and benefits associated with medical exposure, and understand and implement the principles of radiation protection for patients. The education of the referring physicians and radiologists is also important. PMID:26908991