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Sample records for radiation pressure dominated

  1. Stabilized radiation pressure dominated ion acceleration from surface modulated thin-foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min; Kumar, Naveen; Pukhov, Alexander; Yu Tongpu

    2011-07-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the radiation pressure dominated regime of ion acceleration is studied by means of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the growth of the long wavelength mode of the instability can be reduced by transverse diffusion of ions coming from the initial subwavelength modulations on the target front surface. Reduction in the growth of the instability keeps the target structure uniform along the transverse direction and opaque to the laser pulse for a longer duration, improving both the final peak energy and the spectral quality of the ions.

  2. Unlimited energy gain in the laser-driven radiation pressure dominant acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Pegoraro, F.; Korn, G.

    2010-06-15

    The energy of the ions accelerated by an intense electromagnetic wave in the radiation pressure dominated regime can be greatly enhanced by a transverse expansion of a thin target. The expansion decreases the number of accelerated ions in the irradiated region increasing the energy and the longitudinal velocity of the remaining ions. In the relativistic limit, the ions become phase locked with respect to the electromagnetic wave resulting in an unlimited ion energy gain. This effect and the use of optimal laser pulse shape provide a new approach for greatly enhancing the energy of laser accelerated ions.

  3. The Effects of Magnetic Fields on the Dynamics of Radiation Pressure-dominated Massive Star Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Quataert, Eliot; Blaes, Omer

    2017-07-01

    We use three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of magnetic fields on the energy transport and structure of radiation pressure-dominated main sequence massive star envelopes at the region of the iron opacity peak. We focus on the regime where the local thermal timescale is shorter than the dynamical timescale, corresponding to inefficient convective energy transport. We begin with initially weak magnetic fields relative to the thermal pressure, from 100 to 1000 G in differing geometries. The unstable density inversion amplifies the magnetic field, increasing the magnetic energy density to values close to equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy density. By providing pressure support, the magnetic field’s presence significantly increases the density fluctuations in the turbulent envelope, thereby enhancing the radiative energy transport by allowing photons to diffuse out through low-density regions. Magnetic buoyancy brings small-scale magnetic fields to the photosphere and increases the vertical energy transport, with the energy advection velocity proportional to the Alfvén velocity, although in all cases we study, photon diffusion still dominates the energy transport. The increased radiative and advective energy transport causes the stellar envelope to shrink by several scale heights. We also find larger turbulent velocity fluctuations compared with the purely hydrodynamic case, reaching ≈ 100 {{{km}}{{s}}}-1 at the stellar photosphere. The photosphere also shows vertical oscillations with similar averaged velocities and periods of a few hours. The increased turbulent velocity and oscillations will have strong impacts on the line broadening and periodic signals in massive stars.

  4. Dependence of the ion energy on the parameters of the laser pulse and target in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime of acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pegoraro, F.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    When the dominant mechanism for ion acceleration is the laser radiation pressure, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into the energy of relativistic ions may be very high. Stability analysis of a thin plasma layer accelerated by the radiation pressure shows that Raleigh-Taylor instability may enhance plasma inhomogeneity. In the linear stage of instability, the plasma layer decays into separate bunches, which are accelerated by the radiation pressure similarly to clusters accelerated under the action of an electromagnetic wave. The energy and luminosity of an ion beam accelerated in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime are calculated.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the ultra-intense laser interaction with plasma mirrors in radiation pressure dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonia, Krishna Kumar; Maheshwari, K. P.; Jaiman, N. K.

    2017-05-01

    At laser intensity in the range ~ 1022 -1023W/cm2, the radiation pressure starts to play a key role in the interaction of an intense electromagnetic wave with a dense plasma foil. Depending upon the incident laser intensity, polarization of the incident beam and also on the density of the thin plasma layer the mirror motion may be assumed to be uniform, accelerated, or oscillatory. A solid dense plasma slab, accelerated in the radiation pressure dominant (RPD) regime, can efficiently reflect a counter-propagating relativistically strong source pulse consisting of up-shifted frequency and high harmonics. In this RPD regime we present our numerical results for the frequency and brightness of the reflected radiation from a uniformly moving plasma mirror. Our numerical results show that for the appropriate laser and plasma parameters in the case 2γ < {({n}e{λ }s3)}1/6 there are approximately 8.03 × 1042 photons / (mm2 - mrad2 - sec.-0.1% bandwidth) in the energy range ~ 10keV. In the case when 2γ > {({n}e{λ }s3)}1/6 for the same parameters and ad = 300, λd = 0.8 μm, the brightness is found to be 3.27 × 1034 photons / (mm2 - mrad2 - sec. - 0.1% bandwidth) in the energy range ~100 keV.

  6. Photon bubbles and ion acceleration in a plasma dominated by the radiation pressure of an electromagnetic pulse.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, F; Bulanov, S V

    2007-08-10

    The stability of a thin plasma foil accelerated by the radiation pressure of a high intensity electromagnetic (e.m.) pulse is investigated analytically and with particle in cell numerical simulations. It is shown that the onset of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability can lead to transverse bunching of the foil and to broadening of the energy spectrum of fast ions. The use of a properly tailored e.m. pulse with a sharp intensity rise can stabilize the foil acceleration.

  7. Thermal Stability and Vertical Structure of Radiation Dominated Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yanfei; Stone, J. M.; Davis, S.

    2013-01-01

    Standard thin disk model predicts that radiation dominated accretion disk is thermally unstable. However, using a radiation MHD code based on flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation, Hirose et al. (2009) finds that when the accretion stress provided by Magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is calculated self-consistently, the disk is actually stable. We check this surprising result with our recently developed radiation transfer module in Athena. We modify the Godunov method to include the radiation source terms and close the radiation momentum equations with variable Eddington tensor. In this way, it works in both optically thin and thick regimes, and works for both radiation or gas pressure dominated flows. As a general purpose radiation MHD code, it can also be used to study other systems, where radiation field plays an important role, such as feedback effects of stars on the interstellar medium. I will show a set of tests to demonstrate that the code is working accurately as expected for different regimes. I will describe in detail our results on the thermal stability of accretion disks in both the gas pressure dominated regime and radiation pressure dominated regime. Detailed studies of the vertical structures of the accretion disk will also be presented. I will also comment on the differences between our results and the results from FLD calculations.

  8. Radiation damping in focusing-dominated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-06-01

    A quasi-classical method is developed to calculate the radiation damping of a relativistic particle in a straight, continuous focusing system. In one limiting case where the pitch angle of the particle {theta}{sub p} is much larger than the radiation opening angle 1/{gamma}, the radiation power spectrum is similar to synchrotron radiation and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is proportional to the relative energy loss rate. In the other limiting case where {theta}{sub p} {much_lt} 1/{gamma}, the radiation is dipole in nature and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is energy-independent and is much faster than the relative energy rate. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing channel. These results can be extended to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field.

  9. Radiation-Dominated Relativistic Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroschek, C. H.; Hoshino, M.

    2009-08-01

    Relativistic current sheets (RCSs) feature plasma instabilities considered as the potential key to magnetic energy dissipation in Poynting-flux-dominated plasma flows. Kinetic plasma simulations show that the physical nature of RCS evolution changes in the presence of radiation losses: In the ultrarelativistic regime (i.e., magnetization parameter σ=104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density), the combined effect of nonlinear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the relativistic tearing mode. In contrast to previous studies of the RCS with σ˜1, the relativistic tearing mode then prevails over the drift kink mode. The ultrarelativistic RCS shows a typical life cycle from radiation-induced collapse towards a radiation-quiescent phase with topology analogous to that introduced by Sweet and Parker.

  10. Dominant loss mechanisms in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.; Kellerman, A. C.; Spasojevic, M.; Usanova, M.; Agapitov, O. V.; Raita, T.; Engebretson, M.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Zhu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research provided significant improvements in our understanding of the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts. Loss processes are still poorly understood. In this study we present detailed analysis of the global evolution of electron radial flux profiles, pitch angle distributions and phase space density for a range of energies/values of the first adiabatic invariant. We show that various loss mechanisms are operational at various energies. Global simulations at all energies, radial distances, and pitch angels are compared to Van Allen Probes observations. VERB 3D model is capable of reproducing the dynamics of pitch angle distributions and energy spectra, demonstrating which loss mechanisms dominate at different energies. Analysis of the profiles of phase space density provides additional confirmation for our conclusions.

  11. On the thermal stability of radiation-dominated accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2013-11-20

    We study the long-term thermal stability of radiation-dominated disks in which the vertical structure is determined self-consistently by the balance of heating due to the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and cooling due to radiation emitted at the photosphere. The calculations adopt the local shearing box approximation and utilize the recently developed radiation transfer module in the Athena MHD code based on a variable Eddington tensor rather than an assumed local closure. After saturation of the MRI, in many cases the disk maintains a steady vertical structure for many thermal times. However, in every case in which the box size in the horizontal directions are at least one pressure scale height, fluctuations associated with MRI turbulence and dynamo action in the disk eventually trigger a thermal runaway that causes the disk to either expand or contract until the calculation must be terminated. During runaway, the dependence of the heating and cooling rates on total pressure satisfy the simplest criterion for classical thermal instability. We identify several physical reasons why the thermal runaway observed in our simulations differ from the standard α disk model; for example, the advection of radiation contributes a non-negligible fraction to the vertical energy flux at the largest radiation pressure, most of the dissipation does not happen in the disk mid-plane, and the change of dissipation scale height with mid-plane pressure is slower than the change of density scale height. We discuss how and why our results differ from those published previously. Such thermal runaway behavior might have important implications for interpreting temporal variability in observed systems, but fully global simulations are required to study the saturated state before detailed predictions can be made.

  12. Unlimited Ion Acceleration by Radiation Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Pegoraro, F.; Korn, G.

    2010-04-02

    The energy of ions accelerated by an intense electromagnetic wave in the radiation pressure dominated regime can be greatly enhanced due to a transverse expansion of a thin target. The expansion decreases the number of accelerated ions in the irradiated region resulting in an increase in the ion energy and in the ion longitudinal velocity. In the relativistic limit, the ions become phase locked with respect to the electromagnetic wave resulting in unlimited ion energy gain.

  13. Measurement of Radiation Pressure in an Ambient Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Light has momentum and thus exerts ``radiation pressure'' when it is reflected or absorbed due to the conservation of momentum. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are suitable for measurement and utilization of radiation pressure due to their high sensitivities. However, other light-induced mechanical deformations such as photothermal effects often obscure accurate measurements of radiation pressure in these systems. In this work, we investigate the radiation pressure and photothermal force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever under illumination by a 660 nm laser in an ambient environment. To magnify the mechanical effects, the cantilever is driven optically from dc across its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and phase of its oscillation are acquired by an optical beam deflection method and a lockin amplifier. We show that radiation pressure and photothermal effects can be distinguished through the cantilever's frequency response. Furthermore, in a radiation pressure dominant regime, our measurement of the radiation force agrees quantitatively with the theoretical calculation.

  14. SATURATION OF THE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN STRONGLY RADIATION-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yanfei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2013-04-20

    The saturation level of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in a strongly radiation-dominated accretion disk is studied using a new Godunov radiation MHD code in the unstratified shearing box approximation. Since vertical gravity is neglected in this work, our focus is on how the MRI saturates in the optically thick mid-plane of the disk. We confirm that turbulence generated by the MRI is very compressible in the radiation-dominated regime, as found by previous calculations using the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We also find little difference in the saturation properties in calculations that use a larger horizontal domain (up to four times the vertical scale height in the radial direction). However, in strongly radiation pressure dominated disks (one in which the radiation energy density reaches {approx}1% of the rest mass energy density of the gas), we find that Maxwell stress from the MRI turbulence is larger than the value produced when radiation pressure is replaced with the same amount of gas pressure. At the same time, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress is increased by almost a factor of eight compared with the gas pressure dominated case. We suggest that this effect is caused by radiation drag, which acts like bulk viscosity and changes the effective magnetic Prandtl number of the fluid. Radiation viscosity significantly exceeds both the microscopic plasma viscosity and resistivity, ensuring that radiation-dominated systems occupy the high magnetic Prandtl number regime. Nevertheless, we find that radiative shear viscosity is negligible compared to the Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress in the flow. This may have important implications for the structure of radiation-dominated accretion disks.

  15. Saturation of the Magneto-rotational Instability in Strongly Radiation-dominated Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2013-04-01

    The saturation level of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in a strongly radiation-dominated accretion disk is studied using a new Godunov radiation MHD code in the unstratified shearing box approximation. Since vertical gravity is neglected in this work, our focus is on how the MRI saturates in the optically thick mid-plane of the disk. We confirm that turbulence generated by the MRI is very compressible in the radiation-dominated regime, as found by previous calculations using the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We also find little difference in the saturation properties in calculations that use a larger horizontal domain (up to four times the vertical scale height in the radial direction). However, in strongly radiation pressure dominated disks (one in which the radiation energy density reaches ~1% of the rest mass energy density of the gas), we find that Maxwell stress from the MRI turbulence is larger than the value produced when radiation pressure is replaced with the same amount of gas pressure. At the same time, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress is increased by almost a factor of eight compared with the gas pressure dominated case. We suggest that this effect is caused by radiation drag, which acts like bulk viscosity and changes the effective magnetic Prandtl number of the fluid. Radiation viscosity significantly exceeds both the microscopic plasma viscosity and resistivity, ensuring that radiation-dominated systems occupy the high magnetic Prandtl number regime. Nevertheless, we find that radiative shear viscosity is negligible compared to the Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress in the flow. This may have important implications for the structure of radiation-dominated accretion disks.

  16. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  17. Dynamics of Radiation Pressure Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, A.; Benedetti, C.; Pegoraro, F.; Veghini, S.

    2010-02-02

    We describe recent theoretical results on Radiation Pressure Acceleration of ions by ultraintense, circularly polarized laser pulses, giving an insight on the underlying dynamics and suggestions for the development of applications. In thick targets, we show how few-cycle pulses may generate single ion bunches in inhomogeneous density profiles. In thin targets, we present a refinement of the simple model of the accelerating mirror and a comparison of its predictions with simulation results, solving an apparent paradox.

  18. Local Axisymmetric Simulations of Magnetorotational Instability in Radiation-dominated Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Stone, J. M.; Sano, T.

    2002-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of magnetorotational instability in a local patch of accretion disk in which radiation pressure exceeds gas pressure. Such conditions may occur in the central regions of disks surrounding compact objects in active galactic nuclei and Galactic X-ray sources. We assume axisymmetry and neglect vertical stratification. The growth rates of the instability on initially uniform magnetic fields are consistent with the linear analysis of Blaes & Socrates (2001). As is the case when radiation effects are neglected, the nonlinear development of the instability leads to transitory turbulence when the initial magnetic field has no net vertical flux. During the turbulent phase, angular momentum is transported outward. The Maxwell stress is a few times the Reynolds stress, and their sum is about 4 times the mean pressure in the vertical component of the magnetic field. For magnetic pressure exceeding gas pressure, turbulent fluctuations in the field produce density contrasts about equal to the ratio of magnetic to gas pressure. These are many times larger than in the corresponding gas pressure-dominated situation and may have profound implications for the steady state vertical structure of radiation-dominated disks. Diffusion of radiation from compressed regions damps turbulent motions, converting kinetic energy into photon energy.

  19. Structure of radiation-dominated gravitoturbulent quasar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Khajenabi, Fazeleh; Dib, Sami

    2017-02-01

    Self-gravitating accretion discs in a gravitoturbulent state, including radiation and gas pressures, are studied using a set of new analytical solutions. While the Toomre parameter of the disc remains close to its critical value for the onset of gravitational instability, the dimensionless stress parameter is uniquely determined from the thermal energy reservoir of the disc and its cooling rate. Our solutions are applicable to the accretion discs with dynamically important radiation pressure such as that in the quasars discs. We show that physical quantities of a gravitoturbulent disc in the presence of radiation are significantly modified compared to solutions with only gas pressure. We show that the dimensionless stress parameter is an increasing function of the radial distance so that its steepness strongly depends on the accretion rate. In a disc without radiation its slope is 4.5; however, we show that in the presence of radiation, it varies between 2 and 4.5 depending on the accretion rate and the central mass. As for the surface density, we find a shallower profile with an exponent -2 in a disc with sub-Eddington accretion rate compared to a similar disc, but without radiation, where its surface density slope is -3 independent of the accretion rate. We then investigate gravitational stability of the disc when the stress parameter reaches to its critical value. In order to self-consistently determine the fragmentation boundary, however, it is shown that the critical value of the stress parameter is a power-law function of the ratio of gas pressure and the total pressure and its exponent is around 1.7. We also estimate the maximum mass of the central black hole using our analytical solutions.

  20. The Role of Radiation Pressure in the Narrow Line Regions of Seyfert Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa; Groves, Brent; Sutherland, Ralph; Hampton, Elise J.; Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Scharwächter, Julia; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the relative significance of radiation pressure and gas pressure in the extended narrow line regions (ENLRs) of four Seyfert galaxies from the integral field Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). We demonstrate that there exist two distinct types of starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) mixing curves on standard emission line diagnostic diagrams, which reflect the balance between gas pressure and radiation pressure in the ENLR. In two of the galaxies the ENLR is radiation pressure dominated throughout and the ionization parameter remains constant (log U ˜ 0). In the other two galaxies radiation pressure is initially important, but gas pressure becomes dominant as the ionization parameter in the ENLR decreases from log U ˜ 0 to -3.2 ≲ log U ≲ -3.4. Where radiation pressure is dominant, the AGN regulates the density of the interstellar medium on kiloparsec scales and may therefore have a direct impact on star formation activity and/or the incidence of outflows in the host galaxy to scales far beyond the zone of influence of the black hole. We find that both radiation pressure dominated and gas pressure dominated ENLRs are dynamically active with evidence for outflows, indicating that radiation pressure may be an important source of AGN feedback even when it is not dominant over the entire ENLR.

  1. Blood pressure in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Robert W; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Perrone, Ronald D; Torres, Vicente E; Braun, William E; Steinman, Theodore I; Winklhofer, Franz T; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G; Hogan, Marie C; Miskulin, Dana C; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F; Grantham, Jared J; Harris, Peter C; Flessner, Michael F; Bae, Kyongtae T; Moore, Charity G; Chapman, Arlene B

    2014-12-11

    Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P=0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril-telmisartan group and the lisinopril-placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P=0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (-1.17 vs. -0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P=0.002). In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly alter the rate of increase in total kidney volume. As

  2. Blood Pressure in Early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Moore, Charity G.; Chapman, Arlene B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting–enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. RESULTS The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril–telmisartan group and the lisinopril–placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P = 0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (−1.17 vs. −0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly

  3. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The scaling formulas in this paper — many of which involve approximation — apply primarily to electron colliders like CEPC or FCC-ee. The more abstract “radiation dominated” phrase in the title is intended to encourage use of the formulas — though admittedly less precisely — to proton colliders like SPPC, for which synchrotron radiation begins to dominate the design in spite of the large proton mass. Optimizing a facility having an electron-positron Higgs factory, followed decades later by a p, p collider in the same tunnel, is a formidable task. The CEPC design study constitutes an initial “constrained parameter” collider design. Here the constrained parameters include tunnel circumference, cell lengths, phase advance per cell, etc. This approach is valuable, if the constrained parameters are self-consistent and close to optimal. Jumping directly to detailed design makes it possible to develop reliable, objective cost estimates on a rapid time scale. A scaling law formulation is intended to contribute to a “ground-up” stage in the design of future circular colliders. In this more abstract approach, scaling formulas can be used to investigate ways in which the design can be better optimized. Equally important, by solving the lattice matching equations in closed form, as contrasted with running computer programs such as MAD, one can obtain better intuition concerning the fundamental parametric dependencies. The ground-up approach is made especially appropriate by the seemingly impossible task of simultaneous optimization of tunnel circumference for both electrons and protons. The fact that both colliders will be radiation dominated actually simplifies the simultaneous optimization task. All GeV scale electron accelerators are “synchrotron radiation dominated”, meaning that all beam distributions evolve within a fraction of a second to an equilibrium state in which “heating” due to radiation fluctuations is canceled by the “cooling” in

  4. Measurement and Applications of Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy; Munday Lab Team

    Light reflected off a material or absorbed within it exerts radiation pressure through the transfer of momentum. Measuring and utilizing radiation pressure have aroused growing interest in a wide spectrum of research fields. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are good candidates for measuring radiation pressure, but accompanying photothermal effects often obscure the measurement. In this work, we investigate the accurate measurement of the radiation force on microcantilevers in ambient conditions and ways to separate radiation pressure and photothermal effects. Further, we investigate an optically broadband switchable device based on polymer dispersed liquid crystal which has potential applications in solar sails and maneuvering spacecraft without moving parts. The authors would like to thank NASA Early Career Faculty Award and NASA Smallsat Technology Partnership Award for their funding support.

  5. Masses of radiation pressure supported stars in extreme relativistic realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2007-04-01

    It is known that there could be stars supported by radiation pressure alone. In Newtonian gravity, it turns out that such stars must be excessively massive and are called ``Supermassive Stars''. We show that this requirement for excessive mass arises because of weak gravity associated with Newtonian stars . The weakness of gravity here is expressed by the fact that for Newtonian stars, z << 1, where z is the surface gravitational redshift of the star. However, it is also known that sufficiently massive stars undergo continued gravitational collapse to become Black Holes (BH) marked by z=Infinity. Hence as the massive stars would tend to form BHs, they would pass through stages z>> 1. Recently, it has been shown that, such z>>1 stages would be be completely dominated by radiation energy rather than rest mass energy (Mitra, MNRAS Lett., 367, L66, 2006, gr-qc/0601025). By using this result, we show here that, in the realm of extremely strong gravity, there could be radiation pressure supported stars at arbitrary mass scale. Therefore, as we break free from the Newtonian restriction of z <<1, (1) Radiation Pressure Supported Stars need not be supermassive , (2) Radiation Pressure supported stars may have arbitrary low mass (say a few solar mass) or (3) They could be as massive as billion solar masses. The latter would be examples of Relativistic Supermassive Stars. All radiation pressure supported stars are shining at their respective maximal Eddington values and they are never in strict hydrodynamical equilibrium. On the other hand, they are in dynamical quasistatic state and their luminosity could be simply due to secular gravitational contraction known as Helmholtz -Kelvin process. The observed BH candidates could be in this intermediate state of radiation pressure supported relativistic stars (z >>1) rather than in the limiting BH stage (z = Infinity). Ref: A. Mitra, ``Radiation Pressure Supported Stars in Einstein Gravity: Eternally Collapsing Objects'', MNRAS (in

  6. Earth radiation pressure effects on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, P. C.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    A diffuse-earth radiation force model is presented, which includes a latitudinally varying representation of the shortwave and longwave radiation of the terrestrial sphere. Applications to various earth satellites indicate that this force, in particular the shortwave component, can materially affect the recovery of estimated parameters. Earth radiation pressure cannot explain the anomalous deceleration of LAGEOS, but can produce significant along track accelerations on satellites with highly eccentric orbits. Analyses of GEOS-1 tracking data confirm this result.

  7. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  8. Familial melanoma associated with dominant ultraviolet radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, R.G.; Chen, P.; Imray, F.P.; Kidson, C.; Lavin, M.F.; Hockey, A.

    1982-07-01

    Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation was studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 32 members of two families with histories of multiple primary melanomas in several generations. As assayed by colony formation in agar or by trypan blue exclusion following irradiation, cellular sensitivity showed a bimodal distribution. All persons with melanoma or multiple moles were in the sensitive group, while some family members exhibited responses similar to those of controls. Cells from four cases of sporadic melanoma showed normal levels of sensitivity. The data are consistent with a dominantly inherited ultraviolet light sensitivity associated with these examples of familial melanoma. Spontaneous and ultraviolet light-induced sister chromatid exchange frequencies were similar to those in control cell lines. No defect in excision repair was detected in any of the above cell lines, but the sensitive group showed postirradiation inhibition of DNA replication intermediate between controls and an excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cell line.

  9. Gravity by corpuscular radiation pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, C.

    1995-09-01

    It is shown how four orders of magnitude of energy quanta provide all mass/energy in the universe, how their random motion transfers momentum to accelerate intercepting bodies of mass and how shielding causes gravity. Counting of impacts per second measures and defines force: F = (ML/T)/T. Basic field equations are developed. Crucial tests are proposed. It is shown how these quanta add mass/energy to intercepting systems and how a breakdown into the smallest order causes a virtual vacuum in the core of stars and galaxies which allows alternative explanations for their radiation and rotation patterns. Whirlpools are observed in optical, infrared, radio, X- and γ-radiation which show the evolution from gas to stars and galaxies. Oersted effects, accretion, plasma jets and extended lobes stabilize the system to form pairs of large vortex-rings, and the hemispheres of spiral galaxies.

  10. Quantitative measurement of radiation pressure on a microcantilever in ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    Light reflected off a material or absorbed within it exerts radiation pressure through the transfer of momentum. Micro/nano-mechanical transducers have become sensitive enough that radiation pressure can influence these systems. However, photothermal effects often accompany and overwhelm the radiation pressure, complicating its measurement. In this letter, we investigate the radiation force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever in ambient conditions. We identify and separate the radiation pressure and photothermal forces through an analysis of the cantilever's frequency response. Further, by working in a regime where radiation pressure is dominant, we are able to accurately measure the radiation pressure. Experimental results are compared to theory and found to agree within the measured and calculated uncertainties.

  11. Laser-matter interaction in cluster medium in the radiation dominated regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, N.; Kishimoto, Y.; Wu, F.; Fukuda, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We study the interaction between laser and cluster medium in high intensity regime 1022-24 W/cm2 using a particle based integral code (EPIC3D). By introducing four targets consisting of the same mass, i.e. same packing fraction, but having different internal structure, we investigate the effect of cluster on the acceleration dynamics comparing with that of thin film. In the radiation pressure dominated regime, the cluster medium exhibits a higher maximum energy than that achieved by the simple piston mechanism due to the additional accerelation by the Coulomb explosion. The optimum cluster radius for ion acceleration is found to exist depending on the laser power irradiated.

  12. Negative radiation pressure on gain medium structures.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Amit; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate negative radiation pressure on gain medium structures, such that light amplification may cause a nanoscale body to be pulled toward a light source. Optically large gain medium structures, such as slabs and spheres, as well as deep subwavelength bodies, may experience this phenomenon. The threshold gain for radiation pressure reversal is obtained analytically for Rayleigh spheres, thin cylinders, and thin slabs. This threshold vanishes when the gain medium structure is surrounded by a medium with a matched refractive index, thus eliminating the positive scattering forces.

  13. Incipient radiation within the dominant Hawaiian tree Metrosideros polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, E A; Johansen, J B; Sakishima, T; Price, D K; Pillon, Y

    2014-01-01

    Although trees comprise a primary component of terrestrial species richness, the drivers and temporal scale of divergence in trees remain poorly understood. We examined the landscape-dominant tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, for variation at nine microsatellite loci across 23 populations on young Hawai'i Island, sampling each of the island's five varieties throughout its full geographic range. For four varieties, principal coordinate analysis revealed strong clustering of populations by variety across the 10 430 km2 island, indicating partitioning of the species into multiple evolutionarily significant units. The single island-endemic form, riparian var. newellii, showed especially strong differentiation from other varieties despite occurring in sympatry with other varieties and likely evolved from a bog form on the oldest volcano, Kohala, within the past 500 000 years. Along with comparable riparian forms on other Pacific Islands, var. newellii appears to represent parallel incipient ecological speciation within Metrosideros. Greater genetic distance among the more common varieties on the oldest volcano and an inverse relationship between allelic diversity and substrate age appear consistent with colonization of Hawai'i Island by older, partially diverged varieties followed by increased hybridization among varieties on younger volcanoes. This study demonstrates that broad population-level sampling is required to uncover patterns of diversification within a ubiquitous and long-lived tree species. Hawaiian Metrosideros appears to be a case of incipient radiation in trees and thus should be useful for studies of divergence and the evolution of reproductive isolating barriers at the early stages of speciation. PMID:24824285

  14. Collisional and radiative processes in high-pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt H.; Kurunczi, Peter F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2002-05-01

    Discharge plasmas at high pressures (up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure), where single collision conditions no longer prevail, provide a fertile environment for the experimental study of collisions and radiative processes dominated by (i) step-wise processes, i.e., the excitation of an already excited atomic/molecular state and by (ii) three-body collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of excimers. The dominance of collisional and radiative processes beyond binary collisions involving ground-state atoms and molecules in such environments allows for many interesting applications of high-pressure plasmas such as high power lasers, opening switches, novel plasma processing applications and sputtering, absorbers and reflectors for electromagnetic waves, remediation of pollutants and waste streams, and excimer lamps and other noncoherent vacuum-ultraviolet light sources. Here recent progress is summarized in the use of hollow cathode discharge devices with hole dimensions in the range 0.1-0.5 mm for the generation of vacuum-ultraviolet light.

  15. Was the Universe actually radiation dominated prior to nucleosynthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giblin, John T.; Kane, Gordon; Nesbit, Eva; Watson, Scott; Zhao, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Maybe not. String theory approaches to both beyond the Standard Model and inflationary model building generically predict the existence of scalars (moduli) that are light compared to the scale of quantum gravity. These moduli become displaced from their low energy minima in the early Universe and lead to a prolonged matter-dominated epoch prior to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In this paper, we examine whether nonperturbative effects such as parametric resonance or tachyonic instabilities can shorten, or even eliminate, the moduli condensate and matter-dominated epoch. Such effects depend crucially on the strength of the couplings, and we find that unless the moduli become strongly coupled, the matter-dominated epoch is unavoidable. In particular, we find that in string and M-theory compactifications where the lightest moduli are near the TeV scale, a matter-dominated epoch will persist until the time of big bang nucleosynthesis.

  16. Negative Radiation Pressure in Case of Two Interacting Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romańczukiewicz, T.

    2008-12-01

    The new mechanism of an interesting phenomenon of the negative radiation pressure is presented. Force exerted by radiation on the kink in a simple toy model is calculated using perturbation scheme. The results are compared with numerical calculations. The interaction of vortices and radiation is discussed and possible explanation of the negative radiation pressure is examined.

  17. Negative radiation pressure exerted on kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of a kink and a monochromatic plane wave in one dimensional scalar field theories is studied. It is shown that in a large class of models the radiation pressure exerted on the kink is negative, i.e. the kink is pulled towards the source of the radiation. This effect has been observed by numerical simulations in the ϕ4 model, and it is explained by a perturbative calculation assuming that the amplitude of the incoming wave is small. Quite importantly the effect is shown to be robust against small perturbations of the ϕ4 model. In the sine-Gordon (SG) model the time-averaged radiation pressure acting on the kink turns out to be zero. The results of the perturbative computations in the SG model are shown to be in full agreement with an analytical solution corresponding to the superposition of a SG kink with a cnoidal wave. It is also demonstrated that the acceleration of the kink satisfies Newton’s law.

  18. Negative radiation pressure exerted on kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Forgacs, Peter; Lukacs, Arpad; Romanczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2008-06-15

    The interaction of a kink and a monochromatic plane wave in one dimensional scalar field theories is studied. It is shown that in a large class of models the radiation pressure exerted on the kink is negative, i.e. the kink is pulled towards the source of the radiation. This effect has been observed by numerical simulations in the {phi}{sup 4} model, and it is explained by a perturbative calculation assuming that the amplitude of the incoming wave is small. Quite importantly the effect is shown to be robust against small perturbations of the {phi}{sup 4} model. In the sine-Gordon (SG) model the time-averaged radiation pressure acting on the kink turns out to be zero. The results of the perturbative computations in the SG model are shown to be in full agreement with an analytical solution corresponding to the superposition of a SG kink with a cnoidal wave. It is also demonstrated that the acceleration of the kink satisfies Newton's law.

  19. Radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Liseykina, Tatyana V.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    The acceleration of sub-wavelength, solid-density plasma foils by the ultraintense radiation pressure of circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated analytically and with simulations. An improved 'Light Sail' or accelerating mirror model, accounting for nonlinear self-induced transparency effects, is used for estimating the optimal thickness for acceleration. The model predictions are in good agreement with one-dimensional simulations. These latter are analyzed in detail to unfold the dynamics and self-organization of electrons and ions during the acceleration. Two-dimensional simulations are also performed to address the effects of target bending and of laser intensity inhomogeneity.

  20. Radiation pressure of active dispersive chiral slabs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoyan; Li, Hailong; Gao, Dongliang; Gao, Lei; Xu, Jun; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-06-29

    We report a mechanism to obtain optical pulling or pushing forces exerted on the active dispersive chiral media. Electromagnetic wave equations for the pure chiral media using constitutive relations containing dispersive Drude models are numerically solved by means of Auxiliary Differential Equation Finite Difference Time Domain (ADE-FDTD) method. This method allows us to access the time averaged Lorentz force densities exerted on the magnetoelectric coupling chiral slabs via the derivation of bound electric and magnetic charge densities, as well as bound electric and magnetic current densities. Due to the continuously coupled cross-polarized electromagnetic waves, we find that the pressure gradient force is engendered on the active chiral slabs under a plane wave incidence. By changing the material parameters of the slabs, the total radiation pressure exerted on a single slab can be directed either along the propagation direction or in the opposite direction. This finding provides a promising avenue for detecting the chirality of materials by optical forces.

  1. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lipinski, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  2. X-ray line formation in radiation dominated astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Hansen, S. B.; Nagayama, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D.; Mancini, R.; Koepke, M.

    2014-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent Ka photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging Ka intensity. If Ka lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. For the first time in a terrestrial lab, we measured simultaneous absorption and emission spectra from these plasmas at high resolution. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined through space-resolved absorption spectra. The emission spectra have been recorded at different column densities thus testing different radiative transport regime. These should allow us to answer quantitatively the original RAD hypothesis. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Vacuum radiation pressure fluctuations and barrier penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiyun; Ford, L. H.

    2017-07-01

    We apply recent results on the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations to the problem of barrier penetration by quantum particles. The probability for large stress tensor fluctuations decreases relatively slowly with increasing magnitude of the fluctuation, especially when the quantum stress tensor operator has been averaged over a finite time interval. This can lead to large vacuum radiation pressure fluctuations on charged or polarizable particles, which can in turn push the particle over a potential barrier. The rate for this effect depends sensitively upon the details of the time averaging of the stress tensor operator, which might be determined by factors such as the shape of the potential. We make some estimates for the rate of barrier penetration by this mechanism and argue that in some cases this rate can exceed the rate for quantum tunneling through the barrier. The possibility of observation of this effect is discussed.

  4. Laplace plane modifications arising from solar radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The dynamical effects of solar radiation pressure (SRP) in the solar system have been rigorously studied since the early 1900s. This non-gravitational perturbation plays a significant role in the evolution of dust particles in circumplanetary orbits, as well as in the orbital motion about asteroids and comets. For gravitationally dominated orbits, SRP is negligible and the resulting motion is largely governed by the oblateness of the primary and the attraction of the Sun. The interplay between these gravitational perturbations gives rise to three mutually perpendicular planes of equilibrium for circular satellite orbits. The classical Laplace plane lies between the equatorial and orbital planes of the primary, and is the mean reference plane about whose axis the pole of a satellite's orbit precesses. From a previously derived solution for the secular motion of an orbiter about a small body in a SRP dominated environment, we find that SRP acting alone will cause an initially circular orbit to precess around the pole of the primary's heliocentric orbital plane. When the gravitational and non-gravitational perturbations act in concert, the resulting equilibrium planes turn out to be qualitatively different, in some cases, from those obtained without considering the radiation pressure. The warping of the surfaces swept out by the modified equilibria as the semi-major axis varies depends critically on the cross-sectional area of the body exposed. These results, together with an adiabatic invariance argument on Poynting-Robertson drag, provide a natural qualitative explanation for the initial albedo dichotomy of Saturn's moon, Iapetus.

  5. On the impact of radiation pressure on the dynamics and inner structure of dusty wind-driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2014-04-20

    Massive young stellar clusters are strong sources of radiation and mechanical energy. Their powerful winds and radiation pressure sweep up interstellar gas into thin expanding shells that trap the ionizing radiation produced by the central clusters affecting the dynamics and the distribution of their ionized gas. Here we continue our comparison of the star cluster winds and radiation pressure effects on the dynamics of shells around young massive clusters. We calculate the impact that radiation pressure has on the distribution of matter and thermal pressure within such shells, as well as on the density-weighted ionization parameter U{sub w} , and put our results on the diagnostic diagram, which allows one to discriminate between the wind-dominated and radiation-dominated regimes. We found that model-predicted values of the ionization parameter agree well with typical values found in local starburst galaxies. Radiation pressure may affect the inner structure and the dynamics of wind-driven shells, but only during the earliest stages of evolution (before ∼3 Myr) or if a major fraction of the star cluster mechanical luminosity is dissipated or radiated away within the star cluster volume and thus the star cluster mechanical energy output is significantly smaller than star cluster synthetic models predict. However, even in these cases radiation dominates over the wind dynamical pressure only if the exciting cluster is embedded into a high-density ambient medium.

  6. On the Impact of Radiation Pressure on the Dynamics and Inner Structure of Dusty Wind-driven Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Massive young stellar clusters are strong sources of radiation and mechanical energy. Their powerful winds and radiation pressure sweep up interstellar gas into thin expanding shells that trap the ionizing radiation produced by the central clusters affecting the dynamics and the distribution of their ionized gas. Here we continue our comparison of the star cluster winds and radiation pressure effects on the dynamics of shells around young massive clusters. We calculate the impact that radiation pressure has on the distribution of matter and thermal pressure within such shells, as well as on the density-weighted ionization parameter Uw , and put our results on the diagnostic diagram, which allows one to discriminate between the wind-dominated and radiation-dominated regimes. We found that model-predicted values of the ionization parameter agree well with typical values found in local starburst galaxies. Radiation pressure may affect the inner structure and the dynamics of wind-driven shells, but only during the earliest stages of evolution (before ~3 Myr) or if a major fraction of the star cluster mechanical luminosity is dissipated or radiated away within the star cluster volume and thus the star cluster mechanical energy output is significantly smaller than star cluster synthetic models predict. However, even in these cases radiation dominates over the wind dynamical pressure only if the exciting cluster is embedded into a high-density ambient medium.

  7. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron-Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Witherow, W. K.; West, E. A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2- to 6.82-micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam widths of approximately 175- 400 microns at ambient pressures particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of SiO2 and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  8. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron-Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Witherow, W. K.; West, E. A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2- to 6.82-micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam widths of approximately 175- 400 microns at ambient pressures particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of SiO2 and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  9. Land dominates the regional response to CO2 direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Tiffany A.; Voigt, Aiko

    2016-11-01

    In Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) direct radiative forcing (increased CO2 with fixed sea surface temperature) is an imperfect concept because land temperatures are not fixed. Here the response to direct radiative forcing is decomposed into increased CO2 over ocean and land using an AGCM with spatially dependent CO2. The land versus ocean response is mostly linear. Consistent with previous work, ocean direct radiative forcing decreases ocean-averaged outgoing longwave radiation, precipitation, and tropical circulation intensity; however, it cannot explain the regional response to direct radiative forcing. Increased CO2 over land dominates the regional response via energy input over land, e.g., over deserts where there is no cloud and water vapor masking and a Rossby wave teleconnection. This mechanism operates across a range of climate perturbations, including decreased CO2. Previous AGCM decompositions involving direct radiative forcing and indirect sea surface temperature warming must be reinterpreted to include the importance of increased CO2 over land.

  10. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  11. THERMAL STABILITY OF MAGNETIZED, OPTICALLY THIN, RADIATIVE COOLING-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Ma, Ren-Yi; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of optically thin, two-temperature, radiative cooling-dominated accretion disks. Our linear analysis shows that the disk is thermally unstable without magnetic fields, which agrees with previous stability analysis on the Shapiro-Lightman-Eardley disk. By taking into account the effects of magnetic fields, however, we find that the disk can be, or partly be, thermally stable. Our results may be helpful to understand the outflows in optically thin flows. Moreover, such radiative cooling-dominated disks may provide a new explanation of the different behaviors between black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries on the radio/X-ray correlation.

  12. HOW SIGNIFICANT IS RADIATION PRESSURE IN THE DYNAMICS OF THE GAS AROUND YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    The impact of radiation pressure on the dynamics of the gas in the vicinity of young stellar clusters is thoroughly discussed. The radiation over the thermal/ram pressure ratio time evolution is calculated explicitly and the crucial roles of the cluster mechanical power, the strong time evolution of the ionizing photon flux, and the bolometric luminosity of the exciting cluster are stressed. It is shown that radiation has only a narrow window of opportunity to dominate the wind-driven shell dynamics. This may occur only at early stages of the bubble evolution and if the shell expands into a dusty and/or a very dense proto-cluster medium. The impact of radiation pressure on the wind-driven shell always becomes negligible after about 3 Myr. Finally, the wind-driven model results allow one to compare the model predictions with the distribution of thermal pressure derived from X-ray observations. The shape of the thermal pressure profile then allows us to distinguish between the energy and the momentum-dominated regimes of expansion and thus conclude whether radiative losses of energy or the leakage of hot gas from the bubble interior have been significant during bubble evolution.

  13. Infrared Radiation Image Sensor with Function of Vacuum Pressure Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Koichi; Funaki, Hideyuki; Yagi, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Ikuo; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Honda, Hiroto

    We propose a new detecting method of vacuum pressure utilizing reference cells with the similar structure as pixels in the IR(infrared radiation) image sensor of which the sensitivity is greatly depended on the vacuum pressure in the sensor package. This method showed the excellent correlation between the vacuum pressure and output voltage without any additional pirani gauge requiring readout circuit which is generally utilized to detect the vacuum pressure. The proposed method is understood to realize the detection of the package vacuum pressure with detecting infrared radiation as an IR image sensor.

  14. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; ...

    2016-04-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case,more » finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.« less

  15. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-04-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  16. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  17. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahi, A.; Duraschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  18. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahi, A.; Durschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulkinsulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosedreflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  19. Dissipation and Vertical Energy Transport in Radiation-dominated Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaes, Omer; Krolik, Julian H.; Hirose, Shigenobu; Shabaltas, Natalia

    2011-06-01

    Standard models of radiation-supported accretion disks generally assume that diffusive radiation flux is solely responsible for vertical heat transport. This requires that heat must be generated at a critical rate per unit volume if the disk is to be in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. This raises the question of how heat is generated and how energy is transported in MHD turbulence. By analysis of a number of radiation/MHD stratified shearing-box simulations, we show that the divergence of the diffusive radiation flux is indeed capped at the critical rate, but deep inside the disk, substantial vertical energy flux is also carried by advection of radiation. Work done by radiation pressure is a significant part of the energy budget, and much of this work is dissipated later through damping by radiative diffusion. We show how this damping can be measured in the simulations and identify its physical origins. Radiative damping accounts for as much as tens of percent of the total dissipation and is the only realistic physical mechanism for dissipation of turbulence that can actually be resolved in numerical simulations of accretion disks. Buoyancy associated with dynamo-driven, highly magnetized, nearly isobaric nonlinear slow magnetosonic fluctuations is responsible for the radiation advection flux and also explains the persistent periodic magnetic upwelling seen at all values of the radiation to gas pressure ratio. The intimate connection between radiation advection and magnetic buoyancy is the first example we know of in astrophysics in which a dynamo has direct impact on the global energetics of a system.

  20. DISSIPATION AND VERTICAL ENERGY TRANSPORT IN RADIATION-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Blaes, Omer; Shabaltas, Natalia; Krolik, Julian H.; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2011-06-01

    Standard models of radiation-supported accretion disks generally assume that diffusive radiation flux is solely responsible for vertical heat transport. This requires that heat must be generated at a critical rate per unit volume if the disk is to be in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. This raises the question of how heat is generated and how energy is transported in MHD turbulence. By analysis of a number of radiation/MHD stratified shearing-box simulations, we show that the divergence of the diffusive radiation flux is indeed capped at the critical rate, but deep inside the disk, substantial vertical energy flux is also carried by advection of radiation. Work done by radiation pressure is a significant part of the energy budget, and much of this work is dissipated later through damping by radiative diffusion. We show how this damping can be measured in the simulations and identify its physical origins. Radiative damping accounts for as much as tens of percent of the total dissipation and is the only realistic physical mechanism for dissipation of turbulence that can actually be resolved in numerical simulations of accretion disks. Buoyancy associated with dynamo-driven, highly magnetized, nearly isobaric nonlinear slow magnetosonic fluctuations is responsible for the radiation advection flux and also explains the persistent periodic magnetic upwelling seen at all values of the radiation to gas pressure ratio. The intimate connection between radiation advection and magnetic buoyancy is the first example we know of in astrophysics in which a dynamo has direct impact on the global energetics of a system.

  1. Energy density of standing sound waves at the radiation-dominated phase of the universe expansion (hydrodynamic derivation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the early Universe up to hydrogen recombination in the Universe, the radiation pressure was much greater than the pressure of baryons and electrons. Moreover, the energy density of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons was greater than or close to the energy density contained in the rest mass of baryonic matter, i.e., the primordial plasma was a radiated-dominated one and the adiabatic index was close to 4/3. The small density perturbations from which the observed galaxies have grown grew as long as the characteristic perturbation scales exceeded the horizon of the Universe сt at that time. On smaller scales, the density perturbations were standing sound waves. Radiative viscosity and heat conduction must have led to the damping of sound waves on very small scales. After the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, J. Silk calculated the scales of this damping, which is now called Silk damping, knowing the CMBtemperature and assuming the density of baryons and electrons. Observations with the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the Planck satellite have revealed the predicted damping of acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum and confirmed one important prediction of the theory. In 1970, R.A. Sunyaev and Ya.B. Zeldovich showed that such energy release in the early Universe should lead to characteristic deviations of the CMB spectrum from the Planck one. The development of the technology of cryogenic detectors of submillimeter and millimeter wavelength radiation has made it possible to measure the CMB spectral distortions at 10-8 of its total intensity (PIXIE). This has sharply increased the interest of theoretical cosmologists in the problem of energy release when smallscale sound waves are damped. We have derived a relativistic formula for the energy of a standing sound wave in a photon-baryon-electron plasma from simple hydrodynamic and thermodynamic relations. This formula is applicable for an arbitrary relation between the

  2. Radiation pressure of standing waves on liquid columns and small diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    The radiation pressure of standing ultrasonic waves in air is demonstrated in this investigation to influence the dynamics of liquid columns and small flames. With the appropriate choice of the acoustic amplitude and wavelength, the natural tendency of long columns to break because of surface tension was suppressed in reduced gravity [M. J. Marr-Lyon, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2293-2296 (2001); 87(20), 9001(E) (2001)]. Evaluation of the radiation force shows that narrow liquid columns are attracted to velocity antinodes. The response of a small vertical diffusion flame to ultrasonic radiation pressure in a horizontal standing wave was observed in normal gravity. In agreement with our predictions of the distribution of ultrasonic radiation stress on the flame, the flame is attracted to a pressure antinode and becomes slightly elliptical with the major axis in the plane of the antinode. The radiation pressure distribution and the direction of the radiation force follow from the dominance of the dipole scattering for small flames. Understanding radiation stress on flames is relevant to the control of hot fluid objects. [Work supported by NASA.

  3. Pressure radiation from a perforated duct exit region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglin; Vardy, Alan E.; Pokrajac, Dubravka

    2015-09-01

    The influence of a perforated extension region on pressures radiated from the end of a duct is studied numerically using CFD. Planar 2-D geometry is considered and particular attention is paid to the case of pressure disturbances radiated from railway tunnels in cut-and-cover regions. The mechanism that causes this behaviour is described and it is shown to have an important influence of the effectiveness of a perforated extension region. It is found that such regions can strongly reduce the pressures radiated from a duct outlet, but that this benefit is offset by pressures radiated directly from the holes along the perforated region itself. In the particular case of tunnel design, practical studies of wave transmission are usually based on 1-D, plane-wave, analyses. Accordingly, attention is paid to assessing the limitations of such approaches in the case of wave propagation along a perforated region.

  4. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION AS THE DOMINANT RADIATION MECHANISM IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.; Margutti, Raffaella; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a set of numerical simulations of long-duration gamma-ray burst jets associated with massive, compact stellar progenitors. The simulations extend to large radii and allow us to locate the region in which the peak frequency of the advected radiation is set before the radiation is released at the photosphere. Light curves and spectra are calculated for different viewing angles as well as different progenitor structures and jet properties. We find that the radiation released at the photosphere of matter-dominated jets is able to reproduce the observed Amati and energy-Lorentz factor correlations. Our simulations also predict a correlation between the burst energy and the radiative efficiency of the prompt phase, consistent with observations.

  5. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. 1; Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solution for the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan. G. S.; Kallman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scale by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the 2D radiation transfer problem in a flux limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary 1D models for the wind, and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for AGN luminosities greater than 0.1 L(sub edd) external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < tau(sub T) < 0.6), is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  6. Vapor pressure lowering effects due to salinity and suction pressure in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Battistelli, A.; Calore, C.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    The equation-of-state module able to handle saline brines with non-condensible gas, developed for the TOUGH2 simulator, has been improved to include vapor pressure lowering (VPL) due to suction pressure as represented by Kelvin`s equation. In this equation the effects of salt are considered whereas those of non-condensible gas have currently been neglected. Numerical simulations of fluid production from tight matrix blocks have been performed to evaluate the impact of VPL effects due to salinity and suction pressure on the depletion behaviour of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. Previous studies performed neglected VPL due to suction pressure showed that for initial NaCl mass fractions above threshold values, {open_quotes}sealing{close_quotes} of the block occurs and large amounts of liquid fluid may not be recovered. On the other hand, below the threshold value the matrix block dries out due to fluid production. The inclusion of VPL due to suction pressure does not allow complete vaporization of the liquid phase. As a result, the threshold NaCl concentration above which sealing of the matrix block occurs is increased. Above the {open_quotes}critical{close_quotes} NaCl concentration, block depletion behaviour with and without the VPL due to suction pressure is almost identical, as liquid phase saturation remains high even after long production times. As the VPL due to suction pressure depends mainly on capillary pressure, the shape of capillary pressure functions used in numerical simulations is important in determining VPL effects on block depletion.

  7. Effect of random errors in planar PIV data on pressure estimation in vortex dominated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Jeffrey; Yarusevych, Serhiy

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivity of pressure estimation techniques from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements to random errors in measured velocity data is investigated using the flow over a circular cylinder as a test case. Direct numerical simulations are performed for ReD = 100, 300 and 1575, spanning laminar, transitional, and turbulent wake regimes, respectively. A range of random errors typical for PIV measurements is applied to synthetic PIV data extracted from numerical results. A parametric study is then performed using a number of common pressure estimation techniques. Optimal temporal and spatial resolutions are derived based on the sensitivity of the estimated pressure fields to the simulated random error in velocity measurements, and the results are compared to an optimization model derived from error propagation theory. It is shown that the reductions in spatial and temporal scales at higher Reynolds numbers leads to notable changes in the optimal pressure evaluation parameters. The effect of smaller scale wake structures is also quantified. The errors in the estimated pressure fields are shown to depend significantly on the pressure estimation technique employed. The results are used to provide recommendations for the use of pressure and force estimation techniques from experimental PIV measurements in vortex dominated laminar and turbulent wake flows.

  8. The separation of radiating and non-radiating near-field pressure fluctuations in supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongle; Morris, Philip J.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional analysis infers the jet noise source characteristics from either the turbulent fluctuations in the mixing layer, the near-field pressure fluctuations, or the far-field radiated sound. It is generally accepted that the first two techniques include both the radiating and non-radiating noise sources while the last senses only the radiated sound. Understanding of the characteristics of the non-radiating and radiating fluctuations helps to shed light on the noise source mechanisms. For this purpose, a quantitative analysis is introduced in this study to separate the radiating from the non-radiating near-field fluctuations. The analysis uses a high-fidelity unsteady jet flow and noise simulation for an internally mixed dual-stream nozzle. Based on the predicted far-field acoustic pressure on a virtual microphone array, a simple beamforming method is used to derive the equivalent wavepacket-like noise sources on a conical surface outside the jet mixing layer. These radiating noise sources are compared with the total near-field pressure fluctuations to examine their different characteristics. Wavepacket-like noise sources are filtered with the POD (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition) at discrete frequencies. Although the two equivalent noise sources show different amplitude distributions and phase velocities, they agree favorably with the Mach wave radiation theory as well as with the near-field turbulence. Both reproduce well the noise radiation pattern in terms of the phase, wavelength, radiation direction and noise levels when inserted into the wave equation.

  9. Venus exospheric structure - The role of solar radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1989-01-01

    The existence of a 'hot' population of hydrogen atoms in the Venus exosphere is well known. In the outer coronal region where it is dominant, r greater than about 2.0 R(V) (Venus radii), hydrogen atoms are also subject to a relatively strong radiation pressure exerted by resonant scattering of solar Lyman-alpha photons. Collisionless models illustrating the consequent structure are discussed, with the nonthermal population mimicked by a dual Maxwellian exobase kinetic distribution. In these models, a considerable fraction of the 'hot' atoms outside 2.0 R(V) belongs to the quasi-satellite component, this fraction exceeding 1/2 for r values between about 4.0 and 10.0 R(V). Solar ionization of bound atoms occurs mainly outside the ionopause, yielding a partial escape flux greater than about 2,000,000/sq cm per sec over the dayside exobase for assumed solar conditions. The inclusion of a cold exobase prescribed by Pioneer Venus observations has little influence on the outer region (in particular, the quasi-satellite component is unaltered) except that the transition to 'hot' kinetic character occurs closer to the exobase on the nightside due to the colder main exobase temperatures there.

  10. VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYERS OF RADIATION-DOMINATED, RELATIVISTIC JETS. II. THE FREE-STREAMING JET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2015-08-10

    We analyze the interaction of a radiation-dominated jet and its surroundings using the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit. In a previous paper we considered the two-stream scenario, which treats the jet and its surroundings as distinct media interacting through radiation viscous forces. Here we present an alternative boundary layer model, known as the free-streaming jet model—where a narrow stream of fluid is injected into a static medium—and present solutions where the flow is ultrarelativistic and the boundary layer is dominated by radiation. It is shown that these jets entrain material from their surroundings and that their cores have a lower density of scatterers and a harder spectrum of photons, leading to observational consequences for lines of sight that look “down the barrel of the jet.” These jetted outflow models may be applicable to the jets produced during long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington phases of tidal disruption events.

  11. Radiation interactions in high-pressure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1990-01-01

    This article is on basic radiation interaction processes in dense fluids and on interphase studies aiming at the interfacing of knowledge on radiation interaction processes in the gaseous and the liquid state of matter. It is specifically focused on the effect of the density and nature of the medium on electron production in irradiated fluids and on the state, energy, transport, and attachment of slow excess electrons in dense fluids especially dielectric liquids which possess excess-electron conduction bands (V{sub 0} < 0 eV). Studies over the past two decades have shown that the interactions of low-energy electrons with molecules embedded in dense media depend not only on the molecules themselves and their internal state of excitation, but also on the electron state and energy in -- and the nature and density of -- the medium in which the interactions occur.

  12. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P.D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; Witherow, W. K.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2 micron to 6.82 micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam-widths of approx. 175-400 micron, at ambient pressures approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) torr. The downward displacement of the particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of silica and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  13. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron Size Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P.D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; Witherow, W. K.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2 micron to 6.82 micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam-widths of approx. 175-400 micron, at ambient pressures approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) torr. The downward displacement of the particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of silica and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  14. Pressure-Induced Structural Transformation in Radiation-Amorphized Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin T.; Salje, E. K. H.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Tsiok, O. B.

    2007-03-30

    We study the response of a radiation-amorphized material to high pressure. We have used zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} amorphized by natural radiation over geologic times, and have measured its volume under high pressure, using the precise strain-gauge technique. On pressure increase, we observe apparent softening of the material, starting from 4 GPa. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we associate this softening with the amorphous-amorphous transformation accompanied by the increase of local coordination numbers. We observe permanent densification of the quenched sample and a nontrivial 'pressure window' at high temperature. These features point to a new class of amorphous materials that show a response to pressure which is distinctly different from that of crystals.

  15. Pressure-induced structural transformation in radiation-amorphized zircon.

    PubMed

    Trachenko, Kostya; Brazhkin, V V; Tsiok, O B; Dove, Martin T; Salje, E K H

    2007-03-30

    We study the response of a radiation-amorphized material to high pressure. We have used zircon ZrSiO4 amorphized by natural radiation over geologic times, and have measured its volume under high pressure, using the precise strain-gauge technique. On pressure increase, we observe apparent softening of the material, starting from 4 GPa. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we associate this softening with the amorphous-amorphous transformation accompanied by the increase of local coordination numbers. We observe permanent densification of the quenched sample and a nontrivial "pressure window" at high temperature. These features point to a new class of amorphous materials that show a response to pressure which is distinctly different from that of crystals.

  16. Active control of radiated pressure of a submarine hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xia; Tso, Yan; Juniper, Ross

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of the active control of low-frequency radiated pressure from submarine hulls is presented. Two typical hull models are examined in this paper. Each model consists of a water-loaded cylindrical shell with a hemispherical shell at one end and conical shell at the other end, which forms a simple model of a submarine hull. The conical end is excited by an axial force to simulate propeller excitations while the other end is free. The control action is implemented through a Tee-sectioned circumferential stiffener driven by pairs of PZT stack actuators. These actuators are located under the flange of the stiffener and driven out of phase to produce a control moment. A number of cost functions for minimizing the radiated pressure are examined. In general, it was found that the control system was capable of reducing more than half of the total radiated pressure from each of the submarine hull for the first three axial modes.

  17. Manipulation of fluid objects with acoustic radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Thiessen, David B

    2004-11-01

    Conditions are summarized for manipulating and stabilizing fluid objects based on the acoustic radiation pressure of standing waves. Examples include (but are not limited to) liquid drops, gas bubbles in liquids, and cylindrical liquid bridges. The emphasis is on situations where the characteristic wavelength of the acoustic field is large in comparison to the relevant dimension of the fluid object. Tables are presented for ease of comparing the signs of qualitatively different radiation force parameters for a variety of fluid objects.

  18. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, A.; Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Jamme, F.; Rouam, V.; Wien, F.; Laprévote, O.; Réfrégiers, M.

    2012-05-01

    We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  19. Observation of Nonclassical Radiation Pressure Forces on a Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond; Aumentado, Jose; Teufel, John

    Squeezed states of light are known to be useful for enhancing mechanical displacement sensing since they can be tailored to reduce the ``photon counting noise'' that limits the measurement's noise floor. On the other hand, recent experiments in cavity optomechanics have reached measurement regimes where an interrogating light field exerts radiation pressure noise on a mechanical oscillator. One outstanding challenge has been to explore the intersection between such experiments. I will present data obtained using a superconducting cavity optomechanical system wherein a mechanical oscillator is driven by nonclassical radiation pressure imparted by squeezed microwave fields. JBC acknowledges the NRC for financial support.

  20. Cosmic background radiation anisotropies in universes dominated by nonbaryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. R.; Efstathiou, G.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation for universes dominated by massive collisionless relics of the big bang are presented. An initially adiabatic constant curvature perturbation spectrum is assumed. In models with cold dark matter, the simplest hypothesis - that galaxies follow the mass distribution leads to small-scale anisotropies which exceed current observational limits if omega is less than 0.2 h to the -4/3. Since low values of omega are indicated by dynamical studies of galaxy clustering, cold particle models in which light traces mass are probably incorrect. Reheating of the pregalactic medium is unlikely to modify this conclusion. In cold particle or neutrino-dominated universes with omega = 1, presented predictions for small-scale and quadrupole anisotropies are below current limits. In all cases, the small-scale fluctuations are predicted to be about 10 percent linearly polarized.

  1. VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYERS OF RADIATION-DOMINATED, RELATIVISTIC JETS. I. THE TWO-STREAM MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2015-08-10

    Using the relativistic equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit, we analyze the boundary layers that develop between radiation-dominated jets and their environments. In this paper we present the solution for the self-similar, 2D, plane-parallel two-stream problem, wherein the jet and the ambient medium are considered to be separate, interacting fluids, and we compare our results to those of previous authors. (In a companion paper we investigate an alternative scenario, known as the free-streaming jet model.) Consistent with past findings, we show that the boundary layer that develops between the jet and its surroundings creates a region of low-density material. These models may be applicable to sources such as super-Eddington tidal disruption events and long gamma-ray bursts.

  2. Evidence for a Cenozoic radiation of ferns in an angiosperm-dominated canopy.

    PubMed

    Schuettpelz, Eric; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2009-07-07

    In today's angiosperm-dominated terrestrial ecosystems, leptosporangiate ferns are truly exceptional--accounting for 80% of the approximately 11,000 nonflowering vascular plant species. Recent studies have shown that this remarkable diversity is mostly the result of a major leptosporangiate radiation beginning in the Cretaceous, following the rise of angiosperms. This pattern is suggestive of an ecological opportunistic response, with the proliferation of flowering plants across the landscape resulting in the formation of many new niches--both on forest floors and within forest canopies--into which leptosporangiate ferns could diversify. At present, one-third of leptosporangiate species grow as epiphytes in the canopies of angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forests. However, we know too little about the evolutionary history of epiphytic ferns to assess whether or not their diversification was in fact linked to the establishment of these forests, as would be predicted by the ecological opportunistic response hypothesis. Here we provide new insight into leptosporangiate diversification and the evolution of epiphytism by integrating a 400-taxon molecular dataset with an expanded set of fossil age constraints. We find evidence for a burst of fern diversification in the Cenozoic, apparently driven by the evolution of epiphytism. Whether this explosive radiation was triggered simply by the establishment of modern angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forest canopies, or spurred on by some other large-scale extrinsic factor (e.g., climate change) remains to be determined. In either case, it is clear that in both the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, leptosporangiate ferns were adept at exploiting newly created niches in angiosperm-dominated ecosystems.

  3. Evidence for a Cenozoic radiation of ferns in an angiosperm-dominated canopy

    PubMed Central

    Schuettpelz, Eric; Pryer, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    In today's angiosperm-dominated terrestrial ecosystems, leptosporangiate ferns are truly exceptional—accounting for 80% of the ≈11,000 nonflowering vascular plant species. Recent studies have shown that this remarkable diversity is mostly the result of a major leptosporangiate radiation beginning in the Cretaceous, following the rise of angiosperms. This pattern is suggestive of an ecological opportunistic response, with the proliferation of flowering plants across the landscape resulting in the formation of many new niches—both on forest floors and within forest canopies—into which leptosporangiate ferns could diversify. At present, one-third of leptosporangiate species grow as epiphytes in the canopies of angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forests. However, we know too little about the evolutionary history of epiphytic ferns to assess whether or not their diversification was in fact linked to the establishment of these forests, as would be predicted by the ecological opportunistic response hypothesis. Here we provide new insight into leptosporangiate diversification and the evolution of epiphytism by integrating a 400-taxon molecular dataset with an expanded set of fossil age constraints. We find evidence for a burst of fern diversification in the Cenozoic, apparently driven by the evolution of epiphytism. Whether this explosive radiation was triggered simply by the establishment of modern angiosperm-dominated tropical rain forest canopies, or spurred on by some other large-scale extrinsic factor (e.g., climate change) remains to be determined. In either case, it is clear that in both the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, leptosporangiate ferns were adept at exploiting newly created niches in angiosperm-dominated ecosystems. PMID:19567832

  4. Radiation-induced decomposition of PETN and TATB under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Yang, Wenge

    2008-10-02

    We have investigated decomposition of PETN and TATB induced by white synchrotron X-ray radiation in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature and two pressures, nearly ambient and about 6 GPa. The decomposition rate of TATB decreases significantly when it is pressurized to 5.9 GPa. The measurements were highly reproducible and allowed us to obtain decomposition rates and the order parameters of the reactions.

  5. Blood pressure differences between arms and association of dominant hands with blood pressure differences and carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shinji

    2013-06-01

    Guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend that blood pressure (BP) should be measured twice at every visit; it should be measured in both arms at the first visit, and the right arm BP or higher BP should be recorded. Manufacturers of home BP monitors tend to design the device for measurement of left arm BP. The arm preferred for BP measurement differs according to the methods recommended by the society and according to the home BP monitors. The BP difference (ΔBP) is calculated by subtracting left arm BP from right arm BP. Here, we aim to first investigate which hand will give the most accurate reading by a sphygmomanometer in daily medical practice. Second, we wish to assess the association of the dominant hand with absolute BP difference (|ΔBP|) of at least 10 mmHg and with early atherosclerotic markers in a subanalysis. We found that 6.4% of outpatients were left handed, and the percentage of individuals with systolic |ΔBP| (|ΔSBP|) and diastolic |ΔBP| (|ΔDBP|) of at least 10 mmHg was 14.4 and 7.2%, respectively. The dominant hand was not significantly associated with |ΔBP| of at least 10 mmHg or early atherosclerotic markers. This study suggests that BP measured in one arm is substitutable with that of the other arm because of a lack of association of |ΔBP| with the dominant hand. However, BP of both arms should be actively measured in new outpatients with moderate fever, lifestyle-related diseases, vascular events, age 65 years and above, and smoking history, all of which are factors potentially associated with |ΔBP| of at least 10 mmHg, regardless of the dominant hand.

  6. The NuSTAR X-ray Spectrum of Hercules X-1: A Radiation-Dominated Radiative Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Gottlieb, Amy; Fuerst, Felix; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Marcu-Cheatham, Diana; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wilms, Joern; Wood, Kent

    2016-04-01

    We report on new spectral modeling of an observation of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). We utilize a radiation-dominated radiative shock model that is an implementation of the analytic work of Becker & Wolff (2007) on Comptonized accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars within the XSPEC analysis environment. We obtain a good fit to the Her X-1 spin-phase averaged 4 to 78 keV X-ray spectrum observed by NuSTAR during a main-on phase of the Her X-1 35-day accretion disk precession period. This model allows us to estimate the accretion rate, the Comptonizing temperature of the radiating plasma, the radius of the magnetic polar cap, and the average scattering opacity parameters in the accretion column. This is in contrast to previous spectral models that characterized the shape of the X-ray spectrum but could not determine the physical parameters of the accretion flow. We describe the details of our spectral fitting model and we discuss the interpretation of the resulting accretion flow physical parameters.This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  7. The NuSTAR X-Ray Spectrum of Hercules X-1: A Radiation-dominated Radiative Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, Peter A.; Gottlieb, Amy M.; Fürst, Felix; Hemphill, Paul B.; Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wilms, Jörn; Wood, Kent S.

    2016-11-01

    We report on new spectral modeling of the accreting X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1. Our radiation-dominated radiative shock model is an implementation of the analytic work of Becker & Wolff on Comptonized accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars. We obtain a good fit to the spin-phase-averaged 4-78 keV X-ray spectrum observed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array during a main-on phase of the Her X-1 35 day accretion disk precession period. This model allows us to estimate the accretion rate, the Comptonizing temperature of the radiating plasma, the radius of the magnetic polar cap, and the average scattering opacity parameters in the accretion column. This is in contrast to previous phenomenological models that characterized the shape of the X-ray spectrum, but could not determine the physical parameters of the accretion flow. We describe the spectral fitting details and discuss the interpretation of the accretion flow physical parameters.

  8. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities compared with the pure gravity case (i.e. the Chamberlain profiles), in particular at noon and midnight. We finally show the existence of an exopause that appears naturally as the external limit for bounded particles, above which all particles are escaping.

  9. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  10. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  11. Detection of radiation pressure acting on 2009 BD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.

    2012-05-01

    We report the direct detection of radiation pressure on the asteroid 2009 BD, one of the smallest multi-opposition near-Earth objects currently known, with H ˜ 28.4. Under the purely gravitational model of NEODyS the object is currently considered a possible future impactor, with impact solutions starting in 2071. The detection of a radiation-related acceleration allows us to estimate an Area to Mass Ratio ( AMR) for the object, that can be converted (under some assumptions) into a range of possible values for its average density. Our result AMR = (2.97 ± 0.33) × 10 -4 m 2 kg -1 is compatible with the object being of natural origin, and it is narrow enough to exclude a man-made nature. The possible origin of this object, its future observability, and the importance of radiation pressure in the impact monitoring process are also discussed.

  12. Non-radiative processes dominate land surface signals in the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, R. M.; Davin, E.; O'Halloran, T. L.; Pongratz, J.; Zhao, K.; Cescatti, A.

    2016-12-01

    Perturbations to the surface energy budget linked to land cover/land management changes (LCMC) are rarely included in land-climate assessments although they have long been recognized as important drivers of local climate change. At local scales, climate forcings from LCMC depend strongly on changes to surface energy redistribution by various non-radiative mechanisms, dampening or even outweighing the local radiative effect of an albedo change. The extent to which these mechanisms are locally relevant for different types of LCMC across the world remains largely unquantified. Here, we combine extensive records of remote sensing and in-situ observations to quantify local forcings for nine common real-world LCMC perturbations, identifying their underlying physical mechanisms and analyzing their spatial patterns at the global scale. We find that throughout the densely populated regions, non-radiative forcings dominate the local surface temperature response in 8 of 9 LCMC scenarios. Further, the observed local response to re-/afforestation is an annual cooling in all regions south of the upper conterminous United States, Western Europe, and Indo-China. Given that the global response to re-/afforestation in these regions is likely a cooling, projects here can be seen as attractive mitigation measures. Our results - gridded to a 1° x 1° resolution - can be directly used to evaluate climate models or compute indicators providing a more comprehensive picture of the trade-offs between local and global climate forcings linked to land sector projects and policies.

  13. Radiation-pressure-supported obscuring tori around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pier, Edward A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation pressure acting on dust grains can support the vertical thickness of the obscuring tori believed to exist in active galactic nuclei. Using the results of 2D radiation transfer calculations, we evaluate the radiation force acting on these tori. We find that on the inner edge of the torus the radiation force is about 350 l(E) times the gravitational force of the nucleus, where l(E) is the Eddington ratio. Beyond a few torus heights from the inner edge, the radiation force is negligible with respect to gravity. However, between these two extremes lies a region of considerable size where the ratio of radiation force to gravity is nearly constant and can be of order unity for l(E) about 0.1. If the distribution of material within the torus is sufficiently lumpy, there is a significant time-varying component to the radiation force. This drives the random motions of the constituent clouds, thickening the torus at lower values of l(E).

  14. The Role of Radiation Pressure in Assembling Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz-Ho Tsang, Benny; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2016-06-01

    Super star clusters are the most extreme star-forming regions of the Universe - they occupy the most massive end of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, forming stars at exceptionally high rates and gas surface densities. The radiation feedback from the dense population of massive stars is expected to play a dynamic role during the assembly of the clusters, and represents a potential mechanism for launching large-scale galactic outflows. Observationally, large distances and dust obscuration have been withholding clues about the early stages of massive cluster formation; theoretically, the lack of accurate and efficient radiation transfer schemes in multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations has been deterring our understanding of radiative feedback. By extending the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH with a closure-free, Monte Carlo radiation transport scheme, we perform 3D radiation hydrodynamical simulations of super star cluster formation from the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds. Our simulations probe the star formation in densities typical for starbursts, with both non-ionizing UV and dust-reprocessed IR radiation treated self-consistently. We aim to determine the role of radiation pressure in regulating star formation, and its capacity in driving intense outflows.

  15. Observation of strong radiation pressure forces from squeezed light on a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy B.; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José; Teufel, John D.

    2016-07-01

    In quantum-enhanced sensing, non-classical states are used to improve the sensitivity of a measurement. Squeezed light, in particular, has proved a useful resource in enhanced mechanical displacement sensing, although the fundamental limit to this enhancement due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle has not been encountered experimentally. Here we use a microwave cavity optomechanical system to observe the squeezing-dependent radiation pressure noise that necessarily accompanies any quantum enhancement of the measurement precision and ultimately limits the measurement noise performance. By increasing the measurement strength so that radiation pressure forces dominate the thermal motion of the mechanical oscillator, we exploit the optomechanical interaction to implement an efficient quantum nondemolition measurement of the squeezed light. Thus, our results show how the mechanical oscillator improves the measurement of non-classical light, just as non-classical light enhances the measurement of the motion.

  16. Molecular Gas Dominated 50 kpc Ram Pressure Stripped Tail of the Coma Galaxy D100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, Pavel; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Cortese, Luca; Combes, Françoise; Yagi, Masafumi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Palouš, Jan; Roediger, Elke

    2017-04-01

    We have discovered large amounts of molecular gas, as traced by CO emission, in the ram pressure stripped gas tail of the Coma cluster galaxy D100 (GMP 2910), out to large distances of about 50 kpc. D100 has a 60 kpc long, strikingly narrow tail, which is bright in X-rays and Hα. Our observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope reveal in total ˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ H2 (assuming the standard CO-to-H2 conversion) in several regions along the tail, thus indicating that molecular gas may dominate its mass. Along the tail, we measure a smooth gradient in the radial velocity of the CO emission that is offset to lower values from the more diffuse Hα gas velocities. Such a dynamic separation of phases may be due to their differential acceleration by ram pressure. D100 is likely being stripped at a high orbital velocity ≳ 2200 km s-1 by (nearly) peak ram pressure. Combined effects of intra-cluster medium (ICM) viscosity and magnetic fields may be important for the evolution of the stripped interstellar matter. We propose that D100 has reached a continuous mode of stripping of dense gas remaining in its nuclear region. D100 is the second known case of an abundant molecular stripped gas tail, suggesting that conditions in the ICM at the centers of galaxy clusters may be favorable for molecularization. From comparison with other galaxies, we find that there is a good correlation between the CO flux and the Hα surface brightness in ram pressure stripped gas tails, over ˜2 dex. Based on observations made with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  17. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure.

  18. C3 as the dominant carbon cluster in high pressure discharges in graphite hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Khan, Sabih-ud-Din; Khalid, Rahila; Aleem, Abid; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2007-03-01

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C3 is the main feature but C4 and C5 are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C2 is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C3 is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C3 is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  19. Propagation of waves in a medium with high radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisnovatyy-Kogan, G. S.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    The propagation and mutual transformation of acoustic and thermal waves are investigated in media with a high radiative pressure. The equations of hydrodynamics for matter and the radiative transfer equations in a moving medium in the Eddington approximation are used in the investigation. Model problems of waves in a homogeneous medium with an abrupt jump in opacity and in a medium of variable opacity are presented. The characteristic and the times of variability are discussed. Amplitude for the brightness fluctuations for very massive stars are discussed.

  20. Solar radiation pressure effects on the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques, developed for the Mariner 10 Venus/Mercury spacecraft mission, was used for a detailed analysis of the effects of solar light pressure on the Helios spacecraft. Due to the fact that the main body of the Helios spacecraft is a surface of enclosure, inside of which most of the reradiated thermal energy is lost, expressions for the portion of the solar radiation force, produced by the thermal reradiation, had to be given a different form. Hence the need for the derivation of a somewhat different theoretical model for the force acting on the main body of the spacecraft.

  1. Influence of radiation damage on ruby as a pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, B.; Weikusat, C.; Miletich, R.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R.; Fujara, F.

    2010-11-01

    This study tackles the question if ruby crystals, irradiated with energetic heavy ions, can still be used as reliable pressure sensors. The problem is linked to novel irradiation experiments, exposing pressurized samples to swift heavy-ion beams. In order to test and quantify a possible influence of radiation damage on the laser-induced fluorescence lines of ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}), small crystals were exposed to different heavy ions (Xe, Au, and U) with kinetic energies of several giga-electron volt at ambient as well as high-pressure conditions. With increasing fluence (ions/cm{sup 2}), the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines shift both to lower wavelengths which leads to an underestimation of the pressure. An empirical correction term {epsilon} is proposed to include the irradiation damage effect into the commonly employed ruby calibration scale.

  2. Quantum-Electrodynamic Processes in a Radiation-Dominated Robertson-Walker Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Tsaregorodtsev, L. I.

    Quantum electrodynamics in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe with the line element ds2=dt2 - a2(t)(dx2+dy2+dz2) (radiation-dominated universe) is considered. The differential probability of bremsstrahlung of an electron in the external gravitational field and the differential probability of an electron-positron pair and photon creation from the vacuum are calculated by using the perturbative S-matrix formalism. The behavior of these probabilities in different kinematic regions is investigated. The total probabilities are shown to be finite. In conclusion, the total probability of a pair and photon creation from vacuum We is compared with the total probability of pair production due to an expansion of the universe W0. The comparison shows that We=1.9·10-2W0 at about the Compton time of an electron.

  3. Radiation pressure confinement - II. Application to the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Alexei; Laor, Ari; Stern, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are characterized by similar broad emission lines properties at all luminosities (1039 - 1047 erg s-1). What produces this similarity over a vast range of 108 in luminosity? Photoionization is inevitably associated with momentum transfer to the photoionized gas. Yet, most of the photoionized gas in the broad-line region (BLR) follows Keplerian orbits, which suggests that the BLR originates from gas with a large enough column for gravity to dominate. The photoionized surface layer of the gas must develop a pressure gradient due to the incident radiation force. We present solutions for the structure of such a hydrostatic photoionized gas layer in the BLR. The gas is stratified, with a low-density highly ionized surface layer, a density rise inwards and a uniform-density cooler inner region, where the gas pressure reaches the incident radiation pressure. This radiation pressure confinement (RPC) of the photoionized layer leads to a universal ionization parameter U ˜ 0.1 in the inner photoionized layer, independent of luminosity and distance. Thus, RPC appears to explain the universality of the BLR properties in AGN. We present predictions for the BLR emission per unit covering factor, as a function of distance from the ionizing source, for a range of ionizing continuum slopes and gas metallicity. The predicted mean strength of most lines (excluding H β), and their different average-emission radii, are consistent with available observations.

  4. Familial normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) with an autosomal-dominant inheritance: a novel subgroup of NPH.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshimi; Kawanami, Toru; Nagasawa, Hikaru; Iseki, Chifumi; Hanyu, Haruo; Kato, Takeo

    2011-09-15

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) has two clinical forms: secondary NPH and idiopathic NPH (iNPH). Most patients with NPH occur sporadically: until now, only two families have been reported to have sibling cases of NPH. We here report a large family with 4 patients with elderly-onset NPH in three generations. All of them had cognitive impairment, gait disturbance, and urinary problems, along with normal pressure of cerebrospinal fluid. Their brain MRI showed enlargement of the ventricles and a disproportional narrowing of the subarachnoid space and cortical sulci at the high convexity of the cerebrum, which are the features of iNPH on MRI. The family interview also disclosed additional 4 patients who were suspected as having NPH. The disease seems to be inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion. No known causes of secondary NPH were found in any of the patients. This is the first report to show a large family with NPH patients in three generations, who had clinical and MRI features indistinguishable from iNPH. This seems to represent a novel subgroup of NPH, familial NPH. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal Analysis of a Finite Element Model in a Radiation Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Arthur T.

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of thermal analysis, evaluating the University of Arizona mirror design, for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Pre-Phase A vehicle concept. Model building begins using Thermal Desktop(TM), by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, to import a NASTRAN bulk data file from the structural model of the mirror assembly. Using AutoCAD(R) capabilities, additional surfaces are added to simulate the thermal aspects of the problem which, for due reason, are not part of the structural model. Surfaces are then available to accept thermophysical and thermo-optical properties. Thermal Desktop(TM) calculates radiation conductors using Monte Carlo simulations. Then Thermal Desktop(TM) generates the SINDA input file having a one-to-one correspondence with the NASTRAN node and element definitions. A model is now available to evaluate the mirror design in the radiation dominated environment, conduct parametric trade studies of the thermal design, and provide temperatures to the finite element structural model.

  6. Thermal Analysis of a Finite Element Model in a Radiation Dominated Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Arthur T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of thermal analysis, evaluating the University of Arizona mirror design, for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Pre-Phase A vehicle concept. Model building begins using Thermal Desktop(TM), by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, to import a NASTRAN bulk data file from the structural model of the mirror assembly. Using AutoCAD(R) capabilities, additional surfaces are added to simulate the thermal aspects of the problem which, for due reason, are not part of the structural model. Surfaces are then available to accept thermophysical and thermo-optical properties. Thermal Desktop(TM) calculates radiation conductors using Monte Carlo simulations. Then Thermal Desktop(TM) generates the SINDA input file having a one-to-one correspondence with the NASTRAN node and element definitions. A model is now available to evaluate the mirror design in the radiation dominated environment, conduct parametric trade studies of the thermal design, and provide temperatures to the finite element structural model.

  7. Thermal Analysis of a Finite Element Model in a Radiation Dominated Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Arhur T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of thermal analysis, evaluating the University of Arizona mirror design, for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Pre-Phase A vehicle concept. Model building begins using Thermal Desktop(Tm), by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, to import a NASTRAN bulk data file from the structural model of the mirror assembly. Using AutoCAD(R) capabilities, additional surfaces are added to simulate the thermal aspects of the problem which, for due reason, are not part of the structural model. Surfaces are then available to accept thermophysical and thermo-optical properties. Thermal Desktop(Tm) calculates radiation conductors using Monte Carlo simulations. Then Thermal Desktop(Tm) generates the SINDA/Fluint input file having a one-to-one correspondence with the NASTRAN node and element definitions. A model is now available to evaluate the mirror design in the radiation dominated environment conduct parametric trade studies of the thermal design, and provide temperatures to the finite element structural model.

  8. Multi-dimensional effects in radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V. K.

    2015-07-31

    A laser carries momentum. On reflection from an ultra-thin overdense plasma foil, it deposits recoil momentum on the foil, i.e. exerts radiation pressure on the foil electrons and pushes them to the rear. The space charge field thus created takes the ions along, accelerating the electron-ion double layer as a single unit. When the foil has surface ripple, of wavelength comparable to laser wavelength, the radiation pressure acts non-uniformly on the foil and the perturbation grows as Reyleigh-Taylor (RT) instability as the foil moves. The finite spot size of the laser causes foil to bend. These effects limit the quasi-mono energy acceleration of ions. Multi-ion foils, e.g., diamond like carbon foil embedded with protons offer the possibility of suppressing RT instability.

  9. Ion acceleration with radiation pressure in quantum electrodynamic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sorbo, Dario; Blackman, David R.; Capdessus, Remi; Small, Kristina; Slade-Lowther, Cody; Luo, Wen; Duff, Matthew J.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; McKenna, Paul; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Pasley, John; Ridgers, Christopher P.

    2017-05-01

    The radiation pressure of next generation high-intensity lasers could efficiently accelerate ions to GeV energies. However, nonlinear quantum-electrodynamic effects play an important role in the interaction of these lasers with matter. We show that these quantum-electrodynamic effects lead to the production of a critical density pair-plasma which completely absorbs the laser pulse and consequently reduces the accelerated ion energy and efficiency by 30-50%.

  10. Dynamic Response of Dielectric Lenses Influenced By Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Daniel George, Jr.

    Through analytical modeling and numerical simulations the dynamic response and stability of dielectric lenses that are influenced by radiation pressure forces and torques is investigated. Radiation pressure forces and torques are applied to the system via momentum transfer between the laser beam light and lens. The 2D response of a rolling semi-cylindrical rod that is influenced by radiation pressure is simulated using constant and modulating light intensities. Stable oscillations and regions of stability in the motion of the semi-cylindrical rod are found for both a mirrored and non-mirrored rod. The results showed that at a critical intensity of 1.72 x 106 W/m2 and 12.81 x 106 W/m2 the mirrored and non-mirrored rods motion bifurcates and begins to show neutrally stable oscillations around some higher angular orientation. Lastly, it was shown that by sinusoidally modulating the laser intensity that the motion showed stable oscillations around previously unstable equilibrium angles of attack for a constant intensity. The dynamics of a gravity-free 3D hemisphere that is influenced by radiation pressure is also considered. The motion of the system is analyzed to produce various types of gyroscopic motion. Using analytical and numerical techniques pure precessional motion along with looping, sinusoidal, and cuspsoidal nutation was shown. By first utilizing a closed loop PID controller, an open loop control algorithm was developed using an intensity time history from the closed loop system. The intensity time history was then applied to allow for angular position control of the hemisphere for a region of a 4D parameter space. The results showed that for a given parameter space approximately 25% of the initial condition parameter space allowed for the steady state angular position of the hemisphere to be within 5o of the incoming laser light direction.

  11. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    Under some circumstances the absorption of radiation momentum by an absorbing medium opens the possibility of a dynamical instability, sometimes called 'mock gravity'. Here, a simplified abstract model is studied in which the radiation source is assumed to remain spatially uniform, there is no reabsorption or reradiated light, and no forces other than radiative pressure act on the absorbing medium. It is shown that this model displays the unique feature of being not only unstable, but also self-organizing. The structure approaches a statistical dynamical steady state which is almost independent of initial conditions. In this saturated state the absorbers are concentrated in thin walls around empty bubbles; as the instability develops the big bubbles get bigger and the small ones get crushed and disappear. A linear analysis shows that to first order the thin walls are indeed stable structures. It is speculated that this instability may play a role in forming cosmic large-scale structure.

  12. Ion acceleration through radiation pressure in quanto-electrodynamical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sorbo, Dario; Ridgers, Chris; Laser Plasmas; Fusion Team

    2016-10-01

    The strong radiation pressure carried by high-intensity lasers interacting with plasmas can accelerate ions over very short distances. The resulting compact particle accelerator could find applications in medical physics (radiotherapy) as well as in fundamental physics (hadron interactions). With next-generation multi-petawatt lasers, reaching focused intensity 1023Wcm-2 , ions could potentially reach GeV energies. However, the physics of laser-matter interactions at these extreme intensities is not well understood. In particular, on acceleration by the electromagnetic fields of the laser, the electrons in the plasma start to radiate hard photons prolifically. These hard photons can decay to electron-positron pairs, a cascade of pair production can ensue leading to the formation of an over-dense pair plasma which can absorb the laser-pulse. We have developed a self-consistent theory for both hole boring and light sail radiation pressure ion-acceleration, accounting for radiation-reaction and pair-creation. We show that the key role is played by a pair plasma that arises between the laser and the accelerated ions, strongly modifying the laser absorption.

  13. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  14. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams driven by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Steinke, S; Schnürer, M; Sokollik, T; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Jung, D; Schreiber, J; Hegelich, B M; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Tajima, T; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W; Habs, D

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10(19) W/cm2. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C6+ ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  15. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure.

    PubMed

    Fick, Steven E; Breckenridge, Franklin R

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms.

  16. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Steven E.; Breckenridge, Franklin R.

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms. PMID:27805084

  17. Solar Radiation Pressure and Attitude Modeling of GNSS Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.

    2011-12-01

    The main non-gravitational orbit perturbation acting on GNSS satellites is the solar radiation pressure. There are two main approaches to model this force: 1) adjusting empirical parameters that fit best the GNSS tracking data, and 2) computing the a priori force from analytical models based on the detailed satellite structure and information available on ground. The first approach is not based on the physical interaction between solar radiation and the satellite, while the second one cannot be easily adjusted to the real on-orbit behaviour of the satellites, e.g., changes due to aging of optical properties or deviations from nominal attitude. We use here an intermediate approach, an analytical box-wing model based on the physical interaction between the solar radiation and a satellite consisting of a bus (box shape) and solar panels. Furthermore, some of the parameters of the box-wing model can be adjusted to fit the GNSS tracking data, namely the optical properties of the satellite surfaces. It was found that a pure box-wing model interacting with solar radiation is not sufficient for precise orbit determination. In particular a rotation lag angle of the solar panels was identified. This deviation of the solar panels from nominal attitude is a key factor to obtain precise GNSS orbits. Moreover, the yaw attitude of GNSS satellites during eclipse seasons deviates from nominal attitude due to maneuvers performed by the satellites. As mentioned in other studies, the phase measurements are degraded if these maneuvers are not taken into account since the modelled position of the navigation antenna may differ from the true position. In this study we focus on the impact of the yaw attitude on the solar radiation pressure parameters and the benefits for precise orbit determination and prediction.

  18. Quasi-Sun-Pointing of Spacecraft Using Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes a method of utilizing solar-radiation pressure to keep the axis of rotation of a small spin-stabilized spacecraft pointed approximately (typically, within an angle of 10 deg to 20 deg) toward the Sun. Axisymmetry is not required. Simple tilted planar vanes would be attached to the outer surface of the body, so that the resulting spacecraft would vaguely resemble a rotary fan, windmill, or propeller. The vanes would be painted black for absorption of Solar radiation. A theoretical analysis based on principles of geometric optics and mechanics has shown that torques produced by Solar-radiation pressure would cause the axis of rotation to precess toward Sun-pointing. The required vane size would be a function of the angular momentum of the spacecraft and the maximum acceptable angular deviation from Sun-pointing. The analysis also shows that the torques produced by the vanes would slowly despin the spacecraft -- an effect that could be counteracted by adding specularly reflecting "spin-up" vanes.

  19. Self-cooling of a micromirror by radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Gigan, S; Böhm, H R; Paternostro, M; Blaser, F; Langer, G; Hertzberg, J B; Schwab, K C; Bäuerle, D; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A

    2006-11-02

    Cooling of mechanical resonators is currently a popular topic in many fields of physics including ultra-high precision measurements, detection of gravitational waves and the study of the transition between classical and quantum behaviour of a mechanical system. Here we report the observation of self-cooling of a micromirror by radiation pressure inside a high-finesse optical cavity. In essence, changes in intensity in a detuned cavity, as caused by the thermal vibration of the mirror, provide the mechanism for entropy flow from the mirror's oscillatory motion to the low-entropy cavity field. The crucial coupling between radiation and mechanical motion was made possible by producing free-standing micromirrors of low mass (m approximately 400 ng), high reflectance (more than 99.6%) and high mechanical quality (Q approximately 10,000). We observe cooling of the mechanical oscillator by a factor of more than 30; that is, from room temperature to below 10 K. In addition to purely photothermal effects we identify radiation pressure as a relevant mechanism responsible for the cooling. In contrast with earlier experiments, our technique does not need any active feedback. We expect that improvements of our method will permit cooling ratios beyond 1,000 and will thus possibly enable cooling all the way down to the quantum mechanical ground state of the micromirror.

  20. Analysis of the pressure requirements for silk spinning reveals a pultrusion dominated process.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, James; Holland, Chris

    2017-09-19

    Silks are remarkable materials with desirable mechanical properties, yet the fine details of natural production remain elusive and subsequently inaccessible to biomimetic strategies. Improved knowledge of the natural processes could therefore unlock development of a host of bio inspired fibre spinning systems. Here, we use the Chinese silkworm Bombyx mori to review the pressure requirements for natural spinning and discuss the limits of a biological extrusion domain. This provides a target for finite element analysis of the flow of silk proteins, with the aim of bringing the simulated and natural domains into closer alignment. Supported by two parallel routes of experimental validation, our results indicate that natural spinning is achieved, not by extruding the feedstock, but by the pulling of nascent silk fibres. This helps unravel the oft-debated question of whether silk is pushed or pulled from the animal, and provides impetus to the development of pultrusion-based biomimetic spinning devices.The natural production of silks remains elusive and subsequently inaccessible to biomimetic strategies. Here the authors show that silks cannot be spun by pushing alone, and that natural spinning is dominated by pultrusion, which provides design guidelines for future biomimetic spinning systems.

  1. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  2. Jet Formation from Massive Young Stars: Magnetohydrodynamics versus Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik; Porth, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation—assuming a 30 M ⊙ star—we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20° to 32° for stellar masses from 20 M ⊙ to 60 M ⊙. A small change in the line-force parameter α from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by ~8°. We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  3. Rosid radiation and the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengchang; Moore, Michael J.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Bell, Charles D.; Brockington, Samuel F.; Alexandre, Roolse; Davis, Charles C.; Latvis, Maribeth; Manchester, Steven R.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2009-01-01

    The rosid clade (70,000 species) contains more than one-fourth of all angiosperm species and includes most lineages of extant temperate and tropical forest trees. Despite progress in elucidating relationships within the angiosperms, rosids remain the largest poorly resolved major clade; deep relationships within the rosids are particularly enigmatic. Based on parsimony and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of separate and combined 12-gene (10 plastid genes, 2 nuclear; >18,000 bp) and plastid inverted repeat (IR; 24 genes and intervening spacers; >25,000 bp) datasets for >100 rosid species, we provide a greatly improved understanding of rosid phylogeny. Vitaceae are sister to all other rosids, which in turn form 2 large clades, each with a ML bootstrap value of 100%: (i) eurosids I (Fabidae) include the nitrogen-fixing clade, Celastrales, Huaceae, Zygophyllales, Malpighiales, and Oxalidales; and (ii) eurosids II (Malvidae) include Tapisciaceae, Brassicales, Malvales, Sapindales, Geraniales, Myrtales, Crossosomatales, and Picramniaceae. The rosid clade diversified rapidly into these major lineages, possibly over a period of <15 million years, and perhaps in as little as 4 to 5 million years. The timing of the inferred rapid radiation of rosids [108 to 91 million years ago (Mya) and 107–83 Mya for Fabidae and Malvidae, respectively] corresponds with the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests and the concomitant diversification of other clades that inhabit these forests, including amphibians, ants, placental mammals, and ferns. PMID:19223592

  4. Evolution of linear wave dark matter perturbations in the radiation-dominated era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ui-Han; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2017-07-01

    Linear perturbations of the wave dark matter, or ψ dark matter (ψ DM ), of particle mass ˜10-22 eV in the radiation-dominant era are analyzed, and the matter power spectrum at the photon-matter equality is obtained. We identify four phases of evolution for ψ DM perturbations, where the dynamics can be vastly different from the counterparts of cold dark matter (CDM). While in late stages, after mass oscillation, long-wave ψ DM perturbations are almost identical to CDM perturbations, some subtle differences remain. The differences are even greater with intermediate-to-short waves that bear no resemblance to those of CDM throughout the whole evolutionary history. The dissimilarity is due to quantum mechanical effects which lead to severe mode suppression. We also discuss the axion model with a cosine field potential. The power spectrum of axion models is generally almost identical to that of ψ DM , but in the extreme case, when the initial axion angle is near the field potential top, this axion model predicts a power excess over a range of wave numbers and a higher spectral cutoff than ψ DM , as if ψ DM had a higher particle mass.

  5. Influence of electron radiation and temperature on the cyclic, matrix dominated response of graphite-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Susan M.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of electron radiation and elevated temperature on the matrix-dominated cyclic response of standard T300/934 and a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy are characterized. Both materials were subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation, under vacuum, to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous orbit. Cyclic tests were performed at room temperature and elevated temperature (121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates to characterize the effects associated with irradiation and elevated temperature. Both materials exhibited energy dissipation in their response at elevated temperature. The irradiated modified material also exhibited energy dissipation at room temperature. The combination of elevated temperature and irradiation resulted in the most severe effects in the form of lower proportional limits, and greater energy dissipation. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature, T(g), of the standard material was lowered 39 C by irradiation, wereas the T(g) of the modified material was lowered 28 C by irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated materials.

  6. Influence of electron radiation and temperature on the cyclic, matrix dominated response of graphite-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Susan M.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of electron radiation and elevated temperature on the matrix-dominated cyclic response of standard T300/934 and a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy are characterized. Both materials were subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation, under vacuum, to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous orbit. Cyclic tests were performed at room temperature and elevated temperature (121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates to characterize the effects associated with irradiation and elevated temperature. Both materials exhibited energy dissipation in their response at elevated temperature. The irradiated modified material also exhibited energy dissipation at room temperature. The combination of elevated temperature and irradiation resulted in the most severe effects in the form of lower proportional limits, and greater energy dissipation. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature, T(g), of the standard material was lowered 39 C by irradiation, wereas the T(g) of the modified material was lowered 28 C by irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated materials.

  7. Inversion of the Earth spherical albedo from radiation-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, Olli; Herranen, Joonas; Näränen, Jyri; Virtanen, Jenni; Koivula, Hannu; Poutanen, Markku; Penttilä, Antti; Gritsevich, Maria; Muinonen, Karri

    2017-04-01

    We are studying the retrieval of the spherical albedo and net radiation of the Earth from the perturbations caused by the planet's radiation on the dynamics of its satellites. The spherical or Bond albedo gives the ratio of the fluxes incident on and scattered by the planet. The net radiation represents the net heat input into the planet's climate system and drives changes in its atmospheric, surface, and ocean temperatures. The ultimate aim of the study is inverting the problem and estimating the Earth albedo based on observations of satellites, simultaneously improving the space-geodetic positioning accuracy. Here we investigate the effect of the spherical albedo on satellite orbits with the help of a simplified model. We simulate the propagation of satellite orbits using a new simulation software. The simulation contains the main perturbing forces on medium and high Earth orbits, used by, e.g., navigation satellites, including the radiation pressure of reflected sunlight from the Earth. An arbitrary satellite shape model can be used, and the rotation of the satellite is modeled. In this first study, we use a box-wing satellite model with a simple surface BRDF. We also assume a diffusely reflecting Earth with a single global albedo value. We vary the Earth albedo and search for systematic effects on different orbits. Thereafter, we estimate the dependence of the albedo accuracy on the satellite positioning and timing data available. We show that the inversion of the spherical albedo with reasonable accuracy is feasible from the current space-geodetic measurements.

  8. Solar Radiation Pressure Binning for the Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.; Ghrist, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital maintenance parameters for individual satellites or groups of satellites have traditionally been set by examining orbital parameters alone, such as through apogee and perigee height binning; this approach ignored the other factors that governed an individual satellite's susceptibility to non-conservative forces. In the atmospheric drag regime, this problem has been addressed by the introduction of the "energy dissipation rate," a quantity that represents the amount of energy being removed from the orbit; such an approach is able to consider both atmospheric density and satellite frontal area characteristics and thus serve as a mechanism for binning satellites of similar behavior. The geo-synchronous orbit (of broader definition than the geostationary orbit -- here taken to be from 1300 to 1800 minutes in orbital period) is not affected by drag; rather, its principal non-conservative force is that of solar radiation pressure -- the momentum imparted to the satellite by solar radiometric energy. While this perturbation is solved for as part of the orbit determination update, no binning or division scheme, analogous to the drag regime, has been developed for the geo-synchronous orbit. The present analysis has begun such an effort by examining the behavior of geosynchronous rocket bodies and non-stabilized payloads as a function of solar radiation pressure susceptibility. A preliminary examination of binning techniques used in the drag regime gives initial guidance regarding the criteria for useful bin divisions. Applying these criteria to the object type, solar radiation pressure, and resultant state vector accuracy for the analyzed dataset, a single division of "large" satellites into two bins for the purposes of setting related sensor tasking and orbit determination (OD) controls is suggested. When an accompanying analysis of high area-to-mass objects is complete, a full set of binning recommendations for the geosynchronous orbit will be available.

  9. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE...MM-YYYY)   14-03-2017 2. REPORT TYPE  Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  01 May 2013 to 31 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High energy ion acceleration...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 1FORM SF 298 3/15/2017https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll 1 HIGH ENERGY ION ACCELERATION BY

  10. Capillary bridge modes driven with modulated ultrasonic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Scot F.; Thiessen, David B.; Marston, Philip L.

    1996-01-01

    The method of modulated ultrasonic radiation pressure, previously used to drive the capillary modes of drops and bubbles, is used to excite the capillary modes of a cylindrical oil bridge in a Plateau tank. Specific modes may be selected by adjusting the modulation frequency and the location or orientation of the bridge in the ultrasonic field. Mode frequencies were measured as a function of the slenderness for the lowest two axisymmetric modes and two nonaxisymmetric modes. The frequencies of the lowest modes agree with an approximate theory which neglects viscous corrections where the interfacial tension is a fitted parameter.

  11. Lorentz force and radiation pressure on a spherical cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hongsheng; Wu, B.-I.; Zhang Baile; Luo Yu; Zhang Jingjing; Ran Lixin; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2009-07-15

    The mechanical behavior of a transformation based spherical cloak under wave illumination is derived. We show that the equatorial region of the cloak is subject to much higher stress than the polar regions, where the polar axis is defined along the wave propagation direction. These forces do not exist before transformation but stem from the squeezed electromagnetic space. The trajectory of the ray can be interpreted as a result of the recoil force that the cloak exerts upon the ray. The total radiation pressure on an ideal cloak is shown to be exactly zero, effecting a stationary cloak.

  12. High pressure gas pipeline under the influence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Marko N.; Ilic, Gradimir S.; Stefanovic, Velimir P.; Pavlovic, Sasa R.; Bojic, Milorad L. j.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents one of the possible hazardous situations during transportation of gas through the international pipeline. It describes case when at high pressure gas pipeline, due to mechanical or chemical effect, the crack and gas leakage appears and gas is somehow triggered to combusting. As a consequence of heat impingement on the pipe surface will be, change of material properties (decreasing of strength) at high temperatures. In order to avoid greater rapture a reasonable pressure relief rate needs to be applied. Standards in this particular domain of depressurizing procedure are not so exact (DIN EN ISO 23251; API 521). The main part of the work consists of two calculations. First is the numerical simulation of heat radiation of combustible gas which affects the pipeline, done by software FLUENT, and second in Matlab. There are also given conclusions according to achieved results.

  13. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R

    2015-11-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  15. Radiation and Turbulence-Chemistry-Soot-Radiation Interactions in a High-Pressure Turbulent Spray Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreyro, S.; Paul, C.; Sircar, A.; Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.; Roy, S.; Modest, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations are performed of a transient high-pressure turbulent n-dodecane spray flame under engine-relevant conditions. An unsteady RANS formulation is used, with detailed chemistry, a two-equation soot model, various radiation heat transfer models, and a particle-based transported composition probability density function (PDF) method to account for composition and temperature. The PDF model results are compared with those from a locally well-stirred reactor (WSR) model to quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry-soot-radiation interactions. Computed liquid and vapor penetration versus time, ignition delay, and flame lift-off are in good agreement with experiment, and relatively small differences are seen between the WSR and PDF models for these global quantities. Computed soot levels and spatial distributions from the WSR and PDF models show large differences, with PDF results being in better agreement with experimental measurements. A photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution is used to compute the spectral intensity distribution of the radiation reachingthe wall. This provides new insight into the relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation, and the importance of unresolved turbulent fluctuations on radiative heat transfer.

  16. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  17. Radiation pressure confinement - IV. Application to broad absorption line outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Alexei; Laor, Ari; Stern, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    A fraction of quasars present broad absorption lines, produced by outflowing gas with typical velocities of 3000-10 000 km s-1. If the outflowing gas fills a significant fraction of the volume where it resides, then it will be highly ionized by the quasar due to its low density, and will not produce the observed UV absorption. The suggestion that the outflow is shielded from the ionizing radiation was excluded by recent observations. The remaining solution is a dense outflow with a filling factor f < 10-3. What produces such a small f? Here, we point out that radiation pressure confinement (RPC) inevitably leads to gas compression and the formation of dense thin gas sheets/filaments, with a large gradient in density and ionization along the line of sight. The total column of ionized dustless gas is a few times 1022 cm-2, consistent with the observed X-ray absorption and detectable P V absorption. The predicted maximal columns of various ions show a small dependence on the system parameters, and can be used to test the validity of RPC as a solution for the overionization problem. The ionization structure of the outflow implies that if the outflow is radiatively driven, then broad absorption line quasars should have L/L_Eddgtrsim 0.1.

  18. A pressure-correction scheme for convection-dominated incompressible flows with discontinuous velocity and continuous pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Lorenzo; Di Pietro, Daniele A.

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present a pressure-correction scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations combining a discontinuous Galerkin approximation for the velocity and a standard continuous Galerkin approximation for the pressure. The main interest of pressure-correction algorithms is the reduced computational cost compared to monolithic strategies. In this work we show how a proper discretization of the decoupled momentum equation can render this method suitable to simulate high Reynolds regimes. The proposed spatial velocity-pressure approximation is LBB stable for equal polynomial orders and it allows adaptive p-refinement for velocity and global p-refinement for pressure. The method is validated against a large set of classical two- and three-dimensional test cases covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, in which it proves effective both in terms of accuracy and computational cost.

  19. A Novel Radiation-Induced p53 Mutation Is Not Implicated in Radiation Resistance via a Dominant-Negative Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yunguang; Myers, Carey Jeanne; Dicker, Adam Paul; Lu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del) at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent) line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance. PMID:24558369

  20. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OBSCURATION THROUGH DUSTY INFRARED-DOMINATED FLOWS. I. RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS SOLUTION FOR THE WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    2011-11-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scales by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the two-dimensional radiation transfer problem in a flux-limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary one-dimensional models for the wind and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities greater than 0.1 L{sub edd}, external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < {tau}{sub T} < 0.6) is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton-thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  1. Collisional and Radiative Processes in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    High-pressure discharge plasmas (HPDPs) with operating pressures up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure have gained prominence in many areas of application such as EM absorbers and reflectors, remediation of waste streams, deposition and surface modification, surface cleaning and sterilization, and light source development. In particular, HPDPs are widely used as sources for the generation of non-coherent UV and VUV light such as excimer emissions in the spectral range from 50 nm to 300 nm using rare gases or rare gas admixed with other gases as the operating medium. In this talk we will discuss several common types of HPDPs (e.g. microhollow cathode discharge plasmas, dielectric barrier discharge plasmas, capillary dielectrode discharge plasmas) that are commonly used for the generation of non-coherent excimer emissions. The main focus of this talk will be on the elucidation of the underlying microscopic collisional and radiative processes in these plasmas that lead to the photon emission and that determine the efficiency and spectral characteristics of various sources. Processes of particular interest are the generation of intense, monochromatic atomic line emissions in the 90 - 130 nm range, in particular the H Lyman-alpha emission at 121.6 nm, from HPDPs in gas mixtures containing high-pressure He, Ne, or Ar with trace amounts (1which may have great potential in photolithography and related applications. The mechanism for the emission of these intense atomic VUV lines are near-resonant energy transfer processes from the excimer molecule to the diatomic gas (H2, O2, N2). This work was supported by the NSF and by DARPA/ARO and carried out in collaboration with P. Kurunczi, K.H. Schoenbach, M. Laroussi, M. Gupta, and N. Masoud. Helpful discussions with U. Kogelschatz and E. Kunhardt are gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription, and PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV{sub DIL} prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription. Median PTV{sub DIL} D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions and similar PTV{sub DIL} median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm{sup 3} of rectum (Dmax{sub 0.5cc}), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal

  3. Photon-dominated regions around cool stars: The effects of the color temperature of the radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. Van; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of the color temperature of the illuminating radiation field on the chemical and thermal structure of photon-dominated regions (PDRs). We present the results of a study of the photoelectric efficiency of heating by large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains for radiation fields characterized by different effective temperatures. We show that the efficiency for cooler (T(sub eff) approximately = 6000-10,000 K) stars is at most an order of magnitude smaller than that for hotter (T(sub eff) approximately = 20,000-30,000 K) stars. While cooler radiation fields result in less ultraviolet photons capable of heating, the efficiency per absorbed photon is higher, because the grains become less positively charged. We also present detailed calculations of the chemistry and thermal balance for generic PDRs (n(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3), G(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3)). For cooler radiation fields, the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition layers shift toward the surface of the PDR, because fewer photons are available to photodissociate H2 and CO and to ionize C. The dominant cooling lines are the (C II) 158 micron and the (O I) 63 micron lines for the hotter radiation fields, but cooling by CO becomes dominant for a color temperature of 6000 K or lower. The (C II)/CO and (O I)/CO ratios are found to be very good diagnostics for the color temperature of the radiation field.

  4. Radiation Pressure Cooling as a Quantum Dynamical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing; Yang, Liu; Lin, Qing; Xiao, Min

    2017-06-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in optomechanical cooling is how small the thermal phonon number of a mechanical oscillator can be achieved under the radiation pressure of a proper cavity field. Different from previous theoretical predictions, which were based on an optomechanical system's time-independent steady states, we treat such cooling as a dynamical process of driving the mechanical oscillator from its initial thermal state, due to its thermal equilibrium with the environment, to a stabilized quantum state of higher purity. We find that the stabilized thermal phonon number left in the end actually depends on how fast the cooling process could be. The cooling speed is decided by an effective optomechanical coupling intensity, which constitutes an essential parameter for cooling, in addition to the sideband resolution parameter that has been considered in other theoretical studies. The limiting thermal phonon number that any cooling process cannot surpass exhibits a discontinuous jump across a certain value of the parameter.

  5. Small Spacecraft Formation Flying Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junquan

    Solar sails have long been considered as a viable mechanism for interplanetary travel by using light from the Sun to accelerate a spacecraft without propellant. They can be used for missions studying astrophysics, heliophysics and planetary science. A formation flying system using solar radiation pressure is presented in this paper. The proposed formation flying mission uses sails due to the limited volume and power of small spacecraft. Station keeping, pitch attitude slew and yaw attitude slew are accomplished using reflectivity control devices. A nonlinear non-affine controller that provides smooth control performance is applied for formation flying of small spinning spacecraft while considering gravity gradient torques for the attitude dynamics. The performance of the formation flying is numerically demonstrated.

  6. Radiation pressure induced difference-sideband generation beyond linearized description

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Hao Fan, Yu-Wan; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-08

    We investigate radiation-pressure induced generation of the frequency components at the difference-sideband in an optomechanical system, which beyond the conventional linearized description of optomechanical interactions between cavity fields and the mechanical oscillation. We analytically calculate amplitudes of these signals, and identify a simple square-root law for both the upper and lower difference-sideband generation which can describe the dependence of the intensities of these signals on the pump power. Further calculation shows that difference-sideband generation can be greatly enhanced via achieving the matching conditions. The effect of difference-sideband generation, which may have potential application for manipulation of light, is especially suited for on-chip optomechanical devices, where nonlinear optomechanical interaction in the weak coupling regime is within current experimental reach.

  7. Radiation pressure induced difference-sideband generation beyond linearized description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hao; Fan, Yu-Wan; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    We investigate radiation-pressure induced generation of the frequency components at the difference-sideband in an optomechanical system, which beyond the conventional linearized description of optomechanical interactions between cavity fields and the mechanical oscillation. We analytically calculate amplitudes of these signals, and identify a simple square-root law for both the upper and lower difference-sideband generation which can describe the dependence of the intensities of these signals on the pump power. Further calculation shows that difference-sideband generation can be greatly enhanced via achieving the matching conditions. The effect of difference-sideband generation, which may have potential application for manipulation of light, is especially suited for on-chip optomechanical devices, where nonlinear optomechanical interaction in the weak coupling regime is within current experimental reach.

  8. A gas-dynamical approach to radiation pressure acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The study of high intensity ion beams driven by high power pulsed lasers is an active field of research. Of particular interest is the radiation pressure acceleration, for which simulations predict narrow band ion energies up to GeV. We derive a laser-piston model by applying techniques for non-relativistic gas-dynamics. The model reveals a laser intensity limit, below which sufficient laser-piston acceleration is impossible. The relation between target thickness and piston velocity as a function of the laser pulse length yields an approximation for the permissible target thickness. We performed one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations to confirm the predictions of the analytical model. These simulations also reveal the importance of electromagnetic energy transport. We find that this energy transport limits the achievable compression and rarefies the plasma.

  9. A gas-dynamical approach to radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-06-15

    The study of high intensity ion beams driven by high power pulsed lasers is an active field of research. Of particular interest is the radiation pressure acceleration, for which simulations predict narrow band ion energies up to GeV. We derive a laser-piston model by applying techniques for non-relativistic gas-dynamics. The model reveals a laser intensity limit, below which sufficient laser-piston acceleration is impossible. The relation between target thickness and piston velocity as a function of the laser pulse length yields an approximation for the permissible target thickness. We performed one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations to confirm the predictions of the analytical model. These simulations also reveal the importance of electromagnetic energy transport. We find that this energy transport limits the achievable compression and rarefies the plasma.

  10. Radiation pressure efficiency measurements of nanoparticle coated microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Y.; Taylor, Joseph D.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex

    2013-12-02

    Experimental measurements of the radiation pressure efficiency (Q{sub pr}) for several microparticles have been compared to theoretical calculations extrapolated from the Bohren-Huffman code for Mie scattering of coated particles. An increased shift of the Q{sub pr} parameter was observed for 2 μm SiO{sub 2} core particles coated with nanoparticles of higher refractive indices. Coatings of 14 nm melamine particles were found to increase the Q{sub pr} parameter 135 times over similar coatings using SiO{sub 2} particles of the same size. While a coating of 100 nm polystyrene particles also showed a significant increase, they did not agree well with theoretical values. It is hypothesized that other factors such as increased scatter, drag, and finite coating coverage are no longer negligible for coatings using nanoparticles in this size regime.

  11. RADIATION PRESSURE DETECTION AND DENSITY ESTIMATE FOR 2011 MD

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T. E-mail: tholen@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present our astrometric observations of the small near-Earth object 2011 MD (H ∼ 28.0), obtained after its very close fly-by to Earth in 2011 June. Our set of observations extends the observational arc to 73 days, and, together with the published astrometry obtained around the Earth fly-by, allows a direct detection of the effect of radiation pressure on the object, with a confidence of 5σ. The detection can be used to put constraints on the density of the object, pointing to either an unexpectedly low value of ρ=(640±330)kg m{sup −3} (68% confidence interval) if we assume a typical probability distribution for the unknown albedo, or to an unusually high reflectivity of its surface. This result may have important implications both in terms of impact hazard from small objects and in light of a possible retrieval of this target.

  12. Radiation Pressure Detection and Density Estimate for 2011 MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.

    2014-06-01

    We present our astrometric observations of the small near-Earth object 2011 MD (H ~ 28.0), obtained after its very close fly-by to Earth in 2011 June. Our set of observations extends the observational arc to 73 days, and, together with the published astrometry obtained around the Earth fly-by, allows a direct detection of the effect of radiation pressure on the object, with a confidence of 5σ. The detection can be used to put constraints on the density of the object, pointing to either an unexpectedly low value of \\rho = (640+/- 330) kg \\, m ^{-3} (68% confidence interval) if we assume a typical probability distribution for the unknown albedo, or to an unusually high reflectivity of its surface. This result may have important implications both in terms of impact hazard from small objects and in light of a possible retrieval of this target.

  13. Radiation-pressure-driven ion Weibel instability and collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, A.; Grech, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Macchi, A.; Riconda, C.

    2017-09-01

    The Weibel instability from counterstreaming plasma flows is a basic process highly relevant for collisionless shock formation in astrophysics. In this paper we investigate, via two- and three-dimensional simulations, suitable configurations for laboratory investigations of the ion Weibel instability (IWI) driven by a fast quasineutral plasma flow launched into the target via the radiation pressure of an ultra-high-intensity laser pulse ("hole-boring" process). The use of S-polarized light at oblique incidence is found to be an optimal configuration for driving IWI, as it prevents the development of surface rippling observed at normal incidence that would lead to strong electron heating and would favor competing instabilities. Conditions for the evolution of IWI into a collisionless shock are also investigated.

  14. Interstitial Pressure in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Is Dominated by a Gel-Fluid Phase.

    PubMed

    DuFort, Christopher C; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Carlson, Markus A; Osgood, Ryan J; Zhao, Chunmei; Huang, Zhongdong; Thompson, Curtis B; Connor, Robert J; Thanos, Christopher D; Scott Brockenbrough, J; Provenzano, Paolo P; Frost, Gregory I; Michael Shepard, H; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2016-05-10

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure can present a substantial barrier to drug delivery in solid tumors. This is particularly true of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, a highly lethal disease characterized by a robust fibroinflammatory response, widespread vascular collapse, and hypoperfusion that together serve as primary mechanisms of treatment resistance. Free-fluid pressures, however, are relatively low in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cannot account for the vascular collapse. Indeed, we have shown that the overexpression and deposition in the interstitium of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (HA) is principally responsible for generating pressures that can reach 100 mmHg through the creation of a large gel-fluid phase. By interrogating a variety of tissues, tumor types, and experimental model systems, we show that an HA-dependent fluid phase contributes substantially to pressures in many solid tumors and has been largely unappreciated heretofore. We investigated the relative contributions of both freely mobile fluid and gel fluid to interstitial fluid pressure by performing simultaneous, real-time fluid-pressure measurements with both the classical wick-in-needle method (to estimate free-fluid pressure) and a piezoelectric pressure catheter transducer (which is capable of capturing pressures associated with either phase). We demonstrate further that systemic treatment with pegylated recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) depletes interstitial HA and eliminates the gel-fluid phase. This significantly reduces interstitial pressures and leaves primarily free fluid behind, relieving the barrier to drug delivery. These findings argue that quantifying the contributions of free- and gel-fluid phases to hydraulically transmitted pressures in a given cancer will be essential to designing the most appropriate and effective strategies to overcome this important and frequently underestimated resistance mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by

  15. Pressure-induced hydrogen-dominant metallic state in aluminum hydride.

    PubMed

    Goncharenko, Igor; Eremets, M I; Hanfland, M; Tse, J S; Amboage, M; Yao, Y; Trojan, I A

    2008-02-01

    Two structural transitions in covalent aluminum hydride AlH3 were characterized at high pressure. A metallic phase stable above 100 GPa is found to have a remarkably simple cubic structure with shortest first-neighbor H-H distances ever measured except in H2 molecule. Although the high-pressure phase is predicted to be superconductive, this was not observed experimentally down to 4 K over the pressure range 120-164 GPa. The results indicate that the superconducting behavior may be more complex than anticipated.

  16. Pressure-Induced Hydrogen-Dominant Metallic State in Aluminum Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharenko, Igor; Eremets, M. I.; Hanfland, M.; Tse, J. S.; Amboage, M.; Yao, Y.; Trojan, I. A.

    2008-02-01

    Two structural transitions in covalent aluminum hydride AlH3 were characterized at high pressure. A metallic phase stable above 100 GPa is found to have a remarkably simple cubic structure with shortest first-neighbor H-H distances ever measured except in H2 molecule. Although the high-pressure phase is predicted to be superconductive, this was not observed experimentally down to 4 K over the pressure range 120 164 GPa. The results indicate that the superconducting behavior may be more complex than anticipated.

  17. Differential response of mouse male germ-cell stages to radiation-induced specific-locus and dominant mutations.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L; Bangham, J W; Russell, L B

    1998-04-01

    In an attempt to provide a systematic assessment of the frequency and nature of mutations induced in successive stages of spermato- and spermiogenesis, X-irradiated male mice were re-mated at weekly intervals, and large samples of progeny, observed from birth onward, were scored and genetically tested for recessive mutations at seven specific loci and for externally recognizable dominant mutations. Productivity findings provided a rough measure of induced dominant-lethal frequencies. A qualitative assessment of specific-locus mutations (which include deletions and other rearrangements) was made on the basis of homozygosity test results, as well as from information derived from more recent complementation studies and molecular analyses. Both recessive and dominant visibles revealed clear distinctions between spermatogonia and postspermatogonial stages. In addition, differences for both of these endpoints, as well as for presumed dominant lethals, were found among various postspermatogonial stages. It may be concluded that radiation produces its maximum rates of genetic damage in germ-cell stages ranging from midpachytene spermatocytes through early spermatids, a pattern unlike any of those that have been defined for chemicals; further, the frequency peaks for radiation are lower and broader. The difference between post-stem-cell stages overall and stem-cell spermatogonia was smaller than is generally found with chemicals, not only with respect to the frequency but also the nature of mutations.

  18. Differential response of mouse male germ-cell stages to radiation-induced specific-locus and dominant mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, W L; Bangham, J W; Russell, L B

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to provide a systematic assessment of the frequency and nature of mutations induced in successive stages of spermato- and spermiogenesis, X-irradiated male mice were re-mated at weekly intervals, and large samples of progeny, observed from birth onward, were scored and genetically tested for recessive mutations at seven specific loci and for externally recognizable dominant mutations. Productivity findings provided a rough measure of induced dominant-lethal frequencies. A qualitative assessment of specific-locus mutations (which include deletions and other rearrangements) was made on the basis of homozygosity test results, as well as from information derived from more recent complementation studies and molecular analyses. Both recessive and dominant visibles revealed clear distinctions between spermatogonia and postspermatogonial stages. In addition, differences for both of these endpoints, as well as for presumed dominant lethals, were found among various postspermatogonial stages. It may be concluded that radiation produces its maximum rates of genetic damage in germ-cell stages ranging from midpachytene spermatocytes through early spermatids, a pattern unlike any of those that have been defined for chemicals; further, the frequency peaks for radiation are lower and broader. The difference between post-stem-cell stages overall and stem-cell spermatogonia was smaller than is generally found with chemicals, not only with respect to the frequency but also the nature of mutations. PMID:9560376

  19. The Role of Cerenkov Radiation in the Pressure Balance of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Despite the substantial progress made recently in understanding the role of AGN feedback and associated non-thermal effects, the precise mechanism that prevents the core of some clusters of galaxies from collapsing catastrophically by radiative cooling remains unidentified. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the evolution of a cluster's cooling core, in terms of its density, temperature, and magnetic field strength, inevitably enables the plasma electrons there to quickly become Cerenkov loss dominated, with emission at the radio frequency of ≲350 Hz, and with a rate considerably exceeding free–free continuum and line emission. However, the same does not apply to the plasmas at the cluster's outskirts, which lacks such radiation. Owing to its low frequency, the radiation cannot escape, but because over the relevant scale size of a Cerenkov wavelength the energy of an electron in the gas cannot follow the Boltzmann distribution to the requisite precision to ensure reabsorption always occurs faster than stimulated emission, the emitting gas cools before it reheats. This leaves behind the radiation itself, trapped by the overlying reflective plasma, yet providing enough pressure to maintain quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium. The mass condensation then happens by Rayleigh–Taylor instability, at a rate determined by the outermost radius where Cerenkov radiation can occur. In this way, it is possible to estimate the rate at ≈2 M ⊙ year‑1, consistent with observational inference. Thus, the process appears to provide a natural solution to the longstanding problem of “cooling flow” in clusters; at least it offers another line of defense against cooling and collapse should gas heating by AGN feedback be inadequate in some clusters.

  20. Numerical investigation of the transverse instability on the radiation-pressure-driven foil.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Q; Yin, Y; Yu, T P; Xu, H; Zou, D B; Shao, F Q

    2015-12-01

    The development of transverse instability in the radiation-pressure-acceleration dominant laser-foil interaction is numerically examined by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When a plane laser impinges on a foil with modulated surface, the transverse instability is incited, and periodic perturbations of the proton density develop. The growth rate of the transverse instability is numerically diagnosed. It is found that the linear growth of the transverse instability lasts only a few laser periods, then the instability gets saturated. In order to optimize the modulation wavelength of the target, a method of information entropy is put forward to describe the chaos degree of the transverse instability. With appropriate modulation, the transverse instability shows a low chaos degree, and a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam is produced.

  1. Debris perturbed by radiation pressure: relative velocities across circular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestino, C.; Winter, O.; Prado, A.

    It is widely know that there is a large amount of space debris and meteoroid particles around the Earth. The objects larger than 10 cm can be tracked by radar and others means allowing the satellites/ships to be maneuvered to avoid collisions. However, the detection and the attendance of the orbital dynamics of objects smaller than 10 cm (particles) is very difficult. These particles can be generated by explosions of larger objects, collisions between large objects, or simply for the reaction of the oxygen in the wall of an object could generate the escape of paint pieces. The importance of studying the dynamics of these particles is that they can have relative high speeds and their effects in a collision could cause damages and even compromise the space missions. In this present work we considered a dynamical system of mm size particles around the Earth subject to the effects of radiation pressure. Our main goal is to study the evolution of its relative velocity to the circular orbits that it crosses.Firstly, it is considered that the particle is initially in circular orbit. The effect of the radiation pressure produces variations in its eccentricity, resulting in a change in its orbital velocity. The results show that the variation of the radial distance and the relative velocity can be divided in three parts: secular, long period and short period. For the radial distance the secular variation is constant, because the semi-axis is constant. The long period variation presents a configuration that repeats with period inferior to the orbital period of the Earth. And, finally, the short period variation presents points of local maxima and minima for the variation of the width of the radial distance. When considering the variation of the relative velocity we have that the secular behavior and of long period are similar to those obtained for the variation of the radial distance. However, for the short period variation, we have a larger number of local maxima and minima

  2. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclo­philin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. This analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite

  3. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room

  4. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature havemore » not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 107 Gy at 100 K and 105 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite

  5. Dominant factors that govern pressure natriuresis in diuresis and antidiuresis: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Moss, Robert; Layton, Anita T

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a whole kidney model of the urine concentrating mechanism and renal autoregulation. The model represents the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and myogenic mechanisms, which together affect the resistance of the afferent arteriole and thus glomerular filtration rate. TGF is activated by fluctuations in macula densa [Cl(-)] and the myogefnic mechanism by changes in hydrostatic pressure. The model was used to investigate the relative contributions of medullary blood flow autoregulation and inhibition of transport in the proximal convoluted tubule to pressure natriuresis in both diuresis and antidiuresis. The model predicts that medullary blood flow autoregulation, which only affects the interstitial solute composition in the model, has negligible influence on the rate of NaCl excretion. However, it exerts a significant effect on urine flow, particularly in the antidiuretic kidney. This suggests that interstitial washout has significant implications for the maintenance of hydration status but little direct bearing on salt excretion, and that medullary blood flow may only play a signaling role for stimulating a pressure-natriuresis response. Inhibited reabsorption in the model proximal convoluted tubule is capable of driving pressure natriuresis when the known actions of vasopressin on the collecting duct epithelium are taken into account.

  6. Dominant factors that govern pressure natriuresis in diuresis and antidiuresis: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Anita T.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a whole kidney model of the urine concentrating mechanism and renal autoregulation. The model represents the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and myogenic mechanisms, which together affect the resistance of the afferent arteriole and thus glomerular filtration rate. TGF is activated by fluctuations in macula densa [Cl−] and the myogefnic mechanism by changes in hydrostatic pressure. The model was used to investigate the relative contributions of medullary blood flow autoregulation and inhibition of transport in the proximal convoluted tubule to pressure natriuresis in both diuresis and antidiuresis. The model predicts that medullary blood flow autoregulation, which only affects the interstitial solute composition in the model, has negligible influence on the rate of NaCl excretion. However, it exerts a significant effect on urine flow, particularly in the antidiuretic kidney. This suggests that interstitial washout has significant implications for the maintenance of hydration status but little direct bearing on salt excretion, and that medullary blood flow may only play a signaling role for stimulating a pressure-natriuresis response. Inhibited reabsorption in the model proximal convoluted tubule is capable of driving pressure natriuresis when the known actions of vasopressin on the collecting duct epithelium are taken into account. PMID:24553433

  7. Transport simulations of a density limit in radiation-dominated tokamak discharges: Profile effects

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.

    1988-06-01

    The density limit observed in tokamak experiments is thought to be due to a radiative collapse of the current channel. A transport code coupled with an MHD equilibrium routine is used to determine the detailed, self-consistent evolution of the plasma profiles in tokamak discharges with radiated power close to or equalling the input power. The present work is confined to ohmic discharges in steady state. It is found that the shape of the density profile can have a significant impact on the variation of the maximum electron density with plasma current. Analytic calculations confirm this result. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Exploring Rotations Due to Radiation Pressure: 2-D to 3-D Transition Is Interesting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation pressure is an important topic within a standard physics course (see, in particular, Refs. 1 and 2). The physics of radiation pressure is described, the magnitude of it is derived, both for the case of a perfectly absorbing surface and of a perfect reflector, and various applications of this interesting effect are discussed, such as…

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor modes in constant-density incompressible fluids accelerated by radiation pressure. [astrophysical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the behavior of linear perturbations in an incompressible fluid undergoing acceleration by radiation pressure, with reference to processes occurring in quasars, supernovae, and planetary nebulae. It is shown that, contrary to prior expectation, fluids accelerated by radiation pressure, are not always unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Some are, in fact, unstable, but the nature of the instability is qualitatively different.

  10. Exploring Rotations Due to Radiation Pressure: 2-D to 3-D Transition Is Interesting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation pressure is an important topic within a standard physics course (see, in particular, Refs. 1 and 2). The physics of radiation pressure is described, the magnitude of it is derived, both for the case of a perfectly absorbing surface and of a perfect reflector, and various applications of this interesting effect are discussed, such as…

  11. Relativistic drag and emission radiation pressures in an isotropic photonic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeffrey S.; Cleaver, Gerald B.

    2016-06-01

    By invoking the relativistic spectral radiance, as derived by Lee and Cleaver,1 the drag radiation pressure of a relativistic planar surface moving through an isotropic radiation field, with which it is in thermal equilibrium, is determined in inertial and non-inertial frames. The forward- and backward-directed emission radiation pressures are also derived and compared. A fleeting (inertial frames) or ongoing (some non-inertial frames) Carnot cycle is shown to exist as a result of an intra-surfaces temperature gradient. The drag radiation pressure on an object with an arbitrary frontal geometry is also described.

  12. Enhanced solar radiation pressure modeling for Galileo satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenbruck, O.; Steigenberger, P.; Hugentobler, U.

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for modeling solar radiation pressure (SRP) effects on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). It focuses on the Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites, for which obvious SRP modeling deficits can be identified in presently available precise orbit products. To overcome these problems, the estimation of empirical accelerations in the Sun direction (D), solar panel axis (Y) and the orthogonal (B) axis is complemented by an a priori model accounting for the contribution of the rectangular spacecraft body. Other than the GPS satellites, which comprise an almost cubic body, the Galileo IOV satellites exhibit a notably rectangular shape with a ratio of about 2:1 for the main body axes. Use of the a priori box model allows to properly model the varying cross section exposed to the Sun during yaw-steering attitude mode and helps to remove systematic once-per-revolution orbit errors that have so far affected the Galileo orbit determination. Parameters of a simple a priori cuboid model suitable for the IOV satellites are established from the analysis of a long-term set of GNSS observations collected with the global network of the Multi-GNSS Experiment of the International GNSS Service. The model is finally demonstrated to reduce the peak magnitude of radial orbit errors from presently 20 cm down to 5 cm outside eclipse phases.

  13. Radiation pressure calibration and test mass reflectivities for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakova, Natalia; Kaune, Brigitte; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments which were carried out during the main operations of LISA Pathfinder. These experiments were performed by modulating the power of the measurement and reference beams. In one series of experiments the beams were sequentially switched on and off. In the other series of experiments the powers of the beams were modulated within 0.1% and 1% of the constant power. These experiments use recordings of the total power measured on the photodiodes to infer the properties of the Optical Metrology System (OMS), such as reflectivities of the test masses and change of the photodiode efficiencies with time. In the first case the powers are back propagated from the different photodiodes to the same place on the optical bench to express the unknown quantities in the measurement with the complimentary photodiode measurements. They are combined in the way that the only unknown left is the test mass reflectivities. The second experiment compared two estimates of the force applied to the test masses due to the radiation pressure that appears because of the beam modulations. One estimate of the force is inferred from the measurements of the powers on the photodiodes and propagation of this measurement to the test masses. The other estimation of the force is done by calculating it from the change in the main scientific output of the instrument - differential displacement of the two test masses.

  14. Scaling Studies of Laser Proton Acceleration by Radiation Pressure Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C.; Dudinkova, G.; Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, X.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    2010-02-01

    We present scaling studies of proton acceleration by short pulse, intense lasers in the region of radiation pressure acceleration of ultra thin foil. By defining the monoenergetic proton as having energy spread less than 10 percent in 2D PIC simulation, we studied the proton mono-energy profile as a function of the laser power and peak intensity, thin foil thickness and target density ratio to critical density. We found that the energy of monoenergetic proton scales linearly with the square root of laser power after fixing the target density ratio to critical density. The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability plays significant role in increasing the energy spread of accelerated protons. But, there are parameter regimes for instability remediation or suppression. Parameters of interest are for lasers in sub-Peta Watt range and producing quasi energetic protons to 250 Mev and carbon ion to 1 Gev. The simulation results are able to provide experimentalists with suggestion for optimal scaling for laser acceleration of thin foils for instability avoidance and optimal ion acceleration. Possible medical applications of the technology in proton cancer therapy is also discussed. )

  15. Using Solar Radiation Pressure to Control L2 Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tene, Noam; Richon, Karen; Folta, David

    1998-01-01

    The main perturbations at the Sun-Earth Lagrange points L1 and L2 are from solar radiation pressure (SRP), the Moon and the planets. Traditional approaches to trajectory design for Lagrange-point orbits use maneuvers every few months to correct for these perturbations. The gravitational effects of the Moon and the planets are small and periodic. However, they cannot be neglected because small perturbations in the direction of the unstable eigenvector are enough to cause exponential growth within a few months. The main effect of a constant SRP is to shift the center of the orbit by a small distance. For spacecraft with large sun-shields like the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), the SRP effect is larger than all other perturbations and depends mostly on spacecraft attitude. Small variations in the spacecraft attitude are large enough to excite or control the exponential eigenvector. A closed-loop linear controller based on the SRP variations would eliminate one of the largest errors to the orbit and provide a continuous acceleration for use in controlling other disturbances. It is possible to design reference trajectories that account for the periodic lunar and planetary perturbations and still satisfy mission requirements. When such trajectories are used the acceleration required to control the unstable eigenvector is well within the capabilities of a continuous linear controller. Initial estimates show that by using attitude control it should be possible to minimize and even eliminate thruster maneuvers for station keeping.

  16. Theory of radiation pressure on magneto-dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Loudon, Rodney

    2015-06-01

    We present a classical linear response theory for a magneto-dielectric material and determine the polariton dispersion relations. The electromagnetic field fluctuation spectra are obtained and polariton sum rules for their optical parameters are presented. The electromagnetic field for systems with multiple polariton branches is quantized in three dimensions and field operators are converted to 1-dimensional forms appropriate for parallel light beams. We show that the field-operator commutation relations agree with previous calculations that ignored polariton effects. The Abraham (kinetic) and Minkowski (canonical) momentum operators are introduced and their corresponding single-photon momenta are identified. The commutation relations of these and of their angular analogues support the identification, in particular, of the Minkowski momentum with the canonical momentum of the light. We exploit the Heaviside-Larmor symmetry of Maxwell’s equations to obtain, very directly, the Einsetin-Laub force density for action on a magneto-dielectric. The surface and bulk contributions to the radiation pressure are calculated for the passage of an optical pulse into a semi-infinite sample.

  17. 1D problems of radiation pressure on elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Požar, Tomaž; Možina, Janez

    2015-08-01

    We treat the light-matter interaction due to radiation pressure in one dimension using the fundamental, nonrelativistic conservation principles of energy and momentum. Additionally, we assume that the center of mass-energy maintains the same uniform motion if the interaction takes place or not. Since we handle solids as elastic objects, the results are consistent with the principle of causality and agree with recent experimental observations. We analyze the problem of reflection of a light pulse from a fully-reflective mirror and show that its reflection gives rise to an elastic wave with a measurable amplitude and a correct Doppler shift of the reflected pulse. We also analyze the problem of light pulse transmission into an anti-reflection coated, non-dispersive and lossless dielectric, where an elastic wave may as well be accompanied by a mechanical wave escorting the light pulse. We show that the Balazs rigid box thought experiment can be also realized in elastic dielectrics where some of the energy of the incident light is transferred to the wave motion. It follows from our approach that the electromagnetic momentum of the light pulse in the dielectric acquires Abraham's form only when a single type of the mechanical waves accompanies the interaction.

  18. Structural peculiarities dominate the turgor pressure response of the marine alga Valonia utricularis upon osmotic challenges.

    PubMed

    Heidecker, M; Mimietz, S; Wegner, L H; Zimmermann, U

    2003-03-15

    The pressure response of (plant) cells to osmotic challenges depends on the reflection coefficient, sigma, of osmotically active solutes; it is less than predicted by the van't Hoff equation if sigma < 1. In Valonia utricularis, sigma is significantly reduced by internal (and, to a lesser extent, by external) unstirred layers, protecting the cytoplasm against vacuolar osmotic fluctuations. As shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, diffusion-restricted spaces are formed by innumerable small vacuoles that are interconnected with each other and with the central vacuole. They are embedded in networks of cytoplasmic strands connecting and encircling the organelles. Unstirred layers are also created in the central vacuole by an extensive network of acid mucopolysaccharide filaments (visualized by alcian blue staining). Mucopolysaccharides apparently also affect steady-state turgor by reducing the water activity. When the effective vacuolar osmotic pressure was adjusted to that of the bath by perfusion with an artificial vacuolar sap (AVS), an "offset turgor pressure" of 17 +/- 5 kPa was recorded. Consistent with the ultrastructural data, sigma values less than unity were calculated from the pressure response upon vacuolar addition of KCl or sucrose by perfusion (sigma(iKCl) = 0.63 +/- 0.13; sigma(isuc) = 0.58 +/- 0.17). Dilution of AVS yielded slightly higher sigma(iKCl) values (0.73 +/- 0.35). External addition to the artificial sea water (ASW) indicated that sigma(e) > sigma(i) for these osmotica. However, even in this case, sigma(esuc) (0.86 +/- 0.09) and sigma(ePEG) (0.58 +/- 0.08) were significantly less than sigma(eNaCl) (0.94 +/- 0.05) and sigma(eKCl) (0.91 +/- 0.13), presumably due to unstirred layers within the 4 micro m thick cell wall. Consistent with the low sigma values, a partial replacement of NaCl by osmotically equivalent amounts of sucrose (ASW(suc)), PEG and dextran, respectively, as well as replacement of Cl(-) by the large anion MES

  19. Determination of the parametric region in which runaway electron energy losses are dominated by bremsstrahlung radiation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gomez, I.; Martin-Solis, J. R.; Sanchez, R.

    2007-07-15

    It has been recently argued that, at sufficiently large parallel electric fields, bremsstrahlung radiation can greatly reduce the maximum energy that runaway electrons can gain in tokamaks [M. Bakhtiari et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102503 (2005)]. In this contribution, the work of these authors is extended to show that the region where bremsstrahlung radiation dominate runaway energy losses is however more restricted than reported by them. Expressions will be provided for the limits of this region within the parameter space spanned by the background density and parallel electric field, as a function of the rest of the plasma parameters. It will be shown that the background density has to be above a certain critical value and that the parallel electric field must lie within a range of values, below and above which synchrotron radiation dominate the runaway energy losses. Finally, it will be demonstrated that typical disruption parameters lie within this region and, as a result, bremsstrahlung losses still play an important role in controlling the runaway energy.

  20. Pressure losses in fracture-dominated reservoirs: the wellbore constriction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.

    1980-01-01

    Improved energy production from many types of energy reservoirs such as hot dry rock geothermal as well as hydraulically fractured oil, gas, and other geothermal reservoirs requires a better understanding of the fluid mechanics in the vicinity of the fracture-wellbore intersection. Typically, the aperture (smallest dimension) of a hydraulic fracture is only of the order of 1 mm (0.04 in.) so that reasonable energy production rates from geothermal systems require fairly large flow velocities within the fractures, particularly so as the wellbore-fracture intersection is approached. The high velocities and accelerations result in non-Darcian, often turbulent, flow and increased pressure losses. These flow phenomena were investigated experimentally for the simple case where the fracture plane and the wellbore drilling axis are orthogonal and the implication of these experimental results are examined by investigating the pressure losses in a hot dry rock reservoir.

  1. Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Charles J. Wetterer and Keric Hill...has highlighted the need for physically consistent radiation pressure and Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. This paper...seeks to evaluate the impact of BRDF-consistent radiation pres- sure models compared to changes in the other BRDF parameters. The differences in

  2. Exotic hollow atom states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in a radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Nigel; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Dance, R. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Colgan, J.

    2013-10-01

    In high-spectral resolution experiments with the petawatt Vulcan laser, strong x-ray radiation of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from aluminium targets was observed at high laser contrast, for intensities of 3 × 1020 Wcm-2 and micron thick targets. These spectral observations are interpreted using detailed atomic kinetics calculations suggesting these exotic hollow atom states occur at near solid density and are driven by an intense polychromatic x-ray field. We estimate that this x-ray radiation field has energy in the kilovolt range and has an intensity exceeding 1018 Wcm-2. The field may arise through relativistic electron Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the electrostatic fields at the target surface.

  3. Estimating the Error in Statistical HAMR Object Populations Resulting from Simplified Radiation Pressure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, S.; Vörsmann, P.; Wiedemann, C.; Kebschull, C.; Braun, V.; Möckel, M.; Gelhaus, J.; Krag, H.; Klinkrad, H.

    2012-09-01

    The high-area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) object population in ESA's MASTER-2009 software (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) is dominated by Multi-Layer Insulation debris at large sizes. The underlying model employs two independent mechanisms whereby Multi-Layer Insulation debris is created. These mechanisms are fragmentation events on the one hand and a deterioration process leading to the continuous release of larger objects on the other hand. All debris source models used to create the MASTER debris population rely on a semi-analytical propagator to model the major secular and long periodic orbit perturbations. The orbit parameters of HAMR objects are highly susceptive to radiation pressure effects which can result in fast secular and periodic changes for area-to-mass ratios above about 1 square meter per kilogram. The implementation of radiation pressure in this propagator is limited to the effects of solar irradiation on a spherical object and using a cylindrical Earth shadow. The current paper discusses the applicability of such a simplified theory to large statistical HAMR object populations where the main objective is not to predict the exact future location of a single object but rather to give a correct representation of the overall distribution of all HAMR objects. The basis for the current study is given by a numerical propagator which is supported by published observation results. Initially, the effects of object orientation, Earth albedo and thermal radiation on the orbit evolution are discussed. Results from published observations and simulation results give insight into the validity of the implemented model. Fundamental differences between the orbit prediction of this refined numerical propagator and the semi-analytical propagator are looked at with a view towards large statistical populations. To this end, a plausible, statistical, population of HAMR objects is propagated over an extended time period using both propagation

  4. A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion Under Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3 M sun yr-1 or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the "OMOSHI effect," where OMOSHI is an acronym for "One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght." Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  5. A NEW MECHANISM FOR MASS ACCRETION UNDER RADIATION PRESSURE IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the 'OMOSHI effect', where OMOSHI is an acronym for 'One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght'. Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  6. PBH mass growth through radial accretion during the radiation dominated era

    SciTech Connect

    Lora-Clavijo, F.D.; Guzmán, F.S.; Cruz-Osorio, A. E-mail: guzman@ifm.umich.mx

    2013-12-01

    We model the radial accretion of radiation on Primordial Black Holes (PBH) by numerically solving Einstein's equations coupled to an ultrarelativistic ideal gas with equation of state p = ρ/3. We calculate the final mass of a black hole by the integration of the accreted radiation energy density during the leptonic era between t ∼ 10{sup −4}s to t ∼ 10{sup 2}s after the Big Bang. Our results indicate that small PBHs with initial masses between 10{sup −4} to 1M{sub ⊙} may grow up to hundreds of solar masses, and thus can be SMBH seeds. On the other hand, PBHs formed at t ∼ 1s with initial mass between 900 and ∼ 980M{sub ⊙}, by the time t ∼ 100s show masses of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} which are masses of seeds or already formed SMBHs. The fact that we consider only radial flow implies that our results work well as limiting cases, and it is expected that under more general scenarios the accretion rates may change significantly. Nevertheless we show that it is possible that SMBHs can be PBHs that grew due to the accretion of radiation.

  7. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  8. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  9. SAPT units turn-on in an interference-dominant environment. [Stand Alone Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, W.-C.; Yang, C.-C.; Lichtenberg, C.

    1990-01-01

    A stand alone pressure transducer (SAPT) is a credit-card-sized smart pressure sensor inserted between the tile and the aluminum skin of a space shuttle. Reliably initiating the SAPT units via RF signals in a prelaunch environment is a challenging problem. Multiple-source interference may exist if more than one GSE (ground support equipment) antenna is turned on at the same time to meet the simultaneity requirement of 10 ms. A polygon model for orbiter, external tank, solid rocket booster, and tail service masts is used to simulate the prelaunch environment. Geometric optics is then applied to identify the coverage areas and the areas which are vulnerable to multipath and/or multiple-source interference. Simulation results show that the underside areas of an orbiter have incidence angles exceeding 80 deg. For multipath interference, both sides of the cargo bay areas are found to be vulnerable to a worst-case multipath loss exceeding 20 dB. Multiple-source interference areas are also identified. Mitigation methods for the coverage and interference problem are described. It is shown that multiple-source interference can be eliminated (or controlled) using the time-division-multiplexing method or the time-stamp approach.

  10. SAPT units turn-on in an interference-dominant environment. [Stand Alone Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, W.-C.; Yang, C.-C.; Lichtenberg, C.

    1990-01-01

    A stand alone pressure transducer (SAPT) is a credit-card-sized smart pressure sensor inserted between the tile and the aluminum skin of a space shuttle. Reliably initiating the SAPT units via RF signals in a prelaunch environment is a challenging problem. Multiple-source interference may exist if more than one GSE (ground support equipment) antenna is turned on at the same time to meet the simultaneity requirement of 10 ms. A polygon model for orbiter, external tank, solid rocket booster, and tail service masts is used to simulate the prelaunch environment. Geometric optics is then applied to identify the coverage areas and the areas which are vulnerable to multipath and/or multiple-source interference. Simulation results show that the underside areas of an orbiter have incidence angles exceeding 80 deg. For multipath interference, both sides of the cargo bay areas are found to be vulnerable to a worst-case multipath loss exceeding 20 dB. Multiple-source interference areas are also identified. Mitigation methods for the coverage and interference problem are described. It is shown that multiple-source interference can be eliminated (or controlled) using the time-division-multiplexing method or the time-stamp approach.

  11. Robust intravascular optical coherence elastography driven by acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mastik, Frits; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2007-07-01

    High strain spots in the vessel wall indicate the presence of vulnerable plaques. The majority of acute cardiovascular events are preceded by rupture of such a plaque in a coronary artery. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be extended, in principle, to an elastography technique, mapping the strain in the vascular wall. However, the susceptibility of OCT to frame-to-frame decorrelation, caused by tissue and catheter motion, inhibits reliable tissue displacement tracking and has to date obstructed the development of OCT-based intravascular elastography. We introduce a new technique for intravascular optical coherence elastography, which is robust against motion artifacts. Using acoustic radiation force, we apply a pressure to deform the tissue synchronously with the line scan rate of the OCT instrument. Radial tissue displacement can be tracked based on the correlation between adjacent lines, instead of subsequent frames in conventional elastography. The viability of the method is demonstrated with a simulation study. The root mean square (rms) error of the displacement estimate is 0.55 μm, and the rms error of the strain is 0.6%. It is shown that high-strain spots in the vessel wall, such as observed at the sites of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions, can be detected with the technique. Experiments to realize this new elastographic method are presented. Simultaneous optical and ultrasonic pulse-echo tracking demonstrate that the material can be put in a high-frequency oscillatory motion with an amplitude of several micrometers, more than sufficient for accurate tracking with OCT. The resulting data are used to optimize the acoustic pushing sequence and geometry.

  12. On Radiation Pressure in Static, Dusty H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, B. T.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acting on gas and dust causes H II regions to have central densities that are lower than the density near the ionized boundary. H II regions in static equilibrium comprise a family of similarity solutions with three parameters: β, γ, and the product Q 0 n rms; β characterizes the stellar spectrum, γ characterizes the dust/gas ratio, Q 0 is the stellar ionizing output (photons/s), and n rms is the rms density within the ionized region. Adopting standard values for β and γ, varying Q 0 n rms generates a one-parameter family of density profiles, ranging from nearly uniform density (small Q 0 n rms) to shell-like (large Q 0 n rms). When Q 0 n rms >~ 1052 cm-3 s-1, dusty H II regions have conspicuous central cavities, even if no stellar wind is present. For given β, γ, and Q 0 n rms, a fourth quantity, which can be Q 0, determines the overall size and density of the H II region. Examples of density and emissivity profiles are given. We show how quantities of interest—such as the peak-to-central emission measure ratio, the rms-to-mean density ratio, the edge-to-rms density ratio, and the fraction of the ionizing photons absorbed by the gas—depend on β, γ, and Q 0 n rms. For dusty H II regions, compression of the gas and dust into an ionized shell results in a substantial increase in the fraction of the stellar photons that actually ionize H (relative to a uniform-density H II region with the same dust/gas ratio and density n = n rms). We discuss the extent to which radial drift of dust grains in H II regions can alter the dust-to-gas ratio. The applicability of these solutions to real H II regions is discussed.

  13. A study of solar radiation pressure acting on GPS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froideval, Laurent Olivier

    An increasing number of GPS applications require a high level of accuracy. To reduce the error contributed by the GPS ephemerides, an accurate modeling of the forces acting on GPS satellites is necessary. These forces can be categorized into gravitational and non-gravitational forces. The non-gravitational forces are a significant contribution to the total force on a GPS satellite but they are still not fully understood whereas the gravitational forces are well modeled. This study focuses on two non-gravitational forces: Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and the y-bias force. Different SRP models are available in the University of Texas Multi-Satellite Orbit Determination Program (MSODP). The recently developed University College London model was implemented for the purpose of this study. Several techniques to compute parameters associated with SRP models and the y-bias force during an orbit prediction were examined. Using the International GNSS Service (IGS) precise ephemerides as a reference, five different models were compared in the study. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) residuals were also studied to validate the approach. Results showed that the analytical UCL model performed as well as a purely empirical model such as the Extended CODE model. This is important since analytical models attempt to represent the physical phenomena and thus might be better suited to separate SRP from other forces. The y-bias force was then shown to have a once per revolution effect. The time evolution of the y-bias was found to be dependent on the SRP model used, the satellite Block type, the orbital plane, and the attitude of the satellite which suggests that estimates of y-bias contain errors from other sources, particularly the SRP models. The dependency of the y-bias evolution on the orbital plane suggests that the orientation of the plane towards the Sun is important.

  14. Vector-meson-dominance model for radiative decays involving light scalar mesons.

    PubMed

    Black, Deirdre; Harada, Masayasu; Schechter, Joseph

    2002-05-06

    We study a vector-dominance model which predicts quite a large number of currently interesting decay amplitudes of the types S-->gammagamma, V-->Sgamma, and S-->Vgamma, where S and V denote scalar and vector mesons, in terms of three parameters. As an application, the model makes it easy to study in detail a recent proposal to boost the ratio Gamma(phi-->f(0)gamma)/Gamma(phi-->a(0)(0)gamma) by including the isospin violating a(0)(0)-f(0) mixing. However, we find that this effect is actually small in our model.

  15. Features of ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils in the radiation-pressure regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    The acceleration of protons and ions from the interaction of the VULCAN Petawatt laser pulse, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, with ultra-thin, nanometre scale diamond-like-carbon foils has been investigated experimentally. A number of different ion features are observed with different spatial structure and energy spectra, including 1) low energy ring structures, due to channel formation as the target becomes underdense; 2) filamentation for 5 and 10 nm targets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; 3) central non-thermal peaked proton beams due to self cleaning of the lower charge density proton species; 4) a smooth off-axis proton beam going to higher energies with a characteristic low flux, possibly related to post-acceleration in the relativistic transparency regime. The experimental work is supported by 2D numerical PIC simulations, which further elucidate the underlying acceleration mechanisms. These experiments help to improve our understanding of ion acceleration in the radiation pressure dominated regime, and will thus guide future experiments aiming to reach higher proton and carbon energies with high efficiency. This work was supported by the Laser Induced Beams of Radiation and their Applications (LIBRA) programme, which is funded by the EPSRC.

  16. Singular F(R) cosmology unifying early- and late-time acceleration with matter and radiation domination era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We present some cosmological models which unify the late- and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and the matter domination era, and we realize the cosmological models by using the theoretical framework of F(R) gravity. Particularly, the first model unifies the late- and early-time acceleration with the matter domination era, and the second model unifies all the evolution eras of our Universe. The two models are described in the same way at early and late times, and only the intermediate stages of the evolution have some differences. Each cosmological model contains two Type IV singularities which are chosen to occur one at the end of the inflationary era and one at the end of the matter domination era. The cosmological models at early times are approximately identical to the R 2 inflation model, so these describe a slow-roll inflationary era which ends when the slow-roll parameters become of order one. The inflationary era is followed by the radiation era and after that the matter domination era follows, which lasts until the second Type IV singularity, and then the late-time acceleration era follows. The models have two appealing features: firstly they produce a nearly scale invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations and a scalar-to-tensor ratio which are compatible with the most recent observational data and secondly, it seems that the deceleration-acceleration transition is crucially affected by the presence of the second Type IV singularity which occurs at the end of the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Hubble horizon at early times shrinks, as expected for an initially accelerating Universe, then during the matter domination era, it expands and finally after the Type IV singularity, the Hubble horizon starts to shrink again, during the late-time acceleration era. Intriguingly enough, the deceleration-acceleration transition, occurs after the second Type IV singularity. In addition, we investigate which F(R) gravity

  17. Transport simulations of a density limit in radiation-dominated tokamak discharges: II

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.

    1991-05-01

    The procedures developed previously to simulate the radiatively induced tokamak density limit are used to examine in more detail the scaling of the density limit. It is found that the maximum allowable density increases with auxiliary power and decreases with impurity concentration. However, it is demonstrated that there is little dependence of the density limit on plasma elongation. These trends are consistent with experimental results. Our previous work used coronal equilibrium impurities; the primary result of that paper was that the maximum density increases with current when peaked profiles are assumed. Here, this behavior is shown to occur with a coronal nonequilibrium impurity as well. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Repulsive gravity induced by a conformally coupled scalar field implies a bouncing radiation-dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, V.; Novello, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work we revisit a model consisting of a scalar field with a quartic self-interaction potential non-minimally (conformally) coupled to gravity (Novello in Phys Lett 90A:347 1980). When the scalar field vacuum is in a broken symmetry state, an effective gravitational constant emerges which, in certain regimes, can lead to gravitational repulsive effects when only ordinary radiation is coupled to gravity. In this case, a bouncing universe is shown to be the only cosmological solution admissible by the field equations when the scalar field is in such broken symmetry state.

  19. Discharge parameters and dominant electron conductivity mechanism in a low-pressure planar magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2009-06-15

    Parameters of a discharge sustained in a planar magnetron configuration with crossed electric and magnetic fields are studied experimentally and numerically. By comparing the data obtained in the experiment with the results of calculations made using the proposed theoretical model, conclusion was made about the leading role of the turbulence-driven Bohm electron conductivity in the low-pressure operation mode (up to 1 Pa) of the discharge in crossed electric and magnetic fields. A strong dependence of the width of the cathode sputter trench, associated with the ionization region of the magnetron discharge, on the discharge parameters was observed in the experiments. The experimental data were used as input parameters in the discharge model that describes the motion of secondary electrons across the magnetic field in the ionization region and takes into account the classical, near-wall, and Bohm mechanisms of electron conductivity.

  20. Dominant Role of Host Selective Pressure in Driving Hepatitis C Virus Evolution in Perinatal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Aldo; Solforosi, Laura; Debiaggi, Maurizia; Zara, Francesca; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Romanò, Luisa; Zanetti, Alessandro R.; Clementi, Massimo

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of the genetic diversification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) populations was addressed in perinatal infection. Clonal sequences of hypervariable region 1 of the putative E2 envelope protein of HCV were obtained from four HCV-infected newborns (sequential samples spanning a period of 6 to 13 months after birth) and from their mothers (all samples collected at delivery). The data show that the variants detected between birth and the third month of life in samples from the four newborns were present in the HCV populations of their mothers at delivery. In the newborns, a unique viral variant (or a small group of closely related variants) remained stable for weeks despite active viral replication. Diversification of the intrahost HCV population was observed 6 to 13 months after birth and was substantially higher in two of the four subjects, as documented by the intersample genetic distance (GD) (P = 0.007). Importantly, a significant correlation between increasing GD and high values for the intersample Ka/Ks ratio (the ratio between antonymous and synonymous substitutions; an index of the action of selective forces) was observed, as documented by the increase of both parameters over time (P = 0.01). These data argue for a dominant role of positive selection for amino acid changes in driving the pattern of genetic diversification of HCV populations, indicate that the intrahost evolution of HCV populations is compatible with a Darwinian model system, and may have implications in the designing of future antiviral strategies. PMID:10756048

  1. Characterization of Cat-2t, a radiation-induced dominant cataract mutation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Graw, J.; Bors, W.; Gopinath, P.M.; Merkle, S.; Michel, C.; Reitmeir, P.; Schaeffer, E.S.; Summer, K.H.; Wulff, A. )

    1990-07-01

    A dominant cataract mutation was detected recently among the offspring of x-ray-irradiated male mice. The mutation, which causes total lens opacity, has provisionally been designated by the gene symbol Cat-2t. In the lenses of heterozygous and homozygous Cat-2t mutants, the epithelial and fiber cells were swollen and the lens capsule was ruptured. The histologic analysis demonstrated a complete destruction of the cellular organization of the lens, which might be caused by its altered developmental processes. The data derived from biochemical investigations indicate that biochemistry of the cataractous Cat-2t lenses is affected: the osmotic state as indicated by the increased water content and increased Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity; the energy state as indicated by the decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration; and the redox state as indicated by the enhanced content of oxidized glutathione. Additionally, the lenticular protein composition is altered because of the presence of vimentin in the water-soluble fraction. This cannot be explained by the enhanced crosslinking activity of transglutaminase. The changes of the osmotic, energy, and redox states are considered to be secondary in relation to the altered lenticular development. In contrast, the variations concerning vimentin and transglutaminase might be a biochemical indication of the changed development. Possible similarities to other dominantly expressed murine cataract mutants are discussed.

  2. OUTWARD MOTION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES BY STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tazaki, Ryo; Nomura, Hideko

    2015-02-01

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in the surface layer migrate outward owing to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study we calculate the mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates, in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains, for which radiation pressure efficiency becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 μm is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are hardly transported to the outer region by stellar radiation pressure, whereas porous dust aggregates like chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles are efficiently transported to the comet formation region. Crystalline silicates are possibly transported in porous dust aggregates by stellar radiation pressure from the inner hot region to the outer cold cometary region in the protosolar nebula.

  3. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the Orion nebula: the effect of radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghouti, S. Akram; Nejad-Asghar, Mohsen; Abbassi, Shahram

    2017-09-01

    The recent observations of rippled structures on the surface of the Orion molecular cloud (Berné et al. 2010) have been attributed to the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. The wavelike structures that have been mainly seen near star-forming regions take place at the interface between the hot diffuse gas, which is ionized by massive stars, and the cold dense molecular clouds. The radiation pressure of massive stars and stellar clusters is one of the important issues that has been considered frequently in the dynamics of clouds. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation pressure, from the well-known Trapezium cluster in the Orion nebula, on the evolution of KH instability. The stability of the interface between the H ii region and the molecular clouds in the presence of radiation pressure has been studied using the linear perturbation analysis for a certain range of wavelengths. The linear analysis shows that the consideration of the radiation pressure intensifies the growth rate of KH modes and consequently decreases the e-fold time-scale of the instability. On the other hand, the domain of the instability is extended and includes more wavelengths, consisting of smaller ones rather than the case where the effect of the radiation pressure is not considered. Our results show that for λKH > 0.15 pc, the growth rate of KH instability does not depend on radiation pressure. Based on our results, the radiation pressure is a triggering mechanism in the development of the KH instability and subsequent formation of turbulent sub-structures in the molecular clouds near massive stars. The role of magnetic fields in the presence of radiation pressure is also investigated and it has resulted in the magnetic field suppressing the effects induced by radiation pressure.

  4. Point defects in (Mg,Fe)O at high pressures: where does hydrogen dominate over ferric iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2007-12-01

    The point defects play an important role in transport processes of minerals including diffusion, electrical conduction and plastic deformation. Point defects caused by ferric iron and/or hydrogen (proton) are dominant defects in most of the iron-bearing minerals including olivine and (Mg,Fe)O. In many upper-mantle minerals such as olivine, the concentration of ferric iron is much smaller than that of hydrogen, and therefore the small amount of hydrogen changes their transport properties dramatically. However, the situation is very different for lower- mantle minerals such as (Mg,Fe)O. In this presentation, we will review the available experimental data on point defects in (Mg,Fe)O and discuss the relative importance of ferric iron and hydrogen at high pressures based on atomic models. The existing low-pressure data indicate that the maximum solubility of ferric iron in (Mg,Fe)O is on the order of 0.1 (atomic fraction in the total iron), which is much higher than that of hydrogen. However, experimental studies by Bolfan-Casanova et al (2002, 2006) indicate that the solubility of ferric iron decreases while that of hydrogen increases with pressure. This suggests that the dominant impurity to generate point defects in (Mg,Fe)O may change from ferric iron to hydrogen at high pressure. Therefore it is important to quantify the pressure dependence of the solubility of ferric iron and hydrogen. We have explored two models of ferric iron- related defects and found that the existing experimental data suggest that ferric iron may occur at two lattice sites: the tetrahedral site as interstitial atoms as well as the octahedral site. The pressure dependence of the solubility of hydrogen in (Mg,Fe)O are also estimated based on the experimental data and defect models. The cross-over of defect solubility likely occurs in the lower mantle, but the exact depth is poorly constrained because of large uncertainties in the hydrogen solubility and the mechanisms of hydrogen dissolution

  5. Radiation Pressure Effects in the Oscillations of Compressible Rotating Homogeneous Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, T. T.; Pung, S. Y.

    1993-09-01

    Earlier models of compressible, rotating, and homogeneous ellipsoids with gas pressure are generalized to include the presence of radiation pressure. Under the assumptions of a linear velocity field of the fluid and a bounded ellipsoidal surface, the dynamical behaviour of these models can be described by ordinary differential equations. These equations are used to study the finite oscillations of massive radiative models with masses 10M ⊙ and 30M ⊙ in which the effects of radiation pressure are expected to be important. Models with two different degrees of equilibrium are chosen: an equilibrium (i.e., dynamically stable) model with an initial asymmetric inward velocity, and a nonequilibrium model with a nonequilibrium central temperature and which falls inwards from rest. For each of these two degrees of equilibrium, two initial configurations are considered: rotating spheroidal and nonrotating spherical models. From the numerical integration of the differential equations for these models, we obtain the time evolution of their principal semi-diametersa 1 anda 3, and of their central temperatures, which are graphically displayed by making plots of the trajectories in the (a 1,a 3) phase space, and of botha 1 and the total central pressureP c against time. It is found that in all the equilibrium radiative models (in which radiation pressure is taken into account), the periods of the oscillations of botha 1 andP c are longer than those of the corresponding nonradiative models, while the reverse is true for the nonequilibrium radiative models. The envelopes of thea 1 oscillations of the equilibrium radiative models also have much longer periods; this result also holds for the nonequilibrium models whenever the envelope is well defined. Further, as compared to the nonradiative models, almost all the radiative models collapse to smaller volumes before rebouncing, with the more massive model undergoing a larger collapse and attaining a correspondingly larger peakP c

  6. Simulations of radiation pressure ion acceleration with the VEGA Petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach Petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 :1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022 W cm-2 impinging normally on 20 - 60 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure-dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  7. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  8. Calculations of radiative heat transfer in an axisymmetric jet diffusion flame at elevated pressures using different gas radiation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Huaqiang; Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Gu, Mingyan; Liu, Fengshan

    2017-08-01

    Radiation heat transfer in axisymmetric jet diffusion flames under conditions relevant to oxygen-enriched combustion at total pressures of 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm was calculated using several gas radiation models: line-by-line (LBL), narrow-band correlated-k (NBCK), wide-band correlated-k (WBCK), full-spectrum correlated-k (FSCK), spectral-line based weight-sum-of-gray-gases (SLW), and weight-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG). An optimized NBCK model, an optimized FSCK model, and a WBCK model were proposed and evaluated. The LBL results are used as the benchmark solution in the evaluation of other gas radiation models. The optimized NBCK model and the optimized FSCK model are much more computationally efficient than the standard implementation of these models with very little loss in accuracy. The NBCK, WBCK, and FSCK models are accurate and their normalized errors in both the radiative source term and radiative flux remain less than about 7% and display essentially no dependence on the total pressure. Whatever the pressure considered, the FSCK is found to provide accurate predictions by considering only 10 Gauss points. For the same number of gray gases, the SLW is less accurate than the FSCK, especially at pressures higher than the atmospheric pressure. However, its accuracy can be significantly improved to reach that of the FSCKby increasing the number of gray gases. The accuracy of WSGG models deteriorates somewhat with increasing the total pressure in the prediction of radiative heat flux, though it displays no significant dependence on the total pressure in the calculation of the radiative source term. The spectral line broadening has a non-negligible influence on radiative heat transfer in the jet diffusion flame. The somewhat increased inaccuracy of the WSGG model with increasing the total pressure is at least partially due to the application of the model parameters derived at 1 atm to high pressures. The normalized errors of WSGG are about 10 to 20%. The optimized

  9. Pressure generation during neural stimulation with infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, N.; Tan, X.; Xu, Y.; Richter, C.-P.

    2017-02-01

    This study quantifies laser evoked pressure waves in small confined volumes such as a small dish or the cochlea. The pressure was measured with custom fabricated pressure probes in front of the optical fiber. For the pressure measurements during laser stimulation the probes were inserted into scala tympani or vestibuli. At 164 μJ/pulse, the intracochlear pressure was between 96 and 106 dB (re 20 μPa). The pressure was also measured in the ear canal with a sensitive microphone. It was on average 63 dB (re 20 μPa). At radiant energies large enough to evoke an auditory compound action potential, the outer ear canal equivalent pressure was 36-56 dB (re 20 μPa).

  10. CODE's new solar radiation pressure model for GNSS orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Meindl, M.; Beutler, G.; Dach, R.; Schaer, S.; Lutz, S.; Prange, L.; Sośnica, K.; Mervart, L.; Jäggi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) of the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which was developed in the early 1990s, is widely used in the International GNSS Service (IGS) community. For a rather long time, spurious spectral lines are known to exist in geophysical parameters, in particular in the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and in the estimated geocenter coordinates, which could recently be attributed to the ECOM. These effects grew creepingly with the increasing influence of the GLONASS system in recent years in the CODE analysis, which is based on a rigorous combination of GPS and GLONASS since May 2003. In a first step we show that the problems associated with the ECOM are to the largest extent caused by the GLONASS, which was reaching full deployment by the end of 2011. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and combined GPS/GLONASS solutions using the observations in the years 2009-2011 of a global network of 92 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers were analyzed for this purpose. In a second step we review direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) models for GNSS satellites. We demonstrate that only even-order short-period harmonic perturbations acting along the direction Sun-satellite occur for GPS and GLONASS satellites, and only odd-order perturbations acting along the direction perpendicular to both, the vector Sun-satellite and the spacecraft's solar panel axis. Based on this insight we assess in the third step the performance of four candidate orbit models for the future ECOM. The geocenter coordinates, the ERP differences w. r. t. the IERS 08 C04 series of ERPs, the misclosures for the midnight epochs of the daily orbital arcs, and scale parameters of Helmert transformations for station coordinates serve as quality criteria. The old and updated ECOM are validated in addition with satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations and by comparing the orbits to those of the IGS and other analysis centers. Based on all tests, we present a new extended ECOM which

  11. Production of electron-positron pairs by a photon in the radiation-dominated universe

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaregorodtsev, L.I.

    1995-12-01

    The production of an arbitrary number of electron-positron pairs by a photon in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker universe with expansion law a(t) = a{sub o}{radical}t is considered. In Minkowski space, this process is forbidden by conservation laws. The total probability of the process and the mean number of Dirac particles produced as the result of photon decay are calculated and analyzed as functions of the primary-photon energy. The expressions obtained in this study are compared with the results of calculation of photon emission from the vacuum. The massless limit of the total probability of the process is considered. Numerical estimates are obtained for the mean number of particles produced in photon decays in the early universe. These estimates show that the production of Dirac particles in photon decays dominates over their production in photon emission from the vacuum and over their production from the vacuum of a free spinor field. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Solar radiation and tidal exposure as environmental drivers of Enhalus acoroides dominated seagrass meadows.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Richard K F; Rasheed, Michael A; Chartrand, Kathryn M; Roelofs, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence of a global long-term decline in seagrass meadows that is widely attributed to anthropogenic activity. Yet in many regions, attributing these changes to actual activities is difficult, as there exists limited understanding of the natural processes that can influence these valuable ecosystem service providers. Being able to separate natural from anthropogenic causes of seagrass change is important for developing strategies that effectively mitigate and manage anthropogenic impacts on seagrass, and promote coastal ecosystems resilient to future environmental change. The present study investigated the influence of environmental and climate related factors on seagrass biomass in a large ≈250 ha meadow in tropical north east Australia. Annual monitoring of the intertidal Enhalus acoroides (L.f.) Royle seagrass meadow over eleven years revealed a declining trend in above-ground biomass (54% significant overall reduction from 2000 to 2010). Partial Least Squares Regression found this reduction to be significantly and negatively correlated with tidal exposure, and significantly and negatively correlated with the amount of solar radiation. This study documents how natural long-term tidal variability can influence long-term seagrass dynamics. Exposure to desiccation, high UV, and daytime temperature regimes are discussed as the likely mechanisms for the action of these factors in causing this decline. The results emphasise the importance of understanding and assessing natural environmentally-driven change when interpreting the results of seagrass monitoring programs.

  13. Contributions of John Henry Poynting to the understanding of radiation pressure

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, R.; Baxter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The name of Poynting is universally recognized for his development of the well-known expression for the flow of electromagnetic energy. Not so well known is Poynting's series of papers on radiation pressure, with 2011 marking the centenary of the last of his 15 publications on this topic. This paper reviews and assesses his radiation-pressure work, with a level of coverage aimed at the reader familiar with the Maxwell electromagnetic theory and interested in the current understanding of radiation pressure. We begin with brief details of Poynting's life, followed by accounts of the relevant publications by others before and during his period of activity in the field from 1903 to 1911. His contributions to the understanding of radiation-pressure effects in the solar system, and the linear and angular momenta of light are discussed, with evaluations from a modern perspective. PMID:22792039

  14. Orbital transfers in an asteroid system considering the solar radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Geraldo Magela Couto; Bertachini de A. Prado, Antonio F.; Sanchez, Diogo Merguizo; Gomes, Vivian Martins

    2017-10-01

    The present paper studies the effects of the radiation pressure in the trajectories of a spacecraft in transfers between the collinear Lagrange points of a double asteroid system. The system considered is this paper is formed by the double asteroid 1996FG3 and the maneuvers are always assumed to be bi-impulsive. In a system formed by asteroids, the solar radiation pressure has a significant influence in the transfers paths. This occurs because the gravitational forces in these systems are smaller if compared with systems formed by larger bodies. Solutions with lower and higher fuel consumption can be found by adding the solar radiation pressure. The radiation pressure was not used as a control but its effects over the transfers were measured. For a small system of primaries such as an asteroid system, it is very important to take into account this force to make sure that the spacecraft will reach the desired point.

  15. New empirically-derived solar radiation pressure model for GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Y.; Kuang, D.

    2003-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure force is the second largest perturbation acting on GPS satellites, after the gravitational attraction from the Earth, Sun, and Moon. It is the largest error source in the modeling of GPS orbital dynamics.

  16. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  17. CLUMPY ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES. I. CLUMPY-ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOW STRUCTURE AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianmin; Cheng Cheng; Li Yanrong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  18. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  19. High-T_{c} Superconductivity in FeSe at High Pressure: Dominant Hole Carriers and Enhanced Spin Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Ye, G Z; Shahi, P; Yan, J-Q; Matsuura, K; Kontani, H; Zhang, G M; Zhou, Q; Sales, B C; Shibauchi, T; Uwatoko, Y; Singh, D J; Cheng, J-G

    2017-04-07

    The importance of electron-hole interband interactions is widely acknowledged for iron-pnictide superconductors with high transition temperatures (T_{c}). However, the absence of hole pockets near the Fermi level of the iron-selenide (FeSe) derived high-T_{c} superconductors raises a fundamental question of whether iron pnictides and chalcogenides have different pairing mechanisms. Here, we study the properties of electronic structure in the high-T_{c} phase induced by pressure in bulk FeSe from magnetotransport measurements and first-principles calculations. With increasing pressure, the low-T_{c} superconducting phase transforms into the high-T_{c} phase, where we find the normal-state Hall resistivity changes sign from negative to positive, demonstrating dominant hole carriers in contrast to other FeSe-derived high-T_{c} systems. Moreover, the Hall coefficient is enlarged and the magnetoresistance exhibits anomalous scaling behaviors, evidencing strongly enhanced interband spin fluctuations in the high-T_{c} phase. These results in FeSe highlight similarities with high-T_{c} phases of iron pnictides, constituting a step toward a unified understanding of iron-based superconductivity.

  20. High-Tc Superconductivity in FeSe at High Pressure: Dominant Hole Carriers and Enhanced Spin Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Ye, G. Z.; Shahi, P.; Yan, J.-Q.; Matsuura, K.; Kontani, H.; Zhang, G. M.; Zhou, Q.; Sales, B. C.; Shibauchi, T.; Uwatoko, Y.; Singh, D. J.; Cheng, J.-G.

    2017-04-01

    The importance of electron-hole interband interactions is widely acknowledged for iron-pnictide superconductors with high transition temperatures (Tc ). However, the absence of hole pockets near the Fermi level of the iron-selenide (FeSe) derived high-Tc superconductors raises a fundamental question of whether iron pnictides and chalcogenides have different pairing mechanisms. Here, we study the properties of electronic structure in the high-Tc phase induced by pressure in bulk FeSe from magnetotransport measurements and first-principles calculations. With increasing pressure, the low-Tc superconducting phase transforms into the high-Tc phase, where we find the normal-state Hall resistivity changes sign from negative to positive, demonstrating dominant hole carriers in contrast to other FeSe-derived high-Tc systems. Moreover, the Hall coefficient is enlarged and the magnetoresistance exhibits anomalous scaling behaviors, evidencing strongly enhanced interband spin fluctuations in the high-Tc phase. These results in FeSe highlight similarities with high-Tc phases of iron pnictides, constituting a step toward a unified understanding of iron-based superconductivity.

  1. High- Tc Superconductivity in FeSe at High Pressure: Dominant Hole Carriers and Enhanced Spin Fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, J. P.; Ye, G. Z.; Shahi, P.; ...

    2017-04-07

    The importance of electron-hole interband interactions is widely acknowledged for iron-pnictide superconductors with high transition temperatures (Tc). However, high-Tc superconductivity without hole carriers has been suggested in FeSe single-layer films and intercalated iron-selenides, raising a fundamental question whether iron pnictides and chalcogenides have different pairing mechanisms. Here, we study the properties of electronic structure in another high-Tc phase induced by pressure in bulk FeSe from magneto-transport measurements and first-principles calculations. With increasing pressure, the low-Tc superconducting phase transforms into high-Tc phase, where we find the normal-state Hall resistivity changes sign from negative to positive, demonstrating dominant hole carriers in strikingmore » contrast to other FeSe-derived high-Tc systems. Moreover, the Hall coefficient is remarkably enlarged and the magnetoresistance exhibits anomalous scaling behaviours, evidencing strongly enhanced interband spin fluctuations in the high-Tc phase. These results in FeSe highlight similarities with high-Tc phases of iron pnictides, constituting a step toward a unified understanding of iron-based superconductivity.« less

  2. Fluctuation of a Piston in Vacuum Induced by Thermal Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2017-10-01

    We consider the displacement of a piston dividing a vacuum cavity at a finite temperature T induced by fluctuations in the thermal radiation pressure. The correlation function of the thermal radiation pressure is calculated using the theoretical framework developed by Barton, which was first applied to the fluctuation of the Casimir force at absolute zero. We show that the variance of the radiation pressure at a fixed point is proportional to T8 and evaluate the mean square displacement for a piston with a small cross section in a characteristic correlation timescale ħ/(kBT). At room temperature, the contribution of the thermal radiation to the fluctuation is larger than that of the vacuum fluctuation.

  3. Radiation embrittlement and annealing of VVER pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Pressure vessels of the Soviet-designed VVERs are exposed to up to 10X the fast flux of the vessels of US PWRs. They are fabricated of 2 1/2% Cr, 1% Mo or 2 1/2% Cr, 1% Ni steels developed for that purpose. Consequently, the data base on irradiation effects differs somewhat from that of Western-designed pressure vessels. The role of phosphorus, which is high in the older VVER steels, is especially important. Newer grades of steels, low in copper and phosphorus, have been developed. Pressure vessels fabricated before about 1980 were unclad. The embrittlement of these can be tested in situ with a remote microhardness measuring device. Hydrogen pickup from corrosion does not increase the embrittlement due to irradiation. Considerable research has been performed on pressure vessel annealing, and anneals of the core weld region of the pressure vessels of three operating VVERs have been completed at temperatures 160-185{degree}C higher than the irradiation temperature for 150 hours to one week. Recoveries, monitored with a remote microhardness tester, have ranged upward from 70%.

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Influence of the ambient air pressure on short-wavelength radiation from a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, A. F.; Zemtsov, S. S.; Fedyushin, B. T.

    1991-12-01

    A detailed experimental investigation was made of the radiation from a plasma created on an aluminum target by a pulsed CO2 laser at different ambient gas pressures. Measurements were made of the energy and angular distribution of the radiation and of the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into reemitted plasma radiation. The intensity of this radiation was found to exhibit pressure-dependent pulsations. The maximum reflection of the laser radiation from the plasma was recorded at a pressure of ~ 40 Torr. An interpretation is given of the experimental data.

  5. High fidelity radiative heat transfer models for high-pressure laminar hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian; Lei, Shenghui; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Modest, Michael F.; Haworth, Daniel C.

    2014-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is studied numerically for high-pressure laminar H2-air jet diffusion flames, with pressure ranging from 1 to 30 bar. Water vapour is assumed to be the only radiatively participating species. Two different radiation models are employed, the first being the full spectrum k-distribution model together with conventional Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solvers. Narrowband k-distributions of water vapour are calculated and databased from the HITEMP 2010 database, which claims to retain accuracy up to 4000 K. The full-spectrum k-distributions are assembled from their narrowband counterparts to yield high accuracy with little additional computational cost. The RTE is solved using various spherical harmonics methods, such as P1, simplified P3 (SP3) and simplified P5 (SP5). The resulting partial differential equations as well as other transport equations in the laminar diffusion flames are discretized with the finite-volume method in OpenFOAM®. The second radiation model is a Photon Monte Carlo (PMC) method coupled with a line-by-line spectral model. The PMC absorption coefficient database is derived from the same spectroscopy database as the k-distribution methods. A time blending scheme is used to reduce PMC calculations at each time step. Differential diffusion effects, which are important in laminar hydrogen flames, are also included in the scalar transport equations. It was found that the optically thin approximation overpredicts radiative heat loss at elevated pressures. Peak flame temperature is less affected by radiation because of faster chemical reactions at high pressures. Significant cooling effects are observed at downstream locations. As pressure increases, the performance of RTE models starts to deviate due to increased optical thickness. SPN models perform only marginally better than P1 because P1 is adequate except at very high pressure.

  6. An improved radiation metric. [for radiation pressure in strong gravitational fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    An improved radiation metric is obtained in which light rays make a small nonzero angle with the radius, thus representing a source of finite size. Kaufmann's previous solution is criticized. The stabilization of a scatterer near a source of gravitational field and radiation is slightly enhanced for sources of finite size.

  7. A dominant role of oxygen additive on cold atmospheric-pressure He + O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Kong, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    We present in this paper how oxygen additive impacts on the cold atmospheric-pressure helium plasmas by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. For the oxygen concentration [O{sub 2}] > ∼0.1%, the influence of oxygen on the electron characteristics and the power dissipation becomes important, e.g., the electron density, the electron temperature in sheath, the electron-coupling power, and the sheath width decreasing by 1.6 to 16 folds with a two-log increase in [O{sub 2}] from 0.1% to 10%. Also the discharge mode evolves from the γ mode to the α mode. The reactive oxygen species are found to peak in the narrow range of [O{sub 2}] = 0.4%–0.9% in the plasmas, similar to their power-coupling values. This applies to their wall fluxes except for those of O* and O{sub 2}{sup −}. These two species have very short lifetimes, thus only when generated in boundary layers within several micrometers next to the electrode can contribute to the fluxes. The dominant reactive oxygen species and the corresponding main reactions are schematically presented, and their relations are quantified for selected applications.

  8. Do grain boundaries dominate non-radiative recombination in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite thin films?

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Mengjin; Zeng, Yining; Li, Zhen; ...

    2017-01-13

    Here, we examine GBs with respect to non-GB regions (grain surfaces (GSs) and grain interiors (GIs)) in high-quality micrometer-sized perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (or MAPbI3) thin films using high-resolution confocal fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy in conjunction with kinetic modeling of charge-transport and recombination processes. We show that, contrary to previous studies, GBs in our perovskite MAPbI3 thin films do not lead to increased recombination but that recombination in these films happens primarily in the non-GB regions (i.e., GSs or GIs). We also find that GBs in these films are not transparent to photogenerated carriers, which is likely associated with a potential barrier atmore » GBs. Even though GBs generally display lower luminescence intensities than GSs/GIs, the lifetimes at GBs are no worse than those at GSs/GIs, further suggesting that GBs do not dominate non-radiative recombination in MAPbI3 thin films.« less

  9. Do grain boundaries dominate non-radiative recombination in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films?

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengjin; Zeng, Yining; Li, Zhen; Kim, Dong Hoe; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Zhu, Kai

    2017-02-15

    Here, we examine grain boundaries (GBs) with respect to non-GB regions (grain surfaces (GSs) and grain interiors (GIs)) in high-quality micrometer-sized perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (or MAPbI3) thin films using high-resolution confocal fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy in conjunction with kinetic modeling of charge-transport and recombination processes. We show that, contrary to previous studies, GBs in our perovskite MAPbI3 thin films do not lead to increased recombination but that recombination in these films happens primarily in the non-GB regions (i.e., GSs or GIs). We also find that GBs in these films are not transparent to photogenerated carriers, which is likely associated with a potential barrier at GBs. Even though GBs generally display lower luminescence intensities than GSs/GIs, the lifetimes at GBs are no worse than those at GSs/GIs, further suggesting that GBs do not dominate non-radiative recombination in MAPbI3 thin films.

  10. Do grain boundaries dominate non-radiative recombination in CH3NH3PbI 3 perovskite thin films?

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Mengjin; Zeng, Yining; Li, Zhen; ...

    2017-01-13

    Here, we examine GBs with respect to non-GB regions (grain surfaces (GSs) and grain interiors (GIs)) in high-quality micrometer-sized perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (or MAPbI3) thin films using high-resolution confocal fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy in conjunction with kinetic modeling of charge-transport and recombination processes. We show that, contrary to previous studies, GBs in our perovskite MAPbI3 thin films do not lead to increased recombination but that recombination in these films happens primarily in the non-GB regions (i.e., GSs or GIs). We also find that GBs in these films are not transparent to photogenerated carriers, which is likely associated with a potential barrier atmore » GBs. Lastly, even though GBs generally display lower luminescence intensities than GSs/GIs, the lifetimes at GBs are no worse than those at GSs/GIs, further suggesting that GBs do not dominate non-radiative recombination in MAPbI3 thin films.« less

  11. [Comparative analysis of ionizing radiation and xenobiotics influence on spermatogenic epithelium and dominant lethal mutations output in laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Mamina, V P; Zhigal'skiĭ, O A

    2014-01-01

    The study covered state of spermatogenic epithelium and dominant lethal mutations output in mice of BALB/c and CBA lines, subjected to total gamma-irradiation and in Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of potassium bichromate (K2Cr2,O7) in small and sublethal doses. The BALB/c line mice under low irradiation dose (0.25 Gy) demonstrated stimulation effect on spermatogenic epithelium, but in the CBA line mice no such effect was seen. Both mice lines under irradiation of 0.25 Gy and 1.0 Gy demonstrated increase in pathologic sperm counts and in percentage ofpreimplantation embryonal death. In rats, injection of potassium bichromate in doses of 0.028 mg/kg and 2.8 mg/kg increased number of micronuclear spermatids, larger pathologic sperm counts and percentage of postimplantation deaths. Thus, lower general embryonal deaths under radiation exposure is due to preimplantation embryonal deaths, under exposure to 6-valent chromium--is due to postimplantation losses.

  12. OMOSHI Effect: A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion under the Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2009-08-01

    In a massive-star formation process, a high-mass accretion rate is considered to be needed to overcome the strong radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. We examined the accretion structure near the dust sublimation front and found a new mechanism to overcome this radiation pressure. The weight of the accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps with the mass accretion. We call this mechanism the ``OMOSHI effect,'' where OMOSHI is an acronym for ``One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weight.'' OMOSHI is also a Japanese noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation.

  13. The effects of pulse duration on ablation pressure driven by laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ya Zhu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Tang, Chang-Jian

    2015-03-28

    The effects of laser pulse duration on the ablation pressure induced by laser radiation are investigated using Al target. Numerical simulation results using one dimensional radiation hydro code for laser intensities from 5×10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 5×10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations from 0.5 ns to 20 ns are presented. These results suggest that the laser intensity scaling law of ablation pressure differs for different pulse durations. And the theoretical analysis shows that the effects of laser pulse duration on ablation pressure are mainly caused by two regimes: the unsteady-state flow and the radiative energy loss to vacuum.

  14. Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterer, C.; Hill, K.; Jah, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need for physically consistent radiation pressure and Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. This paper seeks to evaluate the impact of BRDF-consistent radiation pressure models compared to changes in the other BRDF parameters. The differences in orbital position arising because of changes in the shape, attitude, angular rates, BRDF parameters, and radiation pressure model are plotted as a function of time for simulated rocket bodies and debris at geo-synchronous orbit (GEO). The initial position and velocity of the space object is kept fixed, and the orbital position difference between a baseline or-bit and the perturbed orbit are plotted as a function of time. This is similar to how the effects of perturbations have been visualized in the past in commonly used astrodynamics references.

  15. Radiation pressure acceleration of corrugated thin foils by Gaussian and super-Gaussian beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adusumilli, K.; Goyal, D.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-01-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability of radiation pressure accelerated ultrathin foils by laser having Gaussian and super-Gaussian intensity distribution is investigated using a single fluid code. The foil is allowed to have ring shaped surface ripples. The radiation pressure force on such a foil is non-uniform with finite transverse component F{sub r}; F{sub r} varies periodically with r. Subsequently, the ripple grows as the foil moves ahead along z. With a Gaussian beam, the foil acquires an overall curvature due to non-uniformity in radiation pressure and gets thinner. In the process, the ripple perturbation is considerably washed off. With super-Gaussian beam, the ripple is found to be more strongly washed out. In order to avoid transmission of the laser through the thinning foil, a criterion on the foil thickness is obtained.

  16. Resonances, radiation pressure and optical scattering phenomena of drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Goosby, S. G.; Langley, D. S.; Loporto-Arione, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation and the response of fluid spheres to spherical harmonic projections of the radiation pressure are described. Simplified discussions of the projections are given. A relationship between the tangential radiation stress and the Konstantinov effect is introduced and fundamental streaming patterns for drops are predicted. Experiments on the forced shape oscillation of drops are described and photographs of drop fission are displayed. Photographs of critical angle and glory scattering by bubbles and rainbow scattering by drops are displayed.

  17. Radiation pressure force from optical cycling on a polyatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Hemmerling, Boerge; Doyle, John M.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate multiple photon cycling and radiative force deflection on the triatomic free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). Optical cycling is achieved on SrOH in a cryogenic buffer-gas beam by employing the rotationally closed P(N\\prime\\prime =1) branch of the vibronic transition {\\tilde{X}}2{{{Σ }}}+(000)≤ftrightarrow {\\tilde{A}}2{{{\\Pi }}}1/2(000). A single repumping laser excites the Sr-O stretching vibrational mode, and photon cycling of the molecule deflects the SrOH beam by an angle of 0.2^\\circ via scattering of ˜100 photons per molecule. This approach can be used for direct laser cooling of SrOH and more complex, isoelectronic species.

  18. Control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit using solar radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Sun, Rong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using solar radiation pressure is investigated. The long term disturbing effect of the main zonal and tesseral harmonics J2 and J_{22} of the geopotential are eliminated by adjusting the initial orbital elements, and a tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO is designed. Then a control system using solar radiation pressure is further proposed to maintain the tetrahedron satellite formation, in which a sliding mode control (SMC) is developed to determine the control force. The control force is acquired from the solar sails equipped on the satellites, and the final control law and strategy using solar radiation pressure are presented. Moreover, three kinds of numerical simulations are especially given to verify the validity of the control system using solar radiation. It shows that Laplace precession of the GEO satellite can be avoided effectively, and the in-plane and out-of-plane errors of the formation can be eliminated easily. And hence the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO using solar radiation pressure is proved to be feasible.

  19. Exospheric perturbations by radiation pressure. 2: Solution for orbits in the ecliptic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The instantaneous rates of change for the orbital elements eccentricity, longitude of perigee from the Sun, and longitude from the Sun of the ascending node are integrated simultaneously for the case of the inclination i = 0. The results confirm the validity of using mean rates when the orbits are tightly bound to the planet and serve as examples to be reproduced by the complicated numerical solutions required for arbitrary inclination. Strongly bound hydrogen atoms escaping from Earth due to radiation pressure do not seem a likely cause of the geotail extending in the anti-sun direction. Instead, radiation pressure will cause those particles' orbits to deteriorate into the Earth's atmosphere.

  20. Effect of electromagnetic pulse transverse inhomogeneity on ion acceleration by radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lezhnin, K. V.; Kamenets, F. F.; Beskin, V. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    During ion acceleration by radiation pressure, a transverse inhomogeneity of an electromagnetic pulse leads to an off-axis displacement of the irradiated target, limiting the achievable ion energy. This effect is analytically described within the framework of a thin foil target model and with particle-in-cell simulations showing that the maximum energy of the accelerated ions decreases as the displacement from the axis of the target's initial position increases. The results obtained can be applied to the optimization of ion acceleration by the laser radiation pressure with mass-limited targets.

  1. Negative radiation pressure and negative effective refractive index via dielectric birefringence.

    PubMed

    Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Rechtsman, Mikael C; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-09

    We show that light guided in a planar dielectric slab geometry incorporating a biaxial medium has lossless modes with group and phase velocities in opposite directions. Particles in a vacuum gap inserted into the structure experience negative radiation pressure: the particles are pulled by light rather than pushed by it. This effectively one-dimensional dielectric structure represents a new geometry for achieving negative radiation pressure in a wide range of frequencies with minimal loss. Moreover, this geometry provides a straightforward platform for experimentally resolving the Abrahams-Minkowski dilemma.

  2. An analytical model for the underwater sound pressure waveforms radiated when an offshore pile is driven.

    PubMed

    Hall, Marshall V

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the pile vibration and consequent sound pressure and particle velocity radiated underwater when an offshore cylindrical pile is struck by a drop hammer. The model, which is based on the coupled equations of motion for axial and radial vibration of a thin cylindrical shell, yields frequency-dependent phase velocity and attenuation of these vibrations. The amplitude of the pulse of axial and radial displacement that travels down a pile following an axial impact is described in terms of the hammer properties. Solutions are obtained for the radiated sound pressure and particle velocity, using Junger and Feit's Transform Formulation of the Pressure Field of Cylindrical Radiators [(Acoustical Society of America, New York, 1993), p. 216]. The model is applied to published data on radiated noise from offshore driving of a steel pile. The modeled pressure waveforms at 12-m horizontal range and at 9 hydrophone depths correlate significantly with the measured waveforms. The modeled pressures of the initial positive peaks (appropriately low-pass filtered) agree with data to within 1 dB. The initial negative peaks however exceed the data by up to 7 dB, and as hydrophone depth increases, the model negative peaks have a maximum at 7 m, whereas the data have a maximum at 9 m.

  3. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  4. Negative pressure dressing for radiation-associated wound dehiscence after posterolateral thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Welvaart, Willem N; Oosterhuis, Jan W A; Paul, Marinus A

    2009-05-01

    Wound complications following surgical resection in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy are common and can be a difficult problem to manage. Negative pressure dressing technology appears to be safe and effective in the treatment of radiation-associated wound complications and can be used in the outpatients clinic setting. The presented case demonstrates that negative pressure dressing also manages the hydropneumothorax as a result of the dehiscence of the thoracic wall.

  5. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  6. Effect of Thermal Radiation on the Integrity of Pressurized Aircraft Evacuation Slides and Slide Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Pres sureI 19. Security Classif. (of this reort) 20. Security Classif. (of this pegs ) 21. No. of Pagos J~ ’E tce UnlsiidUnclassified :179 Ffig DOT F... deta from the new integrity of pressurized evacuation laboratory test method. slide materials exposed to thermal radiation; (2) develop a practical

  7. On the spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillator and its application in sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hossein-Zadeh, M.

    2013-05-01

    We study the RF spectrum of radiation pressure driven optomechanical oscillators (OMO). Using experiments and theoretical estimations we have characterized the relative amplitude of OMO's spectral components as a function of optical detuning and optical input power. We have identified a regime where the optical resonance shift can be directly extracted from the RF spectrum for resonant optical sensing applications.

  8. The Effect of Solar Radiation Pressure on the Motion of an Artificial Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert W.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation pressure on the motion of an artificial satellite are obtained, including the effects of the intermittent acceleration which results from the eclipsing of the satellite by the earth. Vectorial methods have been utilized to obtain the nonlinear equations describing the motion, and the method of Kryloff-Bogoliuboff has been applied in their solution.

  9. Stretching and squeezing of sessile dielectric drops by the optical radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, Hamza; Lasseux, Didier; Arquis, Eric; Wunenburger, Régis; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-01

    We study numerically the deformation of sessile dielectric drops immersed in a second fluid when submitted to the optical radiation pressure of a continuous Gaussian laser wave. Both drop stretching and drop squeezing are investigated at steady state where capillary effects balance the optical radiation pressure. A boundary integral method is implemented to solve the axisymmetric Stokes flow in the two fluids. In the stretching case, we find that the drop shape goes from prolate to near-conical for increasing optical radiation pressure whatever the drop to beam radius ratio and the refractive index contrast between the two fluids. The semiangle of the cone at equilibrium decreases with the drop to beam radius ratio and is weakly influenced by the index contrast. Above a threshold value of the radiation pressure, these "optical cones" become unstable and a disruption is observed. Conversely, when optically squeezed, the drop shifts from an oblate to a concave shape leading to the formation of a stable "optical torus." These findings extend the electrohydrodynamics approach of drop deformation to the much less investigated "optical domain" and reveal the openings offered by laser waves to actively manipulate droplets at the micrometer scale.

  10. An Analytical Theory for the Perturbative Effect of Solar Radiation Pressure on Natural and Artificial Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.

    Solar radiation pressure is the largest non-gravitational perturbation for most satellites in the solar system, and can therefore have a significant influence on their orbital dynamics. This work presents a new method for representing the solar radiation pressure force acting on a satellite, and applies this theory to natural and artificial satellites. The solar radiation pressure acceleration is modeled as a Fourier series which depends on the Sun's location in a body-fixed frame; a new set of Fourier coefficients are derived for every latitude of the Sun in this frame, and the series is expanded in terms of the longitude of the Sun. The secular effects due to the solar radiation pressure perturbations are given analytically through the application of averaging theory when the satellite is in a synchronous orbit. This theory is then applied to binary asteroid systems to explain the Binary YORP effect. Long term predictions of the evolution of the near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4 are discussed under the influence of solar radiation pressure, J2, and 3rd body gravitational effects from the Sun. Secular effects are shown to remain when the secondary asteroid becomes non-synchronous due to a librational motion. The theory is also applied to Earth orbiting spacecraft, and is shown to be a valuable tool for improved orbit determination. The Fourier series solar radiation pressure model derived here is shown to give comparable results for orbit determination of the GPS IIR-M satellites as JPL's solar radiation pressure model. The theory is also extended to incorporate the effects of the Earth's shadow analytically. This theory is briefly applied to the evolution of orbital debris to explain the assumptions that are necessary in order to use the cannonball model for debris orbit evolution, as is common in the literature. Finally, the averaging theory methodology is applied to a class of Earth orbiting solar sail spacecraft to show the orbital effects when the sails are made

  11. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Muehlmatt, Amy; Savage, Alexandria; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-02-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in opening pressure (OP) occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure.

  12. Spectroscopic measurement of radiation of high-pressure mercury discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Ling; Leutz, Ralf; Ries, Harald

    2005-06-15

    Compact size and high efficiency are important features for projection systems. As the most often used sources for projection optics, short arc lamps are characterized by their impressive economy and the ability to produce extremely bright light from small dimensional sources. In this contribution the old principle of back reflection towards the sources is applied to a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp with a reflector to improve the radiance of the source by 35% at a certain reduced solid angle. Increasing the optical thickness of sources is equivalent to reducing the total phase space (etendue) of emitted radiation by the same factor, which is very useful for compacting sources. In addition, by comparing the forward radiation and the back-reflected radiation obtained from spectroscopic measurements, we calculate the absorptivity, emissivity, absorption, and emission coefficients of the plasma of the arc lamp based on Kirchhoff's Law and Planck's equation which is necessary for determining its temperature and pressure.

  13. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  14. ASSESSING RADIATION PRESSURE AS A FEEDBACK MECHANISM IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Brett H.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-02-01

    Radiation pressure from the absorption and scattering of starlight by dust grains may be an important feedback mechanism in regulating star-forming galaxies. We compile data from the literature on star clusters, star-forming subregions, normal star-forming galaxies, and starbursts to assess the importance of radiation pressure on dust as a feedback mechanism, by comparing the luminosity and flux of these systems to their dust Eddington limit. This exercise motivates a novel interpretation of the Schmidt law, the L{sub IR}-L'{sub CO} correlation, and the L{sub IR}-L'{sub HCN} correlation. In particular, the linear L{sub IR}-L'{sub HCN} correlation is a natural prediction of radiation pressure regulated star formation. Overall, we find that the Eddington limit sets a hard upper bound to the luminosity of any star-forming region. Importantly, however, many normal star-forming galaxies have luminosities significantly below the Eddington limit. We explore several explanations for this discrepancy, especially the role of 'intermittency' in normal spirals-the tendency for only a small number of subregions within a galaxy to be actively forming stars at any moment because of the time dependence of the feedback process and the luminosity evolution of the stellar population. If radiation pressure regulates star formation in dense gas, then the gas depletion timescale is 6 Myr, in good agreement with observations of the densest starbursts. Finally, we highlight the importance of observational uncertainties, namely, the dust-to-gas ratio and the CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCN-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors, that must be understood before a definitive assessment of radiation pressure as a feedback mechanism in star-forming galaxies.

  15. Radiation annealing of radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2016-02-01

    Influence of neutron irradiation on RPV steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore - nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation structure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. As a result oscillation arise that in tern lead to enhanced data scatter.

  16. Radiation Pressure--driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kool, Martijn; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-12-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALs) are formed in a radiation pressure- driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  17. Radiation Pressure-Driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKool, Martin; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-01-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALS) are formed in a radiation pressure-driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  18. THE ROLES OF RADIATION AND RAM PRESSURE IN DRIVING GALACTIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: biman@rri.res.in

    2012-05-01

    We study gaseous outflows from disk galaxies driven by the combined effects of ram pressure on cold gas clouds and radiation pressure on dust grains. Taking into account the gravity due to disk, bulge, and dark matter halo, and assuming continuous star formation in the disk, we show that radiation or ram pressure alone is not sufficient to drive escaping winds from disk galaxies and that both processes contribute. We show that in the parameter space of star formation rate (SFR) and rotation speed of galaxies the wind speed in galaxies with rotation speeds v{sub c} {<=} 200 km s{sup -1} and SFR {<=} 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} has a larger contribution from ram pressure, and that in high-mass galaxies with large SFR radiation from the disk has a greater role in driving galactic winds. The ratio of wind speed to circular speed can be approximated as v{sub w} / v{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 0.7}, [SFR/50{sub Sun }yr{sup -1}]{sup 0.4} [v{sub c}/120 km s{sup -1}]{sup -1.25}. We show that this conclusion is borne out by observations of galactic winds at low and high redshift and also of circumgalactic gas. We also estimate the mass loading factors under the combined effect of ram and radiation pressure, and show that the ratio of mass-loss rate to SFR scales roughly as v{sup -1}{sub c}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup -1}, where {Sigma}{sub g} is the gas column density in the disk.

  19. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  20. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarela-tivistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  1. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-09-15

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover, the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarelativistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  2. Communications system using a mirror kept in outer space by electromagnetic radiation pressure

    DOEpatents

    Csonka, Paul L.

    1981-01-01

    A method and system are described for transmitting electromagnetic radiation by using a communications mirror located between about 100 kilometers and about 200 kilometers above ground. The communications mirror is kept aloft above the atmosphere by the pressure of the electromagnetic radiation which it reflects, and which is beamed at the communications mirror by a suitably constructed transmitting antenna on the ground. The communications mirror will reflect communications, such as radio, radar, or television waves up to about 1,100 kilometers away when the communications mirror is located at a height of about 100 kilometers.

  3. High-Fidelity Thermal Radiation Models and Measurements for High-Pressure Reacting Laminar and Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-26

    systems with extensive validation of the aforementioned models. New spectral radiation models for combustion gases at elevated pressures, for both...of the most important combustion gases in high-pressure combustion, including the effects of TRI. As a result high-end models for spectral thermal...specific research areas of this project were: 1) extension of spectral radiation models for combustion gases at the elevated pressures relevant to

  4. Spatial variability and response to anthropogenic pressures of assemblages dominated by a habitat forming seaweed sensitive to pollution (northern coast of Alboran Sea).

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Ricardo; de la Fuente, Gina; Ramírez-Romero, Eduardo; Vergara, Juan J; Hernández, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    The Cystoseira ericaefolia group is conformed by three species: C. tamariscifolia, C. mediterranea and C. amentacea. These species are among the most important habitat forming species of the upper sublittoral rocky shores of the Mediterranean Sea and adjacent Atlantic coast. This species group is sensitive to human pressures and therefore is currently suffering important losses. This study aimed to assess the influence of anthropogenic pressures, oceanographic conditions and local spatial variability in assemblages dominated by C. ericaefolia in the Alboran Sea. The results showed the absence of significant effects of anthropogenic pressures or its interactions with environmental conditions in the Cystoseira assemblages. This fact was attributed to the high spatial variability, which is most probably masking the impact of anthropogenic pressures. The results also showed that most of the variability occurred on at local levels. A relevant spatial variability was observed at regional level, suggesting a key role of oceanographic features in these assemblages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation pressure confinement - III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-12-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe0+ to Fe25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN/d log ξ|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 ≲ ξ ≲ 104 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN/d log ξ| ≈ N1ξa) yield N1 = 3 × 1021 cm- 2 ± 0.4 dex and a = 0-0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed N1 and a? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN/d log ξ| = 8 × 1021 ξ0.03 cm-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of N1 and a depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.

  6. Dominance of the forward compression wave in determining pulsatile components of blood pressure: similarities between inotropic stimulation and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Brett, Sally; Jiang, Benyu; Li, Ye; Epstein, Sally; Alastruey, Jordi; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile components of blood pressure may arise from forward (ventricular generated) or backward wave travel in the arterial tree. The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of forward and backward waves to pulsatility. We used wave intensity and wave separation analysis to determine pulsatile components of blood pressure during inotropic and vasopressor stimulation by dobutamine and norepinephrine in normotensive subjects and compared pulse pressure components in hypertensive (mean±SD, 48.8±11.3 years; 165±26.6/99±14.2 mm Hg) and normotensive subjects (52.2±12.6 years; 120±14.2/71±8.2 mm Hg). Dobutamine (7.5 μg/kg per minute) increased the forward compression wave generated by the ventricle and increased pulse pressure from 36.8±3.7 to 59.0±3.4 mm Hg (mean±SE) but had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure or the midsystolic backward compression wave. By contrast, norepinephrine (50 ng/kg per minute) had no significant effect on the forward compression wave but increased the midsystolic backward compression wave. Despite this increase in the backward compression wave, and an increase in mean arterial pressure, norepinephrine increased central pulse pressure less than dobutamine (increases of 22.1±3.8 and 7.2±2.8 mm Hg for dobutamine and norepinephrine, respectively; P<0.02). An elevated forward wave component (mean±SE, 50.4±3.4 versus 35.2±1.8 mm Hg, in hypertensive and normotensive subjects, respectively; P<0.001) accounted for approximately two thirds of the total difference in central pulse pressures between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Increased central pulse pressure during inotropic stimulation and in essential hypertension results primarily from the forward compression wave. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability. II - One-dimensional simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Woods, Jorden

    1992-01-01

    The clustering of statistically uniform discrete absorbing particles moving solely under the influence of radiation pressure from uniformly distributed emitters is studied in a simple one-dimensional model. Radiation pressure tends to amplify statistical clustering in the absorbers; the absorbing material is swept into empty bubbles, the biggest bubbles grow bigger almost as they would in a uniform medium, and the smaller ones get crushed and disappear. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional system are used to support the conjecture that the system is self-organizing. Simple statistics indicate that a wide range of initial conditions produce structure approaching the same self-similar statistical distribution, whose scaling properties follow those of the attractor solution for an isolated bubble. The importance of the process for large-scale structuring of the interstellar medium is briefly discussed.

  8. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  9. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  10. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  11. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2014-07-15

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 4.0 × 10{sup 4} and an effective mode volume V{sub mode} of 0.67λ{sup 3} when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. The mechanical Q (Q{sub m}) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0 × 10{sup 6} in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g{sub OM} is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  12. Variations of energetic electrons associated with solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Lee, E.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, J.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt varies dynamically under the variations of the solar wind. In this study, we investigated the variations of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt caused by an enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure associated with an interplanetary shock using the measurements from the Van Allen Probes (VAP) satellites. The enhanced dynamic pressure lasted for about 24 hours, but magnetic storm was not occurred. The impact of the interplanetary shock on 13 April 2013 produced dipolarization of the magnetic field for a few minutes, which was simultaneously observed by VAP A and B moving in the nightside region. The enhancement of the electron fluxes with E < ~600 keV coincidentally occurred during the dipolarization. Later, drift echoes with energy dispersion and ULF-like modulations were observed. By comparing the measurements from VAP A and B we will discuss spatial and temporal characteristics of the enhancement of the energetic electron fluxes.

  13. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  14. Experimental Demonstration of a Synthetic Lorentz Force by Using Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Šantić, N.; Dubček, T.; Aumiler, D.; Buljan, H.; Ban, T.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic magnetism in cold atomic gases opened the doors to many exciting novel physical systems and phenomena. Ubiquitous are the methods used for the creation of synthetic magnetic fields. They include rapidly rotating Bose-Einstein condensates employing the analogy between the Coriolis and the Lorentz force, and laser-atom interactions employing the analogy between the Berry phase and the Aharonov-Bohm phase. Interestingly, radiation pressure - being one of the most common forces induced by light - has not yet been used for synthetic magnetism. We experimentally demonstrate a synthetic Lorentz force, based on the radiation pressure and the Doppler effect, by observing the centre-of-mass motion of a cold atomic cloud. The force is perpendicular to the velocity of the cold atomic cloud, and zero for the cloud at rest. Our novel concept is straightforward to implement in a large volume, for a broad range of velocities, and can be extended to different geometries. PMID:26330327

  15. Deflection of the local interstellar dust flow by solar radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, M; Augustsson, K; Grün, E; Gustafson, B A

    1999-12-17

    Interstellar dust grains intercepted by the dust detectors on the Ulysses and Galileo spacecrafts at heliocentric distances from 2 to 4 astronomical units show a deficit of grains with masses from 1 x 10(-17) to 3 x 10(-16) kilograms relative to grains intercepted outside 4 astronomical units. To divert grains out of the 2- to 4-astronomical unit region, the solar radiation pressure must be 1.4 to 1.8 times the force of solar gravity. These figures are consistent with the optical properties of spherical or elongated grains that consist of astronomical silicates or organic refractory material. Pure graphite grains with diameters of 0.2 to 0.4 micrometer experience a solar radiation pressure force as much as twice the force of solar gravity.

  16. Quantification of the VUV radiation in low pressure hydrogen and nitrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Briefi, S.; Rauner, D.; Wünderlich, D.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen and nitrogen containing discharges emit intense radiation in a broad wavelength region in the VUV. The measured radiant power of individual molecular transitions and atomic lines between 117 nm and 280 nm are compared to those obtained in the visible spectral range and moreover to the RF power supplied to the ICP discharge. In hydrogen plasmas driven at 540 W of RF power up to 110 W are radiated in the VUV, whereas less than 2 W is emitted in the VIS. In nitrogen plasmas the power level of about 25 W is emitted both in the VUV and in the VIS. In hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures, the NH radiation increases the VUV amount. The analysis of molecular and atomic hydrogen emission supported by a collisional radiative model allowed determining plasma parameters and particle densities and thus particle fluxes. A comparison of the fluxes showed that the photon fluxes determined from the measured emission are similar to the ion fluxes, whereas the atomic hydrogen fluxes are by far dominant. Photon fluxes up to 5  ×  1020 m-2 s-1 are obtained, demonstrating that the VUV radiation should not be neglected in surface modifications processes, whereas the radiant power converted to VUV photons is to be considered in power balances. Varying the admixture of nitrogen to hydrogen offers a possibility to tune photon fluxes in the respective wavelength intervals.

  17. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter.

    PubMed

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  18. Dynamic thermal and radiative behaviors of a high pressure sodium lamp plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Ahmed, R.; Kazziz, S.; Troudi, L.; Charrada, K.; Helali, H.; Zissis, G.; Said, R.

    2005-08-15

    The main purpose of the present work consists in the study of supply frequency and sodium vapor pressure effects on the sodium lamp properties. The retained model is a two-temperature channel type that reproduces quite well the electrical and thermal behaviors as well as the main radiative characteristics of mercury-sodium discharge plasma and can be easily coupled with the lamp circuitry software.

  19. Ab initio simulation of radiation damage in nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Daniel; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Using Kinetic Monte Carlo we developed a code to study point defect hopping in BCC metallic alloys using energetics and attempt frequencies calculated using VASP, an electronic structure software package. Our code provides a way of simulating the effects of neutron radiation on potential reactor materials. Specifically we will compare the Molybdenum-Chromium alloy system to steel alloys for use in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  20. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  1. Comparison of radiative-convective models with constant and pressure-dependent lapse rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most commonly used models for studying climatic processes is the convective adjustment radiation model. In current radiation models, stable temperature profiles are maintained with a convective adjustment in which the temperature lapse rate is set equal to a critical lapse rate whenever the computed lapse rates exceed the critical value. First introduced by Manabe and Strickler (1964), a variety of convective adjustment models are now in use. It is pointed out that on a global scale, moist adiabatic processes, and thus moist adiabatic lapse rates, approximate the atmospheric temperature profile. Comparisons of profiles from a one-dimensional-radiative-convective model have been made using the conventional 6.5 K/km as the critical lapse rate and the pressure-dependent moist adiabatic lapse rates. For a clear sky and a single effective cloud the surface temperatures are 1 to 3 K higher with the constant 6.5 K/km critical lapse rate.

  2. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, JK; Muehlmatt, A; Savage, A; Lin, L; Kennedy, AR

    2014-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in OP occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure. PMID:25242832

  3. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jk; Muehlmatt, A; Savage, A; Lin, L; Kennedy, Ar

    2014-02-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in OP occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure.

  4. Development of High-Fiber-Volume, Radiation-Resistant, Hig-Pressure Laminates for Cryogenic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Reed

    2001-04-15

    Three new composite laminates have been developed for use as structural supports, thermal insulation in cryogenic and radiation environments. Boron-free, woven glass cloth has been preimpregnated with three types of resin systems. The organic resin systems are multifunctional and are much less sensitive to radiation than the epoxy systems used in G-10CR and G-11CR. The laminates are fabricated by curing the preimpregnated glass cloth under high pressure to produce higher glass content (70-74 vol. %). Higher glass content is beneficial because (1) it increases the laminate strength and stiffness; (2) it leads to more isotropic composite properties; and (3) it increases the overall radiation resistance because half and the amount of organic resin content is used. The cost of at least one of the laminates is comparable to that of G-10CR. Elastic, short-beam shear, thermal contraction, and flexural properties have been measured.

  5. Spectral distortions of the microwave background radiation resulting from the damping of pressure waves

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Initial perturbations of the energy density of the radiation field associated with initial perturbations of the mass density on scales relevant for galaxies and clusters of galaxies are not observable as anisotropies of the temperature of the microwave background radiation. By the recombination epoch, the initial inhomogeneities in the photon distribution is smoothed out by the processes of nonlinear dissipation and photon diffusion on mass scales. As initial inhomogenities of the energy density of the radiation field on scales less than the damping scale at recombination is not seen as an anisotropy in the microwave background but as a spectral distortion of the background. Signatures of pressure wave damping over certain redshift intervals are identified, and an upper bound is obtained for the index of the initial power spectrum of the mass distribution. 35 refs.

  6. The deformation of an erythrocyte under the radiation pressure by optical stretch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Ping; Li, Chuan; Liu, Kuo-Kang; Lai, Alvin C K

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of erythrocytes were studied numerically based upon the mechanical model originally developed by Pamplona and Calladine (ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 115, p. 149, 1993) for liposomes. The case under study is the erythrocyte stretched by a pair of laser beams in opposite directions within buffer solutions. The study aims to elucidate the effect of radiation pressure from the optical laser because up to now little is known about its influence on the cell deformation. Following an earlier study by Guck et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, p. 5451, 2000; Biophys. J., 81, p. 767, 2001), the empirical results of the radiation pressure were introduced and imposed on the cell surface to simulate the real experimental situation. In addition, an algorithm is specially designed to implement the simulation. For better understanding of the radiation pressure on the cell deformation, a large number of simulations were conducted for different properties of cell membrane. Results are first discussed parametrically and then evaluated by comparing with the experimental data reported by Guck et al. An optimization approach through minimizing the errors between experimental and numerical data is used to determine the optimal values of membrane properties. The results showed that an average shear stiffness around 4.611x10-6 Nm(-1), when the nondimensional ratio of shear modulus to bending modulus ranges from 10 to 300. These values are in a good agreement with those reported in literature.

  7. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts using medium- and low-pressure ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Craik, S A; Weldon, D; Finch, G R; Bolton, J R; Belosevic, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation from low- and medium-pressure mercury arc lamps on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was studied using a collimated beam apparatus. Experiments were conducted using parasites suspended in both filtered surface water and phosphate buffered laboratory water. Inactivation of oocysts was measured as reduction in infectivity using a CD-1 neonatal mouse model and was found to be a non-linear function of UV dose over the range of germicidal doses tested (0.8-119 mJ/cm2). Oocyst inactivation increased rapidly with UV dose at doses less than 25 mJ/cm2 with two and three log-units inactivation at approximately 10 and 25 mJ/cm2, respectively. The cause of significant leveling-off and tailing in the UV inactivation curve at higher doses was not determined. Maximum measured oocyst inactivation ranged from 3.4 to greater than 4.9 log-units and was dependent on different batches of parasites. Water type and temperature, the concentration of oocysts in the suspension, and the UV irradiance did not have significant impacts on oocyst inactivation. When compared on the basis of germicidal UV dose, the oocysts were equally sensitive to low- and medium-pressure UV radiation. With respect to Cryptosporidium, both low- and medium-pressure ultraviolet radiation are attractive alternatives to conventional chemical disinfection methods in drinking water treatment.

  8. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Weimin

    2012-07-10

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above {approx}0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Hoiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  9. Radiation pressure and air drag effects on the orbit of the balloon satellite 1963 30D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slowey, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Computed orbits of the balloon satellite 1963 30D are given every 2 days over an interval of 456 days near the beginning of the satellite's lifetime and an interval of 824 days near the end of its lifetime. The effects of radiation pressure on the satellite are examined in some detail. It is found that the variations in all the elements can be represented by use of a single parameter to specify the effect of diffuse reflection from the satellite's surface, and that this parameter remains constant, or nearly so, during the entire 7-year lifetime. Success in obtaining a consistent representation of the radiation-pressure effects is ascribed to the inclusion of the effects of terrestrial radiation pressure, using a model for the earth's albedo that includes seasonal and latitudinal variations. Anomalous effects in the orbital acceleration, as well as in the other elements, are represented quite well by including a small force at right angle to the solar direction and by allowing this to rotate about the solar direction. This implies that the satellite is aspherical, that it is rotating, and that the axis of rotation precesses.

  10. Radiation Pressure on Bacterial Clumps in the Solar Vicinity and Their Survival Between Interstellar Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wickramasinghe, J. T.

    Radiation pressure cross-sections for clumps of hollow bacterial grains with thin coatings of graphite are calculated using rigorous Guttler formulae. The carbonized skins are expected to form through exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, but a limiting thickness of about 0.03 μm is determined by opacity effects. The ratios of radiation pressure to gravity P/G are calculated for varying sizes of the clumps and for varying thickness of the graphite coatings. Bacterial clumps and individual desiccated bacteria without coatings of radii in the range 0.3-8 μm have P/G ratios less than unity, whereas particles with coatings of 0.02 μm thickness have ratios in excess of unity. Such coatings also provide protection from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Putative cometary bacteria, such as have been recently collected in the stratosphere, are thus not gravitationally bound in the solar system provided they possess carbonised exterior coatings. They are rapidly expelled from the solar system reaching nearby protosolar nebulae in timescales of a few million years. Even with the most pessimistic assumptions galactic cosmic rays are unable to diminish viability to an extent that vitiates the continuity of panspermia.

  11. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-18

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  12. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  13. Massive loops in thermal SU(2) Yang-Mills theory: Radiative corrections to the pressure beyond two loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischer, Ingolf; Grandou, Thierry; Hofmann, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    We address the loop expansion of the pressure in the deconfining phase of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics. We devise an efficient book-keeping of excluded energy-sign and scattering-channel combinations for the loop four-momenta associated with massive quasiparticles, circulating in (connected) bubble diagrams subject to vertex constraints inherited from the thermal ground state. These radiative corrections modify the one-loop pressure exerted by free thermal quasiparticles. Increasing the loop order in two-particle irreducible (2PI) bubble diagrams, we exemplarily demonstrate a suppressing effect of the vertex constraints on the number of valid combinations. This increasingly strong suppression gave rise to the conjecture in arXiv:hep-th/0609033 that the loop expansion would terminate at a finite order. Albeit the low-temperature dependence of the 2PI 3-loop diagram complies with this behavior, a thorough analysis of the high-temperature situation reveals that the leading power in temperature is thirteen such that this diagram dominates all lower loop orders for sufficiently high temperatures. An all-loop-order resummation of 2PI diagrams with dihedral symmetry is thus required, defining an extremely well-bounded analytical continuation of the low-temperature result.

  14. Mitigation of radiation-pressure-induced angular instability of a Fabry-Perot cavity consisting of suspended mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Koji; Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki; Furusawa, Akira; Kawamura, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    To observe radiation pressure noise in optical cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, high laser power is necessary. However, because the radiation pressure on the mirrors could cause an angular anti-spring effect, the high laser power could induce angular instability to the cavity. An angular control system using radiation pressure as an actuator, which was previously invented to reduce the anti-spring effect for the low power case, was applied to the higher power case where the angular instability would occur. As a result the angular instability was mitigated. It was also demonstrated that the cavity was unstable without this control system.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the persistence of ocean surface slick microlayer pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skop, Richard A.; Tseng, Ruo-Shan; Brown, John W.

    1992-12-01

    Coastal seawater was collected on incoming high tides at the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. 3.51 of water was transferred to a plexiglass bubble-tank and aerated for 30 sec at a flow rate of 4.0 ml/min per cm2 of water surface area (158 cm2) using glass frits producing bubbles of 203 +/- 61 micrometers diameter. The surface pressure was then determined using calibrated spreading oils of known spreading pressure. After cleaning the seawater surface thoroughly, the water was re-aerated and allowed to stand for 1 to 3 hours in the absence and presence of longwave (365 nm) or shortwave (254 nm) ultraviolet (UV) light, both having an intensity of approximately 300 +/- 25 (mu) W/cm2. In the absence of UV radiation, the surface pressure fell to approximately 64% of its initial value after 1 hour of standing and to approximately 63% of its initial value after 3 hours. Comparable results were obtained in the presence of longwave UV exposure. Under shortwave UV radiation, the decline in surface pressure was substantially accelerated; becoming 55% of the initial value after 1 hour and 35% of the initial value after 3 hours.

  16. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence in Low Gravity and Optical Radiation Pressure Positioning of the Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiessen, D. B.; Young, J. E.; Marr-Lyon, M. J.; Richardson, S. L.; Breckon, C. D.; Douthit, S. G.; Jian, P. S.; Torruellas, W. E.; Marston, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    Several groups of researchers have demonstrated that high frequency sound in water may be used to cause the regular repeated compression and luminescence of a small bubble of gas in a flask. The phenomenon is known as single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). It is potentially important because light emitted by the bubble appears to be associated with a significant concentration of energy within the volume of the bubble. Unfortunately, the detailed physical mechanisms causing the radiation of light by oscillating bubbles are poorly understood and there is some evidence that carrying out experiments in a weightless environment may provide helpful clues. In addition, the radiation pressure of laser beams on the bubble may provide a way of simulating weightless experiments in the laboratory. The standard model of SBSL attributes the light emission to heating within the bubble by a spherically imploding shock wave to achieve temperatures of 50,000 K or greater. In an alternative model, the emission is attributed to the impact of a jet of water which is required to span the bubble and the formation of the jet is linked to the buoyancy of the bubble. The coupling between buoyancy and jet formation is a consequence of the displacement of the bubble from a velocity node (pressure antinode) of the standing acoustic wave that drives the radial bubble oscillations. One objective of this grant is to understand SBSL emission in reduced buoyancy on KC-135 parabolic flights. To optimize the design of those experiments and for other reasons which will help resolve the role of buoyancy, laboratory experiments are planned in simulated low gravity in which the radiation pressure of laser light will be used to position the bubble at the acoustic velocity node of the ultrasonic standing wave. Laser light will also be used to push the bubble away from the velocity node, increasing the effective buoyancy. The original experiments on the optical levitation and radiation pressure on bubbles

  17. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation and High Pressure: New Light on Materials Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemley, Russell

    2005-03-01

    Current technological advances now make it possible to perform experiments on materials subjected to static or sustained conditions up to multimegabar pressures (>300 GPa) and from cryogenic temperatures to several thousand degrees (˜0.5 eV range). With these techniques, densities of condensed matter can be increased over an order of magnitude, causing numerous transformations and new physical and chemical phenomena to occur. Growth in this area largely been made possible by accelerating developments in diamond-anvil cell methods coupled with new synchrotron radiation techniques. Significant advances have occurred in x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, inelastic scattering, radiography, and infrared spectroscopy. With recent developments, structure refinements based on polycrystalline data up to multimegabar pressures have been possible. Single-crystal methods have been extended to megabar pressure, with the prospect of full crystallographic refinements. `Three- dimensional' diffraction data can be collected for determining strength, deformation, and elastic tensors at high P-T conditions. Studies carried out during the past three years provide numerous breakthroughs in high-pressure x-ray spectroscopy and a broad range of inelastic scattering methods. Other experiments have exploited the use of x-ray radiography over a range of pressures. Finally, synchrotron infrared measurements have revealed a wealth of high-pressure phenomena, particularly for molecular systems. Examples to be discussed include investigations of dense hydrogen; transformations in molecular materials; novel ceramics; new types of superconductors, electronic, and magnetic materials; and liquids and amorphous materials.

  19. Unified Application of Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack. The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  20. Unified Application Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack (alpha). The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  1. Left-handed metamaterials operating in the visible: negative refraction and negative radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezec, Henri

    2009-03-01

    Forty years ago, V. Veselago derived the electromagnetic properties of a hypothetical material having simultaneously-negative values of electric permittivity and magnetic permeability [1]. Such a material, denominated ``left-handed'', was predicted to exhibit a negative index of refraction, as well as a number of other counter-intuitive optical properties. For example, it was hypothesized that a perfect mirror illuminated with a plane wave would experience a negative radiation pressure (pull) when immersed in a left-handed medium, as opposed to the usual positive radiation pressure experienced when facing a dielectric medium such as air or glass. Since left-handed materials are not available in nature, considerable efforts are currently under way to implement them under the form of artificial ``metamaterials'' -- composite media with tailored bulk optical characteristics resulting from constituent structures which are smaller in both size and density than the effective wavelength in the medium. Here we show how surface-plasmon modes propagating in a stacked array of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides can be harnessed to yield a volumetric left-handed metamaterial characterized by an in-plane-isotropic negative index of refraction over a broad frequency range spanning the blue and green. By sculpting this material with a focused-ion beam we realize prisms and micro-cantilevers which we use to demonstrate, for the first time, (a) in-plane isotropic negative-refraction at optical frequencies, and (b) negative radiation pressure. We predict and experimentally verify a negative ``superpressure'', the magnitude of which exceeds the photon pressure experienced by a perfect mirror by more than a factor of two. 1) V. Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, p.509 (1968).

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of Lipid Mesophase Structural Changes Induced by Pressure and X-Radiation Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Anchi

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of structural changes occurring in phase transformations in liquid crystalline phases of hydrated lipids were studied using synchrotron -based time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Pressure-induced phase transitions. An experimental arrangement for studying hydrated lipid phase transitions under pressures up to 1800 bar and at temperatures up to 90^circC was developed. It was capable of performing both transient (pressure-jump) and stationary (pressure oscillation) relaxation kinetic measurements. The observables included x-ray diffraction and in-sample pressure and temperature. The setup was evaluated and used for studying the chain order/disorder transition in the lamellar phases of hydrated lipids. The lamellar gel (L_{beta '})-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L_alpha) transition in hydrated 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine was studied by constructing its pressure-temperature phase diagram in the range of 1 to 1200 bar and 65 to 90 ^ circC and using large amplitude (400 to 1300 bars) pressure-jumps. The phase diagram provided the phase boundary locations as well as the equilibrium thermomechanical properties of the material. The P-jumps showed that the limiting transit time of the L_{beta '}-to-L_alpha transition was ca. 1 s, while that of the reverse transition was <=q50 ms. Also observed was that the lipid responded rapidly to the P-jump in the L_{beta'} phase up to the rate-determining L_{ beta'}-to-Lalpha transition. Analysis of the structure response spectra for the main transition of hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero -3-phosphocholine and monoelaidin shows that the transition mechanism is consistent with the Avrami-Kolmogorov model with an effective growth dimensionality of ca. 1. A layer -by-layer transition mechanism was proposed. Results of the thermal response have been evaluated. X-Radiation damage induced structural and phase changes. The use of intense synchrotron x-radiation is limited by sample radiation

  3. Opportunities and challenges to conserve water on the landscape in snow-dominated forests: The quest for the radiative minima and more...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, T. E.; Kumar, M.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Seyednasrollah, B.; Ellis, C. R.; Lawler, R.; Essery, R.

    2012-12-01

    In mountainous, forested environments, vegetation exerts a strong control on snowcover dynamics that affect ecohydrological processes, streamflow regimes, and riparian health. Snowcover deposition and ablation patterns in forests are controlled by a complex combination of canopy interception processes coupled with radiative and turbulent heat flux patterns related to topographic and canopy cover variations. In seasonal snow environments, snowcover ablation dynamics in forests are dominated by net radiation. Recent research indicates that in small canopy gaps a net radiation minima relative to both open and forested environments can occur, but depends strongly on solar angle, gap size, slope, canopy height and stem density. The optimal gap size to minimize radiation to snow was estimated to have a diameter between 1 and 2 times the surrounding vegetation height. Physically-based snowmelt simulations indicate that gaps may increase SWE and desynchronize snowmelt by approximately 3 weeks between north and south facing slopes, relative to undisturbed forests. On east and west facing slopes, small gaps cause melt to be slightly delayed relative to intact forests, and have a minimal effect on melt synchronicity between slopes. Recent research focused on canopy thinning also indicates that a net radiation minima occurs in canopies of intermediate densities. Physically-based radiative transfer simulations using a discrete tree-based model indicate that in mid-latitude level forests, the annually-integrated radiative minima occurs at a tree spacing of 2.65 relative to the canopy height. The radiative minima was found to occur in denser forests on south-facing slopes and sparser forests on north-facing slopes. The radiative minimums in thinned forests are controlled by solar angle, crown geometry and density, tree spacing, slope, and aspect. These results indicate that both gap and homogeneous forest thinning may be used to reduce snowmelt rates or alter melt synchronicity

  4. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-04-15

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  5. Why the Big Bang Model Cannot Describe the Observed Universe Having Pressure and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    It has been recently shown that, since in general relativity (GR), given one time label t, one can choose any other time label t → t* = f(t), the pressure of a homogeneous and isotropic fluid is intrinsically zero (Mitra, Astrophys. Sp. Sc. 333, 351, 2011). Here we explore the physical reasons for the inevitability of this mathe-matical result. The essential reason is that the Weyl Postulate assumes that the test particles in a homogene-ous and isotropic spacetime undergo pure geodesic motion without any collisions amongst themselves. Such an assumed absence of collisions corresponds to the absence of any intrinsic pressure. Accordingly, the "Big Bang Model" (BBM) which assumes that the cosmic fluid is not only continuous but also homogeneous and isotropic intrinsically corresponds to zero pressure and hence zero temperature. It can be seen that this result also follows from the relevant general relativistic first law of thermodynamics (Mitra, Found. Phys. 41, 1454, 2011). Therefore, the ideal BBM cannot describe the physical universe having pressure, temperature and ra-diation. Consequently, the physical universe may comprise matter distributed in discrete non-continuous lumpy fashion (as observed) rather than in the form of a homogeneous continuous fluid. The intrinsic ab-sence of pressure in the "Big Bang Model" also rules out the concept of a "Dark Energy".

  6. The influence of a pressure wavepacket's characteristics on its acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Serré, R; Robinet, J-C; Margnat, F

    2015-06-01

    Noise generation by flows is modeled using a pressure wavepacket to excite the acoustic medium via a boundary condition of the homogeneous wave equation. The pressure wavepacket is a generic representation of the flow unsteadiness, and is characterized by a space envelope of pseudo-Gaussian shape and by a subsonic phase velocity. The space modulation yields energy in the supersonic range of the wavenumber spectrum, which is directly responsible for sound radiation and directivity. The influence of the envelope's shape on the noise emission is studied analytically and numerically, using an acoustic efficiency defined as the ratio of the acoustic power generated by the wavepacket to that involved in the modeled flow. The methodology is also extended to the case of acoustic propagation in a uniformly moving medium, broadening possibilities toward practical flows where organized structures play a major role, such as co-flow around cruising jet, cavity, and turbulent boundary layer flows. The results of the acoustic efficiency show significant sound pressure levels, especially for asymmetric wavepackets radiating in a moving medium.

  7. Dominant Mutations (lex) in Escherichia coli K-12 Which Affect Radiation Sensitivity and Frequency of Ultraviolet Light-Induced Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David W.; Low, K. Brooks; Edmiston, Susan J.

    1972-01-01

    Three mutations, denoted lex-1, -2 and -3, which increase the sensitivity of Escherichia coli K-12 to ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation, have been found by three-factor transduction crosses to be closely linked to uvrA on the E. coli K-12 linkage map. Strains bearing these mutations do not appear to be defective in genetic recombination although in some conjugational crosses they may fail to produce a normal yield of genetic recombinants depending upon the time of mating and the marker selected. The mutagenic activity of UV is decreased in the mutant strains. After irradiation with UV, cultures of the strains degrade their deoxyribonucleic acid at a high rate, similar to recA− mutant strains. Stable lex+/lec− heterozygotes are found to have the mutant radiation-sensitive phenotype of haploid lex− strains. PMID:4343824

  8. A nonlocal radiation transport and 1-D Boltzmann model for low pressure Hg-Ar discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzese, J.; Giuliani, J.; Petrov, G.

    2003-10-01

    A 1-D, steady state model for a low-pressure Ar-Hg plasma has been recently developed and used to study a positive column discharge with properties similar to the conventional mercury fluorescent lamp [1]. The model consists of the Boltzmann equation for the EEDF including the spatial gradient term self-consistently coupled to a collisional-radiative equilibrium description of 5 Ar and 11 Hg species, as well as the gas thermal balance equation and an equation for the ambipolar potential. The effect of radiation trapping on the resonant level populations was initially treated with effective lifetimes following the conventional Holstein theory. The description of the averaged plasma properties was found to be satisfactory, but some model predictions were not in accordance with radially resolved measurements. The model was then substantially improved by incorporating a 1-D radiation transport model. The latter includes the isotope structure of 254 and 185 nm lines, the effects of foreign gas collisional broadening, partial frequency redistribution of the emission profile of 185 nm line, Voigt profiles for all other lines, and nonlocal photopumping. The radiation transport model is self-consistently coupled with the kinetic part of the model through species population dynamics. [1] G. M. Petrov and J. Giuliani, J. Appl. Phys. vol. 94 (2003)

  9. Investigation of Low-Pressure Ultraviolet Radiation on Inactivation of Rhabitidae Nematode from Water

    PubMed Central

    DEHGHANI, Mohammad Hadi; JAHED, Gholam-Reza; ZAREI, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rhabditidae is a family of free-living nematodes. Free living nematodes due to their active movement and resistance to chlorination, do not remove in conventional water treatment processes thus can be entered to distribution systems and cause adverse health effects. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) can be used as a method of inactivating for these organisms. This cross sectional study was done to investigate the efficiency of ultraviolet lamp in the inactivation of free living nematode in water. Methods: The effects of radation time, turbidity, pH and temperature were invistigated in this study. Ultraviolet lamp used in this study was a 11 W lamp and intensity of this lamp was 24 μw / cm2. Results: Radiation time required to achieve 100% efficiency for larvae nematode and adults was 9 and 10 minutes respectively. There was a significant correlation between the increase in radiation time, temperature rise and turbidity reduction with inactivation efficiency of lamp (P<0.001). Increase of turbidity up 25 NTU decreased inactivation efficiency of larvae and adult nematodes from 100% to 66% and 100% to 64% respectively. Change in pH range from 6 to 9 did not affect the efficiency of inactivation. With increasing temperature inactivation rate increased. Also the effect of the lamp on inactivation of larvae nematod was mor than adults. Conclusions: It seems that with requiring the favorable conditions low-pressure ultraviolet radiation systems can be used for disinfection of water containing Rhabitidae nematode. PMID:23641409

  10. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    DOE PAGES

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; ...

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guidingmore » structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.« less

  11. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guiding structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.

  12. Stabilization and Low-Frequency Oscillation of Capillary Bridges with Modulated Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Morse, S. F.; Thiessen, David B.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported here it is demonstrated that acoustic radiation pressure may be used in simulated low gravity to produce stable bridges significantly beyond the Rayleigh limit with S as large as 3.6. The bridge (PDMS mixed with a dense liquid) has the same density as the surrounding water bath containing an ultrasonic standing wave. Modulation was first used to excite specific bridge modes. In the most recent work reported here the shape of the bridge is optically sensed and the ultrasonic drive is electronically adjusted such that the radiation stress distribution dynamically quenches the most unstable mode. This active control simulates passive stabilization suggested for low gravity. Feedback increases the mode frequency in the naturally stable region since the effective stiffness of the mode is increased.

  13. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses and angle-resolved-stochastic photon emission in the quantum-radiation-dominated regime (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianxing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses and the signatures of stochastic photon emission via the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly-focused superstrong laser beam in the quantum-radiation-dominated regime. We consider the electron-laser interaction at near-reflection conditions when pronounced high-energy gamma-ray bursts arise in the backward-emission direction with respect to the initial motion of the electrons. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. Moreover, the quantum stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission is exhibited in the angular distributions of the radiation and explained in an intuitive picture. Although, the visibility of the stochasticity signatures depends on the laser and electron beam parameters, the signatures are of a qualitative nature and robust. The stochasticity, a fundamental quantum property of photon emission, should thus be measurable rather straightforwardly with laser technology available in near future.

  14. Design of a 0-50 mbar pressure measurement channel compatible with the LHC tunnel radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Juan; Jelen, Dorota; Trikoupis, Nikolaos

    2017-02-01

    The monitoring of cryogenic facilities often require the measurement of pressure in the sub 5’000 Pa range that are used for flow metering applications, for saturated superfluid helium, etc. The pressure measurement is based on the minute displacement of a sensing diaphragm often through contactless techniques by using capacitive or inductive methods. The LHC radiation environment forbid the use of standard commercial sensors because of the embedded electronics that are affected both by radiation induced drift and transient Single Event Effects (SEE). Passive pressure sensors from two manufacturers were investigated and a CERN designed radiation-tolerant electronics has been developed for measuring variable-reluctance sensors. During the last maintenance stop of the LHC accelerator, four absolute pressure sensors were installed in some of the low pressure bayonet heat exchangers and four differential pressure sensors on the venturi flowmeters that monitor the cooling flow of the 20.5 kA current leads of the ATLAS end-cap superconducting toroids. The pressure sensors operating range is about 1000 to 5000 Pa and the targeted uncertainty is +/- 50 Pa which would permit to measure the equivalent saturation temperature at 1.8 K within better than 0.01 K. This paper describes the radiation hard measuring head that is based on an inductive bridge, its associated radiation-tolerant electronics that is installed under the LHC superconducting magnets or the ATLAS detector cavern; and the first operational experience.

  15. RADIATION PRESSURE AND MASS EJECTION IN {rho}-LIKE STATES OF GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Joseph; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lee, Julia C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a unifying scenario to address the physical origin of the diversity of X-ray light curves within the {rho} variability class of the microquasar GRS 1915+105. This 'heartbeat' state is characterized by a bright flare that recurs every {approx}50-100 s, but the profile and duration of the flares vary significantly from observation to observation. Based on a comprehensive, phase-resolved study of heartbeats in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer archive, we demonstrate that very different X-ray light curves do not require origins in different accretion processes. Indeed, our detailed comparison of the phase-resolved spectra of a double-peaked oscillation and a single-peaked oscillation shows that different cycles can have basically similar X-ray spectral evolution. We argue that all heartbeat oscillations can be understood as the result of a combination of a thermal-viscous radiation pressure instability, a local Eddington limit in the disk, and a sudden, radiation-pressure-driven evaporation or ejection event in the inner accretion disk. This ejection appears to be a universal, fundamental part of the {rho} state, and is largely responsible for a hard X-ray pulse seen in the light curve of all cycles. We suggest that the detailed shape of oscillations in the mass accretion rate through the disk is responsible for the phenomenological differences between different {rho}-type light curves, and we discuss how future time-dependent simulations of disk instabilities may provide new insights into the role of radiation pressure in the accretion flow.

  16. Radiation Pressure Effects On The R1 And R2 Rings Of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfair, Rafael; Giuliatti Winter, S. M.

    2008-09-01

    Showalter & Lissauer (2006), through a careful analysis of several Hubble Space Telescope images, discovered two small satellites of Uranus, Mab and Cupid. These images also reveled the existence of two faint rings, R/2003 U1 (R1) and R/2003 U2 (R2). In this work we study the effects of the solar radiation pressure on small particles located in these two rings using numerical simulations, where each ring is represented by an ensemble of particles of several sizes, from 0.5 to 10 microns, under the influence of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, planetary oblateness and the perturbation of the closest satellites (Puck and Mab for R1 and Portia and Rosalind for R2). Our results show that Poynting-Roberson drag causes the orbit collapse in a time scale of 105 to 106 years, while planetary oblateness prevent the eccentricity increases due to radiation pressure. A combination of all perturbations shows that, although Mab's size, the satellite is hit by some particles with impact velocity several times larger than the scape velocity what can result in ejection of material. The inner ring R2 does not have any evident material source and particles initially in the ring region oscillates before colliding with one of surrounding moon. Particles can remain within the region for more than 105 orbital periods, what allows collision with macroscopic bodies that may inhabit the region, leading to the production of new ring material for R2. Acknowledgment: RS and SMGW thanks FAPESP for the financial support.

  17. Application of solar radiation pressure to formation control near libration points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongming

    In this dissertation, the use of solar radiation pressure (SRP) for spacecraft formation control near one of the collinear Sun-Earth or Earth-Moon libration points is investigated. Specifically, we consider whether formation spacecraft that are equipped with Sun-facing reflective surfaces (solar sail or sun shield) can exploit the solar radiation force that acts on them to perform gradual relative maneuvering. The relative motion between formation spacecraft with solar sail or sun shield near libration point is analyzed. A set of linearized equations of relative motion for libration point formations under differential solar radiation forcing is derived, with the sun shield or solar sail off-pointing angle taken as the control input variable. These equations are firstly used to study the formation reconfiguration problem. With this model, we study the existence and properties of solution trajectories that take the spacecraft from a given initial formation geometry to a desired final one in the Sun-Earth system. The existence of time-optimal transfer trajectories is also investigated. The problem of formation keeping using solar radiation pressure in the Sun-Earth system is then discussed. Since the amplitude of the SRP force is constrained by the area of sun shield and the permissible maximum off-pointing angle, the theory of regulator with constrained control is applied to design the formation-keeping controller in order to use the capacity of on-board sun shield more efficiently. A subtopic of adaption of frequency of out-of-plane relative motion using SRP is also presented. Finally, we extend the investigation to the Earth-Moon system. The modeling of relative motion with SRP in the vicinity of the translunar libration point is examined. A formation-keeping controller based on a set of equations of relative motion is developed.

  18. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  19. Adjustable box-wing model for solar radiation pressure impacting GPS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C. J.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the major uncertainty sources affecting Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite orbits is the direct solar radiation pressure. In this paper a new model for the solar radiation pressure on GPS satellites is presented that is based on a box-wing satellite model, and assumes nominal attitude. The box-wing model is based on the physical interaction between solar radiation and satellite surfaces, and can be adjusted to fit the GPS tracking data. To compensate the effects of solar radiation pressure, the International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers employ a variety of approaches, ranging from purely empirical models based on in-orbit behavior, to physical models based on pre-launch spacecraft structural analysis. It has been demonstrated, however, that the physical models fail to predict the real orbit behavior with sufficient accuracy, mainly due to deviations from nominal attitude, inaccurately known optical properties, or aging of the satellite surfaces. The adjustable box-wing model presented in this paper is an intermediate approach between the physical/analytical models and the empirical models. The box-wing model fits the tracking data by adjusting mainly the optical properties of the satellite's surfaces. In addition, the so called Y-bias and a parameter related to a rotation lag angle of the solar panels around their rotation axis (about 1.5° for Block II/IIA and 0.5° for Block IIR) are estimated. This last parameter, not previously identified for GPS satellites, is a key factor for precise orbit determination. For this study GPS orbits are generated based on one year (2007) of tracking data, with the processing scheme derived from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). Two solutions are computed, one using the adjustable box-wing model and one using the CODE empirical model. Using this year of data the estimated parameters and orbits are analyzed. The performance of the models is comparable, when looking at orbit overlap and orbit

  20. Giant Deformations of a Liquid-Liquid Interface Induced by the Optical Radiation Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, Alexis; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2001-07-30

    Because of the small momentum of photons, very intense fields are generally required to bend a liquid interface with the optical radiation pressure. We explore this issue in a near-critical phase-separated liquid mixture to vary continuously the meniscus softness by tuning the temperature. Low power continuous laser waves become sufficient to induce huge stationary bulges. Using the beam size to build an ''optical'' Bond number, Bo , we investigate the crossover from low to large Bo . The whole set of data collapses onto a single master curve which illustrates the universality of the phenomenon.

  1. Improving Space Object Catalog Maintenance Through Advances in Solar Radiation Pressure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, J.; Scheeres, D.

    This paper investigates the weaknesses of using the cannonball model to represent the solar radiation pressure force on an object in an orbit determination process, and presents a number of alternative models that greatly improve the orbit determination performance. These weaknesses are rooted in the fact that the cannonball model is not a good representation of the true solar radiation pressure force acting on an arbitrary object. Using an erroneous force model results in poor estimates, inaccurate trajectory propagation, unrealistic covariances, and the inability to fit long and/or dense arcs of data. The alternative models presented are derived from a Fourier series representation of the solar radiation pressure force. The simplest instantiation of this model requires only two more parameters to be estimated, however this results in orders of magnitude improvements in tracking accuracy. This improvement is illustrated through numerical examples of a discarded upper stage in a geosynchronous transfer orbit, and more drastically for a piece of high area-to-mass ratio debris in a near-geosynchronous orbit. The upper stage example shows that using the proposed 3-parameter model can improve the orbit fit from 5 days of tracking data by 2-4 orders of magnitude over the cannonball model. Perhaps more importantly, over a 28 day propagation arc with the estimated models, the prediction errors with the 3-parameter model rarely exceed 2-sigma of the propagated covariance, whereas the cannonball prediction errors grow to over 70-sigmaof the propagated covariance. Most significantly, we show that using the proposed Fourier model greatly improves estimation of HAMR debris orbits, where the cannonball model can struggle to fit the data at any level. In the most extreme case tested, fitting 3 short arcs of data each separated by 100 hours, the Fourier model fits the orbit to the centimeter level, while the cannonball model has errors on the order of 1000 km. Implementation of

  2. Radiation trapping in rubidium optical pumping at low buffer-gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberry, M. A.; Reyes, J. P.; Gay, T. J.; Tupa, D.

    2007-02-15

    We have made a systematic study of rubidium optical pumping in a simple cylindrical cell geometry with a high-power 10 W diode laser array, low magnetic fields, and buffer-gas pressures of less than 50 torr. We have determined rubidium polarizations experimentally for H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, He, and Ar buffer gases, with Rb number densities from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Comparison to a relatively simple optical pumping model allows us to extract useful information about radiation trapping and quenching effects.

  3. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-04

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  4. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi; Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  5. The partially-coupled modal contribution assumption of noise radiation and the dominant noise-contribution mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruijun; Hao, Zhiyong; Zheng, Xu; Xiong, Fei; Yang, Wenying; Jiang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    A novel partially-coupled modal contribution assumption is presented in this paper. The partially-coupled assumption is theoretically presented, and it is proved to be more reasonable according to the law of conservation of energy compared with the traditional decoupled and coupled assumptions. The proposed method is applied to analyze a complex engineering structure. Based on the partially-coupled assumption, the dominant noise-contribution mode (DNCM) is identified at each frequency. The DNCM method is more effective in determining the most significant mode which makes the noise control more precise.

  6. OPERATION DOMINIC, FISH BOWL Series. Project Officer’s Report - Project 2.2. Gamma Radiation Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    3.5 Location of gamma dosimeters in Project 2.1 neutron detector containers. m 43 ^-pafi ytl - US (dj-UtL^- n M r L ■ L ■ «^ i. n V ^. w^» U...Washington, D. C; SECRET- RESTRICTED DATA. 6. A. latter and R. Latter; "Sunlamp Calculations" Rand Corporation Report 1956; Santa Monica...RESTEICTED DATA. 38. "The Nuclear Radiation Handbook" AFSWP-1100, Nuclear Development Corporation of America, White Plains, New York, 25 March 1957; SECRET-RESTRICTED DATA. 64

  7. Analysis of the effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres : application to Earth, Mars, Titan and hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, Arnaud; Garnier, Philippe; Toublanc, Dominique; Mazelle, Christian; Dandouras, Iannis

    2015-04-01

    Because of rare collisions, the motion of light species (H, H2) in the planetary exospheres is essentially determined by the external forces: the gravitation from the planet and the radiation pressure, ... Currently, the only analytical model used to model exospheric neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain model which takes into account only the gravity. In this work and in the same way as Chamberlain, we solve rigorously and analytically, based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the additional effect of the radiation pressure in particular for hydrogen (the model works for any species sensitive to the radiation pressure) on the structure of the exosphere and on the density profiles of ballistic particles. This approach was initially developed by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) only in the Sun-planet direction. We extend it here to the whole exosphere with a 2D model. Also, we determine analytically the escape flux on the dayside at SZA=0, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : 1. strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of geotail at Earth for example 2. the natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined 3. an increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius) 4. a significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a «blow-off » regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme radiation pressure. The influence of the radiation pressure on the escape flux may thus bring conditions on the size of primary atmospheres, because of a strong radiation pressure in the Sun's young years. Finally, we show that this model may be applied to exoplanets, in particular to the hot Jupiters that are also subject to additional effects

  8. Analytical Analysis of the Effect of the Radiation Pressure on Planetary Exospheres: Application to Earth, Mars, Titan and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2014-12-01

    Because of rare collisions, the motion of light species (H, H2) in the planetary exospheres is essentially determined by the external forces: the gravitation from the planet and the radiation pressure, ... Currently, the only analytical model used to model exospheric neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain model which takes into account only the gravity. In this work and in the same way as Chamberlain, we solve rigorously and analytically, based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the additional effect of the radiation pressure in particular for hydrogen (the model works for any species sensitive to the radiation pressure) on the structure of the exosphere and on the density profiles of ballistic particles. This approach was initially developed by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) only in the Sun-planet direction. We extend it here to the whole exosphere with a 2D model. Also, we determine analytically the escape flux on the dayside at SZA=0, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of geotail at Earth for example the natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined an increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius) a significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a «blow-off » regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme radiation pressure. The influence of the radiation pressure on the escape flux may thus bring conditions on the size of primary atmospheres, because of a strong radiation pressure in the Sun's young years. Finally, we show that this model may be applied to exoplanets, in particular to the hot Jupiters that are also subject to additional effects: centrifugal

  9. Synchrotron radiation and high pressure: new light on materials under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang; Struzhkin, Viktor V

    2005-03-01

    With the steady development of static high-pressure techniques in recent years, it is now possible to probe in increasing detail the novel behavior of materials subjected to extreme conditions of multimegabar pressures (>300 GPa) and temperatures from cryogenic states to thousands of degrees. By and large, the growth in this area has been made possible by accelerating developments in diamond-anvil cell methods coupled with new synchrotron radiation techniques. Significant advances have occurred in high-pressure powder and single-crystal diffraction, spectroscopy, inelastic scattering, radiography, and infrared spectroscopy. A brief overview of selected highlights in each of these classes of experiments is presented that illustrate both the state-of-the-art as well as current technical and scientific challenges. The experiments have been made possible by the development of a spectrum of new techniques at both third- and second-generation high-energy sources together with key advances in high-pressure technology. The results have implications for a variety of problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, geoscience, planetary science, and biology.

  10. [Nasal endoscope negative pressure cleaning and sinupret drops to treat radiation nasosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenbiao; Quan, Chaokun; Zhang, Longcheng

    2015-12-01

    To observe the effect of nasal endoscope negative pressure cleaning and sinupret drops to treat radiation nasosinusitis (RNS). One hundred and fifty-three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were randomly divided into treatment group A, B, C . Group A using nasal endoscope negative pressure cleaning and sinupret drops, group B using nasal endoscope negative pressure cleaning and normal saline spray washing, group C using saline nasal irrigation through nasal catheter. All patients with sinusitis condition were evaluated at the end of radiotherapy, three months and six months after radiotherapy. Comparison between groups, three periods of RNS incidence, moderate to severe RNS incidence are A < B < C. Six months after radiotherapy, group A compared with group C, there are significant difference (P < 0.01), group A and group C compared with group B respectively, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Nasal endoscope negative pressure cleaning and sinupret drops can significantly reduce the long-term incidence of RNS, especially obviously reduce the incidence of moderate to severe RNS,which is a practical and effective method to treat RNS.

  11. Semi-analytical solar radiation pressure modeling for QZS-1 orbit-normal and yaw-steering attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, Peter; Darugna, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure (SRP) is the dominant non-gravitational perturbation of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) satellites. In the absence of detailed surface models, empirical SRP models, such as the Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM), are widely used in practice for GNSS orbit determination but may require an undue number of parameters to properly describe the actual motion. Building up on previous research for spacecraft in yaw-steering (YS) attitude, analytical expressions for the SRP acceleration in orbit-normal (ON) attitude are established based on a generic box-wing model, and related to the corresponding parameters of the ECOM. The results are used to obtain an a priori SRP model for the QZS-1 satellite of the Quasi Zenith Satellite System (QZSS), which achieves a modeling accuracy of about 1 nm/s2 using as little as 6 parameters. To compensate remaining modeling deficiencies, we combine the analytical a priori model with a complementary set of five empirical parameters based on an ECOM-type formulation. QZS-1 orbits based on the resulting ;semi-analytical; SRP model exhibit a better than 10 cm RMS consistency with satellite laser ranging measurements for both YS and ON attitude modes, which marks a 2-4 times improvement over legacy orbit products without a priori model.

  12. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Frisch, P.; Gruntman, M.; Mueller, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  13. Solar sail equilibria with albedo radiation pressure in the circular restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøtte, Mariusz E.; Holzinger, Marcus J.

    2017-02-01

    Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and albedo effects are investigated in the circular restricted three-body problem for a system consisting of the Sun, a reflective minor body and a solar sail. As an approximation of albedo radiation pressure (ARP), the minor body is treated as Lambertian with reflected flux scattered by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function. Incorporating ARP, which is a function of SRP, into the solar sail equations of motion renders additional artificial equilibrium points in a volume between the L1 and L2 points which is defined as the region of influence. Based on the model, characterization of the findings are provided that are theoretically applicable to any body with discernible albedo such as for instance Earth, Mars or an asteroid. Example results are presented for a Sun-Vesta system which show that the inclusion of ARP generates artificial equilibrium points requiring solar sail designs with very low mass-to-area ratio. The equilibrium points are found to be unstable in general but asymptotic stability may be enforced with sail attitude feedback control.

  14. Electron density and temperature diagnostics for atmospheric pressure plasmas using continuum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghoo; Moon, Se Youn; Choe, Wonho

    2014-10-01

    Information on electrons is particularly valuable because most of the important plasma reactions are governed by electron kinetics. However, diagnostics of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas is still challenging although there are some advanced diagnostics available such as laser Thomson scattering or optical emission spectroscopy combined with complex plasma equilibrium models. In this work, we report a simple spectroscopic diagnostic method with high temporal and spatial resolution based on continuum radiation in the UV and visible range for ne and Te. Together with the basic principle for the diagnostics including electron-atom bremsstrahlung (or neutral bremsstrahlung) and hydrogen radiative dissociation continuum, some experimental results in several argon and helium atmospheric pressure plasmas will be presented. In a typical argon 13.56 MHz parallel plate capacitive discharge, the measured values are Te = 2.5 eV and ne = 0.7--1.1 × 1012 cm-3 at Prf = 110--200 W. Two-dimensional Te profile of an Ar pulsed plasma jet using a DSLR camera and this diagnostics will also be shown.

  15. Modes of elastic plates and shells in water driven by modulated radiation pressure of focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Daniel, Timothy D.; Abawi, Ahmad T.; Kirsteins, Ivars

    2015-11-01

    The modulated radiation pressure (MRP) of ultrasound has been used for decades to selectively excite low frequency modes associated with surface tension of fluid objects in water. Much less is known about the excitation of low frequency modes of less compliant metallic objects. Here we use MRP of focused ultrasound to excite resonant flexural vibrations of a circular metal plate in water. The source transducer was driven with a double-sideband suppressed carrier voltage as in. The response of the target (detected with a hydrophone) was at twice the modulation frequency and proportional to the square of the drive voltage. Since the radiation pressure of focused beams is spatially localized, mode shapes could be identified by scanning the source along the target while measuring the target's response. Additional measurements were done with an open-ended water-filled copper circular cylindrical shell in which resonant frequencies and mode shapes were also identified. These experiments show how focused ultrasound can be used to identify low-frequency modes of elastic objects without direct contact. Supported by ONR.

  16. Ponderomotive force on solitary structures created during radiation pressure acceleration of thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Vipin K.; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-05-15

    We estimate the ponderomotive force on an expanded inhomogeneous electron density profile, created in the later phase of laser irradiated diamond like ultrathin foil. When ions are uniformly distributed along the plasma slab and electron density obeys the Poisson's equation with space charge potential equal to negative of ponderomotive potential, φ=−φ{sub p}=−(mc{sup 2}/e)(γ−1), where γ=(1+|a|{sup 2}){sup 1/2}, and |a| is the normalized local laser amplitude inside the slab; the net ponderomotive force on the slab per unit area is demonstrated analytically to be equal to radiation pressure force for both overdense and underdense plasmas. In case electron density is taken to be frozen as a Gaussian profile with peak density close to relativistic critical density, the ponderomotive force has non-monotonic spatial variation and sums up on all electrons per unit area to equal radiation pressure force at all laser intensities. The same result is obtained for the case of Gaussian ion density profile and self consistent electron density profile, obeying Poisson's equation with φ=−φ{sub p}.

  17. Towards Relaxing the Spherical Solar Radiation Pressure Model for Accurate Orbit Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachut, M.; Bennett, J.

    2016-09-01

    The well-known cannonball model has been used ubiquitously to capture the effects of atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure on satellites and/or space debris for decades. While it lends itself naturally to spherical objects, its validity in the case of non-spherical objects has been debated heavily for years throughout the space situational awareness community. One of the leading motivations to improve orbit predictions by relaxing the spherical assumption, is the ongoing demand for more robust and reliable conjunction assessments. In this study, we explore the orbit propagation of a flat plate in a near-GEO orbit under the influence of solar radiation pressure, using a Lambertian BRDF model. Consequently, this approach will account for the spin rate and orientation of the object, which is typically determined in practice using a light curve analysis. Here, simulations will be performed which systematically reduces the spin rate to demonstrate the point at which the spherical model no longer describes the orbital elements of the spinning plate. Further understanding of this threshold would provide insight into when a higher fidelity model should be used, thus resulting in improved orbit propagations. Therefore, the work presented here is of particular interest to organizations and researchers that maintain their own catalog, and/or perform conjunction analyses.

  18. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, S. F.; Davis, G.A.; Loheide, S.P.; Butler, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells.

  19. Exotic dense-matter states pumped by a relativistic laser plasma in the radiation-dominated regime.

    PubMed

    Colgan, J; Abdallah, J; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Wagenaars, E; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Evans, R G; Gray, R J; Kaempfer, T; Lancaster, K L; McKenna, P; Rossall, A L; Skobelev, I Yu; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Zhidkov, A G; Woolsey, N C

    2013-03-22

    In high-spectral resolution experiments with the petawatt Vulcan laser, strong x-ray radiation of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from thin Al foils was observed at pulse intensities of 3 × 10(20) W/cm(2). The observations of spectra from these exotic states of matter are supported by detailed kinetics calculations, and are consistent with a picture in which an intense polychromatic x-ray field, formed from Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the electrostatic fields at the target surface, drives the KK hollow atom production. We estimate that this x-ray field has an intensity of >5 × 10(18) W/cm(2) and is in the 3 keV range.

  20. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  1. A collisional-radiative model for low-pressure weakly magnetized Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Tsankov, Tsanko; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Marchuk, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative (CR) models are widely investigated in plasma physics for describing the kinetics of reactive species and for optical emission spectroscopy. This work reports a new Ar CR model used in low-pressure (0.01-10 Pa) weakly magnetized (<0.1 Tesla) plasmas, including ECR, helicon, and NLD discharges. In this model 108 realistic levels are individually studied, i.e. 51 lowest levels of the Ar atom and 57 lowest levels of the Ar ion. We abandon the concept of an ``effective level'' usually adopted in previous models for glow discharges. Only in this way the model can correctly predict the non-equilibrium population distribution of close energy levels. In addition to studying atomic metastable and radiative levels, this model describes the kinetic processes of ionic metastable and radiative levels in detail for the first time. This is important for investigation of plasma-surface interaction and for optical diagnostics using atomic and ionic line-ratios. This model could also be used for studying Ar impurities in tokamaks and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Pressure transducer for measuring acoustic radiation force based on a magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Pavan, T. Z.; Almeida, T. W. J.; Pádua, M. L. A.; Baggio, A. L.; Fatemi, M.; Carneiro, A. A. O.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a pressure transducer based on a magnetic sensor to measure acoustic radiation force (ARF) and small displacements. The methodology presented in this paper allowed this transducer to be calibrated for use as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter. It can control the acoustic intensity emitted by ultrasound used, for example, in ARF impulse imaging, vibro-acoustography and high-intensity focused ultrasound techniques. The device comprises a magnet, a membrane, a magnetoresistive sensor and a coil to cancel the external magnetic field. When ARF is applied to the membrane, the magnetic field on the sensor changes due to the magnetic target displacement. The variation of the output signal from the magnetic transducer is proportional to the acoustic pressure applied to the membrane. A focused ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of 3 MHz was used to apply a continuous ARF. The sensitivities of the magnetic transducer as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter, evaluated in water, were respectively 0.597 µV MPa-1 and 0.073 µV (W cm-2)-1/2, while those of the needle hydrophone (Onda model HNP-0400) used in the magnetic transducer calibration were respectively, 0.5024 mV MPa-1 and 6.153 mV (W cm-2)-1/2. The transducer resolution to displacement is 5 nm and 6 dB of signal attenuation occurs for 7° of misalignment. The transducer responded well to acoustic pressure in water above 200 kPa.

  3. Cellular metabolic responses of PET radiotracers to (188)Re radiation in an MCF7 cell line containing dominant-negative mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Choi, Jung-A; Lee, Su-Jae; Ahn, Soon-Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Sup; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the relations between the cell uptakes of metabolic radiotracers and beta-radiation pretreatment using a dominant mutant p53 (p53mt) cell line to evaluate the effects of p53 genes on (18)F labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer uptakes. pCMV-Neo-Bam (control), which contains a neo-resistance marker, and p53 dominant-negative mutant expression constructs were stably transfected into MCF7 cell line. Cells were plated in 24-well plates at 1.0x10(5) cells for 18 h. Rhenium-188 ((188)Re) (a beta emitter) was added to the medium (3.7, 18.5, 37 MBq) and incubated for 24 h. We performed gamma-counting to determine the cellular uptakes of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), o-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 2'-[(18)F]fluoro-2'-deoxythymidine (FLT) (370 kBq, 60 min). Cell viabilities were determined by trypan blue staining and flow cytometry. p53mt cells showed 1.5-2-fold higher FDG uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FDG uptake was greater after (188)Re treatment (P<.01). FET uptake increased with (188)Re dose without a significant difference between p53 statuses. p53mt cells showed lower FLT uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FLT uptake was greater after (188)Re treatment. By cell viability testing and FACS analysis, p53mt cells showed lower viability and a larger apoptotic fraction (sub-G1) than wild-type p53 cells after (188)Re treatment. We speculate that p53 dysfunction increases glucose and decreases thymidine metabolism in cancer cells and that this may be exaggerated by (188)Re beta-radiation. Our findings suggest that FDG could reflect tumor viability and malignant potential after (188)Re beta-radiation treatment, whereas FLT could be a more useful PET radiotracer for assessing therapeutic response to beta-radiation, especially in cancer cells with an altered function of p53.

  4. Measurement of radiation-pressure-induced optomechanical dynamics in a suspended Fabry-Perot cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Corbitt, Thomas; Ottaway, David; Innerhofer, Edith; Pelc, Jason; Mavalvala, Nergis

    2006-08-15

    We report on experimental observation of radiation-pressure induced effects in a high-power optical cavity. These effects play an important role in next-generation gravitational wave detectors, as well as in quantum nondemolition interferometers. We measure the properties of an optical spring, created by coupling of an intense laser field to the pendulum mode of a suspended mirror, and also the parametric instability (PI) that arises from the coupling between acoustic modes of the cavity mirrors and the cavity optical mode. We measure an unprecedented optical rigidity of K=(3.08{+-}0.09)x10{sup 4} N/m, corresponding to an optical rigidity that is 6000 times stiffer than the mechanical stiffness, and PI strength R{approx_equal}3. We measure the unstable nature of the optical spring resonance, and demonstrate that the PI can be stabilized by feedback to the frequency of the laser source.

  5. The Action of Pressure-Radiation Forces on Pulsating Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Oguz, N.; Prosperetti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The action of pressure-radiation (or Bjerknes) forces on gas bubbles is well understood. This paper studies the analogous phenomenon for vapor bubbles, about which much less is known. A possible practical application is the removal of boiling bubbles from the neighborhood of a heated surface in the case of a downward facing surface or in the absence of gravity. For this reason, the case of a bubble near a plane rigid surface is considered in detail. It is shown that, when the acoustic wave fronts are parallel to the surface, the bubble remains trapped due to secondary Bjerknes force caused by an "image bubble." When the wave fronts are perpendicular to the surface, on the other hand, the bubble can be made to slide laterally.

  6. On the Use of Controlled Radiation Pressure to Send a Satellite to a Graveyard Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Neto, J. B.; Sanchez, D. M.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Smirnov, G. V.

    2017-10-01

    A very important topic in modern astrodynamics is the removal of satellites from their orbits, after the end of their missions. In this work, we propose the use of the solar radiation pressure to change the orbital energy of a satellite, to remove it from the operational region to a graveyard orbit. A mechanism for changing the area-to-mass ratio of the satellite and/or its reflectivity coefficient is used to accomplish this task. We derive an analytical model to find the maximum eccentricity achieved during the removal trajectory, for different initial conditions for the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node. After that, the best trajectories, i.e., trajectories with low eccentricity, are integrated using a numerical model. These low eccentricity trajectories are important because satellites with disposal orbits with low eccentricity pose a lower risk of crossing the operational region during the de-orbiting.

  7. Nonlinear acoustics in a dispersive continuum: Random waves, radiation pressure, and quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, M. A.

    The nonlinear interaction of sound with sound is studied using dispersive hydrodynamics which derived from a variational principle and the assumption that the internal energy density depends on gradients of the mass density. The attenuation of sound due to nonlinear interaction with a background is calculated and is shown to be sensitive to both the nature of the dispersion and decay bandwidths. The theoretical results are compared to those of low temperature helium experiments. A kinetic equation which described the nonlinear self-inter action of a background is derived. When a Deybe-type cutoff is imposed, a white noise distribution is shown to be a stationary distribution of the kinetic equation. The attenuation and spectrum of decay of a sound wave due to nonlinear interaction with zero point motion is calculated. In one dimension, the dispersive hydrodynamic equations are used to calculate the Langevin and Rayleigh radiation pressures of wave packets and solitary waves.

  8. Energetics and energy scaling of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tungchang; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt; Tripathi, Vipin

    2011-12-15

    Theoretical and computational studies of the ion energy scaling of the radiation pressure acceleration of an ultra-thin foil by short pulse intense laser irradiation are presented. To obtain a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam with an energy spread of less than 20%, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum energy of the quasi-monoenergetic ion beam is limited by self-induced transparency at the density minima caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For foils of optimal thickness, the time over which Rayleigh-Taylor instability fully develops and transparency occurs is almost independent of the laser amplitude. With a laser power of about one petawatt, quasi-monogenetic protons with 200 MeV and carbon ions with 100 MeV per nucleon can be obtained, suitable for particle therapy applications.

  9. Physical Mechanism of the Transverse Instability in Radiation Pressure Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y.; Pai, C.-H.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wu, Y. P.; Hua, J. F.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.; Silva, L. O.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The transverse stability of the target is crucial for obtaining high quality ion beams using the laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism. In this Letter, a theoretical model and supporting two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are presented to clarify the physical mechanism of the transverse instability observed in the RPA process. It is shown that the density ripples of the target foil are mainly induced by the coupling between the transverse oscillating electrons and the quasistatic ions, a mechanism similar to the oscillating two stream instability in the inertial confinement fusion research. The predictions of the mode structure and the growth rates from the theory agree well with the results obtained from the PIC simulations in various regimes, indicating the model contains the essence of the underlying physics of the transverse breakup of the target.

  10. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  11. Droplet actuation by surface acoustic waves: an interplay between acoustic streaming and radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2010-11-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) are known to be a versatile technique for the actuation of sessile drops. Droplet displacement, internal mixing or drop splitting, are amongst the elementary operations that SAW can achieve, which are useful on lab-on-chip microfluidics benches. On the purpose to understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved during these operations, we study experimentally the droplet dynamics varying different physical parameters. Here in particular, the influence of liquid viscosity and acoustic frequency is investigated: it is indeed predicted that both quantities should play a role in the acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling involved in the dynamics. The key point is to compare the relative magnitude of the attenuation length, i.e. the scale within which the acoustic wave decays in the fluid, and the size of the drop. This relative magnitude governs the relative importance of acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, which are both involved in the droplet dynamics.

  12. Enhanced laser absorption from radiation pressure in intense laser plasma interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; ...

    2017-06-06

    The reflectivity of a short-pulse laser at intensities of 2 x 1021Wcm-2 with ultra-high contrast (10-15) on sub-micrometer silicon nitride foilswas studied experimentally using varying polarizations and target thicknesses. Furthermore, the reflected intensity and beam quality were found to be relatively constant with respect to intensity for bulk targets. For submicron targets, the measured reflectivity drops substantially without a corresponding increase in transmission, indicating increased conversion of fundamental to other wavelengths and particle heating. The experimental results and trends we observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations emphasize the critical role of ion motion due to radiation pressure on the absorption process.more » Ion motion during ultra-short pulses enhances the electron heating, which subsequently transfers more energy to the ions.« less

  13. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  14. Physical Mechanism of the Transverse Instability in Radiation Pressure Ion Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Lu, W; Gu, Y Q; Silva, L O; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-12-02

    The transverse stability of the target is crucial for obtaining high quality ion beams using the laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism. In this Letter, a theoretical model and supporting two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are presented to clarify the physical mechanism of the transverse instability observed in the RPA process. It is shown that the density ripples of the target foil are mainly induced by the coupling between the transverse oscillating electrons and the quasistatic ions, a mechanism similar to the oscillating two stream instability in the inertial confinement fusion research. The predictions of the mode structure and the growth rates from the theory agree well with the results obtained from the PIC simulations in various regimes, indicating the model contains the essence of the underlying physics of the transverse breakup of the target.

  15. Enhanced laser absorption from radiation pressure in intense laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; Chvykov, V.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2017-06-01

    The reflectivity of a short-pulse laser at intensities of 2× {10}21 {{Wcm}}-2 with ultra-high contrast ({10}-15) on sub-micrometer silicon nitride foils was studied experimentally using varying polarizations and target thicknesses. The reflected intensity and beam quality were found to be relatively constant with respect to intensity for bulk targets. For submicron targets, the measured reflectivity drops substantially without a corresponding increase in transmission, indicating increased conversion of fundamental to other wavelengths and particle heating. Experimental results and trends observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations emphasize the critical role of ion motion due to radiation pressure on the absorption process. Ion motion during ultra-short pulses enhances the electron heating, which subsequently transfers more energy to the ions.

  16. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Radiation pressure on submerged mirrors: implications for the momentum of light in dielectric media.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2007-03-05

    Radiation pressure measurements on mirrors submerged in dielectric liquids have consistently shown an effective Minkowski momentum for the photons within the liquid. Using an exact theoretical calculation based on Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz law of force, we demonstrate that this result is a consequence of the fact that conventional mirrors impart, upon reflection, a 180 degrees phase shift to the incident beam of light. If the mirror is designed to impart a different phase, then the effective momentum will turn out to be anywhere between the two extremes of the Minkowski and Abraham momenta. Since all values in the range between these two extremes are equally likely to be found in experiments, we argue that the photon momentum inside a dielectric host has the arithmetic mean value of the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  18. Radiation Pressure on Submerged Mirrors: Implications for the Momentum of Light in Dielectric Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2007-03-01

    Radiation pressure measurements on mirrors submerged in dielectric liquids have consistently shown an effective Minkowski momentum for the photons within the liquid. Using an exact theoretical calculation based on Maxwell’s equations and the Lorentz law of force, we demonstrate that this result is a consequence of the fact that conventional mirrors impart, upon reflection, a 180° phase shift to the incident beam of light. If the mirror is designed to impart a different phase, then the effective momentum will turn out to be anywhere between the two extremes of the Minkowski and Abraham momenta. Since all values in the range between these two extremes are equally likely to be found in experiments, we argue that the photon momentum inside a dielectric host has the arithmetic mean value of the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  19. Ultrahigh energy proton generation in sequential radiation pressure and bubble regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Ji Liangliang; Wang Fengchao; Wen Meng; Wang Wenpeng; Xu Jiancai; Yu Yahong

    2010-12-15

    Protons in a microtarget embedded in an underdense high-mass plasma can be accelerated sequentially by the radiation pressure of a short circularly polarized laser pulse and the induced wake bubble field in the background plasma, which has been shown in detail by two-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It has been found that instead of using transverse Gaussian pulses proton energy can be increased dramatically by using a transverse super-Gaussian laser pulse. With a 2.14x10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse in a tritium plasma of density 1.5x10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3}, 76 GeV high-quality quasimonoenergetic protons have been obtained. The scaling relations between the obtainable proton energy and the laser amplitude as well as the background plasma density have been shown.

  20. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams from nanofoil targets: the leaky light-sail regime.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Dromey, B; Geissler, M; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the "leaky light sail," is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10¹⁹  W/cm². 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2 × 10²⁰  W/cm².

  1. Dust scattering and the radiation pressure force in the M82 superwind

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Carl T.; Thompson, Todd A.; Martini, Paul E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-11-20

    Radiation pressure on dust grains may be an important physical mechanism driving galaxy-wide superwinds in rapidly star-forming galaxies. We calculate the combined dust and gas Eddington ratio (Γ) for the archetypal superwind of M82. By combining archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, a standard dust model, Monte Carlo dust scattering calculations, and the Herschel map of the dust surface density distribution, the observed far-UV/near-UV surface brightness in the outflow constrains both the total UV luminosity escaping from the starburst along its minor axis (L {sub *,UV}) and the flux-mean opacity, thus allowing a calculation of Γ. We find that L {sub *,UV} ≈ (1-6) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, ∼2-12 times greater than the UV luminosity observed from our line of sight. On a scale of 1-3 kpc above the plane of M82, we find that Γ ∼ 0.01-0.06. On smaller scales (∼0.25-0.5 kpc), where the enclosed mass decreases, our calculation of L {sub *,UV} implies that Γ ∼ 0.1 with factor of few uncertainties. Within the starburst itself, we estimate the single-scattering Eddington ratio to be of order unity. Thus, although radiation pressure is weak compared to gravity on kpc scales above the plane of M82, it may yet be important in launching the observed outflow. We discuss the primary uncertainties in our calculation, the sensitivity of Γ to the dust grain size distribution, and the time evolution of the wind following M82's recent starburst episodes.

  2. Regularization of circular restricted three-body problem accounting radiation pressure and oblateness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a time- and space-coordinate transformation, commonly known as the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS)-transformation, is applied to reduce the order of singularities arising due to the motion of an infinitesimal body in the vicinity of a smaller primary in the three-body system. In this work, the Sun-Earth system is considered assuming the Sun to be a radiating body and the Earth as an oblate spheroid. The study covers motion around collinear Lagrangian L1 and L2 points. Numerical computations are performed for both regularized and non-regularized equations of motion and results are compared for non-periodic as well as periodic motion. In the transformed space, time is also computed as a function of solar radiation pressure (q) and oblateness of the Earth (A2). The two parameters (q, A2) have a significant impact on time in the transformed space. It is found that KS-regularization reduces the order of the pole from five to three at the point of singularity of the governing equations of motion.

  3. Dynamics in the vicinity of (101955) Bennu: solar radiation pressure effects in equatorial orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanut, T. G. G.; Aljbaae, S.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Carruba, V.

    2017-09-01

    Here, we study the dynamical effects of the solar radiation pressure (SRP) on a spacecraft that will survey the near-Earth rotating asteroid (101955) Bennu when the projected shadow is accounted for. The spacecraft's motion near (101955) Bennu is modelled in the rotating frame fixed at the centre of the asteroid, neglecting the Sun gravity effects. We calculate the SRP at the perihelion, semimajor axis and aphelion distances of the asteroid from the Sun. The goals of this work are to analyse the stability for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous mass distribution and study the effects of the SRP in equatorial orbits close to the asteroid (101955) Bennu. As results, we find that the mascon model divided into 10 equal layers seems to be the most suitable for this problem. We can highlight that the centre point E8, which was linearly stable in the case of the homogeneous mass distribution, becomes unstable in this new model changing its topological structure. For a Sun initial longitude ψ0 = -180°, starting with the spacecraft longitude λ = 0, the orbits suffer fewer impacts and some (between 0.4 and 0.5 km), remaining unwavering even if the maximum solar radiation is considered. When we change the initial longitude of the Sun to ψ0 = -135°, the orbits with initial longitude λ = 90° appear to be more stable. Finally, when the passage of the spacecraft in the shadow is accounted for, the effects of SRP are softened, and we find more stable orbits.

  4. Modes of targets in water excited and identified using radiation pressure of modulated focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Timothy; Fortuner, Auberry; Abawi, Ahmad; Kirsteins, Ivars; Marston, Philip

    2016-11-01

    The modulated radiation pressure (MRP) of ultrasound has been widely used to selectively excite low frequency modes of fluid objects. We previously used MRP to excite less compliant metallic object in water including the low frequency modes of a circular metal plate in water. A larger focused ultrasonic transducer allows us to drive modes of larger more-realistic targets. In our experiments solid targets are suspended by strings or supported on sand and the modulated ultrasound is focused on the target's surface. Target sound emissions were recorded and a laser vibrometer was used to measure the surface velocity of the target to give the magnitude of the target response. The source transducer was driven with a doublesideband suppressed carrier voltage as in. By varying the modulation frequency and monitoring target response, resonant frequencies can be measured and compared to finite element models. We also demonstrate the radiation torque of a focused first-order acoustic vortex beam associated with power absorption in the Stokes layer adjacent to a sphere. Funded by ONR.

  5. Radiation properties of low-pressure discharges in rare-gas mixtures containing xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gortchakov, S.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2005-02-01

    Glow discharges in mixtures of xenon with other rare gases can be used as alternatives to mercury-containing UV/VUV radiation sources and fluorescent lamps. The advantages of such sources are environmental compatibility, instant light output after switching on, and less pronounced temperature dependence. However, the optimum choice of the gas composition with respect to the maximum efficiency and power of the xenon resonance radiation as well as to a stable discharge operation still remains an open question. The dc cylindrical positive column of low-pressure discharges in rare-gas mixtures is studied by a detailed self-consistent kinetic description. The influence of the buffer gases helium, neon and argon as well as the appropriate choice of the xenon admixture are revealed by analysing different triple-gas mixtures. Changes in the global power budget and the radial structure of the plasma are discussed. A mixture of He and about 1-2% Xe arises as an optimum composition.

  6. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. ); Lambert, H.E. )

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

  7. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry-Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Koji; Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki; Furusawa, Akira; Kawamura, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    In experiments with Fabry-Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect.

  8. The effects of the solar radiation pressure on the F-ring particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfair, R.; Giuliatti Winter, S.

    The Saturn s F-ring is a narrow ring orbiting outside the main ring system of Saturn It is located between two close satellites Prometheus the interior one and Pandora The gravitational interactions between the ring particles and the satellites can be responsible for several structures found in this ring Showalter et al 1992 showed that the F-ring material could be divided into two regions a core composed by centimeter or large particles and a dust envelope composed by mu m particles Recent observations by Cassini instruments brought more complications to this region with the discovery of two new faint rings between the A ring and Prometheus one of these rings has the satellite Atlas embedded on it These new rings are tenuous like the dust envelope which surround the F-ring and the solar radiation force can play a significant role in this dynamical environment In this work we analysed the effects due to the solar radiation forces on the particles of the F ring and the two new discovered rings In this analysis we also included the perturbation of the satellite Prometheus on the F ring particles and the satellite Atlas on the new rings particles We have numerically simulated particles with size ranging from 1-500 mu m in radius The density of these particles was assumed to be 1g cm 3 Our results show that a sample of scattered F ring particles can be trapped due to Prometheus effects However the particles from the new discovered rings have a short lifetime due to the solar radiation pressure Only those particles coorbital to Atlas

  9. Inactivation of single-celled Ascaris suum eggs by low-pressure UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Sarah A; Nelson, Kara L

    2006-03-01

    Intact and decorticated single-celled Ascaris suum eggs were exposed to UV radiation from low-pressure, germicidal lamps at fluences (doses) ranging from 0 to 8,000 J/m2 for intact eggs and from 0 to 500 J/m2 for decorticated eggs. With a UV fluence of 500 J/m2, 0.44-+/-0.20-log inactivation (mean+/-95% confidence interval) (63.7%) of intact eggs was observed, while a fluence of 4,000 J/m2 resulted in 2.23-+/-0.49-log inactivation (99.4%). (The maximum quantifiable inactivation was 2.5 log units.) Thus, according to the methods used here, Ascaris eggs are the most UV-resistant water-related pathogen identified to date. For the range of fluences recommended for disinfecting drinking water and wastewater (200 to 2,000 J/m2), from 0- to 1.5-log inactivation can be expected, although at typical fluences (less than 1,000 J/m2), the inactivation may be less than 1 log. When the eggs were decorticated (the outer egg shell layers were removed with sodium hypochlorite, leaving only the lipoprotein ascaroside layer) before exposure to UV, 1.80-+/-0.32-log reduction (98.4%) was achieved with a fluence of 500 J/m2, suggesting that the outer eggshell layers protected A. suum eggs from inactivation by UV radiation. This protection may have been due to UV absorption by proteins in the outer layers of the 3- to 4-microm-thick eggshell. Stirring alone (without UV exposure) also inactivated some of the Ascaris eggs (approximately 20% after 75 min), which complicated determination of the inactivation caused by UV radiation alone.

  10. Inactivation of Single-Celled Ascaris suum Eggs by Low-Pressure UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Sarah A.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2006-01-01

    Intact and decorticated single-celled Ascaris suum eggs were exposed to UV radiation from low-pressure, germicidal lamps at fluences (doses) ranging from 0 to 8,000 J/m2 for intact eggs and from 0 to 500 J/m2 for decorticated eggs. With a UV fluence of 500 J/m2, 0.44- ± 0.20-log inactivation (mean ± 95% confidence interval) (63.7%) of intact eggs was observed, while a fluence of 4,000 J/m2 resulted in 2.23- ± 0.49-log inactivation (99.4%). (The maximum quantifiable inactivation was 2.5 log units.) Thus, according to the methods used here, Ascaris eggs are the most UV-resistant water-related pathogen identified to date. For the range of fluences recommended for disinfecting drinking water and wastewater (200 to 2,000 J/m2), from 0- to 1.5-log inactivation can be expected, although at typical fluences (less than 1,000 J/m2), the inactivation may be less than 1 log. When the eggs were decorticated (the outer egg shell layers were removed with sodium hypochlorite, leaving only the lipoprotein ascaroside layer) before exposure to UV, 1.80- ± 0.32-log reduction (98.4%) was achieved with a fluence of 500 J/m2, suggesting that the outer eggshell layers protected A. suum eggs from inactivation by UV radiation. This protection may have been due to UV absorption by proteins in the outer layers of the 3- to 4-μm-thick eggshell. Stirring alone (without UV exposure) also inactivated some of the Ascaris eggs (∼20% after 75 min), which complicated determination of the inactivation caused by UV radiation alone. PMID:16517669

  11. DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RADIATION PRESSURE-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND WINDS IN STAR CLUSTERS AND GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-12-01

    The pressure exerted by the radiation of young stars may be an important feedback mechanism that drives turbulence and winds in forming star clusters and the disks of starburst galaxies. However, there is great uncertainty in how efficiently radiation couples to matter in these high optical depth environments. In particular, it is unclear what levels of turbulence the radiation can produce, and whether the infrared radiation trapped by the dust opacity can give rise to heavily mass-loaded winds. In this paper, we report a series of two-dimensional flux-limited diffusion radiation-hydrodynamics calculations performed with the code ORION in which we drive strong radiation fluxes through columns of dusty matter confined by gravity in order to answer these questions. We consider both systems where the radiation flux is sub-Eddington throughout the gas column, and those where it is super-Eddington at the midplane but sub-Eddington in the atmosphere. In the latter, we find that the radiation-matter interaction gives rise to radiation-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which drives supersonic turbulence at a level sufficient to fully explain the turbulence seen in Galactic protocluster gas clouds, and to make a non-trivial contribution to the turbulence observed in starburst galaxy disks. However, the instability also produces a channel structure in which the radiation-matter interaction is reduced compared to time-steady analytic models because the radiation field is not fully trapped. For astrophysical parameters relevant to forming star clusters and starburst galaxies, we find that this effect reduces the net momentum deposition rate in the dusty gas by a factor of {approx}2-6 compared to simple analytic estimates, and that in steady state the Eddington ratio reaches unity and there are no strong winds. We provide an approximation formula, appropriate for implementation in analytic models and non-radiative simulations, for the force exerted by the infrared radiation

  12. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected with Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Muneyasu; He, Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DN(dominant-negative)Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Materials and Methods Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 MOI) and irradiated with single doses or 0-5 doses of 3 Gy with 6 h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing 100% N2. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after (final) irradiation, and cell survival determined by colony formation. Survival data were fitted to L-Q model or exponential line. Results Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of HCT8 and HT29 cells. Virus enhancement ratio (VER) for single dose irradiation at surviving fraction of 0.1 was ~1.3 for both oxic and hypoxic HCT8, and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. Similar VER of 1.2–1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses but these values were smaller than values found for DNKu70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference is discussed. The OERs for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses were 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus-infection slightly altered them. Conclusion Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DNKu70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple doses. PMID:20510198

  13. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-01-01

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20–25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution. PMID:27595795

  14. Assessment of Radiation Embrittlement in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzar, Davor

    2010-10-01

    The radiation-enhanced formation of small (1-2 nm) copper-rich precipitates (CRPs) is critical for the occurrence of embrittlement in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. Small CRPs are coherent with the bcc matrix, which causes local matrix strain and interaction with the dislocation strain fields, thus impeding dislocation mobility. As CRPs grow, there is a critical size at which a phase transformation occurs, whereby the CRPs are no longer coherent with the matrix, and the strain is relieved. Diffraction-line-broadening analysis (DLBA) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to characterize the precipitate formation in surrogate ferritic reactor-pressure vessel steels. The materials were aged for different times at elevated temperature to produce a series of specimens with different degrees of copper precipitation. SANS measurements showed that the precipitate size distribution broadens and shifts toward larger sizes as a function of ageing time. Mechanical hardness showed an increase with ageing time, followed by a decrease, which can be associated with the reduction in the number density as well as the loss of coherency at larger sizes. Inhomogeneous strain correlated with mechanical hardness.

  15. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-09-06

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20-25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution.

  16. Autosomal dominant

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether the trait is dominant or recessive. A single abnormal gene on one of the first 22 nonsex ( autosomal ) chromosomes from either parent can cause an autosomal disorder. Dominant inheritance means ...

  17. A Dissipative Mapping Technique for the N-Body Problem Incorporating Radiation Pressure, Poynting-Robertson Drag, and Solar Wind Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehoe, Thomas J. J.; Murray, Carl D.; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2003-12-01

    By implementing a version of the dissipative mapping technique introduced by R. Malhotra, we have developed a new integration code for the N-body problem that incorporates the effects of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag, and solar wind drag. The advantage of employing the dissipative mapping technique is that it modifies the basic N-body symplectic integration algorithm developed by Wisdom & Holman to allow certain nongravitational effects to be modeled and therefore retains the speed of execution common to codes based upon this algorithm. To achieve this, we have adapted the dissipative mapping technique to the requirements of the forces being modeled. We present the results of tests that demonstrate the suitability of this new dissipative integration code for investigating the dynamical behavior of micron-sized dust particles in heliocentric orbits in the solar system and, more generally, of particles in exosolar planetary systems where the dominant nongravitational perturbations to the particles' astrocentric orbits are due to the effects of radiation pressure, P-R drag, and solar wind drag.

  18. Radiation of X-rays using polarized LiNbO3 single crystal in low-pressure ambient gas.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Shinji; Nakanishi, Yoshikazu; Mizoguchi, Tadahiro; Ito, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Shinzo

    2009-09-01

    The dependence of X-ray intensity on the pressure and type of ambient gas was investigated for LiNbO(3) single crystals polarized in the c-axis direction at pressures of approximately 1 to 30 Pa. Ionization of surrounding gas molecules by the electric field generated by the crystal led to the production of both positive ions and free electrons. The electrons were accelerated toward a Cu target, radiating both white X-rays and X-rays specific to the crystal or target material by bremsstrahlung. The integrated X-ray intensity per cycle in the energy range 1 to 20 keV showed a local maximum value at a pressure P(max). The logarithm of P(max) was proportional to the Boltzmann factor using the first ionization energy of each ambient gas molecule. The value of P(max) was found to be independent of the electrical surface area of the crystal. The integrated X-ray intensity was approximated qualitatively by a quadratic function with pressure, which was upwardly convex. It was found that one of the causes of the reduction in X-ray intensity at pressures P > P(max) is the adsorption of positive ions generated by the ionization of gas molecules on the negative electric surface. It was also discovered that the lifetime of the X-ray radiation device could be improved when the X-ray radiation case was covered with another hermetically sealed decompression case. The gas with the smallest first ionization energy, with a partial pressure of P(max), was enclosed inside the X-ray radiation case (inner case) and the gas with the largest first ionization energy was enclosed at a suitable pressure between the inner and outer cases.

  19. Inactivation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus in chicken meat and exudate using high pressure processing, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet light

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stapylococcus saprophyticus is a common contaminant in foods and causes urinary tract infections in humans. Three nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve the safety foods include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV-C). A...

  20. Effect Of The Radiation Pressure On Planetary Exospheres: Analytical Approach And Application To Earth, Mars and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2015-12-01

    The atomic Hydrogen is one of the most abundant species in many planetary exospheres, such as on Earth, on planets in the Solar System and on Hot Jupiters. Because the exosphere is a quasi-collisionless medium, the atomic Hydrogen can reach several planetary radii without collisions and its motion is only determined by external forces such as the gravity and the radiation pressure. However, the exosphere still remains a complex medium : 1) to model because, on one hand, this is a region of interaction between the interplanetary medium and the planetary atmosphere and, on another hand, the fluid approach is not appropriate and a kinetic should be used instead, 2) to observe because of the extremely low densities. Currently, the most used analytical model to determine the neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain's one, which however includes only the gravity. We have developed an analytical model based on the previous work by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) with a Hamiltonian approach, taking into account both the gravity and the radiation pressure. We extend their previous 1D model (density profiles on the Sun-planet axis only) into a 2D model depending on the distance from the planet and the zenith angle to derive density profiles (Beth et al. 2015b, in review). Moreover, we derived an analytical formula for the thermal escape to compare with the classical Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : Strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of "geotail" at Earth, Natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined, Increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius), Significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a "blow-off" regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme

  1. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  2. Investigation of the threshold intensity versus gas pressure in the breakdown of helium by 248 nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2014-10-01

    An investigation of the unexpectedly strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure in the experimental study on the breakdown of He by short laser wavelength (Turcu et al., in Opt Commun, 134:66-68, 1997) is presented. A modified electron cascade model is applied (Evans and Gamal, in J Phys D Appl Phys, 13:1447-1458, 1980). Computations revealed reasonable agreement between the calculated thresholds and the measured ones. Moreover, the calculated electron energy distribution function and its parameters proved that multiphoton ionization of ground and excited atoms is the main source for the seed electrons, which contributes to the breakdown of helium. The effect of diffusion losses over pressures <1,000 Torr elucidated the origin of the strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure. Collisional ionization dominates only at high pressures. No evidence for recombination losses is observed for pressures up to 3,000 Torr.

  3. Collisional-radiative model of helium microwave discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Gadonna, K.; Belmonte, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together

  4. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  5. The effect of line-tying on the radiative MHD stability of coronal plasmas with radial pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of photospheric line-tying, i.e., solar coronal loop structures, was investigated in terms of the effect on radiative modes and the influence that different radial pressure profiles exert on the effects of line-tying on radiative MHD stability. Energy is assumed dissipated by heat conduction and radiation and zero- and first-order solutions are obtained for the radiative time scales. Line-tying is a magnetic tension in the zero-order MHD mode and produces stability. Heat conduction occurs along bent field lines in first-order MHD modes when plasmas cross the field lines. Irradiated cool-core loops can experience MHD instabilities in the cylinder center, while line-tying can stabilize the plasma in the surrounding hot medium. Line-tying also adds stability to magnetosonic and condensation modes.

  6. Physics and Novel Schemes of Laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration for Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi

    2016-06-14

    The main objective of our work is to provide theoretical basis and modeling support for the design and experimental setup of compact laser proton accelerator to produce high quality proton beams tunable with energy from 50 to 250 MeV using short pulse sub-petawatt laser. We performed theoretical and computational studies of energy scaling and Raleigh--Taylor instability development in laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) and developed novel RPA-based schemes to remedy/suppress instabilities for high-quality quasimonoenergetic proton beam generation as we proposed. During the project period, we published nine peer-reviewed journal papers and made twenty conference presentations including six invited talks on our work. The project supported one graduate student who received his PhD degree in physics in 2013 and supported two post-doctoral associates. We also mentored three high school students and one undergraduate student of physics major by inspiring their interests and having them involved in the project.

  7. Families of periodic orbits in Hill's problem with solar radiation pressure: application to Hayabusa 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancotti, Marco; Campagnola, Stefano; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2014-11-01

    This work studies periodic solutions applicable, as an extended phase, to the JAXA asteroid rendezvous mission Hayabusa 2 when it is close to target asteroid 1999 JU3. The motion of a spacecraft close to a small asteroid can be approximated with the equations of Hill's problem modified to account for the strong solar radiation pressure. The identification of families of periodic solutions in such systems is just starting and the field is largely unexplored. We find several periodic orbits using a grid search, then apply numerical continuation and bifurcation theory to a subset of these to explore the changes in the orbit families when the orbital energy is varied. This analysis gives information on their stability and bifurcations. We then compare the various families on the basis of the restrictions and requirements of the specific mission considered, such as the pointing of the solar panels and instruments. We also use information about their resilience against parameter errors and their ground tracks to identify one particularly promising type of solution.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Synthetic Lorentz Force on Cold Atoms by Using Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Ticijana; Santic, Neven; Dubcek, Tena; Aumiler, Damir; Buljan, Hrvoje

    2015-05-01

    The quest for synthetic magnetism in quantum degenerate atomic gases is motivated by producing controllable quantum emulators, which could mimic complex quantum systems such as interacting electrons in magnetic fields. Experiments on synthetic magnetic fields for neutral atoms have enabled realization of the Hall effect, Harper and Haldane Hamiltonians, and other intriguing topological effects. Here we present the first demonstration of a synthetic Lorentz force, based on the radiation pressure and the Doppler effect, in cold atomic gases captured in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). Synthetic Lorentz force on cold atomic cloud is measured by recording the cloud trajectory. The observed force is perpendicular to the cloud velocity, and it is zero for the atomic cloud at rest. The proposed concept is straightforward to implement in a large volume and different geometries, it is applicable for a broad range of velocities, and it can be realized for different atomic species. The experiment is based on the theoretical proposal introduced in. This work was supported by the UKF Grant No. 5/13 and Croatian MZOS.

  9. GIOVE-B solar radiation pressure modeling for precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Montenbruck, Oliver; Hugentobler, Urs

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have identified systematic errors in the orbit and clock estimates of the GIOVE and Galileo IOV satellites in the order of ± 20 cm. These errors are visible as periodic variations in the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and clock residuals. For IOV, these variations could be attributed to the contribution of a stretched satellite body and it was shown that a simple a priori box model for the solar radiation pressure can significantly reduce these errors. GIOVE-B has similar dimensions as the IOV satellites but its orientation is different: for GIOVE-B the narrow side of the satellite points to the Earth rather than the longitudinal side. In addition, an extra plate carrying, amongst others, the laser retro reflector array is mounted on the spacecraft introducing shadowing effects. These features are considered with a simple box-plate model. This model reduces the periodic clock errors and the SLR residual RMS of GIOVE-B by a factor of two. Most importantly, the box-plate model reduces the SLR offset from 11 cm to less than 1 cm. The largest part of this reduction comes from considering the plate and its shadowing effects.

  10. Geocoronal structure - The effects of solar radiation pressure and the plasmasphere interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of planetary exospheres is extended to incorporate solar radiation pressure in a rigorous manner, and an evaporative geocoronal prototype (classical, motionless exobase) is constructed using Liouville's theorem. Model calculations for density and kinetic temperature at points along the earth-sun axis (solar and antisolar directions) reveal an extensive satellite component, comprising approximately 2/3 of the total hydrogen density near 10 earth radii, and a temperature profile suggestive of an isotropic quasi-Maxwellian velocity distribution for the bound component. A geotail is also evident as an enhancement of the density at local midnight compared to local noon that increases outward (from approximately 25 percent at 10 earth radii to over 60 percent at 20 earth radii). Additional mechanisms acting upon the geocorona alter the basic evaporative case in notable ways. Solar ionization has been included in a simple fashion; the effect is to partially deplete the density without otherwise altering the structure. Interaction with a simple plasmasphere via the Boltzmann equation results in 'heating' the geocorona and enhancing the escape flux at the expense of the density of the bound component, an effect not appreciated in earlier studies; the geotail survives this interaction.

  11. Information Dominance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    Information dominance may be defined as superiority in the generation, manipulation, and use of information sufficient to afford its possessors... information dominance at the strategic level: knowing oneself and one’s enemy; and, at best, inducing them to see things as one does.

  12. Comparison of microstructural features of radiation embrittlement of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Erak, D. Yu.; Lavrenchuk, O. V.

    2002-02-01

    Comparative microstructural studies of both surveillance specimens and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 light water reactor systems have been carried out, following irradiation to different fast neutron fluences and of the heat treatment for extended periods at the operating temperatures. It is shown that there are several microstructural features in the radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 steels compared to VVER-440 RPV steels that can cause changes in the contributions of different radiation embrittlement mechanisms for VVER-1000 steel.

  13. The radiation pressure-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability - Analysis and application to QSO emission line clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The growth of perturbations in a photoionized gas slab accelerated by radiation pressure under conditions like those in QSO emission-line regions is analyzed. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and numerical radiation-transfer calculations are performed to evaluate the coefficients and roots of that dispersion relation for L-alpha optical depths between 0.1 and 10,000. The nonlinear growth of the waves is estimated, and it is concluded that complete dispersal of the clouds is likely. On the basis of qualitative arguments it is suggested that clouds of greater optical depth are linearly stable.

  14. A new treatment of the albedo radiation pressure in the case of a uniform albedo and of a spherical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borderies, Nicole; Longaretti, Pierre-Yves

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a model for the radiation pressure acceleration of a spherical satellite, due to the radiation reflected by a planet with a uniform albedo. A particular choice of variables allows one to reduce the surface integrals over the lit portion of the planet visible to the satellite to one-dimensional integrals. Exact analytical expressions are found for the integrals corresponding to the case where the spacecraft does not 'see' the terminator. The other integrals can be computer either numerically, or analytical in an approximate form. The results are compared with those of Lochry (1966). The model is applied to Magellan, a spacecraft orbiting Venus.

  15. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Box-wing model approach for solar radiation pressure modelling in a multi-GNSS scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Guillermo; Jesús García, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The solar radiation pressure force is the largest orbital perturbation after the gravitational effects and the major error source affecting GNSS satellites. A wide range of approaches have been developed over the years for the modelling of this non gravitational effect as part of the orbit determination process. These approaches are commonly divided into empirical, semi-analytical and analytical, where their main difference relies on the amount of knowledge of a-priori physical information about the properties of the satellites (materials and geometry) and their attitude. It has been shown in the past that the pre-launch analytical models fail to achieve the desired accuracy mainly due to difficulties in the extrapolation of the in-orbit optical and thermic properties, the perturbations in the nominal attitude law and the aging of the satellite's surfaces, whereas empirical models' accuracies strongly depend on the amount of tracking data used for deriving the models, and whose performances are reduced as the area to mass ratio of the GNSS satellites increases, as it happens for the upcoming constellations such as BeiDou and Galileo. This paper proposes to use basic box-wing model for Galileo complemented with empirical parameters, based on the limited available information about the Galileo satellite's geometry. The satellite is modelled as a box, representing the satellite bus, and a wing representing the solar panel. The performance of the model will be assessed for GPS, GLONASS and Galileo constellations. The results of the proposed approach have been analyzed over a one year period. In order to assess the results two different SRP models have been used. Firstly, the proposed box-wing model and secondly, the new CODE empirical model, ECOM2. The orbit performances of both models are assessed using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements, together with the evaluation of the orbit prediction accuracy. This comparison shows the advantages and disadvantages of

  17. Reduced radiative conductivity of low spin FeO6-octahedra in FeCO3 at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of Earth's mantle to conduct heat by radiation is determined by optical properties of mantle phases. Optical properties of mantle minerals at high pressure are accessible through diamond anvil cell experiments, but because of the intense thermal radiation at T > 1000 K such studies are limited to lower temperatures. Accordingly, radiative thermal conductivity at mantle conditions has been evaluated with the assumption of the temperature-independent optical properties. Particularly uncertain is the temperature-dependence of optical properties of lower mantle minerals across the spin transition, as the spin state itself is a strong function of temperature. Here we use laser-heated diamond anvil cells combined with a pulsed ultra-bright supercontinuum laser probe and a synchronized time-gated detector to examine optical properties of high and low spin ferrous iron at 45-73 GPa up to 1600 K in an octahedral crystallographic unit (FeO6), one of the most abundant building blocks in the mantle. Siderite (FeCO3) is used as a model for FeO6-octahedra as it contains no ferric iron and exhibits a sharp optically apparent pressure-induced spin transition at 44 GPa, simplifying data interpretation. We find that the optical absorbance of low spin FeO6 increases with temperature due to the partially lifted Laporte selection rule. The temperature-induced low-to-high spin transition, however, results in a dramatic drop in absorbance of the FeO6 unit in siderite. The absorption edge (Fe-O charge transfer) red-shifts (∼1 cm-1/K) with increasing temperature and at T > 1600 K and P > 70 GPa becomes the dominant absorption mechanism in the visible range, suggesting its superior role in reducing the ability of mantle minerals to conduct heat by radiation. This implies that the radiative thermal conductivity of analogous FeO6-bearing minerals such as ferropericlase, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle, is substantially reduced approaching the core

  18. An Enhanced Box-Wing Solar Radiation pressure model for BDS and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qunhe; Wang, Xiaoya; Hu, Xiaogong; Guo, Rui; Shang, Lin; Tang, Chengpan; Shao, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure forces are the largest non-gravitational perturbations acting on GNSS satellites, which is difficult to be accurately modeled due to the complicated and changing satellite attitude and unknown surface material characteristics. By the end of 2015, there are more than 50 stations of the Multi-GNSS Experiment(MGEX) set-up by the IGS. The simple box-plate model relies on coarse assumptions about the dimensions and optical properties of the satellite due to lack of more detailed information. So, a physical model based on BOX-WING model is developed, which is more sophisticated and more detailed physical structure has been taken into account, then calculating pressure forces according to the geometric relations between light rays and surfaces. All the MGEX stations and IGS core stations had been processed for precise orbit determination tests with GPS and BDS observations. Calculation range covers all the two kinds of Eclipsing and non-eclipsing periods in 2015, and we adopted the un-differential observation mode and more accurate values of satellite phase centers. At first, we tried nine parameters model, and then eliminated the parameters with strong correlation between them, came into being five parameters of the model. Five parameters were estimated, such as solar scale, y-bias, three material coefficients of solar panel, x-axis and z-axis panels. Initial results showed that, in the period of yaw-steering mode, use of Enhanced ADBOXW model results in small improvement for IGSO and MEO satellites, and the Root-Mean-Square(RMS) error value of one-day arc orbit decreased by about 10%~30% except for C08 and C14. The new model mainly improved the along track acceleration, up to 30% while in the radial track was not obvious. The Satellite Laser Ranging(SLR) validation showed, however, that this model had higher prediction accuracy in the period of orbit-normal mode, compared to GFZ multi-GNSS orbit products, as well with relative post

  19. A Numerical Algorithm to Calculate the Pressure Distribution of the TPS Front End Due to Desorption Induced by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, I. C.; Kuan, C. K.; Chen, Y. T.; Yang, J. Y.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Chen, J. R.

    2010-06-01

    The pressure distribution is an important aspect of a UHV subsystem in either a storage ring or a front end. The design of the 3-GeV, 400-mA Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) foresees outgassing induced by photons and due to a bending magnet and an insertion device. An algorithm to calculate the photon-stimulated absorption (PSD) due to highly energetic radiation from a synchrotron source is presented. Several results using undulator sources such as IU20 are also presented, and the pressure distribution is illustrated.

  20. Prediction of radiation doses during the dismantling of the pressurized tank from emergency core cooling system of RBMK- 1500 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, A.; Poskas, P.; Poskas, G.

    2013-07-01

    Preparation for the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant involves multiple problems. Personnel radiation safety during the performance of dismantling activities is one of them. In order to assess the optimal personnel radiation safety, the modelling is performed for large components by the means of computer code 'VISIPLAN 3D ALARA Planning tool' developed by SCK CEN (Belgium). Modelling results of radiation doses during the dismantling of the pressurized tank from the emergency core cooling system (ECCS PT) of RBMK-1500 reactor are presented in this paper. The mass of one ECCS PT is approximately 47.6 tons. The radiological surveys indicate that the inner surface of the ECCS PT is contaminated with radioactive products of corrosion and sediments due to the radioactive water. The assessment of workers exposure was performed to comply with ALARA. The effective doses to the workers were modeled for different strategies of ECCS PT dismantling. The impact of dismantling tools and shielding types and extract ventilation flow rate during the dismantling of ECCS PT on effective doses were analyzed. The total effective personnel doses were obtained by summarizing the effective personnel doses from various sources of exposure, i. e., direct radiation from radioactive equipment, internal radiation due to inhalation of radioactive aerosols, and direct radiation from radioactive aerosols arising during hot cutting in premises. (authors)

  1. Heavy ion acceleration in the radiation pressure acceleration and breakout afterburner regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by high-intensity sub-picosecond lasers. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, three laser systems are modeled that cover the range between femtosecond and picosecond pulses. By varying the laser pulse duration we observe a transition from radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) to the relativistic induced transparency (RIT) regime for heavy ions akin to light ions. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. A more detailed study involving variation of peak laser intensity I 0 and pulse duration τFWHM revealed that the transition point from RPA to RIT regime depends on the peak laser intensity on target and occurs for pulse duration {τ }{{F}{{W}}{{H}}{{M}}}{{R}{{P}}{{A}}\\to {{R}}{{I}}{{T}}}[{{f}}{{s}}]\\cong 210/\\sqrt{{I}0[{{W}} {{{cm}}}-2]/{10}21}. The most abundant gold ion and charge-to-mass ratio are Au51+ and q/M ≈ 1/4, respectively, half that of light ions. For ultrathin foils, on the order of one skin depth, we established a linear scaling of the maximum energy per nucleon (E/M)max with (q/M)max, which is more favorable than the quadratic one found previously. The numerical simulations predict heavy ion beams with very attractive properties for applications: high directionality (<10° half-angle), high fluxes (>1011 ions sr-1) and energy (>20 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  2. A new empirical solar radiation pressure model for BeiDou GEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junhong; Gu, Defeng; Ju, Bing; Shen, Zhen; Lai, Yuwang; Yi, Dongyun

    2016-01-01

    Two classic empirical solar radiation pressure (SRP) models, the Extended Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) Orbit Model ECOM 5 and ECOM 9 have been widely used for Global Positioning System (GPS) Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites precise orbit determination (POD). However, these two models are not suitable for BeiDou Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites due to their special attitude control mode. With the experimental design method this paper proposes a new empirical SRP model for BeiDou GEO satellites, which is featured by three constant terms in DYX directions, two sine terms in DX directions and one cosine term in the Y direction. It is the first time to reveal that the periodic terms in the D direction are more important than those in YX directions for BeiDou GEO satellites. Compared with ECOM 5 and ECOM 9, the BeiDou GEO satellite orbits are significantly stabilized with the new SRP force model. The average orbit overlapping root mean square (RMS) achieved by the proposed model is 7.5 cm in the radial component, which is evidently improved over those of 37.4 and 13.2 cm for ECOM 5 and ECOM 9, respectively. In addition, the correlation coefficients between GEO orbit overlaps precision and the elevation angle of the Sun have been decreased to -0.12, 0.21, and -0.03 in radial, along-track and cross-track components by using the proposed model, while they are -0.94, -0.79 and -0.29 for ECOM 5 and -0.70, 0.21 and 0.10 for ECOM 9. Moreover, the standard deviation (STD) of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data residuals for the GEO satellite C01 is reduced by 37.4% and 16.1% compared with those of ECOM 5 and ECOM 9 SRP models.

  3. Detection of Yarkovsky effect and solar radiation pressure on Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggioli, Laura; Del Vigna, Alessio; Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2016-10-01

    The orbit of small-sized asteroids can be affected by non-gravitational perturbations. When this happens, non-gravitational forces need to be taken into account since they are as important as collisions and gravitational perturbations for the overall understanding of the asteroid orbital evolution.The Yarkovsky effect and the Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) are non-gravitational perturbations that can be modelled knowing the physical properties of asteroids, and whose consequences of the motions can be measured from accurate astrometry.The knowledge of the physical properties of asteroids is usually not sufficient to produce the thermophysical models needed for the computation of the Yarkovsky acceleration. Nevertheless, it can often be measured as a semimajor axis drift if the astrometric dataset contains extremely accurate observations (e.g. radar data), or if the observations span a sufficiently long time interval.Farnocchia et al. 2013 list 21 NEAs with a measurable semimajor-axis drift. Since 2013, the number of asteroids for which it is possible to detect the Yarkovsky effect has grown. This is due to the increased quality and time span of the observations, and to new radar measurements that have since become available. We are able to detect the Yarkovsky effect for more than 40 NEAs, employing a high precision dynamical model, including the Newtonian attraction of 16 massive asteroids and the planetary relativistic terms, and a suitable astrometric data treatment. We present a list of objects with a significant detection of Yarkovksy effect and a value compatible with the Yarkovsky mechanism.The computed non-gravitational perturbations will be added to the web portal of the ESA SSA-NEO Coordination Centre, highlighting the fact that the orbit has been computed taking the Yarkovsky effect or the SRP into account. The inclusion of non-gravitational perturbations can also affect the results of the impact monitoring, as in the case of (410777) 2009 FD, (29075

  4. An a priori solar radiation pressure model for the QZSS Michibiki satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Guo, Jing; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Xianglin

    2017-07-01

    It has been noted that the satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals of the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) Michibiki satellite orbits show very marked dependence on the elevation angle of the Sun above the orbital plane (i.e., the β angle). It is well recognized that the systematic error is caused by mismodeling of the solar radiation pressure (SRP). Although the error can be reduced by the updated ECOM SRP model, the orbit error is still very large when the satellite switches to orbit-normal (ON) orientation. In this study, an a priori SRP model was established for the QZSS Michibiki satellite to enhance the ECOM model. This model is expressed in ECOM's D, Y, and B axes (DYB) using seven parameters for the yaw-steering (YS) mode, and additional three parameters are used to compensate the remaining modeling deficiencies, particularly the perturbations in the Y axis, based on a redefined DYB for the ON mode. With the proposed a priori model, QZSS Michibiki's precise orbits over 21 months were determined. SLR validation indicated that the systematic β -angle-dependent error was reduced when the satellite was in the YS mode, and better than an 8-cm root mean square (RMS) was achieved. More importantly, the orbit quality was also improved significantly when the satellite was in the ON mode. Relative to ECOM and adjustable box-wing model, the proposed SRP model showed the best performance in the ON mode, and the RMS of the SLR residuals was better than 15 cm, which was a two times improvement over the ECOM without a priori model used, but was still two times worse than the YS mode.

  5. Solar Radiation Pressure Estimation and Analysis of a GEO Class of High Area-to-Mass Ratio Debris Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelecy, Tom; Payne, Tim; Thurston, Robin; Stansbery, Gene

    2007-01-01

    A population of deep space objects is thought to be high area-to-mass ratio (AMR) debris having origins from sources in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) belt. The typical AMR values have been observed to range anywhere from 1's to 10's of m(sup 2)/kg, and hence, higher than average solar radiation pressure effects result in long-term migration of eccentricity (0.1-0.6) and inclination over time. However, the nature of the debris orientation-dependent dynamics also results time-varying solar radiation forces about the average which complicate the short-term orbit determination processing. The orbit determination results are presented for several of these debris objects, and highlight their unique and varied dynamic attributes. Estimation or the solar pressure dynamics over time scales suitable for resolving the shorter term dynamics improves the orbit estimation, and hence, the orbit predictions needed to conduct follow-up observations.

  6. The end-of-life disposal of satellites in libration-point orbits using solar radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldini, Stefania; Colombo, Camilla; Walker, Scott

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an end-of-life propellant-free disposal strategy for libration-point orbits which uses solar radiation pressure to restrict the evolution of the spacecraft motion. The spacecraft is initially disposed into the unstable manifold leaving the libration-point orbit, before a reflective sun-pointing surface is deployed to enhance the effect of solar radiation pressure. Therefore, the consequent increase in energy prevents the spacecraft's return to Earth. Three European Space Agency missions are selected as test case scenarios: Herschel, SOHO and Gaia. Guidelines for the end-of-life disposal of future libration-point orbit missions are proposed and a preliminary study on the effect of the Earth's orbital eccentricity on the disposal strategy is shown for the Gaia mission.

  7. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Ma, W. J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-15

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an ultrathin foil accelerated by the radiation pressure of an intense laser.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Nagel, S R; Dover, N P; Bellei, C; Beg, F N; Bott, S; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E; Hassan, S M; Hilz, P; Jung, D; Kneip, S; Mangles, S P D; Lancaster, K L; Rehman, A; Robinson, A P L; Spindloe, C; Szerypo, J; Tatarakis, M; Yeung, M; Zepf, M; Najmudin, Z

    2012-06-01

    We report experimental evidence for a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability driven by radiation pressure of an ultraintense (10(21) W/cm(2)) laser pulse. The instability is witnessed by the highly modulated profile of the accelerated proton beam produced when the laser irradiates a 5 nm diamondlike carbon (90% C, 10% H) target. Clear anticorrelation between bubblelike modulations of the proton beam and transmitted laser profile further demonstrate the role of the radiation pressure in modulating the foil. Measurements of the modulation wavelength, and of the acceleration from Doppler-broadening of back-reflected light, agree quantitatively with particle-in-cell simulations performed for our experimental parameters and which confirm the existence of this instability.

  9. Nanocrystalline silver dressing and subatmospheric pressure therapy following neoadjuvant radiation therapy and surgical excision of a feline injection site sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Woods, Samantha; de Castro Marques, Ana I; Renwick, Mala G; Argyle, Sally A; Yool, Donald A

    2012-03-01

    CLINICAL SUMMARY: This is the first clinical report of use of a combination of nanocrystalline silver and subatmospheric pressure therapy to treat a resistant wound infection, following tumour removal and radiation therapy, in a difficult-to-manage surgical site in a cat. The therapy was well tolerated and the authors suggest it is a valid treatment protocol for management of non-healing or infected wounds in the cat.

  10. How solar radiation pressure acts on RSAT and VSAT with a small evolving tip-off in SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, J.; Sengoku, A.; Nagaoka, N.; Iwata, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kawano, N.

    2001-09-01

    The solar radiation pressure model for the sub-satellites RSAT and VSAT in the SELENE project is improved to correct the mean acceleration due to an evolving tip-off of the spin during the life time of satellites. The shape of the satellites is assumed to be a regular octagonal pillar. Solar radiation pressure force components acting on each surface element of the satellite are calculated independently and summed vectorially during a total period of Euler's free nutation of the satellite to obtain the mean acceleration of the satellite center of mass. The Doppler tracking data reduction process for the RSAT is simulated after incorporating the modified model into the orbit analysis software. Comparing with two other types of solar radiation pressure models, the standard cannonball model and a non tip-off model, it is found that when the tip-off becomes larger than 5°/s, the orbit determination result of using the modified model is better than the results of using other ones.

  11. THE EFFECT OF RADIATION PRESSURE ON EMISSION-LINE PROFILES AND BLACK HOLE MASS DETERMINATION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, Hagai; Marziani, Paola

    2010-11-20

    We present a new analysis of the motion of pressure-confined, broad-line region (BLR) clouds in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taking into account the combined influence of gravity and radiation pressure. We calculate cloud orbits under a large range of conditions and include the effect of column density variation as a function of location. The dependence of radiation pressure force on the level of ionization and the column density are accurately computed. The main results are as follows. (1) The mean cloud locations (r{sub BLR}) and line widths (FWHMs) are combined in such a way that the simple virial mass estimate, r{sub BLR}, FWHM{sup 2}/G, gives a reasonable approximation to M{sub BH} even when radiation pressure force is important. The reason is that L/M rather than L is the main parameter affecting the planar cloud motion. (2) Reproducing the mean observed r{sub BLR}, FWHM, and line intensity of H{beta} and C IV {lambda}1549 requires at least two different populations of clouds. (3) The cloud location is a function of both L {sup 1/2} and L/M. Given this, we suggest a new approximation for r{sub BLR} which, when inserted into the BH mass equation, results in a new approximation for M{sub BH}. The new expression involves L {sup 1/2}, FWHM, and two constants that are obtained from a comparison with available M-{sigma}* mass estimates. It deviates only slightly from the old mass estimate at all luminosities. (4) The quality of the present black hole mass estimators depends, critically, on the way the present M-{sigma}* AGN sample (29 objects) represents the overall population, in particular the distribution of L/L{sub Edd}.

  12. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  13. Directed Evolution and In Silico Analysis of Reaction Centre Proteins Reveal Molecular Signatures of Photosynthesis Adaptation to Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  14. Measurement of electrical avalanches and optical radiation near solid insulators in high pressure (up to 0. 3 MPa) nitrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. ); Sudarshan, T.S. )

    1991-03-01

    Electron and ion avalanches have been recorded near a variety of insulators (plexiglas, teflon, high-density polyethylene, low-density polyethylene, polypropylene, delrin, polyvinyl chloride, and nylon) in nitrogen gas at pressures of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 MPa. With the exception of nylon, suppression of avalanches has been observed in the presence of insulators. In addition to electron and ion avalanches, simultaneous measurement of optical radiation associated with an electron avalanche was successfully carried out. Qualitative explanations have been provided for the suppression of avalanches near most insulators and an anomalous growth of avalanches near nylon insulators. Photoemission from nylon surfaces appears to be responsible for the enhanced growth of avalanches near nylon insulators. More precise measurements of optical radiation are needed to better understand the electron-photon interactions near a solid insulator in a gaseous dielectric medium.

  15. High-pressure potato starch granule gelatinization: synchrotron radiation micro-SAXS/WAXS using a diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R; Hanfland, M; Mezouar, M; Riekel, C

    2007-07-01

    Potato starch granules have been examined by synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle scattering in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 750 MPa. Use of a 1 microm synchrotron radiation beam allowed the mapping of individual granules at several pressure levels. The data collected at 183 MPa show an increase in the a axis and lamellar period from the edge to the center of the granule, probably due to a gradient in water content of the crystalline and amorphous lamellae. The average granules radius increases up to the onset of gelatinization at about 500 MPa, but the a axis and the lamellar periodicity remain constant or even show a decrease, suggesting an initial hydration of amorphous growth rings. The onset of gelatinization is accompanied by (i) an increase in the average a axis and lamellar periodicity, (ii) the appearance of an equatorial SAXS streak, and (iii) additional short-range order peaks.

  16. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER RESEARCH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCERS, PRESSURE), UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , PRESSURE GAGES, SHOCK WAVES, STRESSES, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, NUCLEAR RADIATION.

  17. Continuous-variable entanglement and quantum-state teleportation between optical and macroscopic vibrational modes through radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pirandola, Stefano; Mancini, Stefano; Vitali, David; Tombesi, Paolo

    2003-12-01

    We study an isolated, perfectly reflecting, mirror illuminated by an intense laser pulse. We show that the resulting radiation pressure efficiently entangles a mirror vibrational mode with the two reflected optical sideband modes of the incident carrier beam. The entanglement of the resulting three-mode state is studied in detail and it is shown to be robust against the mirror mode temperature. We then show how this continuous-variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport an unknown quantum state of an optical mode onto the vibrational mode of the mirror.

  18. Mechanical effects of light on material media: radiation pressure and the linear and angular momenta of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2014-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves carry energy as well as linear and angular momenta. Interactions between light and material media typically involve the exchange of all three entities. In all such interactions energy and momentum (both linear and angular) are conserved. Johannes Kepler seems to have been the first person to notice that the pressure of sunlight is responsible for the tails of the comets pointing away from the Sun. Modern applications of radiation pressure and photon momentum include solar sails, optical tweezers for optical trapping and micro-manipulation, and optically-driven micro-motors and actuators. This paper briefly describes certain fundamental aspects underlying the mechanical properties of light, and examines several interesting phenomena involving the linear and angular momenta of photons.

  19. High-speed visualization and radiated pressure measurement of a laser-induced gas bubble in glycerin-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Takehiro; Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherical gaseous bubble created by focusing a nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm into a large volume of glycerin-water solutions. Free oscillation of the bubble and shock wave emission from the bubble dynamics are recorded by a high-speed camera together with a pulse laser stroboscope; concurrently, pressure radiated from the oscillating bubble is measured by a hydrophone. The bubble achieves a mechanical equilibrium after free oscillation is damped out; the equilibrium state stays for a while, unlike vapor bubbles. We speculate that the bubble content is mainly gases originally dissolved in the liquid (i.e., air). The bubble dynamics we observed are compared to Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations that account for diffusive effects; the (unknown) initial pressure just after laser focusing is tuned to obtain agreement between the experiment and the calculation. Moreover, viscous effects on the shock propagation are examined with the aid of compressible Navier-Stokes simulation.

  20. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Drozdov, L. A. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  1. Radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag for small spherical particles. [in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soter, S.; Burns, J. A.; Lamy, P. L.

    1977-01-01

    Robertson's expression for the velocity-dependent effect of solar radiation on the motion of small particles is difficult because of its dependence on relativistic considerations, and it is also deficient in that it assumes perfectly absorbing particles. The present paper gives a heuristic derivation of the Poynting-Robertson effect. Robertson's expression for perfectly absorbing particles is obtained but on a much simpler physical basis, and an expression is also obtained for a particle that in general scatters, transmits, and absorbs light. Some numerical results on the solar radiation forces felt by small particles of cosmochemically important compositions are given.

  2. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  3. In-situ Diffraction Study of Magnetite at Simultaneous High Pressure and High Temperature Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetite intertwined with the evolution of human civilizations, and remains so today. It is technologically and scientifically important by virtue of its unique magnetic and electrical properties. Magnetite is a common mineral found in a variety of geologic environments, and plays an important role in deciphering the oxygen evolution in the Earth's atmosphere and its deep interiors. The latter application asks for the knowledge of the thermal and elastic properties of magnetite at high pressures and temperatures, which is currently not available in literature. We have carried out a few in-situ diffraction experiments on magnetite using white synchrotron radiation at beamline X17B2 of National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). A DIA module in an 1100-ton press and WC anvils were employed for compression, and diffraction spectra were collected at simultaneous high pressures (P) and temperatures (T) (up to 9 GPa and 900 oC). Mixture of amorphous boron and epoxy resin was used as pressure medium, and NaCl as pressure marker. Temperature was recorded by W-Re thermocouples. Commercially purchased magnetite powder and a mixture of the said powder and NaCl (1:1) were used as starting material in separate experiments. Preliminary data analyses have yielded following observations: (1) Charge disordering seen at ambient pressure remains active in current experiments, especially at lower pressures (< 6 GPa); (2) Though at each condition potentially complicated by charge disordering process, isothermal compression curves remains simple and reproducible; (3) During cooling, the reversibility and degree of cation disordering depend on the starting material and/or experimental P-T path; and (4) cation disordering notably reduces the apparent bulk moduli of magnetite.

  4. Synthesis of high-molecular-weight polymer of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate by radiation-induced polymerization at high pressure. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, I.; Okada, T.; Sasuga, T.; Takehisa, M.; Machi, S.

    1981-02-01

    Polymer of the methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and its copolymer with acrylamide are used as cationic flocculants for the treatment of waste water containing organic suspensions. As reported, radiation-induced polymerization is one of the most convenient methods because of its temperature independence of initiation and extremely large G-value. In general, a flocculant with higher molecular weight has larger flocculation effects. The high-molecular-weight products were prepared in high monomer concentration and a low dose rate. This paper concerns the polymerization and copolymerization of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate at high pressure, up to 7000 kg/cm/sup 2/, providing high-molecular-weight cationic flocculants.

  5. On the Motion of Carbon Nanotube Clusters near Optical Fiber Tips: Thermophoresis, Radiative Pressure, and Convection Effects.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the motion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes clusters in water or ethanol upon irradiation with a 975 and 1550 nm laser beam guided by an optical fiber. Upon measuring the velocities of the nanotube clusters in and out of the laser beam cone, we were able to identify thermophoresis, convection and radiation pressure as the main driving forces that determine the equilibrium position of the dispersion at low optical powers: while thermophoresis and convection pull the clusters toward the laser beam axis (negative Soret coefficient), radiation pressure pushes the clusters away from the fiber tip. A theoretical solution for the thermophoretic velocity, which considers interfacial motion and a repulsive potential interaction between the nanotubes and the solvent (hydrophobic interaction), shows that the main mechanism implicated in this type of thermophoresis is the thermal expansion of the fluid, and that the clusters migrate to hotter regions with a characteristic thermal diffusion coefficient D(T) of 9 × 10(-7) cm(2) K(-1) s(-1). We further show that the characteristic length associated with thermophoresis is not that of the nanotube clusters size, O(1) μm, but that corresponding to the microstructure of the clusters, O(1) nm. We finally discuss the role of the formation of gas-liquid interfaces (microbubbles) at high optical powers on the deposition of carbon nanotubes on the optical fiber end faces.

  6. [Time lag effect between stem sap flow and photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure deficit of Acacia mangium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhao, Ping; Cai, Xi-An; Ma, Ling; Rao, Xing-Quan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2008-02-01

    Based on the measurement of the stem sap flow of Acacia mangium with Granier' s thermal dissipation probe, and the cross-correlation and time serial analysis of the sap flow and corresponding photosynthetically active radiation and vapor pressure deficit, this paper studied the time lag effect between the stem sap flow of A. mangium and the driving factors of the tree canopy transpiration. The results indicated that the main driving factors of the transpiration were photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Sap flux density (Js) was more dependent on PAR than on VPD, and the dependence was more significant in dry season than in wet season. Sap flow lagged behind PAR but advanced than VPD in both dry and wet seasons. The time lag did not show any significant variation across different size tree individuals, but showed significant variation in different seasons. Time lag effect was not correlated with tree height, diameter at the breast, and canopy size. The time lag between Js and VPD was significantly related to nighttime water recharge in dry season, but reversed in wet season.

  7. Promising high-pressure DF - CO{sub 2} laser for amplifying picosecond radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Agroskin, V Ya; Bravy, B G; Vasil'ev, G K; Kashtanov, S A; Makarov, E F; Sotnichenko, S A; Chernyshev, Yu A

    2012-10-31

    A scheme of the experiment is described and the results of measuring the small-signal gain in the active medium of a pulsed chemical DF - CO{sub 2} laser at a medium pressure in the range from 1 to 2.5 atm are reported. The values obtained (above 5 m{sup -1} at a pressure of 2.5 atm) make this laser a promising final amplifier of a multiterawatt laser system in the 10-{mu}m wavelength region. (lasers)

  8. Prediction of radiation induced hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castin, N.; Malerba, L.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use an artificial neural network approach to obtain predictions of neutron irradiation induced hardening, more precisely of the change in the yield stress, for reactor pressure vessel steels of pressurized water nuclear reactors. Different training algorithms are proposed and compared, with the goal of identifying the best procedure to follow depending on the needs of the user. The numerical importance of some input variables is also studied. Very accurate numerical regressions are obtained, by taking only four input variables into account: neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, and chemical composition (Cu and Ni content). Accurate extrapolations in term of neutron fluence are obtained.

  9. Survey of Materials Problems Resulting from Low-Pressure and Radiation Environment in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lad, Robert A.

    1960-01-01

    On the basis of our present knowledge of the space environment, one might state that the exposure of materials to the radiation environment will present problems mainly with the impairment of the transparency of plastics and ionic solids due to ultraviolet radiation and with surface sputtering effects on emissivity and other thin film properties. The high vacuum in space will be of greater consequence in that it will render useless some members of practically all of the material classes. However, adequate solutions to most problems can be anticipated if enough information is at hand. This survey indicates that information is lacking at levels from the basic to the applied. A partial list of research areas in need of attack is included.

  10. Day-night changes in the altitude distribution, physical properties and radiative impact of low-altitude clouds over the stratocumulus-dominated subtropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Rajeev, K.; Sijikumar, S.

    2017-08-01

    Properties of low-altitude clouds, their radiative impact and day-night changes over the subtropical oceans of prominent stratocumulus occurrence (the Northeast and the Southeast Pacific, the Southeast Atlantic, and the South Indian Ocean) are investigated using multi-year (2006-2010) CloudSat, CALIPSO and radiative flux observations. In all these regions, the occurrence, thickness and longwave radiative impact of clouds are enhanced during the nighttime, while the altitude of peak cloud occurrence (960-1200 m) remains steady. The observed features provide evidence for the physical mechanisms proposed earlier for the coupling between marine boundary layer and low-level clouds and their day-night variations over these regions.

  11. Shifting habitats, morphology, and selective pressures: developmental polyphenism in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian spiders.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Michael S; Carter, Rebecca A; Croucher, Peter J P; Gillespie, Rosemary G

    2015-01-01

    Particularly intriguing examples of adaptive radiation are those in which lineages show parallel or convergent evolution, suggesting utilization of similar genetic or developmental pathways. The current study focuses on an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian "spiny-leg" spiders in which diversification is associated with repeated convergent evolution leading to similar sets of ecomorphs on each island. However, two species on the oldest islands in the archipelago exhibit variability, occurring as two different ecomorphs. More derived species on the younger islands show much less variability, any one species displaying a single ecomorph. We measured ecomorphological features within individuals over time to determine the nature of the variability. Then, using transcriptomes, we conducted lineage-based tests for selection under varying models and analyses of gene tree versus species tree incongruencies. Our results provide strong evidence that variability in color in Tetragnatha kauaiensis and T. polychromata is associated with development within individuals (polyphenism). Moreover, a total of 28 loci showed a signature of selection associated with loss of the color-changing phenotype, and 37 loci showed a signature of selection associated with the colonization of a new environment. The results illustrate how developmental polyphenism might provide an avenue for the repeated evolution of ecomorphs during adaptive radiation. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Theory for planetary exospheres: III. Radiation pressure effect on the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem and its implication on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-12-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the stellar radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with a Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain [1989] Icarus, 81, 145-163. In this third paper, we investigate the effect of the stellar radiation pressure on the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem (CR3BP), called also the photogravitational CR3BP, and its implication on the escape and the stability of planetary exospheres, especially for hot Jupiters. In particular, we describe the transformation of the equipotentials and the location of the Lagrange points, and we provide a modified equation for the Hill sphere radius that includes the influence of the radiation pressure. Finally, an application to the hot Jupiter HD 209458b and hot Neptune GJ 436b reveals the existence of a blow-off escape regime induced by the stellar radiation pressure.

  13. Status of Knowledge of Radiation Embrittlement in USA Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    NRC-FIN-5528 UNCLASSIFIED NRL-R-,737 NUREG -CR-2511 Ni." EEEIIEIIIEI mEE/hhhE AD ~ NUREG /CR-251 1 0 AD A I INRL Memo Rpt 4737 Status of Knowledge of...J2.75 ti a Tec nica for ati Irv Ce Spr ~~~ Sid 1 NUREG /CR-2511 NRL Memo Rpt 4737 R5 Status of Knowledge of Radiation Embrittlement in USA Reactor...vendor reports and correspondence; Commission papers; and applicant and licensee documents and correspondence. The following documents in the NUREG

  14. Assessing the Impact of Earth Radiation Pressure Acceleration on Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielberg, Kristin; Forootan, Ehsan; Lück, Christina; Kusche, Jürgen; Börger, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The orbits of satellites are influenced by several external forces. The main non-gravitational forces besides thermospheric drag, acting on the surface of satellites, are accelerations due to the Earth and Solar Radiation Pres- sure (SRP and ERP, respectively). The sun radiates visible and infrared light reaching the satellite directly, which causes the SRP. Earth also emits and reflects the sunlight back into space, where it acts on satellites. This is known as ERP acceleration. The influence of ERP increases with decreasing distance to the Earth, and for low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites ERP must be taken into account in orbit and gravity computations. Estimating acceler- ations requires knowledge about energy emitted from the Earth, which can be derived from satellite remote sensing data, and also by considering the shape and surface material of a satellite. In this sensitivity study, we assess ERP accelerations based on different input albedo and emission fields and their modelling for the satellite missions Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). As input fields, monthly 1°x1° products of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant En- ergy System (CERES), L3 are considered. Albedo and emission models are generated as latitude-dependent, as well as in terms of spherical harmonics. The impact of different albedo and emission models as well as the macro model and the altitude of satellites on ERP accelerations will be discussed.

  15. Radiation Pressure Force from Optical Cycling on a Polyatomic Molecule SrOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Sedlack, Alex; Hemmerling, Boerge; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    Polyatomic molecules hold promise for many applications in physics and chemistry due to their rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The starting point for our approach to the production of ultracold strontium monohydroxide (SrOH) is buffer-gas cooling followed by laser manipulation. Linear geometry, diagonal Franck-Condon factors, short radiative lifetimes and unresolved hyperfine splittings make SrOH a particularly attractive candidate for direct laser cooling. We report deflection of the SrOH beam through radiative force from optical cycling on the X~2Σ+ <-->Ã2Π1 / 2 transition. We observe × 12 fluorescence enhancement with closed spin-rotation splitting and demonstrate cycling between different vibrational levels with the Sr <--> O mode repumping laser. Observed deflection and detection signals correspond to the scattering of ~ 100 photons. Additional repumping laser for the bending mode would lead to scattering of ~ 1 , 000 photons allowing for transverse laser cooling of the SrOH beam. We will also describe our experimental efforts towards laser slowing and trapping of SrOH.

  16. Fast computation of radiation pressure force exerted by multiple laser beams on red blood cell-like particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Ming-Jiang; Yang, Ming-Lin; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Mature red blood cells (RBC) do not contain huge complex nuclei and organelles, makes them can be approximately regarded as homogeneous medium particles. To compute the radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted by multiple laser beams on this kind of arbitrary shaped homogenous nano-particles, a fast electromagnetic optics method is demonstrated. In general, based on the Maxwell's equations, the matrix equation formed by the method of moment (MOM) has many right hand sides (RHS's) corresponding to the different laser beams. In order to accelerate computing the matrix equation, the algorithm conducts low-rank decomposition on the excitation matrix consisting of all RHS's to figure out the so-called skeleton laser beams by interpolative decomposition (ID). After the solutions corresponding to the skeletons are obtained, the desired responses can be reconstructed efficiently. Some numerical results are performed to validate the developed method.

  17. Negating the Yearly Eccentricity Magnitude Variation of Super-synchronous Disposal Orbits due to Solar Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. L.

    Solar radiation pressure alters satellites' eccentricity by accelerating and decelerating them during each orbit. The accumulated perturbation cancels yearly for geostationary satellites, but meanwhile the perigee radius changes. Disposed satellites must be reorbited higher to compensate, using more fuel. The examined disposal orbit points toward the Sun and uses the satellite's natural eccentricity. This causes the eccentricity vector to only change direction, keeping the perigee radius constant. This thesis verifies this behavior over one year with an analytical derivation and MATLAB simulation, gaining useful insights into its cause. The traditional and proposed disposal orbits are then modeled using NASA's GMAT for more realistic simulations. The proposed orbit's sensitivity to satellite and initialization errors is also examined. Relationships are developed to show these errors' effect on the perigee radius. In conclusion, while this orbit can be used in the short term, margins are necessary to guarantee protection of the geostationary belt.

  18. Thermoluminescent properties of Ni and Co doped synthetic, high pressure, high temperature diamonds: application to ionising radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Gheeraert, E; Kanda, H; Lapraz, D; Briand, D

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond crystals grown under diluted nickel or cobalt as solvent catalysts is reported. After a study of TL properties of 6 different samples, it is shown that a crystal grown with Ni+2%Ti and annealed at 2100 K presents an intense glow peak at around 490 K. This peak is characterised by a broad emission band centred at 530 nm (2.34 eV). This crystal presents a significant, reproducible and linear TL response relative to the absorbed dose up to an X ray air kerma of 10 Gy. All these features make this material suitable for ionising radiation dosimetry. A similar study is made on another crystal grown from pure Co, and a comparative review of the results does show that for dosimetry work, Ni-containing diamonds are more appropriate than those grown from Co catalyst.

  19. Analysis of radiation pressure force exerted on a biological cell induced by high-order Bessel beams using Debye series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renxian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Han, Xiang'e.; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Shuxi

    2013-09-01

    Debye series expansion (DSE) is employed to the analysis of radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on biological cells induced by high-order Bessel beams (BB). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) for high-order Bessel beams are calculated using analytical expressions obtained by the integral localized approximation (ILA). Different types of cells, including a real Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell and a lymphocyte which are respectively modeled by a coated and five-layered sphere, are considered. The RPF induced by high-order Bessel beams is compared with that by Gaussian beams and zeroth-order Bessel beams, and the effect of different scattering processes on RPF is studied. Numerical calculations show that high-order Bessel beams with zero central intensity can also transversely trap particle in the beam center, and some scattering processes can provide longitudinal pulling force.

  20. On the and families of orbits in the Hill problem with solar radiation pressure and their application to asteroid orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Yárnoz, Daniel; Scheeres, Daniel J.; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this paper is on the exploration of the and - families of planar symmetric periodic orbits around minor bodies under the effect of solar radiation pressure (SRP). An extended Hill problem with SRP allows the study of spacecraft trajectories in the vicinity of asteroids orbiting the Sun. The evolution of the and - families is presented with SRP increasing from the classical Hill problem to levels characteristic of current and future planned missions to minor bodies, as well as one extreme case with very large SRP for a small asteroid. In addition, the implications of considering a spherical body are analysed, in terms of trajectories colliding with the asteroid and eclipses, which limits the feasibility of various family branches. Finally, the influence of SRP on the linear stability of feasible orbits is calculated.

  1. Remote sensing of cloud-top pressure using reflected solar radiation in the oxygen A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for using the reflection of solar radiation in the oxygen A-band to determine cloud-top altitude. Because of multiple scattering and molecular absorption inside the cloud, the reflection of clouds is substantially modified in comparison with a mirror cloud, which is assumed to have a 100 percent reflection. To infer true cloud-top altitude, therefore, it is necessary to accurately estimate the amount of 'photon penetration'. Theoretical calculations indicate that the amount of photon penetration depends on the altitude, the scaled volume scattering coefficient, and the scaled optical thickness of the cloud. Algorithms using the reflection in the oxygen A-band to determine the cloud-top pressure have been applied to an aircraft field experiment in conjunction with CCOPE, 1981. Results of this study are very encouraging, especially for extended clouds.

  2. Station coordinates in the standard earth 3 system and radiation-pressure perturbations from ISAGEX camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Latimer, J.; Mendes, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous and individual camera observations of GEOS 1, GEOS 2, Pageos, and Midas 4 obtained during the International Satellite Geodesy Experiment are utilized to determine station coordinates. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Standard Earth III system of coordinates is used to tie the geometrical network to a geocentric system and as a reference for calculating satellite orbits. A solution for coordinates combining geometrical and dynamical methods is obtained, and a comparison between the solutions and terrestrial data is made. The radiation-pressure and earth-albedo perturbations for Pageos are very large, and Pageos' orbits are used to evaluate the analytical treatment of these perturbations. Residual effects, which are probably of interest to aeronomists, remain in the Pageos orbits.

  3. Investigation of high thermal contact conductance at low contact pressure for high-heat-load optical elements of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Ohashi, H.; Goto, S.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the thermal-contact-conductance (TCC) of indirect cooling components in synchrotron radiation beamlines. To reduce the strain on the optical element, we explored conditions for insertion materials with a high TCC in region with low contact pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa. We examined the TCC at the interface between oxygen-free copper (OFC) and insertion materials such as indium, graphite, and gold foil. The TCC depended on the hardness and thickness of the insertion material. Thin indium (20 μm thick) showed the highest TCC. Nickel and gold passivation on the OFC surface reduced the TCC to 30% of that for the bare OFC. Future work will involve exploring the passivation conditions of OFC for higher TCC is and measuring the TCC under cryogenic-cooling conditions.

  4. A pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenick, W. Van . Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to [+-]3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]16] A over the environmental range of temperature ([minus]40 to +40 C). Using a single 10[sup 11] [Omega] feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]15] A to 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]11] A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 [mu]R h[sup [minus]1]), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically [approximately]27 pA at 1 mR h[sup [minus]1]. A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale[trademark] Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  5. Radiation Pressure Forces, the Anomalous Acceleration, and Center of Mass Motion for the TOPEX/POSEIDON Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, Daniel G.; Born, George H.

    2000-01-01

    Shortly after launch of the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) spacecraft (s/c), the Precision Orbit Determination (POD) Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Center for Space Research at the University of Texas, discovered residual along-track accelerations, which were unexpected. Here, we describe the analysis of radiation pressure forces acting on the T/P s/c for the purpose of understanding and providing an explanation for the anomalous accelerations. The radiation forces acting on the T/P solar army, which experiences warping due to temperature gradients between the front and back surfaces, are analyzed and the resulting along-track accelerations are determined. Characteristics similar to those of the anomalous acceleration are seen. This analysis led to the development of a new radiation form model, which includes solar array warping and a solar array deployment deflection of as large as 2 deg. As a result of this new model estimates of the empirical along-track acceleration are reduced in magnitude when compared to the GSFC tuned macromodel and are less dependent upon beta(prime), the location of the Sun relative to the orbit plane. If these results we believed to reflect the actual orientation of the T/P solar array then motion of the solar array must influence the location of the s/c center of mass. Preliminary estimates indicate that the center of mass can vary by as much as 3 cm in the radial component of the s/c's position due to rotation of the deflected, warped solar array panel .The altimeter measurements rely upon accurate knowledge of the center of mass location relative to the s/c frame of reference. Any radial motion of the center of mass directly affects the altimeter measurements.

  6. Ethylene Decomposition Initiated by Ultraviolet Radiation from Low Pressure Mercury Lamps: Kinetics Model Prediction and Experimental Verification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, Zbigniew Boguslaw

    1995-01-01

    Ethylene is an important auto-catalytic plant growth hormone. Removal of ethylene from the atmosphere surrounding ethylene-sensitive horticultural products may be very beneficial, allowing an extended period of storage and preventing or delaying the induction of disorders. Various ethylene removal techniques have been studied and put into practice. One technique is based on using low pressure mercury ultraviolet lamps as a source of photochemical energy to initiate chemical reactions that destroy ethylene. Although previous research showed that ethylene disappeared in experiments with mercury ultraviolet lamps, the reactions were not described and the actual cause of ethylene disappearance remained unknown. Proposed causes for this disappearance were the direct action of ultraviolet rays on ethylene, reaction of ethylene with ozone (which is formed when air or gas containing molecular oxygen is exposed to radiation emitted by this type of lamp), or reactions with atomic oxygen leading to formation of ozone. The objective of the present study was to determine the set of physical and chemical actions leading to the disappearance of ethylene from artificial storage atmosphere under conditions of ultraviolet irradiation. The goal was achieved by developing a static chemical model based on the physical properties of a commercially available ultraviolet lamp, the photochemistry of gases, and the kinetics of chemical reactions. The model was used to perform computer simulations predicting time dependent concentrations of chemical species included in the model. Development of the model was accompanied by the design of a reaction chamber used for experimental verification. The model provided a good prediction of the general behavior of the species involved in the chemistry under consideration; however the model predicted lower than measured rate of ethylene disappearance. Some reasons for the model -experiment disagreement are radiation intensity averaging, the experimental

  7. Pressure-induced absorption coefficients for radiative transfer calculations in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, Regis

    1988-01-01

    The semiempirical theory of Birnbaum and Cohen (1976) is used to calculate the FIR pressure-induced absorption (PIA) spectra of N2, CH4, N2 + Ar, N2 + CH4, and N2 + H2 under conditions like those in the Titan troposphere. The results are presented graphically and compared with published data from laboratory measurements of PIA in the same gases and mixtures (Dagg et al., 1986; Dore et al., 1986). Good agreement is obtained, with only a slight underestimation of PIA at 300-400/cm in the case of CH4. The absorption coefficients are presented in tables, and it is suggested that the present findings are of value for evaluating the effects of tropospheric clouds on the Titan FIR spectrum and studying the greenhouse effect near the Titan surface.

  8. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  9. Soft X-ray radiation due to a nanosecond diffuse discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2010-02-01

    A source of soft X-rays with an effective photon energy of 9 keV and a subnanosecond pulse width is built around a gas diode filled with atmospheric-pressure air and a UAEB-150 generator. A collector placed behind a grounded mesh electrode detects an electron beam and a pulse with positive polarity, the latter being due to an electric field surrounding the mesh. It is shown that the intensity of soft X-rays from the gas-diode-based source depends on the material of a massive potential anode; namely, it grows with an increase in the atomic number of the cathode material. In the case of a tantalum anode, X-ray photons with an effective energy of 9 and 17 keV contribute to the exposure dose.

  10. Correlating radiation exposure with embrittlement: Comparative studies of electron- and neutron-irradiated pressure vessel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-22

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results show the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiate samples relative to unalloyed iron. Despite their disparate nature of defect production similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  11. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  12. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  13. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  14. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  15. Potential Repair of Escherichia coli DNA following Exposure to UV Radiation from Both Medium- and Low-Pressure UV Sources Used in Drinking Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, J. L.; Slawson, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    The increased use of UV radiation as a drinking water treatment technology has instigated studies of the repair potential of microorganisms following treatment. This study challenged the repair potential of an optimally grown nonpathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli after UV radiation from low- and medium-pressure lamps. Samples were irradiated with doses of 5, 8, and 10 mJ/cm2 from a low-pressure lamp and 3, 5, 8, and 10 mJ/cm2 from a medium-pressure UV lamp housed in a bench-scale collimated beam apparatus. Following irradiation, samples were incubated at 37°C under photoreactivating light or in the dark. Sample aliquots were analyzed for up to 4 h following incubation using a standard plate count. Results of this study showed that E. coli underwent photorepair following exposure to the low-pressure UV source, but no repair was detectable following exposure to the medium-pressure UV source at the initial doses examined. Minimal repair was eventually observed upon medium-pressure UV lamp exposure when doses were lowered to 3 mJ/cm2. This study clearly indicates differences in repair potential under laboratory conditions between irradiation from low-pressure and medium-pressure UV sources of the type used in water treatment. PMID:12089006

  16. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

  17. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  18. Influence of fluence rate on radiation-induced mechanical property changes in reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L. )

    1990-03-01

    This report describes a set of experiments undertaken using a 2 MW test reactor, the UBR, to qualify the significance of fluence rate to the extent of embrittlement produced in reactor pressure vessel steels at their service temperature. The test materials included two reference plates (A 302-B, A 533-B steel) and two submerged arc weld deposits (Linde 80, Linde 0091 welding fluxes). Charpy-V (C{sub v}), tension and 0.5T-CT compact specimens were employed for notch ductility, strength and fracture toughness (J-R curve) determinations, respectively. Target fluence rates were 8 {times} 10{sup 10}, 6 {times} 10{sup 11} and 9 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} {minus}s{sup {minus}1}. Specimen fluences ranged from 0.5 to 3.8 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The data describe a fluence-rate effect which may extend to power reactor surveillance as well as test reactor facilities now in use. The dependence of embrittlement sensitivity on fluence rate appears to differ for plate and weld deposit materials. Relatively good agreement in fluence-rate effects definition was observed among the three test methods. 52 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. The metamorphic and kinematic history of a subduction channel analogue - the subgreenschist Chrystalls Beach Complex, New Zealand - and effects of metamorphic fluid pressure generation on dominant deformation style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction channel shear zones, comprising subducting sediments, fragments of oceanic crust, and material eroded off the upper plate, are commonly inferred to occur along subduction megathrusts. The Chrystalls Beach Complex, an accretionary mélange within the Otago Schist on the South Island of New Zealand, comprises highly sheared trench-fill sedimentary rocks and scattered pillow basalts, and is inferred to have formed during Jurassic subduction under the paleo-Pacific Gondwana margin. Lithologically and structurally, this mélange is analogous to a subduction channel shear zone. Equilibrium mineral assemblages indicate peak P-T conditions in the range 400-550 MPa and 250-300°C. Relatively high pressures of burial and accretion during foliation development are inferred from phengite content and b0 spacing analyses of white mica. Rare lawsonite occurs in a post-foliation vein, and illite `crystallinity' measurements indicate a thermal overprint during exhumation. These P-T estimates and their relative chronology indicate that the mineral assemblages developed along a clockwise P-T path, compatible with published models for rocks deformed along the seismogenic subduction thrust interface and exhumed in an accretionary prism (e.g. Gerya and Stöckhert, 2006). The mélange deformed in a mixed continuous-discontinuos style. Extensive deformation by dissolution-precipitation creep provides evidence for relatively large strains accommodated by viscous flow at temperatures ≤ 300°C. Discontinuous deformation is evident in an extensive fault-fracture mesh involving mutually cross-cutting subvertical extension veins and subhorizontal slickenfibre shear surfaces. For quartz in extension and shear veins, 14.5‰<δ18O<17.0‰. At a temperature of 300°C, this range in vein quartz δ18O indicates that the veins precipitated from aqueous fluid with 7‰<δ18O<10‰, corresponding to a pore fluid enriched in 18O. This relative enrichment likely results from progressive

  20. Inactivation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in ground chicken meat using high pressure processing and gamma radiation, and in purge and chicken meat surfaces by ultraviolet light

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common contaminants in meat and poultry. Nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve safety and shelf-life of both human and pet foods can include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV...

  1. When do Acacia mellifera trees use water? Responses of sap velocity to soil water availability, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Thomsen, Simon; Gröngröft, Alexander; Eschenbach, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Acacia mellifera (multi-stem deciduous tree) is one of the dominant woody species responsible for bush encroachment in southern African savannahs. However, very little is known on water use, transpiration or xylem sap flow of A. mellifera. We analyzed the responses of sap velocity in A. mellifera to soil moisture, vapour pressure deficit and global radiation. This knowledge is necessary to improve hydrological modelling and will as such contribute to our understanding of the impacts of bush encroachment in (semi) arid savannahs on the soil water balance. We monitored sap velocities at two sites that differed in tree density in a semi-arid thornbush savannah in central Namibia (mean annual precipitation = 346 mm). Sap velocities were derived using the Heat Ratio Method. Measurements were done in four periods of 3-4 months between November 2014 and September 2016. The measurement periods covered the transitions between the dry and rainy season and vice versa, and the dry season. In two of these periods we did measurements at all stems of three trees per site (a total of 17-19 stems), while in the other two periods sap velocities were measured on one stem per tree for six to eight trees per site. The study was done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management) granted by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Preliminary results indicate that the day-to-day fluctuations in cumulative daily sap velocity showed a three-phase interaction with soil water tension (minimum soil water tension of four sensors to 1-m depth). Phase I: At soil water tension < pF 2.5, soil water tension had little influence on sap velocities, and fluctuations in sapflow seemed to be related to VPD and global radiation. Phase II: At soil water tensions between pF 2.5 and pF 3.2, sap velocities were negatively related to soil water tension. Phase III: At soil water tensions > pF 3.2 no sap flow could be

  2. Effects of quantum statistical pressure on the Washimi-Karpman magnetization and power radiation in degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-09-01

    The physical properties of the Washimi-Karpman ponderomotive magnetization are investigated in relativistically degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas including the influence of quantum statistical degeneracy pressure. The induced magnetization and power radiation due to the Washimi-Karpman ponderomotive interaction are obtained in Fermi-Dirac plasmas. It is found that the ponderomotive magnetization decreases with an increase of the relativistic degeneracy parameter. It is also shown that the quantum statistical degeneracy pressure effect is more significant in small frequency and large wave number domains than that in large frequency and small wave number domains. In addition, it is found that the ponderomotive power radiation decreases with an increase of the relativistic degeneracy parameter in Fermi-Dirac plasmas. The variations of the Washimi-Karpman magnetization and power radiation due to the physical characteristics of degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas are also discussed.

  3. High quality ion acceleration from a double-layer target dominated by the radiation pressure of a transversely Gaussian laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xueren; Xie Baisong; Wu Haicheng; Zhao Xueyan; Zhang Shan; Aimidula, Aimierding; Liu Mingping

    2010-10-15

    The ion acceleration from a double-layer target irradiated by a transversely Gaussian laser pulse is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. The main idea of the double-layer target is to match the transverse areal mass density of the target with the laser intensity profile by single ion specie with two densities or by two ion species. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the target deformation and the transverse instability are efficiently suppressed in the double-layer scheme, ions within the laser spot are uniformly accelerated and are well collimated in the forward direction, GeV/u monoenergetic ion beams with very low divergency are observed.

  4. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    PubMed

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  5. General Relativistic Radiation Pressure Supported Stars as Quasar Central Engines in an Universe Which is Recycling Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2011-11-01

    Hoyle & Folwler (1963a,b) suggested that quasars may contain Radiation Pressure Supported Stars (RPSS), which are quasi-Newtonian (surface redshitf z ≪ 1) and supermassive. This proposal however did not work and one of the reasons was that such quasi-Newtonian PRSSs are unstable to gravitational contraction to become extremely general relativistic RPSSs. And since trapped surfaces are not allowed, (Mitra 2009a) these relativistic RPSSs are bound to hover around their instantaneous "Schwarzschild Radius" Rs = 2GM/c2. In view of the fact that they have z ≫ 1, they appear as "Black Holes" (BH) to distant observers. However since, they are always radiating, in a strict sense, they are always contracting. During such extreme compatification, RPSSs are likely to acquire extremely large magnetic field due to magnetic flux freezing, and hence they have strong magnetosphere around them by which they may arrest the accretion disk surrounding them at "Alfven Radius", Ra ≫ Rs. In contrast, for an accreting Schwarzschild black hole, one expects the inner edge of the accretion disk to be at Ri = 3Rs. Consequently, such ultramagnetized RPSSs have been nick named as Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects" (MECOs). Microlensing studies of several quasar structures have shown that indeed Ri ˜ 35Rs rather that R1 = 3Rs, and which confirms that quasars harbor MECOs rather than true black holes (Schild et al. 2006, 2008, Lovegrove et al. 2011). Further the recent proof that the true BHs have M = 0 confirms that the BH candidates are not true BHs (Mitra 2004a,b; 2009b). Here we highlight the facts (i) outflows from quasars and (ii) their ability to recycle cosmic matter for having new stars and galaxies are best understood by realizing that they contain MECOs rather than true BHs.

  6. Radiation Pressure, Poynting-Robertson Drag, and Solar Wind Drag in the Restricted Three-Body Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Jackson, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag, and solar wind drag on dust grains trapped in mean motion resonances with the Sun and Jupiter in the restricted (negligible dust mass) three-body Problem. We especially examine the evolution of dust grains in the 1:1 resonance. As a first step, the Sun and Jupiter are idealized to both be in circular orbit about a common center of mass (circular restricted three-body problem). From the equation of motion of the dust particle in the rotating reference frame, the drag-induced time rate of change of its Jacobi "constant," C, is then derived and expressed in spherical coordinates. This new mathematical expression in spherical coordinates shows that C, in the 1:1 resonance, both oscillates and secularly increases with increasing time. The new expression gives rise to an easy understanding of how an orbit evolves when the radiation force and solar wind drag are included. All dust grain orbits are unstable in time when PR and solar wind drag are included in the Sun-Jupiter-dust system. Tadpole orbits evolve into horseshoe orbits; and these orbits continuously expand in size to lead to close encounters with Jupiter. Permanent trapping is impossible. Orbital evolutions of a dust grain trapped in the 1:1 resonance in the planar circular, an inclined case, an eccentric case, and the actual Sun-Jupiter case are numerically simulated and compared with each other and show grossly similar time behavior. Resonances other than 1:1 are also explored with the new expression. Stable exterior resonance trapping may be possible under certain conditions. One necessary condition for such a trap is derived. Trapping in interior resonances is shown to be always unstable.

  7. Effects of electromagnetic radiation from 3G mobile phone on heart rate, blood pressure and ECG parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Colak, Cengiz; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Ermis, Necip; Tagluk, Mehmet Emin; Colak, Cemil; Sarihan, Ediz; Dilek, Omer Faruk; Turan, Bahadir; Bakir, Sevtap; Acet, Ahmet

    2012-08-01

    Effects of electromagnetic energy radiated from mobile phones (MPs) on heart is one of the research interests. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) from third-generation (3G) MP on the heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and ECG parameters and also to investigate whether exogenous melatonin can exert any protective effect on these parameters. In this study 36 rats were randomized and evenly categorized into 4 groups: group 1 (3G-EMR exposed); group 2 (3G-EMR exposed + melatonin); group 3 (control) and group 4 (control + melatonin). The rats in groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 3G-specific MP's EMR for 20 days (40 min/day; 20 min active (speech position) and 20 min passive (listening position)). Group 2 was also administered with melatonin for 20 days (5 mg/kg daily during the experimental period). ECG signals were recorded from cannulated carotid artery both before and after the experiment, and BP and HR were calculated on 1st, 3rd and 5th min of recordings. ECG signals were processed and statistically evaluated. In our experience, the obtained results did not show significant differences in the BP, HR and ECG parameters among the groups both before and after the experiment. Melatonin, also, did not exhibit any additional effects, neither beneficial nor hazardous, on the heart hemodynamics of rats. Therefore, the strategy (noncontact) of using a 3G MP could be the reason for ineffectiveness; and use of 3G MP, in this perspective, seems to be safer compared to the ones used in close contact with the head. However, further study is needed for standardization of such an assumption.

  8. Dynamic responses of the Earth's radiation belts during periods of solar wind dynamic pressure pulse based on normalized superposed epoch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Gu, Xudong; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing

    2016-09-01

    Using the electron flux measurements obtained from five satellites (GOES 15 and POES 15, 16, 18, and 19), we investigate the flux variations of radiation belt electrons during forty solar wind dynamic pressure pulses identified between September 2012 and December 2014. By utilizing the mean duration of the pressure pulses as the epoch timeline and stretching or compressing the time phases of individual events to normalize the duration by means of linear interpolation, we have performed normalized superposed epoch analysis to evaluate the dynamic responses of radiation belt energetic electrons corresponding to various groups of solar wind and magnetospheric conditions in association with solar wind dynamic pressure pulses. Our results indicate that by adopting the timeline normalization we can reproduce the typical response of the electron radiation belts to pressure pulses. Radiation belt electron fluxes exhibit large depletions right after the Pdyn peak during the periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and are more likely to occur during the Pdyn pulse under southward IMF Bz conditions. For the pulse events with large negative values of (Dst)min, radiation belt electrons respond in a manner similar to those with southward IMF Bz, and the corresponding postpulse recovery can extend to L 3 and exceed the prepulse flux levels. Triggered by the solar wind pressure enhancements, deeper earthward magnetopause erosion provides favorable conditions for the prompt electron flux dropouts that extend down to L 5, and the pressure pulses with longer duration tend to produce quicker and stronger electron flux decay. In addition, the events with high electron fluxes before the Pdyn pulse tend to experience more severe electron flux dropouts during the course of the pulse, while the largest rate of electron flux increase before and after the pulse occurs under the preconditioned low electron fluxes. These new results help us understand how electron fluxes

  9. Side-effects of a bad attitude: How GNSS spacecraft orientation errors affect solar radiation pressure modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilssner, Florian; Springer, Tim; Schönemann, Erik; Zandbergen, Rene; Enderle, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure (SRP) is the largest non-gravitational perturbation for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites, and can therefore have substantial impact on their orbital dynamics. Various SRP force models have been developed over the past 30 years for the purpose of precise orbit determination. They all rely upon the assumption that the satellites continuously maintain a Sun-Nadir pointing attitude with the navigation antenna boresight (body-fixed z-axis) pointing towards Earth center, and the solar panel rotation axis (body-fixed y-axis) being normal to the Sun direction. However, in reality, this is not perfectly the case. Reasons for a non-nominal spacecraft attitude may be eclipse maneuvers, commanded attitude biases and Sun/horizon sensor measurement errors, for example due to mounting misalignment or incorrectly calibrated sensor electronics. In this work the effect of GNSS spacecraft orientation errors on SRP modelling is investigated. Simplified mathematical functions describing the SRP force acting on the solar arrays in the presence of yaw-, pitch- and roll-biases are derived. Special attention is paid to the yaw-bias and its relationship to the SRP dynamics, particular in direction of the spacecraft y-axis ("y-bias force"). Analytical and experimental results gathered from orbit and attitude analyses of GPS Block II/IIA/IIF satellites demonstrate how sensitive the SRP coefficients are to changes in yaw.

  10. A passive satellite deorbiting strategy for medium earth orbit using solar radiation pressure and the J2 effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücking, Charlotte; Colombo, Camilla; McInnes, Colin R.

    2012-08-01

    The growing population of space debris poses a serious risk to the future of space flight. To effectively manage the increase of debris in orbit, end-of life disposal has become a key requirement for future missions. This poses a challenge for Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) spacecraft which require a large Δv to re-enter the atmosphere or reach the geostationary graveyard orbit. This paper further explores a passive strategy based on the joint effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's oblateness acting on a high area-to-mass-ratio object. The concept was previously presented as an analytical planar model. This paper uses a full 3D model to validate the analytical results numerically for equatorial circular orbits first, then investigating higher inclinations. It is shown that for higher inclinations the initial position of the Sun and right ascension of the ascending node become increasingly important. A region of very low required area-to-mass-ratio is identified in the parameter space of semi-major axis and inclination which occurs for altitudes below 10,000 km.

  11. Precision measurement of a low-loss cylindrical dumbbell-shaped sapphire mechanical oscillator using radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhill, J.; Ivanov, E.; Tobar, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present first results from a number of experiments conducted on a 0.53-kg cylindrical dumbbell-shaped sapphire crystal. Here we report on an optomechanical experiment utilizing a modification to the typical cylindrical architecture. Mechanical motion of the crystal structure alters the dimensions of the crystal, and the induced strain changes the permittivity. These two effects result in parametric frequency modulation of resonant microwave whispering gallery modes that are simultaneously excited within the crystal. A microwave readout system is implemented, allowing extremely low noise measurements of this frequency modulation near our modes of interest, having a phase noise floor of -165 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz. Fine tuning of the crystal's suspension has allowed for the optimization of mechanical quality factors in preparation for cryogenic experiments, with a value of Q =8 ×107 achieved at 127 kHz. This results in a Q ×f product of 1013, equivalent to the best measured values in a macroscopic sapphire mechanical system. Results are presented that demonstrate the excitation of mechanical modes via radiation pressure force, allowing an experimental method of determining the transducer's displacement sensitivity d f /d x and calibrating the system. Finally, we demonstrate parametric backaction phenomenon within the system. These are all important steps towards the goal of achieving quantum limited measurements of a kilogram-scale macroscopic device for the purpose of detecting deviations from standard quantum theory resulting from quantum gravitational effects.

  12. Asymmetry in melting and growth relaxation of 4He crystals in superfluid after manipulation by acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Abe, Haruka; Okuda, Yuichi

    2017-02-01

    The relaxation dynamics of the crystal–superfluid interface of 4He after deformation induced by acoustic radiation pressure was investigated for various crystal orientations. The melting relaxation after growth was approximately 10 times slower than the growth relaxation after melting for vicinal surfaces and facets, while both relaxation times were consistent with each other for rough surfaces. The asymmetry in the time constant between the melting and growth of vicinal surfaces and facets can be qualitatively explained as the effect of superflow induced by local rapid interface motion, such as a quick rounding of facet edges of the 4He crystal. Rough surfaces move more isotropically and no significant local rapid interface motion is induced; therefore, their relaxation is likely to be symmetric with a minimal effect of superflow. While the growth relaxation was simply back to the initial shape in a single stage, the melting relaxation was much more complex with multiple stages and the exhibition of various anomalous shapes depending on temperature. Anomalous shapes such as needle-like shapes during melting have a larger curvature and higher energy and thus should have disappeared more quickly than the growth shape with a smaller curvature, but they were considerably stable and disappeared slowly. This counter-intuitive asymmetry suggests the significant role of superflow in the relaxation process.

  13. Mechanisms for Induction of Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage by Diagnostic Ultrasound: Review and Consideration of Acoustical Radiation Surface Pressure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2016-12-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound can induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in rats and other mammals. This phenomenon represents the only clearly demonstrated biological effect of (non-contrast enhanced) diagnostic ultrasound and thus presents a uniquely important safety issue. However, the physical mechanism responsible for PCH remains uncertain more than 25 y after its discovery. Experimental research has indicated that neither heating nor acoustic cavitation, the predominant mechanisms for bioeffects of ultrasound, is responsible for PCH. Furthermore, proposed theoretical mechanisms based on gas-body activation, on alveolar resonance and on impulsive generation of liquid droplets all appear unlikely to be responsible for PCH, owing to unrealistic model assumptions. Here, a simple model based on the acoustical radiation surface pressure (ARSP) at a tissue-air interface is hypothesized as the mechanism for PCH. The ARSP model seems to explain some features of PCH, including the approximate frequency independence of PCH thresholds and the dependence of thresholds on biological factors. However, ARSP evaluated for experimental threshold conditions appear to be too weak to fully account for stress failure of pulmonary capillaries, gauging by known stresses for injurious physiologic conditions. Furthermore, consideration of bulk properties of lung tissue suggests substantial transmission of ultrasound through the pleura, with reduced ARSP and potential involvement of additional mechanisms within the pulmonary interior. Although these recent findings advance our knowledge, only a full understanding of PCH mechanisms will allow development of science-based safety assurance for pulmonary ultrasound.

  14. Computation of radiation pressure force exerted on arbitrary shaped homogeneous particles by high-order Bessel vortex beams using MLFMA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minglin; Wu, Yueqian; Ren, Kuan Fang; Sheng, Xinqing

    2016-11-28

    Due to special characteristics of nondiffraction and self reconstruction, the Bessel beams have attracted wide attention in optical trapping and appear to be a dramatic alternative to Gaussian beams. We present in this paper an efficient approach based on the surface integral equations (SIE) to compute the radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted on arbitrary shaped homogeneous particles by high-order Bessel vortex beam (HOBVB). The incident beam is described by vector expressions perfectly satisfy Maxwell's equations. The problem is formulated with the combined tangential formulation (CTF) and solved iteratively with the aid of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA). Then RPF is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor over a spherical surface tightly enclosing the particle and analytical expression for electromagnetic fields of incident beam in near region are used. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of the rigorous method for spherical particle to validate the accuracy of the approach. Some numerical results on relative large particles of complex shape, such as biconcave cell-like particles with different geometry parameters are given, showing powerful capability of our approach. These results are expected to provide useful insights into the RPF exerted on complex shaped particles by HOBVB.

  15. Estimates of the radiation-induced mutation frequencies to recessive visible, dominant cataract and enzyme-activity alleles in germ cells of AKR, BALB/c, DBA/2 and (102xC3H)F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Pretsch, W; Favor, J; Lehmacher, W; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A

    1994-07-01

    Male mice of the genotypes AKR, BALB/c, (102/ElxC3H/El)F1 or DBA/2 were exposed to 3 + 3 Gy irradiation with a 24 h fractionation interval and mated to untreated Test-stock females. The offspring were screened for activity alterations of 10 erythrocyte enzymes as well as recessive specific-locus and dominant cataract mutations. The observed mutation rates per locus per gamete x 10(-5) for treated spermatogonia were 6.8, 4.9, 2.5 and 1.3 for enzyme-activity mutations, 8.6, 24.1, 22.8 and 31.4 for specific-locus mutations, and 0.7, 0.9, 0.6 and 2.5 for cataract mutations, respectively. Some variability from strain to strain in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations was observed. However, there was no consistent effect of genotype on the frequency of induced mutations and it is concluded that no effect of genetic background exists for the four genotypes tested. There is good agreement between the observed enzyme-activity mutation rate in children of survivors of the atomic bombings and the expected mutation rate based on results with mice. Results are therefore consistent with an estimation of human radiation-induced genetic risks based upon an extrapolation of experimental results in the mouse.

  16. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader; Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir; Symon, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  17. Evaluation of the OMI Cloud Pressures Derived from Rotational Raman Scattering by Comparisons with other Satellite Data and Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  18. Evaluation of the OMI Cloud Pressures Derived from Rotational Raman Scattering by Comparisons with other Satellite Data and Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander; Joiner, Joanna; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Levelt, Pieternel; Stephens, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine differences between cloud pressures retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) using the ultraviolet rotational Raman scattering (RRS) algorithm and those from the thermal infrared (IR) Aqua/MODIS. Several cloud data sets are currently being used in OMI trace gas retrieval algorithms including climatologies based on IR measurements and simultaneous cloud parameters derived from OMI. From a validation perspective, it is important to understand the OMI retrieved cloud parameters and how they differ with those derived from the IR. To this end, we perform radiative transfer calculations to simulate the effects of different geophysical conditions on the OMI RRS cloud pressure retrievals. We also quantify errors related to the use of the Mixed Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept as currently implemented of the OMI algorithms. Using properties from the Cloudsat radar and MODIS, we show that radiative transfer calculations support the following: (1) The MLER model is adequate for single-layer optically thick, geometrically thin clouds, but can produce significant errors in estimated cloud pressure for optically thin clouds. (2) In a two-layer cloud, the RRS algorithm may retrieve a cloud pressure that is either between the two cloud decks or even beneath the top of the lower cloud deck because of scattering between the cloud layers; the retrieved pressure depends upon the viewing geometry and the optical depth of the upper cloud deck. (3) Absorbing aerosol in and above a cloud can produce significant errors in the retrieved cloud pressure. (4) The retrieved RRS effective pressure for a deep convective cloud will be significantly higher than the physical cloud top pressure derived with thermal IR.

  19. The influence of radiative heat exchange on the character of gasdynamic flows under conditions of pulsed discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, F. G.; Lapshin, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    The gasdynamics of pulse-periodic radiative discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor has been studied in the framework of a two-temperature multifluid model. It is established that, at a limited volume of the gas-discharge tube, the character of gasdynamic flows depends on the conditions of radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma. In cases in which the main contribution to radiative energy losses is related to a spectral region with optical thickness τ R (λ) ˜ 1, there is nonlocal radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma, which is uniformly heated over the entire tube volume and moves from the discharge axis to tube walls during the entire pulse of discharge current. Under the conditions of radiative losses determined by the spectral region where τ R (λ) ≪ 1, the reabsorption of radiation is absent and discharge plasma is nonuniformly heated by the current pulse. This leads to the appearance of reverse motions, so that the heated plasma is partly pushed toward the tube walls and partly returned to the discharge axis.

  20. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  1. Accretion in Radiative Equipartition (AiRE) Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Yasaman K.; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2017-07-01

    Standard accretion disk theory predicts that the total pressure in disks at typical (sub-)Eddington accretion rates becomes radiation pressure dominated. However, radiation pressure dominated disks are thermally unstable. Since these disks are observed in approximate steady state over the instability timescale, our accretion models in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime (i.e., inner disk) need to be modified. Here, we present a modification to the Shakura & Sunyaev model, where the radiation pressure is in equipartition with the gas pressure in the inner region. We call these flows accretion in radiative equipartition (AiRE) disks. We introduce the basic features of AiRE disks and show how they modify disk properties such as the Toomre parameter and the central temperature. We then show that the accretion rate of AiRE disks is limited from above and below, by Toomre and nodal sonic point instabilities, respectively. The former leads to a strict upper limit on the mass of supermassive black holes as a function of cosmic time (and spin), while the latter could explain the transition between hard and soft states of X-ray binaries.

  2. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  3. High-Pressure Synchtron Radiation X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate C(CH[subscript 2]ONO[subscript 2 ])[subscript 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinska-Kalita, K.E.; Pravica, M.; Nicol, M.

    2006-02-02

    A high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate, C(CH{sub 2}ONO{sub 2}){sub 4}, (PETN), has been performed in a diamond-anvil cell at ambient temperature using synchrotron radiation. Pressure-induced alterations in the profiles of the diffraction lines, including their positions, widths and intensities were followed up to 30 GPa in a compressino cycle. The spectral changes in the diffraction patterns at low pressures indicated continuous densification of the tetragonal structure (space group P{bar 4}2{sub 1}c). The diffraction patterns confirmed that PETN compressed from ambient pressure to 7.4 GPa by 17%. At 8.2 GPa and above, several new diffraction lines appeared in the patterns. These lines suggest that the lattice undergoes an incomplete stress-induced structural transformation from the tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure (most probably space group P2{sub 1}22{sub 1}). The mixture of both structures appeared to persist to 30 GPa. The progressive broadening of the diffraction lines as the pressure increased beyond 10 GPa is attributed to the combined diffraction lines of a mixture of two coexisting PETN phases and inhomogeneous pressure distribution within the sample.

  4. Interactions Between Small Arrays of Atmospheric Pressure Micro-Plasma Jets: Gas Dynamic, Radiation and Electrostatic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are widely used devices for biomedical applications. A typical plasma jet consists of a tube through which noble gas or its mixture with a molecular gas flows. The noble gas creates a channel into the ambient air which is eventually dispersed by interdiffusion with the air. Plasma plumes are formed by the propagation of ionization waves (IWs) through the tubes and then through the noble gas phase channel. The IW typically propagates until the mole fraction of the ambient air in the channel increases above a critical values which requires a larger E/N to propagate the IW. By grouping several jets together to form an array of jets, one can in principle increase the area treated by the plume. If the jets are sufficiently far apart, the IWs and resulting plasma plumes are independent. As the spacing between the jets decreases, the plasma jets begin to mutually interact. In this talk, we discuss results from a computational investigation of small arrays of He/O2 micro-plasma jets propagating into ambient air. The model used in this work, nonPDPSIM, is a plasma hydrodynamics model in which continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for charged and neutral species with solution of Poisson's equation for the electric potential. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the gas dynamics and radiation transport is addressed using a propagator method. We found that as the spacing between the jets decreases, the He channels from the individual jets tend to merge. The IWs from each channel also merge into regions having the highest He mole fraction and so lowest E/N to sustain the IW. The proximity of the IWs enable other forms of interaction. If the IWs are of the same polarity, electrostatic forces can warp the paths of the IWs. If in sufficient proximity, the photoionization from one IW can influence its neighbors. The synchronization of the voltage pulses of adjacent IWs can also influence its neighbors. With synchronized pulses

  5. The effect of temperature and pressure on optical absorption spectra of transition zone minerals - Implications for the radiative conductivity of the Earth's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Goncharov, A. F.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Optical absorption spectra of high-pressure minerals can be used as indirect tools to calculate radiative conductivities of the Earth’s interior [e.g., 1]. Recent high-pressure studies imply that e.g. ringwoodite, γ-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4, does not become opaque in the near infrared and visible region, as previously assumed, but remains transparent to 21.5 GPa [2]. Therefore, it has been concluded that radiative heat transfer does not necessarily become blocked at high pressures of the mantle and ferromagnesian minerals actually might contribute to the heat flow in the Earth’s interior [2]. However, experimental results on temperature effects on radiative heat transfer are not available. We studied the effect of both, pressure and temperature, on the optical absorption of hydrous Fe-bearing ringwoodite, γ-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4, and hydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite, β-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4, which are the main components of the Earth’s transition zone. Gem-quality single-crystals were synthesized at 18 GPa and 1400 °C in a 5000t multianvil apparatus. Crystals were analyzed by Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. For optical absorption measurements in the IR - VIS - UV spectral range (400 - 50000 cm-1) 50 µm sized single-crystals of ringwoodite and wadsleyite were double polished to thicknesses of 13 µm and 18 µm, respectively, and loaded in resistively heated diamond-anvil cells with argon as pressure medium. After taking measurements at high pressure and room temperature, ringwoodite was studied at 26 GPa up to 650 °C and wadsleyite spectra were recorded at 16 GPa up to 450 °C. At ambient pressure the absorption spectrum of ringwoodite reveals a crystal field band (Fe2+) at 12075 cm-1, an intervalence charge transfer band (Fe2+ to Fe3+) at 16491 cm-1, and an absorption edge due to ligand-metal charge transfer close to 30000 cm-1. The wadsleyite spectrum is characterized by a similar absorption edge in the VIS-UV range

  6. Effects of total pressure on non-grey gas radiation transfer in oxy-fuel combustion using the LBL, SNB, SNBCK, WSGG, and FSCK methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Huaqiang; Gu, Mingyan; Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Liu, Fengshan; Zhou, Huaichun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of total pressure on gas radiation heat transfer are investigated in 1D parallel plate geometry containing isothermal and homogeneous media and an inhomogeneous and non-isothermal CO2-H2O mixture under conditions relevant to oxy-fuel combustion using the line-by-line (LBL), statistical narrow-band (SNB), statistical narrow-band correlated-k (SNBCK), weighted-sum-of-grey-gases (WSGG), and full-spectrum correlated-k (FSCK) models. The LBL calculations were conducted using the HITEMP2010 and CDSD-1000 databases and the LBL results serve as the benchmark solution to evaluate the accuracy of the other models. Calculations of the SNB, SNBCK, and FSCK were conducted using both the 1997 EM2C SNB parameters and their recently updated 2012 parameters to investigate how the SNB model parameters affect the results under oxy-fuel combustion conditions at high pressures. The WSGG model considered is the recently developed one by Bordbar et al. [19] for oxy-fuel combustion based on LBL calculations using HITEMP2010. The total pressure considered ranges from 1 up to 30 atm. The total pressure significantly affects gas radiation transfer primarily through the increase in molecule number density and only slightly through spectral line broadening. Using the 1997 EM2C SNB model parameters the accuracy of SNB and SNBCK is very good and remains essentially independent of the total pressure. When using the 2012 EM2C SNB model parameters the SNB and SNBCK results are less accurate and their error increases with increasing the total pressure. The WSGG model has the lowest accuracy and the best computational efficiency among the models investigated. The errors of both WSGG and FSCK using the 2012 EM2C SNB model parameters increase when the total pressure is increased from 1 to 10 atm, but remain nearly independent of the total pressure beyond 10 atm. When using the 1997 EM2C SNB model parameters the accuracy of FSCK only slightly decreases with increasing the total pressure.

  7. High-pressure Experimental Studies on Geo-liquids Using Synchrotron Radiation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-12-23

    Here, we review recent progress in studying silicate, carbonate, and metallic liquids of geological and geophysical importance at high pressure and temperature, using the large-volume high-pressure devices at the third-generation synchrotron facility of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. These integrated high-pressure facilities now offer a unique combination of experimental techniques that allow researchers to investigate structure, density, elasticity, viscosity, and interfacial tension of geo-liquids under high pressure, in a coordinated and systematic fashion. Moreover, we describe experimental techniques, along with scientific highlights. Future developments are also discussed.

  8. Understanding Accretion Disks through Three Dimensional Radiation MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei

    I study the structures and thermal properties of black hole accretion disks in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Angular momentum transfer in the disk is provided by the turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), which is calculated self-consistently with a recently developed 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code based on Athena. This code, developed by my collaborators and myself, couples both the radiation momentum and energy source terms with the ideal MHD equations by modifying the standard Godunov method to handle the stiff radiation source terms. We solve the two momentum equations of the radiation transfer equations with a variable Eddington tensor (VET), which is calculated with a time independent short characteristic module. This code is well tested and accurate in both optically thin and optically thick regimes. It is also accurate for both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. With this code, I find that when photon viscosity becomes significant, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress from the MRI turbulence can increase significantly with radiation pressure. The thermal instability of the radiation pressure dominated disk is then studied with vertically stratified shearing box simulations. Unlike the previous results claiming that the radiation pressure dominated disk with MRI turbulence can reach a steady state without showing any unstable behavior, I find that the radiation pressure dominated disks always either collapse or expand until we have to stop the simulations. During the thermal runaway, the heating and cooling rates from the simulations are consistent with the general criterion of thermal instability. However, details of the thermal runaway are different from the predictions of the standard alpha disk model, as many assumptions in that model are not satisfied in the simulations. We also identify the key reasons why previous simulations do not find the instability. The thermal

  9. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  10. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; ...

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  11. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. Using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites, we report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse. When the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ˜ 6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. It is demonstrated that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  12. Characterization of Damage to Bacteria and Bio-macromolecules Caused by (V)UV Radiation and Particles Generated by a Microscale Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Narberhaus, Franz; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets effectively inactivate bacteria on ­surfaces including infected tissues. This is due to the combined effects of (V)UV radiation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions, and high electric fields. A well-characterized microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated with He/O2 gas mixture has been modified so that (V)UV radiation and heavy reactive particles (mainly O3 molecules and O atoms) emitted from the plasma source can be separated effectively. The separation is achieved by an additional lateral He flow, which diverts the heavy particles from the jet axis. The new jet geometry is called X-Jet. Separation of different plasma components allows studying their effects on living cells and bio-macromolecules separately. First, the effectiveness of the separation of different plasma components was demonstrated by treatment of monolayers of vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. To characterize effects on nucleic acids, dried plasmid DNA and total cellular RNA were treated with the separated plasma components. Dried bovine serum albumin was used to study etching effects of (V)UV radiation and heavy particles on proteins. We found that heavy particles emitted from the X-Jet kill vegetative cells more effectively than the (V)UV radiation from this type of plasma source. All bio-macromolecules investigated, DNA, RNA, and proteins, are affected by plasma treatment. DNA exposed to the (V)UV-channel of the jet seems to be prone to thymine dimer formation not only in vitro but also in vivo as indicated by induction of the photolyase in Escherichia coli, while DNA strand breaks occur under both jet channels. Heavy particles seem more effective in degrading RNA and in etching protein in vitro.

  13. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  14. High-Pressure-Hydrogen-Induced Spin Reconfiguration in GdFe2 Observed by 57Fe-Polarized Synchrotron Radiation Mössbauer Spectroscopy with Nuclear Bragg Monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Takaya; Imai, Yasuhiko; Hirao, Naohisa; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Nakamura, Yumiko; Sakaki, Kouji; Enoki, Hirotoshi; Ishimatsu, Naoki; Masuda, Ryo; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    57Fe-polarized synchrotron radiation Mössbauer spectroscopy (PSRMS) with an X-ray phase plate and a nuclear Bragg monochromator was used to study ferrimagnetic GdFe2 in high-pressure hydrogen. The pressure-dependent spectra clearly showed a two-step magnetic transition of GdFe2. 57Fe-PSRMS with circular polarization gave direct evidence that the Fe moment was directed parallel to the net magnetization of the GdFe2 hydride at 20 GPa. This spin configuration was opposite to that of the initial GdFe2, suggesting an extreme weakening of the antiferromagnetic interaction between Fe and Gd. 57Fe-PSRMS enables the characterization of the nonuniform properties of iron-based polycrystalline powder alloys. The excellent applicability of 57Fe-PSRMS covers a wide range of scientific fields.

  15. Absorption of infrared radiation by carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures: Part B. Total emissivity charts and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The line-by-line procedure developed in the associated paper (Part A ) has been used to generate the total emissivity chart for pure CO and CO -N2 /air mixtures at 1 bar total pressure, in the 300 to 3000 K temperature and 0.01 to 3000 bar cm pressure path length range. Methods of scaling the emissivity to pressures different to 1 bar, in the range 0.1 to 40 bar, are provided through pressure correction graphs and EXCEL interpolator (Supplementary Material). The interpolated emissivities are within ± 2% margin from the line-by-line calculated values. The newly developed emissivity graphs are substantially more accurate than the existing Ulrich (1936) & Hottel (1954) and Abu-Romia & Tien (1966) charts.

  16. Using ultrasonic measurements and a two-phase composite model to assess radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    Ultrasonic methods used in the study of radiation damage and recovery in single crystals appear to also be useful for similar studies on polycrystalline alloys. Ultrasonic methods have demonstrated a sensitivity to radiation damage as affected by neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, large changes in composition, and possibly, as well, by neutron energy spectrum. On the microstructure defect evolution, only the residual defects created through the radiation event will contribute to the final macroscopic material property change. From a microstructure point, it is generally accepted that radiation hardening and embrittlement in metals are caused by clusters of vacancies, interstitial, and solute atoms that impede the motion of slip dislocations. Although vacancy-type defects are a major contributor to the material hardening, they also indicate the presence of other interstitial defects. Thus the total volume change of vacancy-type defects before and after irradiation can serve as a direct index to the final material property changes. The volume change of the vacancy-type defects can be determined by utilizing the two -phase composite model (matrix and void-type inclusion) to interpret wave velocities of baseline and irradiated specimens that are obtained from the ultrasonic wave experiment. This is a relatively economic and straightforward procedure. The correlation of the volume change of the vacancy-type defects with the existing destructive mechanical test results may play an important role in the future for the prediction of the radiation embrittlement and remaining plant lifetime, especially for the older plants on the verge of exhausting all the available mechanical test specimens loaded in the surveillance capsules. The above hypothesis was supported by the limited irradiated data analyzed and presented in his paper. The proposed ultrasonic methodology also has a potential application to assess creep damage in fossil power plants.

  17. RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2011-08-20

    Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

  18. Radiation pressure excitation of a low temperature atomic force/magnetic force microscope for imaging in 4-300 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćelik, Ümit; Karcı, Özgür; Uysallı, Yiǧit; Özer, H. Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel radiation pressure based cantilever excitation method for imaging in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Piezo-excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, however it may cause spurious resonance peaks. Therefore, the direct excitation of the cantilever plays a crucial role in AFM imaging. A fiber optic interferometer with a 1310 nm laser was used both for the excitation of the cantilever at the resonance and the deflection measurement of the cantilever in a commercial low temperature atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (AFM/MFM) from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever's resonance frequency by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The laser beam is typically modulated by ˜500 μW, and ˜141.8 nmpp oscillation amplitude is obtained in moderate vacuum levels between 4 and 300 K. We have demonstrated the performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging atomic steps in graphite, magnetic domains in CoPt multilayers between 4 and 300 K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO(2212) single crystal at 4 K for the first time.

  19. Radiation pressure excitation of a low temperature atomic force/magnetic force microscope for imaging in 4-300 K temperature range.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ümit; Karcı, Özgür; Uysallı, Yiğit; Özer, H Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel radiation pressure based cantilever excitation method for imaging in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Piezo-excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, however it may cause spurious resonance peaks. Therefore, the direct excitation of the cantilever plays a crucial role in AFM imaging. A fiber optic interferometer with a 1310 nm laser was used both for the excitation of the cantilever at the resonance and the deflection measurement of the cantilever in a commercial low temperature atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (AFM/MFM) from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever's resonance frequency by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The laser beam is typically modulated by ∼500 μW, and ∼141.8 nmpp oscillation amplitude is obtained in moderate vacuum levels between 4 and 300 K. We have demonstrated the performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging atomic steps in graphite, magnetic domains in CoPt multilayers between 4 and 300 K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO(2212) single crystal at 4 K for the first time.

  20. Experimental analysis of the pressure drop and heat transfer through metal foams used as volumetric receivers under concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albanakis, C.; Missirlis, D.; Yakinthos, K.; Goulas, A.; Michailidis, N.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.; Granier, B.

    2009-01-15

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of porous materials, when treated as volumetric receivers under concentrated solar radiation. For this reason various porous metallic and ceramic materials have been tested as potential receivers for concentrated solar radiation. The experimental investigation showed that their efficiency was depending on both materials parameters and flow conditions. In this work, a variety of foam materials such as Ni and Ni alloy, inconel, copper, aluminum and SiC with different open cell porosity were tested as potential media to be used as volumetric receivers and heat exchangers. However, since the results were similar, for space economy, only the results of two of them, nickel and inconel were presented in detail and compared with each other. (author)