Science.gov

Sample records for radiation processes annual

  1. A retrospective study on annual evaluation of radiation processing for frozen bone allografts complying to quality system requirements.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Saravana; Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Min, N G Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    Bone allografts have been used widely to fill up essential void in orthopaedic surgeries. The benefit of using allografts to replace and reconstruct musculoskeletal injuries, fractures or disease has obtained overwhelming acceptance from orthopaedic surgeons worldwide. However, bacterial infection and disease transmission through bone allograft transplantation have always been a significant issue. Sterilization by radiation is an effective method to eliminate unwanted microorganisms thus assist in preventing life threatening allograft associated infections. Femoral heads procured from living donors and long bones (femur and tibia) procured from cadaveric donors were sterilized at 25 kGy in compliance with international standard ISO 11137. According to quality requirements, all records of bone banking were evaluated annually. This retrospective study was carried out on annual evaluation of radiation records from 1998 until 2012. The minimum doses absorbed by the bones were ranging from 25.3 to 38.2 kGy while the absorbed maximum doses were from 25.4 to 42.3 kGy. All the bones supplied by our UMMC Bone Bank were sterile at the required minimum dose of 25 kGy. Our analysis on dose variation showed that the dose uniformity ratios in 37 irradiated boxes of 31 radiation batches were in the range of 1.003-1.251, which indicated the doses were well distributed.

  2. Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Pamela E.; Smith, G. Louis; Wilber, Anne C.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the Earth s surface are investigated by use of the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Data Set. Because of the immense difference between the heat capacity of land and ocean, the surface of Earth is partitioned into these two categories. Principal component analysis is used to quantify the annual cycles. Over land, the first principal component describes over 95% of the variance of the annual cycle of the upward and downward longwave fluxes. Over ocean the first term describes more than 87% of these annual cycles. Empirical orthogonal functions show the corresponding geographical distributions of these cycles. Phase plane diagrams of the annual cycles of upward longwave fluxes as a function of net shortwave flux show the thermal inertia of land and ocean.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  4. Annual Cycle of Cloud Forcing of Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    2006-01-01

    The climate of the Earth is determined by its balance of radiation. The incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes are strongly modulated by clouds, which are not well understood. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986) provided data from which the effects of clouds on radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) could be computed (Ramanathan, 1987). At TOA, clouds increase the reflected solar radiation, tending to cool the planet, and decrease the OLR, causing the planet to retain its heat (Ramanathan et al., 1989; Harrison et al., 1990). The effects of clouds on radiation fluxes are denoted cloud forcing. These shortwave and longwave forcings counter each other to various degrees, so that in the tropics the result is a near balance. Over mid and polar latitude oceans, cloud forcing at TOA results in large net loss of radiation. Here, there are large areas of stratus clouds and cloud systems associated with storms. These systems are sensitive to surface temperatures and vary strongly with the annual cycle. During winter, anticyclones form over the continents and move to the oceans during summer. This movement of major cloud systems causes large changes of surface radiation, which in turn drives the surface temperature and sensible and latent heat released to the atmosphere.

  5. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  6. Radiation processing and market economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagórski, Z. P.

    1998-06-01

    In the system of totalitarian economy, regulated by bureaucracy, the real value of equipment, materials and services is almost completely unknown, what makes impossible the comparison of different technologies, eliminates competition, disturbs research and development. With introduction of market economy in Central and Eastern Europe, the radiation processing has lost doubtful support, becoming an independent business, subject to laws of free market economy. Only the most valuable objects of processing have survived that test. At the top of the list are: radiation sterilization of medical equipment and radiation induced crosslinking of polymers, polyethylene in particular. New elements of competition has entered the scene, as well as questions of international regulations and standards have appeared.

  7. Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

    2013-05-07

    In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth's surface that approximately follows the Stefan-Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth's surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called "gain factor," which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth's surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called "cloud radiative forcing" is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model.

  8. Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

    2013-01-01

    In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth’s surface that approximately follows the Stefan–Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth’s surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called “gain factor,” which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth’s surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called “cloud radiative forcing” is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model. PMID:23613585

  9. Apparatus for processing electromagnetic radiation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Measuring apparatus including a ruled member having alternate transparent and opaque zones. An optical coupler connecting the ruled member with electromagnetic radiation-conversion apparatus. The conversion apparatus may include a photomultiplier and a discriminator. Radiation impinging on the ruled member will, in part, be converted to electrical pulses which correspond to the intensity of the radiation. A method of processing electromagnetic radiation includes providing a member having alternating dark and light zones, establishing movement of the member through the beam of electromagnetic radiation with the dark zones interrupting passage of radiation through the rule, providing an optical coupler to connect a portion of the radiation with a conversion station where the radiation portion is converted into an electrical pulse which is related to the intensity of the radiation received at the conversion station. The electrical pulses may be counted and the digitized signals stored or permanently recorded to produce positional information.

  10. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  11. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  12. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  13. Radiation exposures for DOE contractor employees-1988. Twenty-first annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Merwin, S. E.; Millet, W. H.; Traub, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    This report is one of a series of annual reports provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) summarizing occupational radiation exposures received by DOE and DOE contractor employees. These reports provide an overview of radiation exposures received each year and identify trends in exposures being experienced over the years.

  14. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees, 1987. Twentieth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-10-01

    This report is one of series of annual reports provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) summarizing occupational radiation exposures received by DOE and DOE contractor employees. These reports provide an overview of radiation exposures received each year, as well as identification of trends in exposures being experienced over the years. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  15. Radiation Exposures for DOE and DOE Contractor Employees - 1989. Twenty-second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. H.; Eschbach, P. A.; Harty, R.; Millet, W. H.; Scholes, V. A.

    1992-12-01

    This report is one of a series of annual reports provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) summarizing occupational radiation exposures received by DOE and DOE contractor employees. These reports provide an overview of radiation exposures received each year and identify trends in exposures being experienced over the years.

  16. The annual effective dose from natural sources of ionising radiation in Canada.

    PubMed

    Grasty, R L; LaMarre, J R

    2004-01-01

    A review and analysis of published information combined with the results of recent gamma ray surveys were used to determine the annual effective dose to Canadians from natural sources of radiation. The dose due to external radiation was determined from ground gamma ray surveys carried out in the cities of Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Winnipeg and was calculated to be 219 microSv. A compilation of airborne gamma ray data from Canada and the United States shows that there are large variations in external radiation with the highest annual outdoor level of 1424 microSv being found in northern Canada. The annual effective inhalation dose of 926 microSv from 222Rn and 220Rn was calculated from approximately 14,000 measurements across Canada. This value includes a contribution of 128 microSv from 222Rn in the outdoor air together with 6 microSv from long-lived uranium and thorium series radionuclides in dust particles. Based on published information, the annual effective dose due to internal radioactivity is 306 microSv. A program developed by the Federal Aviation Administration was used to calculate a population-weighted annual effective dose from cosmic radiation of 318 microSv. The total population-weighted average annual effective dose to Canadians from all sources of natural background radiation was calculated to be 1769 microSv but varies significantly from city to city, largely due to differences in the inhalation dose from 222Rn.

  17. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Ahmed, Shamshad

    2005-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R&D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described.

  18. Packaging food for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolprasert, Vanee

    2016-12-01

    Irradiation can play an important role in reducing pathogens that cause food borne illness. Food processors and food safety experts prefer that food be irradiated after packaging to prevent post-irradiation contamination. Food irradiation has been studied for the last century. However, the implementation of irradiation on prepackaged food still faces challenges on how to assess the suitability and safety of these packaging materials used during irradiation. Irradiation is known to induce chemical changes to the food packaging materials resulting in the formation of breakdown products, so called radiolysis products (RP), which may migrate into foods and affect the safety of the irradiated foods. Therefore, the safety of the food packaging material (both polymers and adjuvants) must be determined to ensure safety of irradiated packaged food. Evaluating the safety of food packaging materials presents technical challenges because of the range of possible chemicals generated by ionizing radiation. These challenges and the U.S. regulations on food irradiation are discussed in this article.

  19. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees - 1991. Twenty-fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E.; Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A.

    1994-11-01

    This is the 24th annual radiation exposure report published by US DOE and its predecessor agencies. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and COE contractor facilities during 1991. Trends in radiations exposures are evaluated. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimates from expert groups.

  20. Radiation effects in nuclear waste materials. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.; Corrales, L.R.

    1997-06-01

    'The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels of radiation effects in glass and ceramics. This research will provide the underpinning science and models for evaluation and performance assessments of glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposal of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scrap, and excess weapons plutonium. Studies will focus on the effects of ionization and elastic collision interactions on defect production, defect interactions, diffusion, solid-state phase transformations, and gas accumulation using actinide-containing materials, gamma irradiation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of a-decay and p-decay on nuclear waste glasses and ceramics. This program will exploit a variety of structural, optical, and spectroscopic probes to characterize the nature and behavior of the defects, defect aggregates, and phase transforma-tions. Computer simulation techniques will be used to determine defect production, calculate defect stability, defect energies, damage processes within an a-recoil cascade, and defect/gas diffusion and interactions. A number of irradiation facilities and capabilities will be used, including user facilities at several national laboratories, to study the effects of irradiation under different conditions.'

  1. Thermodynamic processes induced by coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown by quantum statistics that under certain stated conditions the entropy of coherent radiation is zero and it is still negligible for multimode laser operation. This makes possible gas kinetic processes which, to a small extent, have already been observed or even utilized, but which can be greatly enhanced by an optimized choice of molecular structures and radiation conditions. Radiative cooling of gases is discussed in detail. The conditions for maximum heat withdrawal are derived, and it is proposed that the processes of cooling and relaxation heating can be sufficiently separated in time to achieve certain effects and thermodynamic cycles. One of these is the complete conversion, possible in principle, of coherent radiation into work. This concept is based on a heat pump process followed by heat-to-work conversion, the heat rejected being just equal to that withdrawn by radiation. The conditions for complete conversion turn out to be the same as for maximum heat withdrawal. The feasibility of these processes depends on the degree to which practical conditions can be met, and on the validity of certain assumptions which have to await experimental verification.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  3. Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Process Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Buckner, Melvin R.

    2005-07-21

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Thermochemical Process is a means of producing hydrogen via water-splitting through a combination of chemical reactions and electrochemistry. Energy is supplied to the system as high temperature heat (approximately 900 C) and electricity. Advanced nuclear reactors (Generation IV) or central solar receivers can be the source of the primary energy. Large-scale hydrogen production based on this process could be a major contributor to meeting the needs of a hydrogen economy. This project's objectives include optimization of the HyS process design, analysis of technical issues and concerns, creation of a development plan, and laboratory-scale proof-of-concept testing. The key component of the HyS Process is the SO2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). Studies were performed that showed that an electrolyzer operating in the range of 500-600 mV per cell can lead to an overall HyS cycle efficiency in excess of 50%, which is superior to all other currently proposed thermochemical cycles. Economic analysis indicated hydrogen production costs of approximately $1.60 per kilogram for a mature nuclear hydrogen production plant. However, in order to meet commercialization goals, the electrolyzer should be capable of operating at high current density, have a long operating lifetime , and have an acceptable capital cost. The use of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) technology, which leverages work for the development of PEM fuel cells, was selected as the most promising route to meeting these goals. The major accomplishments of this project were the design and construction of a suitable electrolyzer test facility and the proof-of-concept testing of a PEM-based SDE.

  4. Benefits of radiation processing to public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampelmacher, E. H.

    The problem of foodborne diseases, in which especially food of animals origin and the infected animal is involved, is reviewed. Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination of meat and poultry may today, together with parasites in meat and fish be considered as an increasing public health problem. Control and prevention measures, especially including radiation processing is summarized and with regard to specific micro-organisms and parasites and to various food commodities suitable for irradiation purposes. The possibilities of this new processing technique for reduction and probably elimination of pathogens and parasites are discussed and recommendations are given for practical application of radiation in order to eliminate health risks eliminating from contaminated food.

  5. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  6. ADVANCED RADIATION THEORY SUPPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2002, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    J. DAVIS; J. APRUZESE; , Y. CHONG; R. CLARK; A. DASGUPTA; J. GIULIANI; P. KEPPLE; R. TERRY; J. THORNHILL; A. VELIKOVICH

    2003-05-01

    Z-PINCH PHYSICS RADIATION FROM WIRE ARRAYS. This report describes the theory support of DTRA's Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) program carried out by NRL's Radiation Hydrodynamics Branch (Code 6720) in FY 2002. Included is work called for in DTRA MIPR 02-2045M - ''Plasma Radiation Theory Support'' and in DOE's Interagency Agreement DE-AI03-02SF22562 - ''Spectroscopic and Plasma Theory Support for Sandia National Laboratories High Energy Density Physics Campaign''. Some of this year's work was presented at the Dense Z-Pinches 5th International Conference held June 23-28 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A common theme of many of these presentations was a demonstration of the importance of correctly treating the radiation physics for simulating Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) load behavior and diagnosing load properties, e.g, stagnation temperatures and densities. These presentations are published in the AIP Conference Proceedings and, for reference, they are included in Section 1 of this report. Rather than describe each of these papers in the Executive Summary, they refer to the abstracts that accompany each paper. As a testament to the level of involvement and expertise that the Branch brings to DTRA as well as the general Z-Pinch community, eight first-authored presentations were contributed at this conference as well as a Plenary and an Invited Talk. The remaining four sections of this report discuss subjects either not presented at the conference or requiring more space than allotted in the Proceedings.

  7. Silicon web process development. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.S.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McHugh, J.P.; Hill, F.E.; Skutch, M.E.; Driggers, J.M.; Hopkins, R.H.

    1980-06-30

    During this reporting period significant milestones have been met. A new barrier crucible design which consistently maintains melt stability over long periods of time has been successfully tested and used in long growth runs. The pellet feeder for melt replenishment was operated continuously for growth runs of up to 17 hours (a one day growth cycle). The liquid level sensor comprising a laser/sensor system was operated, performed well, and meets the requirements for maintaining liquid level height during growth and melt replenishment. An automated feedback loop connecting the feed mechanism and the liquid level sensing system was designed and constructed and, during the preparation of this report, operated successfully for 3 1/2 hours demonstrating the feasibility of semi-automated dendritic web growth. The web throughput task has resulted in a demonstration of wider good quality web as well as a demonstration of higher throughput rates. The accomplishments during the report period are described in detail. The economic analysis of the dendritic web process was updated. The sensitivity of the cost of sheet to variations in capital equipment cost and recycling dendrites was calculated; and it was shown that these factors have relatively little impact on sheet cost. An important finding was that dendrites from web which had gone all the way through the solar cell fabrication process, when melted and grown into web, produce crystals which show no degradation in cell efficiency. Material quality remains high and cells made from web grown at the start, during, and the end of a run from a replenished melt show comparable efficiencies.

  8. 40 CFR 35.9015 - Summary of annual process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Summary of annual process. 35.9015 Section 35.9015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Financial Assistance for the National Estuary Program § 35.9015...

  9. 40 CFR 35.9015 - Summary of annual process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Summary of annual process. 35.9015 Section 35.9015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Financial Assistance for the National Estuary Program § 35.9015...

  10. 40 CFR 35.9015 - Summary of annual process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Summary of annual process. 35.9015 Section 35.9015 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Financial Assistance for the National Estuary Program § 35.9015...

  11. Utilisation of Thermal Radiation for Process Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberpals, Jan; Hermann, Tobias; Berger, Peter; Singpiel, Holger

    Particularly the automation of thermal material processing makes high demands on monitoring and controlling the resulting quality. A new promising approach is the utilisation of the emitted thermal radiation to get detailed information about temperature distributions and geometrical structures. Indeed, current laser systems with strong focusability exhibit a high innovation potential in many application ranges, for example the possibility of adjusting the welding depth to even small material thicknesses. However, the usability of these advantages is limited because the suitable process windows are considerably constricted at increased welding speed. Therefore, a reliable monitoring of thermal material processing is of vital importance.

  12. Evaluation of 20-min and Annual Radiation Budget Components and Cloudiness in a Mountainous Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, E.

    2007-05-01

    Logan, Utah (USA) is among cities located in the mountainous valley in the western portion of Rocky Mountains in North America. It is the county seat of Cache Valley, a metropolitan area with a population of about 100,000. The valley had the polluted air in the USA during January 2004. To evaluate the daily and annual radiation budget and cloudiness in this mountainous valley, we set up a radiation station in the middle of the valley to measure the 20- min radiation budget components namely: incoming (Rso) and outgoing (Rso) solar or shortwave radiation, using to CM21 Kipp and Zonen (one inverted) and incoming (Rli) (or atmospheric) and outgoing (Rlo) or terrestrial) longwave radiation using two CG1 Kipp and Zonen Pyrgeometers (one inverted) during the year of 2003. All pyranometers and Pyrgeometers were ventilated with four CV2 Kipp and Zonen ventilation systems throughout the year to prevent deposition of dew, frost and snow, which otherwise would disturb the measurements. We also measured the 2-m air temperature and relative humidity along with surface temperature. All measurements were taken every 2 s, averaged to 20 min, continuously throughout the year 2000. A Met One heated rain gauge measured precipitation. Comparison of the annual radiation budget components indicates that about 25% of the annual Rsi (5848.6 MJ/ (squared m-y)) was reflected back to sky as Rso. Rli and Rlo amounted to 9968.7 and 13303.5 MJ/ (squared m-y)), respectively. This yielded about 1364.9 MJ/ (squared m- y)) available energy (Rn). Having the 2-m air temperature and moisture data and comparison between the theoretical and the measured longwave radiation, we evaluated the 20-m cloudy conditions throughout the year of 2003. The average cloud base height was 587 m (ranged from zero for foggy conditions to about 3000 m). Annual cloudiness contributed about 139.1 MJ/ (squared m-y)) more energy in this valley.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  14. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  15. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  16. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomson, Teolan

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies dynamic processes of fast-alternating solar radiation which are assessed by alternation of clouds. Most attention is devoted to clouds of type Cumulus Humilis, identified through visual recognition and/or a specially constructed automatic sensor. One second sampling period was used. Recorded data series were analyzed with regard to duration of illuminated 'windows' between shadows, their stochastic intervals, fronts and the magnitude of increments of solar irradiance. (author)

  17. Annual cycle of radiation fluxes over the Arctic ocean: Sensitivity to cloud optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A. ); Ebert, E.E. )

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes are derived. Existing data on cloud fraction and cloud microphysical properties are utilized. Four types of cloud are considered: low stratus clouds, midlevel clouds, citrus clouds, and wintertime ice crystal precipitation. Internally consistent annual cycles of surface temperature, surface albedo, cloud fraction and cloud optical properties, components of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes, and cloud radiative forcing are presented. The modeled total cloud optical depth (weighted by cloud fraction) ranges from a low value in winter of 2 to a high summertime value of 8. Infrared emmissivities for liquid water clouds are shown to be substantially less than unity during the cold half of the year. Values of modeled surface cloud radiative forcing are positive except for two weeks in midsummer; over the course of the year clouds have a net warming effect on the surface in the Arctic. Total cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere is determined to be positive only briefly in early autumn. Surface longwave fluxes are shown to be very sensitive to the presence of lower-tropospheric ice crystal precipitation during the cold half of the year.

  18. Industrial uses of radiation processing in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, J. P.

    Since 1979, the Irradiation Department of IRE, in conjunction with universities and the industrial sector, has set up an extensive programme of research, development and promotion of the radiation process applied to cross-linking and polymerization of plastics, to waste treatment and to food preservation. Starting from scratch, it is thanks to our research in this last-mentioned field that we have been able to develop and to increase the application of the irradiation process within the food industry. At present, two irradiation facilities of a total design capacity of 2.5 10 6 Ci irradiate 24 hours per day mostly for the agro-industry.

  19. Cloud contribution to the daily and annual radiation budget in a mountainous valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Esmaiel

    An automated-ventilated radiation station has been set up in a mountainous valley at the Logan Airport in northern Utah, USA, since mid-1995, to evaluate the daily and annual radiation budget components, and develop an algorithm to study cloudiness and its contribution to the daily and annual radiation. This radiation station (composed of pyranometers, pyrgeometers and a net radiometer) provides continuous measurements of downward and upward shortwave, longwave and net radiation throughout the year. The surface temperature and pressure, the 2-m air temperature and humidity, precipitation, and wind at this station were also measured. A heated rain gauge provided precipitation information. Using air temperature and moisture and measured downward longwave (atmospheric) radiation, appropriate formula (among four approaches) was chosen for computation of cloudless-skies atmospheric emissivity. Considering the additional longwave radiation during the cloudy skies coming from the cloud in the waveband which the gaseous emission lacks (from 8-13 μm), an algorithm was developed which provides continuous 20-min cloud information (cloud base height, cloud base temperature, percent of skies covered by cloud, and cloud contribution to the radiation budget) over the area during day and night. On the partly-cloudy day of 3 February, 2003, for instance, cloud contributed 1.34 MJ m - 2 d - 1 out of 26.92 MJ m - 2 d - 1 to the daily atmospheric radiation. On the overcast day of 18 December, 2003, this contribution was 5.77 MJ m - 2 d - 1 out of 29.38 MJ m - 2 d - 1 . The same contribution for the year 2003 amounted to 402.85 MJ m - 2 y - 1 out of 9976.08 MJ m - 2 y - 1 . Observations (fog which yielded a zero cloud base height and satellite cloud imaging data) throughout the year confirmed the validity of the computed data. The nearby Bowen ratio station provided the downward radiation and net radiation data. If necessary, these data could be substituted for the missing data at the

  20. Radiation and Photochemistry Section annual report, October 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    The research described in this survey is a study of transient intermediates and chemistry induced by energetic radiation in the condensed phase. The survey is presented in two major parts: the first one studies ions, excited states, and other transients in the condensed phase; the second one studies the role of solvents in chemical reactivity. Some highlights of the past year were observations of ion-molecule reactions of excited aromatic cations via flash photolysis and transient dc conductivity; anion solvation study revealing role of solvent molecular structure; zeolite matrix study of C{sub 7}H{sub 8} radical cation chemistry; and H atom reaction with O{sub 2}, I{sup {minus}}, and comparison of diffusion of H, D, and muonium in ice. Refs, 25 figs, 5 tabs.

  1. Public relations and the radiation processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, T. Donna

    The world's uneasiness and mistrust regarding anything nuclear has heightened in recent years due to events such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. Opinion polls and attitude surveys document the public's growing concern about issues such as the depletion of the ozone layer, the resulting greenhouse effect and exposure of our planet to cosmic radiation. Ultimately, such research reveals an underlying fear regarding the unseen impacts of modern technology on the environment and on human health. These concerns have obvious implications for the radiation processing industry, whose technology is nuclear based and not easily understood by the public. We have already seen organized nuclear opponents mobilize public anxiety, fear and misunderstanding in order to oppose the installation of radiation processing facilities and applications such as food irradiation. These opponents will no doubt try to strengthen resistance to our technology in the future. Opponents will attempt to convince the public that the risks to public and personal health and safety outweigh the benefits of our technology. We in the industry must head off any tendency for the public to see us as the "enemy". Our challenge is to counter public uneasiness and misunderstanding by effectively communicating the human benefits of our technology. Clearly it is a challenge we cannot afford to ignore.

  2. Processes linking the hydrological cycle and the atmospheric radiative budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fueglistaler, Stephan; Dinh, Tra

    2016-04-01

    We study the response of the strength of the global hydrological cycle to changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) using the HiRAM General Circulation Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), with the objective to better connect the well-known energetic constraints to physical processes. We find that idealized model setups using a global slab ocean and annual mean insolation give similar scalings as coupled atmosphere-ocean models with realistic land and topography. Using the surface temperatures from the slab ocean runs, we analyse the response in the atmospheric state and hydrological cycle separately for a change in CO2 (but fixed surface temperature), and for a change in surface temperature (but fixed CO2). The former perturbation is also referred to as the "fast" response, whereas the latter is commonly used to diagnose a model's climate sensitivity. As expected from the perspective of the atmospheric radiative budget, an increase in CO2 at fixed surface temperature decreases the strength of the hydrological cycle, and an increase in surface temperature increases the strength of the hydrological cycle. However, the physical processes that connect the atmospheric radiative energy budget to the sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface remain not well understood. The responses to the two perturbations are linearly additive, and we find that the experiment with fixed surface temperature and changes in CO2 is of great relevance to understanding the total response. This result points to the importance of local radiative heating rate changes rather than just the net atmospheric radiative loss of energy. Although larger in magnitude, the response to changes in surface temperature is dominated by the temperature dependence of the water vapor pressure, but in both cases changes in near-surface relative humidity are very important.

  3. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  4. Processing circuitry for single channel radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D. (Inventor); Delaune, Paul B. (Inventor); Turner, Kathryn M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Processing circuitry is provided for a high voltage operated radiation detector. An event detector utilizes a comparator configured to produce an event signal based on a leading edge threshold value. A preferred event detector does not produce another event signal until a trailing edge threshold value is satisfied. The event signal can be utilized for counting the number of particle hits and also for controlling data collection operation for a peak detect circuit and timer. The leading edge threshold value is programmable such that it can be reprogrammed by a remote computer. A digital high voltage control is preferably operable to monitor and adjust high voltage for the detector.

  5. Estimation of annual occupational effective doses from external ionizing radiation at medical institutions in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korir, Geoffrey; Wambani, Jeska; Korir, Ian

    2011-04-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses due to occupational radiation exposure among radiation workers from participating medical institutions in Kenya, where monthly dose measurements were collected for a period of one year ranging from January to December in 2007. A total of 367 medical radiation workers were monitored using thermoluminescent dosemeters. They included radiologists (27%), oncologists (2%), dentists (4%), Physicists (5%), technologists (45%), nurses (4%), film processor technicians (3%), auxiliary staff (4%), and radiology office staff (5%). The average annual effective dose of all categories of staff was found to range from 1.19 to 2.52 mSv. This study formed the initiation stage of wider, comprehensive and more frequent monitoring of occupational radiation exposures and long-term investigations into its accumulation patterns in our country.

  6. Factors determining the viability of radiation processing in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linde, HJ; Basson, RA

    In the fifteen years since the introduction of radiation processing to South Africa, four commercial irradiation facilities have been established. These are involved in the processing of a large variety of products, from syringes and prostheses to strawberries and sugar yeast. Three of the facilities are devoted mainly to food irradiation and several thousand tonnes are now processed annually. During this period it was repeatedly experienced that the successful introduction of radiation processing in general, and food radurization in particular, on a commercial scale was critically dependent on the following factors: acceptance by the producer, industry and consumer; initial capital expenditure; running costs and overheads in general; and continous throughput. All of these factors contribute to the processing cost which is the ultimate factor in determing the value/price ratio for the potential entrepreneur and customer of this new technology. After a market survey had identified the need for a new food irradiation facility to cope with the growing interest in commercial food radurization in the Western Cape, the above-mentioned factors were of cardinal importance in the design and manufacture of a new irradiator. The resulting batch-pallet facility which was commisioned in August 1986, is rather inefficient as far as energy utilization is concerned but this shortcoming is compensated for by its low cost, versatility and low hold-up. Although the facility has limitations as far as the processing of really large volumes of produce is concerned, it is particularly suitable not only for developing countries, but for developed countries in the introductory phase of commercial food radurization.

  7. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees, 1990. Twenty-third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E.; Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A.

    1994-03-01

    This is the 23rd in a series of annual radiation exposure reports published by the Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and DOE contractor facilities during 1990. Trends in radiation exposures are evaluated by comparing the doses received in 1990 to those received in previous years. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimated from expert groups. This report is the third that is based on detailed exposure data for each individual monitored at a DOE facility. Prior to 1988, only summarized data from each facility were available. This report contains information on different types of radiation doses, including total effective, internal, penetrating, shallow, neutron, and extremity doses. It also contains analysis of exposures by age, sex, and occupation of the exposed individuals. This report also continues the precedent established in the Twenty-First (1988) Annual Report by conducting a detailed, one-time review and analysis of a particular topic of interest. The special topic for this report is a comparison of total effective, internal, and extremity dose equivalent values against penetrating dose equivalent values.

  8. Thermodynamic models of radiation-induced processes in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Eremin, E. N.; Kasymov, S. S.; Laurinas, V. CH; Chernyavskii, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is proposed to qualitatively describe the radiation-induced processes in solids: temperature dependence of the X-ray radio luminescence output, dependence of these processes on the excitation density, energy accumulating in a solid under exposure to ionizing radiation and its temperature dependence. The proposed model and the formula derived can be used to develop radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive materials.

  9. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  10. Effects of Cloudiness on the Daily and Annual Radiation Balance: Elaboration on the Shartwave and Longwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, E.

    2007-12-01

    (atmospheric) radiation shows the cloud (if any) contribution to the radiation budget. The results indicate that for the partial cloudy day of 6 April, 2005, cloudiness caused less shortwave radiation 23.29 - 13.76 = 9.53 MJ m-2 d-1 received at the surface. On the same day cloud contributed an additional radiation of 25.44 - 23.44 = 2.00 MJ m-2 d-1. On 29 November, 2005, these values were 9.37 - 1.98 = 7.39 and 28.82 - 23.86 = 4.96 MJ m-2 d-1, respectively. On the annual basis, the 2005 cloudiness caused a reduction of 7279 - 5800 = 1479 MJ m-2 y-1 for the shortwave radiation, while the additional longwave radiation due to cloudiness amounted to 9976 - 9573 = 403 MJ m-2 y-1. The cloudiness in 2005 caused a negative feedback on the climate in this valley.

  11. Radiation processing and functional properties of soybean ( Glycine max)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pednekar, Mrinal; Das, Amit K.; Rajalakshmi, V.; Sharma, Arun

    2010-04-01

    Effect of radiation processing (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on soybean for better utilization was studied. Radiation processing reduced the cooking time of soybean and increased the oil absorption capacity of soy flour without affecting its proximate composition. Irradiation improved the functional properties like solubility, emulsification activity and foam stability of soybean protein isolate. The value addition effect of radiation processing has been discussed for the products (soy milk, tofu and tofu fortified patties) prepared from soybean.

  12. 16 CFR 610.3 - Streamlined process for requesting annual file disclosures from nationwide specialty consumer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT FREE ANNUAL FILE DISCLOSURES § 610.3 Streamlined process for requesting annual file disclosures from nationwide specialty consumer reporting... specialty consumer reporting agency only: (1) To provide the annual file disclosure or other...

  13. Radiation hardened PMOS process with ion implanted threshold adjust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.

    1979-01-01

    By including specific process modifications the effect of ion implantation on radiation hardness can be minimized and radiation hard ion implanted MOS circuits can be fabricated. The experimental procedure followed was to examine key processing steps (with respect to radiation hardness) on ion-implanted individual PMOS transistors. The individual transistors were evaluated by continuously monitoring the threshold voltage as the transistors were being irradiated. By comparing runs it was possible to deduce what is considered a radiation hard ion implanted process. Tests with a complex LSI PMOS IC processor chip containing over 2000 transistors and resistors were also conducted

  14. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes simple electrical circuits, showing that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decay of atoms. Compares a two-circuit electrical system with a two-level atom. (MLH)

  15. Reporting of Uncertainty at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. Robert

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is designed to disseminate new scientific findings and technical advances to professionals. Best practices of scientific dissemination require that some level of uncertainty (or imprecision) is provided. Methods and Materials: A total of 279 scientific abstracts were selected for oral presentation in a clinical session at the 2013 ASTRO Annual Meeting. A random sample of these abstracts was reviewed to determine whether a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) or analogous measure of precision was provided for time-to-event analyses. Results: A sample of 140 abstracts was reviewed. Of the 65 abstracts with Kaplan-Meier or cumulative incidence analyses, 6 included some measure of precision (6 of 65 = 9%; 95% CI, 2-16). Of the 43 abstracts reporting ratios for time-to-event analyses (eg, hazard ratio, risk ratio), 22 included some measure of precision (22 of 43 = 51%; 95% CI, 36-66). Conclusions: Measures of precision are not provided in a significant percentage of abstracts selected for oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of ASTRO.

  16. Radiation processing of minimally processed vegetables and aromatic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, M. J.; Sousa, M. B.; Sapata, M. M.; Ferreira, A.; Curado, T.; Andrada, L.; Botelho, M. L.; Veloso, M. G.

    2009-07-01

    Vegetables are an essential part of people's diet all around the world. Due to cultivate techniques and handling after harvest, these products, may contain high microbial load that can cause food borne outbreaks. The irradiation of minimally processed vegetables is an efficient way to reduce the level of microorganisms and to inhibit parasites, helping a safe global trade. Evaluation of the irradiation's effects was carried out in minimal processed vegetables, as coriander ( Coriandrum sativum L .), mint ( Mentha spicata L.), parsley ( Petroselinum crispum Mill, (A.W. Hill)), lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) and watercress ( Nasturium officinale L.). The inactivation level of natural microbiota and the D 10 values of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria innocua in these products were determined. The physical-chemical and sensorial characteristics before and after irradiation at a range of 0.5 up to 2.0 kGy applied doses were also evaluated. No differences were verified in the overall of sensorial and physical properties after irradiation up to 1 kGy, a decrease of natural microbiota was noticed (⩾2 log). Based on the determined D10, the amount of radiation necessary to kill 10 5E. coli and L. innocua was between 0.70 and 1.55 kGy. Shelf life of irradiated coriander, mint and lettuce at 0.5 kGy increased 2, 3 and 4 days, respectively, when compared with non-irradiated.

  17. An assessment of annual whole-body occupational radiation exposure in Ireland (1996-2005).

    PubMed

    Colgan, P A; Currivan, L; Fenton, D

    2008-01-01

    Whole-body occupational exposure to artificial radiation sources in Ireland for the years 1996-2005 has been reviewed. Dose data have been extracted from the database of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, which contains data on >95% of monitored workers. The data have been divided into three sectors: medical, industrial and education/research. Data on exposure to radon in underground mines and show caves for the years 2001-05 are also presented. There has been a continuous increase in the number of exposed workers from 5980 in 1996 to 9892 in 2005. Over the same time period, the number of exposed workers receiving measurable doses has decreased from 676 in 1996 to 189 in 2005 and the collective dose has also decreased from 227.1 to 110.3 man millisievert (man mSv). The collective dose to workers in the medical sector has consistently declined over the 10-y period of the study while that attributable to the industrial sector has remained reasonably static. In the education/research sector, the collective dose typically represents 5% or less of the total collective dose from all practices. Over the 10 y of the study, a total of 77 914 annual dose records have been accumulated, but only 4040 (<6%) of these represent measurable radiation doses in any given year. Over the same time period, there were 283 instances in which exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv and 21 of these exceeded 5 mSv. Most of the doses >1 mSv were received by individuals working in diagnostic radiology (which also includes interventional radiology) in hospitals and site industrial radiography. There has been only one instance of a dose above the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Evaluating the data for the period 2001-05 separately, the average annual collective dose from the medical, industrial and educational/research sectors are approximately 60, 70 and 2 man mSv with the average dose per exposed worker who received a measurable dose being 0.32, 0.79 and 0.24 m

  18. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination second annual report, July 1, 1985--June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.L.

    1996-06-30

    This is the second annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, to replace the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET) and reports to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Executive Office of the President. Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy. During CIRRPC`s second year, the member agencies have called upon this interagency resource to assist in coordinating science and policy issues and to provide a vehicle to accomplish multiagency tasks.

  19. Process of Coping with Radiation Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jean E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of informational intervention entailing objective descriptions of experience on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy among 84 men with prostate cancer. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of…

  20. 16 CFR 610.3 - Streamlined process for requesting annual file disclosures from nationwide specialty consumer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT FREE ANNUAL FILE DISCLOSURES § 610.3... have a streamlined process for accepting and processing consumer requests for annual file disclosures... specialty consumer reporting agency and with the Federal Trade Commission; and (C) In the event that...

  1. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-01

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  2. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-19

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  3. Annual and interannual variations of Earth-emitted radiation based on a 10-year data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bess, T. Dale; Smith, G. Louis; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rose, Fred G.

    1989-01-01

    The method of empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) was applied to a 10-year data set of outgoing longwave radiation. Spherical harmonic functions are used as a basis set for producing equal area map results. The following findings are noted. The first EOF accounts for 66 percent of the variance. After that, each EOF accounts for only a small variance, forming a slowly converging series. The first two EOF's describe mainly the annual cycle. The third EOF is primarily the semiannual cycle although many other EOF's also contain significant semiannual parts. These results reaffirm those based on a shorter data set. In addition, a much stronger spring/fall mode was found in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean for the second EOF than was found earlier. This difference is attributed to the use of broadband radiometer data which were available for the present study. The earlier study used data from a window channel instrument which is not as sensitive to water vapor variations. The fourth EOF describes much of the 1976 to 1977 and 1982 to 1983 ENSO phenomena. There is typically a gap in the spectrum between a semiannual peak and the annual cycle for all but the first EOF. A semiannual OLR dipole straddles the Asian-Australian monsoon track.

  4. Reaction of runaway electron distributions to radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Adam; Embréus, Ola; Hirvijoki, Eero; Pusztai, István; Decker, Joan; Newton, Sarah L.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2015-11-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by a charged particle in accelerated motion is associated with a reduction in its energy, accounted for by the inclusion of a radiation reaction force in the kinetic equation. For runaway electrons in plasmas, the dominant radiative processes are the emission of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. In this contribution, we investigate the impact of the associated radiation reaction forces on the runaway electron distribution, using both analytical and numerical studies, and discuss the corresponding change to the runaway electron growth rate, which can be substantial. We also report on the formation of non-monotonic features in the runaway electron tail as a consequence of the more complicated momentum-space dynamics in the presence of radiation reaction.

  5. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  6. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  7. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE I) 2000 ANNUAL REPORT, NUMBER 242

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the Third Annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the area of research of clean products and processes, life cycle analysis, computer tools and pollution prevention.

  8. 50 CFR 648.96 - Monkfish annual adjustment process and framework specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monkfish annual adjustment process and... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.96 Monkfish annual... (including the CV-based performance standard, fishery stratification, and/or reports), or other...

  9. NATO CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES -(PHASE I) - 2002 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The annual report summarizes the activities of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study on clean products and processes for 2002, including the proceedings of the 2002 annual meeting held in Vilnius, Lithuania. The report presents a wealth of information on cleaner production activities in ove...

  10. Meeting the Needs of the Nation for Radiation Protection: Summary of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toohey, Richard E

    2017-02-01

    The 52nd Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) was held in Bethesda, MD, 11-12 April 2016, on the topic of "Meeting National Needs for Radiation Protection." This meeting was an outgrowth of the NCRP initiative "Where are the Radiation Professionals?" (WARP), which addresses looming shortages in professional personnel trained in the radiological disciplines, including but not limited to health physics, radiological engineering, radiobiology, radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation emergency response; and the medical disciplines of diagnostic and interventional radiology, radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, and medical physics. A shortage of radiation professionals has been predicted for at least 20 y but now seems to be imminent. Obviously radiation professionals are needed for regulatory responsibilities at both state and federal levels, national defense, energy production, waste management, industrial applications, education, and medicine. Although the supply of radiation professionals in medicine appears to be adequate for the next decade or so, the use of radiation in medical diagnosis and therapy will continue to increase with the aging of the general population.

  11. A basic interpretation of the technical language of radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeley, Catherine M.

    2004-09-01

    For the food producer contemplating the purchase of radiation processing equipment the task of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the available technologies, electron beam (E-beam), X-ray and gamma, to determine the best option for their application, is onerous. Not only is the level of investment daunting but also, to be sure of comparing like with like, the evaluator requires a basic understanding of the science underpinning radiation processing. There have been many papers published that provide technical specialists with a rigorous interpretation of this science (In: Gaughran, E.R.L., Goudie, A.J. (Eds.), Technical Developments and Prospects of Sterilization by Ionizing Radiation, International Conference, Vienna. Multiscience Publications Ltd., pp. 145-172). The objective for this paper is to give non-specialists an introduction to the language of radiation processing and to clarify some of the terminology associated with the use of radioactive sources for this application.

  12. Influence of radiation processing of grapes on wine quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sumit; Padole, Rupali; Variyar, Prasad S.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    Grapes (Var. Shiraz and Cabernet) were subjected to radiation processing (up to 2 kGy) and wines were prepared and matured (4 months, 15 °C). The wines were analyzed for chromatic characteristics, total anthocyanin (TA), phenolic (TP) and total antioxidant (TAC) content. Aroma of wines was analyzed by GC/MS and sensory analysis was carried out using descriptive analysis. TA, TP and TAC were 77, 31 and 37 percent higher for irradiated (1500 Gy) Cabernet wines, while irradiated Shiraz wines demonstrated 47, 18 and 19 percent higher TA, TP and TAC, respectively. HPLC-DAD analysis revealed that radiation processing of grapes resulted in increased extraction of phenolic constituents in wine with no qualitative changes. No major radiation induced changes were observed in aroma constituents of wine. Sensory analysis revealed that 1500 Gy irradiated samples had higher fruity and berry notes. Thus, radiation processing of grapes resulted in wines with improved organoleptic and antioxidant properties.

  13. Critical review of radiation processing of hydrogel and polysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuuchi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Radiation processing of an aqueous solution of polymer initiated by rad OH radicals formed by radiolysis of water is applied for preparation of hydrogel wound dressing and plant growth promoter. Recently, Fenton reagent that generates rad OH radicals was successfully applied to synthesize PVP hydrogel. The Fenton reaction also can be applied to the depolymerization of chitosan. These progresses in the syntheses of hydrogel and oligo-chitosan by radiation and non-radiation methods such as hydrolysis, oxidative degradation, photolysis, sonolysis and degradation by microwave are reviewed to survey a possibility to reduce the costs of production. Radiation synthesized hydrogel should target value-added medical products because only radiation can crosslink and sterilize simultaneously. Oligo-chitosan can be produced economically by irradiation of solid chitin by Fenton reagent, if necessary.

  14. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and..., PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may...

  15. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and..., PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may...

  16. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and..., PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may...

  17. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and..., PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may...

  18. Food processors requirements met by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Raymond W.

    2002-03-01

    Processing food using irradiation provides significant advantages to food producers by destroying harmful pathogens and extending shelf life without any detectable physical or chemical changes. It is expected that through increased public education, food irradiation will emerge as a viable commercial industry. Food production in most countries involves state of the art manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and shipping techniques that provides maximum efficiency and profit. In the United States, food sales are extremely competitive and profit margins small. Most food producers have heavily invested in equipment and are hesitant to modify their equipment. Meat and poultry producers in particular utilize sophisticated production machinery that processes enormous volumes of product on a continuous basis. It is incumbent on the food irradiation equipment suppliers to develop equipment that can easily merge with existing processes without requiring major changes to either the final food product or the process utilized to produce that product. Before a food producer can include irradiation as part of their food production process, they must be certain the available equipment meets their needs. This paper will examine several major requirements of food processors that will most likely have to be provided by the supplier of the irradiation equipment.

  19. Modeling of clouds and radiation for developing parameterizations for general circulation models. Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B.; Westphal, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    We have used a hierarchy of numerical models for cirrus and stratus clouds and for radiative transfer to improve the reliability of general circulation models. Our detailed cloud microphysical model includes all of the physical processes believed to control the lifecycles of liquid and ice clouds in the troposphere. We have worked on specific GCM parameterizations for the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, making use of a mesocale model as the test-bed for the parameterizations. We have also modeled cirrus cloud properties with a detailed cloud physics model to better understand how the radiatively important properties of cirrus are controlled by their environment. We have used another cloud microphysics model to investigate of the interactions between aerosols and clouds. This work is some of the first to follow the details of interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets and has shown some unexpected relations between clouds and aerosols. We have also used line-by- line radiative transfer results verified with ARM data, to derive a GCMS.

  20. On possibility of diamond formations in radiation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Bolsheva, L. N.; Grachjova, T. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes was checked by studying diamond contents in carburanium sample. The diamonds were not found and this result is discussed. At present one possible process of formation of nanometer-size diamond crystals in some meteorites and Earth's diamonds (carbonado), the radiation mechanism, is suggested: the formation of diamonds from carbonaceous matter in tracks of U fragment fissions and heavy fragmentation due to the action of energetic particles of cosmic rays. Bjakov et. al. have carried out the calculations and shown that the volume of formed diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites by radiation processes corresponds to discovery of diamond volume in chondrites. The discovery by Ozima et. al. of the unsupported fission of Xe and Kr in carbonado supports the supposition that carbonado could be formed by radiation processes. The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes leads to the study of diamond contents in Earth's samples enriched by uranium and carbon. The attempt to release the diamonds from carburanium was undertaken.

  1. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and... Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may be safely used under the...

  2. The broad base of radiation processing using cobalt-60 in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransohoff, J. A.

    Only recently, an integrated, highly interdependent radiation processing industry based on the use of cobalt-60 has become established in the United States. The principal participants include nearly all the suppliers of disposable medical supplies, several major chemical companies, several privately owned corporations of modest size, the Crown Corporation of a foreign government, and several hundred firms which purchase radiation processing service. The total investment in radiation processing plant and equipment is on the order of fifty million dollars, and the annual retail value of products processed is in the many hundreds of millions of dollars. In all there are twenty-six process irradiators operating in fourteen different states, utilizing nearly twenty million Curies of cobalt-60. Sixteen of these systems are owned and operated by companies which process their own products more or less exclusively. The other ten are owned and operated by six different contract processors who produce and sell little if any product of their own manufacture. The successful efforts of the industry to develop new products and processes are supplemented by the activities of dozens of corporate, government and university research and test facilities located throughout the country. Several firms have designed and constructed viable radiation processing plants, and among the operating medical supply irradiators, there are four different types of conveying mechanism that have proven to be viable. There are two established suppliers of cobalt-60 sources in the megacurie range. Based upon the number of new plants that have been announced, ordered and are under construction, the base appears to be growing at the rate of about 20 percent per year, and many of the existing plants are experiencing increased utilization.

  3. Development of a radiation-hard CMOS process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is recommended that various techniques be investigated which appear to have the potential for improving the radiation hardness of CMOS devices for prolonged space flight mission. The three key recommended processing techniques are: (1) making the gate oxide thin. It has been shown that radiation degradation is proportional to the cube of oxide thickness so that a relatively small reduction in thickness can greatly improve radiation resistance; (2) cleanliness and contamination control; and (3) to investigate different oxide growth (low temperature dry, TCE and HCL). All three produce high quality clean oxides, which are more radiation tolerant. Technique 2 addresses the reduction of metallic contamination. Technique 3 will produce a higher quality oxide by using slow growth rate conditions, and will minimize the effects of any residual sodium contamination through the introduction of hydrogen and chlorine into the oxide during growth.

  4. International cooperative effort to establish dosimetry standardization for radiation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, H. IV

    1989-01-01

    Radiation processing is a rapidly developing technology with numerous applications in food treatment, sterilization, and polymer modification. The effectiveness of the process depends, however, on the proper application of dose and its measurement. These aspects are being considered by a wide group of experts from around the world who have joined together to write a comprehensive set of standards for dosimetry for radiation processing. Originally formed in 1984 to develop standards for food processing dosimetry, the group has now expanded into a full subcommittee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), with 97 members from 19 countries. The scope of the standards now includes dosimetry for all forms of radiation processing. The group has now completed and published four standards, and is working on an additional seven. Three are specifically for food applications and the others are for all radiation applications, including food processing. Together, this set of standards will specify acceptable guidelines and methods for accomplishing the required irradiation treatment, and will be available for adoption by national regulatory agencies in their procedures and protocols. 1 tab.

  5. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved.

  6. Effectiveness of radiation processing for elimination of Salmonella Typhimurium from minimally processed pineapple (Ananas comosus Merr.).

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Dhokane, Varsha S; Hajare, Sachin N; Sharma, Arun; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2007-04-01

    The microbiological quality of market samples of minimally processed (MP) pineapple was examined. The effectiveness of radiation treatment in eliminating Salmonella Typhimurium from laboratory inoculated ready-to-eat pineapple slices was also studied. Microbiological quality of minimally processed pineapple samples from Mumbai market was poor; 8.8% of the samples were positive for Salmonella. D(10) (the radiation dose required to reduce bacterial population by 90%) value for S. Typhimurium inoculated in pineapple was 0.242 kGy. Inoculated pack studies in minimally processed pineapple showed that the treatment with a 2-kGy dose of gamma radiation could eliminate 5 log CFU/g of S. Typhimurium. The pathogen was not detected from radiation-processed samples up to 12 d during storage at 4 and 10 degrees C. The processing of market samples with 1 and 2 kGy was effective in improving the microbiological quality of these products.

  7. Topographic Slope, Solar Radiation and Land Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosor, A. L.; Hahmann, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    The Earth's surface is composed of non-uniform terrain, which partially controls the amount of incident radiation available at the surface and in turn controls its regional vegetation cover and its hydrological and ecological processes. A complete treatment of the physical mechanisms that determine a region's climate should include a detailed description of its land surface processes. The processes associated with net solar radiation and surface water movements are sensitive to the degree to which the surface slope and aspect are approximated. Therefore, a careful representation of land surface-atmosphere transfer interactions requires the terrain to be viewed as separate homogenous sub-regions of different slope and aspect, particularly over complex terrain. This study describes a mathematical representation of the surface topography developed to provide an aggregated measure of the radiative effects on inclined terrain. We have obtained a "radiative equivalent" topography (i.e., elevation, slope, and aspect), for use as boundary conditions to a fine-mesh land model coupled to the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3). Using the data sets developed at the U.S Geological Survey Data Center (at 1 km resolution), we have derived aggregated slopes and aspects at the 0.5 o x 0.5 o fine-mesh resolution. The aggregated slopes and aspects are used in an off-line test using BATS for the Arizona region. This test indicates considerable differences in the latent and sensible heat fluxes between the "flat" terrain simulation and that where slopes and azimuths are considered in the computation of the incident solar radiation. This poster will present the results of a more complete test of the effects of incorporating the effective incident solar radiation of inclined surfaces on the climate. In particular, the effects on snow hydrology over the Western United States will be explored.

  8. The Iron Project:. Radiative Atomic Processes in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical objects, such as, stars, galaxies, blackhole environments, etc are studied through their spectra produced by various atomic processes in their plasmas. The positions, shifts, and strengths of the spectral lines provide information on physical processes with elements in all ionization states, and various diagnostics for temperature, density, distance, etc of these objects. With presence of a radiative source, such as a star, the astrophysical plasma is dominated by radiative atomic processes such as photoionization, electron-ion recombination, bound-bound transitions or photo-excitations and de-excitations. The relevant atomic parameters, such as photoionization cross sections, electron-ion recombination rate coefficients, oscillator strengths, radiative transition rates, rates for dielectronic satellite lines etc are needed to be highly accurate for precise diagnostics of physical conditions as well as accurate modeling, such as, for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. This report illustrates detailed features of radiative atomic processes obtained from accurate ab initio methods of the latest developments in theoretical quantum mechanical calculations, especially under the international collaborations known as the Iron Project (IP) and the Opacity Project (OP). These projects aim in accurate study of radiative and collsional atomic processes of all astrophysically abundant atoms and ions, from hydrogen to nickel, and calculate stellar opacities and have resulted in a large number of atomic parameters for photoionization and radiative transition probabilities. The unified method, which is an extension of the OP and the IP, is a self-consistent treatment for the total electron-ion recombination and photoionization. It incorporates both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination processes and provides total recombination rates and level-specific recombination rates for hundreds of levels for a wide range of

  9. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  10. Radiation processing applications in the Czechoslovak water treatment technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, K.; Pastuszek, F.; Sedláček, M.

    The regeneration of biologically clogged water wells by radiation proved to be a successful and economically beneficial process among other promising applications of ionizing radiation in the water supply technology. The application conditions and experience are mentioned. The potential pathogenic Mycobacteria occuring in the warm washing and bathing water are resistant against usual chlorine and ozone concentrations. The radiation sensitivity of Mycobacteria allowed to suggest a device for their destroying by radiation. Some toxic substances in the underground water can be efficiently degraded by gamma radiation directly in the wells drilled as a hydraulic barrier surrounding the contaminated land area. Substantial decrease of CN - concentration and C.O.D. value was observed in water pumped from such well equipped with cobalt sources and charcoal. The removing of pathogenic contamination remains to be the main goal of radiation processing in the water purification technologies. The decrease of liquid sludge specific filter resistance and sedimentation acceleration by irradiation have a minor technological importance. The hygienization of sludge cake from the mechanical belt filter press by electron beam appears to be the optimum application in the Czechoslovak conditions. The potatoes and barley crop yields from experimental plots treated with sludge were higher in comparison with using the manure. Biological sludge from the municipal and food industry water purification plants contains nutritive components. The proper hygienization is a necessary condition for using them as a livestock feed supplement. Feeding experiments with broilers and pigs confirmed the possibility of partial (e.g. 50%) replacement of soya-, bone- or fish flour in feed mixtures by dried sludge hygienized either by heat or by the irradiation.

  11. Annual Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2007-04-05

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  12. Food Processing and Agriculture. Wisconsin Annual Farm Labor Report, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Employment Service, Madison.

    A yearly report on the migrant farm worker situation in Wisconsin evaluates the year 1968 in relation to past years and makes projections for the future. Comparisons are made of trends in year-round employment practices, seasonal food processing, the cherry industry, and the cucumber industry. The report includes a discussion on the social aspects…

  13. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The radiation processing of materials and commercial products with high-energy X-rays, which are also identified by the German term bremsstrahlung, can produce beneficial changes that are similar to those obtained by irradiation with nuclear gamma rays emitted by cobalt-60 sources. Both X-rays and gamma rays are electromagnetic radiations with short wavelengths and high photon energies that can stimulate chemical reactions by creating ions and free radicals in irradiated materials. Nevertheless, there are some physical differences in these energy sources that can influence the choice for practical applications. The English translation of bremsstrahlung is braking radiatiorn or deceleration radiation. It is produced when energetic electrons are deflected by the strong electric field near an atomic nucleus. The efficiency for producing this kind of electromagnetic energy increases with the kinetic energy of the electrons and the atomic number of the target material. The energy spectrum of the emitted X-ray photons is very broad and extends up to the maximum energy of the incident electrons. In contrast, a cobalt-60 nucleus emits two gamma rays simultaneously, which have well-defined energies. Another significant difference is the angular distribution of the radiation. Nuclear gamma rays are emitted in all directions, but high-energy bremsstrahlung photons are concentrated in the direction of the incident electrons when they strike the target material. This property enables an X-ray processing facility to be more compact than a gamma-ray processing facility with similar throughput capacity, and it increases the penetration and the efficiency for absorbing the emitted X-ray energy in the irradiated material. Recent increases in the electron energy and the electron beam power from modern industrial accelerators have increased the throughput rates in X-ray processing facilities, so that this irradiation method is now economically competitive with large cobalt-60

  14. The Impact of Gamma Radiation on Sediment Microbial Processes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley R.; Boothman, Christopher; Pimblott, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities have the potential to control the biogeochemical fate of some radionuclides in contaminated land scenarios or in the vicinity of a geological repository for radioactive waste. However, there have been few studies of ionizing radiation effects on microbial communities in sediment systems. Here, acetate and lactate amended sediment microcosms irradiated with gamma radiation at 0.5 or 30 Gy h−1 for 8 weeks all displayed NO3− and Fe(III) reduction, although the rate of Fe(III) reduction was decreased in 30-Gy h−1 treatments. These systems were dominated by fermentation processes. Pyrosequencing indicated that the 30-Gy h−1 treatment resulted in a community dominated by two Clostridial species. In systems containing no added electron donor, irradiation at either dose rate did not restrict NO3−, Fe(III), or SO42− reduction. Rather, Fe(III) reduction was stimulated in the 0.5-Gy h−1-treated systems. In irradiated systems, there was a relative increase in the proportion of bacteria capable of Fe(III) reduction, with Geothrix fermentans and Geobacter sp. identified in the 0.5-Gy h−1 and 30-Gy h−1 treatments, respectively. These results indicate that biogeochemical processes will likely not be restricted by dose rates in such environments, and electron accepting processes may even be stimulated by radiation. PMID:25841009

  15. Control of radiative processes using tunable plasmonic nanopatch antennas.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alec; Hoang, Thang B; McGuire, Felicia; Mock, Jack J; Ciracì, Cristian; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2014-08-13

    The radiative processes associated with fluorophores and other radiating systems can be profoundly modified by their interaction with nanoplasmonic structures. Extreme electromagnetic environments can be created in plasmonic nanostructures or nanocavities, such as within the nanoscale gap region between two plasmonic nanoparticles, where the illuminating optical fields and the density of radiating modes are dramatically enhanced relative to vacuum. Unraveling the various mechanisms present in such coupled systems, and their impact on spontaneous emission and other radiative phenomena, however, requires a suitably reliable and precise means of tuning the plasmon resonance of the nanostructure while simultaneously preserving the electromagnetic characteristics of the enhancement region. Here, we achieve this control using a plasmonic platform consisting of colloidally synthesized nanocubes electromagnetically coupled to a metallic film. Each nanocube resembles a nanoscale patch antenna (or nanopatch) whose plasmon resonance can be changed independent of its local field enhancement. By varying the size of the nanopatch, we tune the plasmonic resonance by ∼ 200 nm, encompassing the excitation, absorption, and emission spectra corresponding to Cy5 fluorophores embedded within the gap region between nanopatch and film. By sweeping the plasmon resonance but keeping the field enhancements roughly fixed, we demonstrate fluorescence enhancements exceeding a factor of 30,000 with detector-limited enhancements of the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 74. The experiments are supported by finite-element simulations that reveal design rules for optimized fluorescence enhancement or large Purcell factors.

  16. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1987: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory (CRHL) was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the lifetime hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. It is a long-term (life span) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages-at-irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the developmental period. The basic experiment under the contract contains 1,680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. The annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of November 21, 1986 through November 20, 1987.

  17. Influence of Cloud-Radiative Processes on Predecessor Rain Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Omar Angelo

    Predecessor rain events (PREs) are coherent mesoscale rainstorms that occur well in advance of recurving tropical cyclones (TCs) and have a high potential to cause flooding and adverse societal impacts. In 2007, a PRE associated with TC Erin produced record-breaking rainfall (> 350 mm) across southern Minnesota and Wisconsin, contributing to seven fatalities and over $170 million in property damage. A series of idealized numerical simulations is conducted using an aquaplanet version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model Advanced Research core (WRF-ARW) v.3.6 to examine the influence of cloud-radiative processes on the development of PREs. This study finds that cloud-radiative feedback (CRF), the interaction of hydrometeor cloud species with longwave (LW) and shortwave (SW) radiation, produces a more robust PRE structure with stronger convective activity and, ultimately, more precipitation. It is demonstrated that LW cooling associated with clouds outside of the PRE region induces a stronger horizontal pressure gradient that enhances low level con ergence and drives more vigorous ascent. Therefore, the primary radiation driver of PRE formation occurs outside of the PRE itself and is based on how the model responds radiatively to low clouds. In addition, the warming component of CRF enhances parcel buoyancy and reduces vertical stabilities within the PRE structure. In particular, the distribution of cloud ice produces a greater depth of in-cloud, primarily LW warming conducive to stronger convective processes. In contrast, SW CRF effects weaken PRE development through a combination of in-cloud cooling and low level cloud top warming, countering the LW CRF effects responsible for greater rainfall production. Moreover, PRE formation is found to be sensitive to the diurnal cycle, resulting in faster development at night and slower development during the day. A seasonal sensitivity also brings about weaker PRE intensification during the summer season; shorter

  18. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  19. Enhancement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracheva, A. Yu.; Zav'yalov, M. A.; Ilyukhina, N. V.; Kukhto, V. A.; Tarasyuk, V. T.; Filippovich, V. P.; Egorkin, A. V.; Chasovskikh, A. V.; Pavlov, Yu. S.; Prokopenko, A. V.; Strokova, N. E.; Artem'ev, S. A.; Polyakova, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    The work is dedicated to improvement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies. International practice of radiation processing of food raw materials is presented and an increase in the consumption of irradiated food products is shown. The prospects of using radiation technologies for the processing of food products in Russia are discussed. The results of studies of radiation effects on various food products and packaging film by γ radiation and accelerated electrons are presented.

  20. A formula for comparing annual damaging ultraviolet DUV radiation doses at tropical and mid-latitude sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutchis, P.

    1980-06-01

    A simple formula is developed in this paper for the relative annual damaging ultraviolet radiation (DUV) dose at different tropical and mid-latitude sites. The formula consists of six multiplicative factors which include the effects of amount of ozone, latitude, altitude, cloudiness, ground albedo, and amount of aerosols. A seasonal ozone variation factor is introduced to modify the tropical relative DUV formula for application to mid-latitude sites. The approach involves correlations of sometimes sparse data, and remains to be validated in the general sense. The formula should be useful, where more exact data are not available, in studies of the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation, and its possible increase from a reduction in stratospheric ozone on land and marine ecological systems and skin cancer incidence in white Caucasian populations.

  1. Collisional and radiative processes in high-pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt H.; Kurunczi, Peter F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2002-05-01

    Discharge plasmas at high pressures (up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure), where single collision conditions no longer prevail, provide a fertile environment for the experimental study of collisions and radiative processes dominated by (i) step-wise processes, i.e., the excitation of an already excited atomic/molecular state and by (ii) three-body collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of excimers. The dominance of collisional and radiative processes beyond binary collisions involving ground-state atoms and molecules in such environments allows for many interesting applications of high-pressure plasmas such as high power lasers, opening switches, novel plasma processing applications and sputtering, absorbers and reflectors for electromagnetic waves, remediation of pollutants and waste streams, and excimer lamps and other noncoherent vacuum-ultraviolet light sources. Here recent progress is summarized in the use of hollow cathode discharge devices with hole dimensions in the range 0.1-0.5 mm for the generation of vacuum-ultraviolet light.

  2. Modeling of clouds and radiation for developing parameterizations for general circulation models. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    We are using a hierarchy of numerical models of cirrus and stratus clouds and radiative transfer to improve the reliability of general circulation models. Our detailed cloud microphysical model includes all of the physical processes believed to control the lifecycle of liquid and ice clouds in the troposphere. In our one-dimensional cirrus studies, we find that the ice crystal number and size in cirrus clouds are not very sensitive to the number of condensation nuclei which are present. We have compared our three-dimensional meoscale simulations of cirrus clouds with radar, lidar satellite and other observations of water vapor and cloud fields and find that the model accurately predicts the characteristics of a cirrus cloud system. The model results reproduce several features detected by remote sensing (lidar and radar) measurements, including the appearance of the high cirrus cloud at about 15 UTC and the thickening of the cloud at 20 UTC. We have developed a new parameterizations for production of ice crystals based on the detailed one-dimensional cloud model, and are presently testing the parameterization in three-dimensional simulations of the FIRE-II November 26 case study. We have analyzed NWS radiosonde humidity data from FIRE and ARM and found errors, biases, and uncertainties in the conversion of the sensed resistance to humidity.

  3. CIRRPC: Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination. Eighth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.L.

    1992-12-01

    CIRRPC`s eighth year was marked by the completion of several CIRRPC projects, including: An independent study on the possible health effects of extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields; a report evaluating the uncertainties identified in a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and their impact on the report`s application to Federal risk assessment; an analysis of the use of two reports on radiation risk assessment from NAS and the United Nations; and an update of Part 11 of ORAU`s radiation protection fact sheets, a compilation of major US radiation protection standards and guides. CIRRPC also sponsored a workshop on internal dosimetry and provided financial support to the 1991 Health Physics Society Summer School on the biological basis of radiation protection practice. The program highlights are briefly described in this report.

  4. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1995: Twenty-eighth annual report. Volume 17

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1995 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. In 1995, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 199 person-cSv (person-rem). This is the same value that was reported for 1994. The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 256 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 170 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 17,153 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1995, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.26 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.32 cSv (rem).

  5. Interpretation of black body radiation as a decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Clarence A.

    2007-06-01

    The treatment of black body radiation as a decay process with the wavelength ( λ) as the time marker, leads to an apportioning function ( Dλ) that distributes the total thermodynamic Stefan-Boltzmann emitted intensity ( I) over the entire wavelength range (Clarence A Gall, BAPS, March Meeting 2007, Denver, CO). The resulting distribution function ( Iλ=IDλ=σT^6b^2λe^-Tbλ) gives the Stefan-Boltzmann law on integration over the same interval. Differentiation of Iλ produces Wien's displacement law as the condition for the wavelength at maximum emitted intensity ( λm) . Substitution of λm in Iλ yields the maximum emitted intensity ( Iλm) as being proportional to T,5. Hence Iλ satisfies exactly the three known empirical laws of black body radiation and fulfils Einstein's hope for a solution of the radiation problem without the use of light quanta. Finally the replacement of Tb with a single constant G simplifies the distribution function so that Iλ=σGG^6λe^-Gλ where σG=b^4σ. Consequently G defines a new temperature scale with units of reciprocal wavelength that unifies the thermodynamic and colour scales.

  6. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook. FY 1991 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL`s Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU`s), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

  7. Radiative and collisional processes in CNA 2Π i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Joshua B.; Huang, Yuhui; Titarchuk, Tatiana

    1996-02-01

    In the last four years we have carried out a number of studies on the radiative and collisional processes in theA 2Π i state of CN. Many of these of interest to those studying planetary atmospheres, comets and solar spectra are summarized in this paper. Data for CNA 2Π i fluorescence lifetimes and quenching rates, and collisional energy transfer between CNA 2Π i andX 2∑+ are reported. Detailed comparisons and a discussion of the results may be found in several already published papers.

  8. Processing of thermoset prepreg laminate via exposure to microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; Meek, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Studies of microwave-assisted curing of neat resins (epoxy) and unidirectional glass and carbon fiber laminates have shown that a substantial reduction in the curing time was obtained. This may be explained by the penetration of microwave energy directly and throughout the laminate with enhancement of the kinetics of the chemical reaction. Results of this work indicate that the microwave assisted curing of glass fiber laminates also shows a substantial reduction of the required curing time. Microwave radiation of 2.45 GHz has been demonstrated to be an acceptable method to cure unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. Also, effective curing of crossply (0/90) laminates through this method was observed when proper rotation of the parts accompanied the curing process. This is in accordance with previous work. Multidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminates demonstrate a lack of coupling during the curing process. A direct curing of these laminates was not possible by microwave radiation with the experimental approach used, in agreement with previous work. Nevertheless, a moderate reduction in the curing time of these thin laminates was observed due to hybrid curing.

  9. Processes for quality improvements in radiation oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, T J; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials.

  10. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  11. Effects of clouds on the Earth radiation budget; Seasonal and inter-annual patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal and regional variations of clouds and their effects on the climatological parameters were studied. The climatological parameters surface temperature, solar insulation, short-wave absorbed, long wave emitted, and net radiation were considered. The data of climatological parameters consisted of about 20 parameters of Earth radiation budget and clouds of 2070 target areas which covered the globe. It consisted of daily and monthly averages of each parameter for each target area for the period, Jun. 1979 - May 1980. Cloud forcing and black body temperature at the top of the atmosphere were calculated. Interactions of clouds, cloud forcing, black body temperature, and the climatological parameters were investigated and analyzed.

  12. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.L.

    1991-06-30

    In 1990--91 CIRRPC`s program included efforts to improve interagency coordination on ionizing radiation risk assessments, a review of the reported health risks to humans from exposure to extremely low- frequency electric and magnetic fields (ELF/EMF), and increased coordination with national and international organizations such as NCRP and ICRP.

  13. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE 1) 1998 ANNUAL REPORT (EPA/600/R-98/065)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the first annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Cincinnati in March 1998. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, life cycle analysis, ecolabeling, and pollution prevention tools.

  14. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1994. Twenty-seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). Annual reports for 1994 were received from a total of 303 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 303 licensees indicated that 152,028 individuals were monitored, 79,780 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 24,740 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 15% decrease from the 1993 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem) for 1994. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. In 1994, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 198 person-cSv (person-rem). This represents a 18% decrease from the 1993 value of 242 person-cSv (person-rem). The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 327 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 131 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 18,178 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1994, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.28 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem).

  15. UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBES AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is defined as wavelengths in the range of 200 to 400 nm. In contrast to visible radiation (400 - 800 nm), which has a well-defined role as the energy source for most of the Earth's primary production, the effects of UV radiation on b...

  16. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  17. The Bioelectromagnetics Society eleventh annual meeting, 1989. [Extremely low frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains the abstracts from the symposia and poster sessions at the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Bioelectromagnetics Society, held on June 18--22, 1989, in Tucson, AZ. Five special symposia were held which dealt with: Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) fields and neuroendocrine function; electromagnetic (EM) therapy for cardiac arrythmia; application of time-varying fields for tissue healing; the biophysics of resonance phenomena in EM interactions with biomolecular systems; and new probes for biological assessments. Additional symposia dealt with radiofrequency (RF) and microwave effects on neural and ocular systems; pulsed and ELF fields; calcium and ELF; ELF and static magnetic fields; ELF and RF, dosimetry and instrumentation; ELF and biomembranes; RF and ultrasound; behavioral effects of EM; physiological effects of RF; RF hyperthermia and tumor treatment; modeling; and the neurological and endocrine effects of ELF.

  18. CSU-FDA collaborative radiological health laboratory annual report, 1980: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A long-term study of the mortality, morbidity, and physiopathology of beagles exposed to a single dose of ionizing radiation during one of six stages of either prenatal or postnatal development. The results of this study will provide insight into the lifetime risks associated with prenatal and postnatal exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. This annual report describes the long-term study and the short-term experiments being performed to evaluate spontaneous and radiation-induced problems, as well as the computer storage and retrieval system and its uses in the study.

  19. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  20. Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, C; Marone, F; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M

    2010-07-01

    With synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy, three-dimensional structures down to the micrometer level can be visualized. Tomographic data sets typically consist of 1000 to 1500 projections of 1024 x 1024 to 2048 x 2048 pixels and are acquired in 5-15 min. A processing pipeline has been developed to handle this large amount of data efficiently and to reconstruct the tomographic volume within a few minutes after the end of a scan. Just a few seconds after the raw data have been acquired, a selection of reconstructed slices is accessible through a web interface for preview and to fine tune the reconstruction parameters. The same interface allows initiation and control of the reconstruction process on the computer cluster. By integrating all programs and tools, required for tomographic reconstruction into the pipeline, the necessary user interaction is reduced to a minimum. The modularity of the pipeline allows functionality for new scan protocols to be added, such as an extended field of view, or new physical signals such as phase-contrast or dark-field imaging etc.

  1. Thirteenth Annual Warren K. Sinclair Keynote Address: Where Are the Radiation Professionals (WARP)?

    PubMed

    Toohey, Richard E

    2017-02-01

    In July 2013, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements convened a workshop for representatives from government, professional organizations, academia, and the private sector to discuss a potential shortage of radiation protection professionals in the not-too-distant future. This shortage manifests itself in declining membership of professional societies, decreasing enrollment in university programs in the radiological sciences, and perhaps most importantly, the imminent retirement of the largest birth cohort in American history, the so-called "baby boomer" generation. Consensus emerged that shortages already are, or soon will be, felt in government agencies (including state radiation control programs); membership in professional societies is declining precipitously; and student enrollments and university support for radiological disciplines are decreasing with no reversals expected. The supply of medical physicists appears to be adequate at least in the near term, although a shortage of available slots in accredited clinical training programs looms large. In general, the private sector appears stable, due in part to retirees joining the consultant ranks. However, it is clear that a severe problem exists with the lack of an adequate surge capacity to respond to a large-scale reactor accident or radiological terrorism attack in the United States. The workshop produced a number of recommendations, including increased funding of both fellowships and research in the radiological sciences, as well as creation of internships, practicums, and post-doctoral positions. A federal joint program support office that would more efficiently manage the careers of radiological professionals in the civil service would enhance recruiting and development, and increase the flexibility of the various agencies to manage their staffing needs.

  2. Fiscal Year 1993 annual report for the Bubble Membrane Radiator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Sambrook, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities conducted on the Bubble Membrane Radiator (BMR) Project during Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington. Funding for this work has been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC), Crew and Thermal Sciences Division. The BMR Project was initiated at PNL in March 1988 to continue development of promising thermal management concepts for space applications. In FY 1992 work was refocused from the BMR to fabrication and testing of ultralight fabric reflux tubes (UFRT) because of progress in this area and the desire to incorporate this concept in thermal management for a lunar colony. Development, optimization, and testing of UFRTs continued in FY 1993 under five tasks. Task B, Radiative Properties, and Task D, Development of Tough Metal UFRT Technology, were initiated in FY 1992 and completed this year. Three additional tasks were initiated: Task 1, Fabricate Tubes; Task 2, Heat Transfer Optimization; and Task 3, Analyses Follow-On. A summary of the activities under these tasks and conclusions are provided below.

  3. Community Radiation Monitoring Program annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.N.; McArthur, R.D.

    1991-07-01

    The events of FY 1990 indicate that another successful year in the evolution of the Community Radiation Monitoring Program is in the books. The agencies and organizations involved in the program have developed a sound and viable working relationship, and it appears that the major objectives, primarily dispelling some of the concerns over weapons testing and radiation on the part of the public, are being effectively addressed. The program is certainly a dynamic operation, growing and changing to meet perceived needs and goals as more experience is gained through our work. The change in focus on our public outreach efforts will lead us to contacts with more students and schools, service clubs and special interest groups in the future, and will refine, and hopefully improve, our communication with the public. If that can be accomplished, plus perhaps influencing a few more students to stay in school and even grow up to be scientists, engineers and better citizens, we will be closer to having achieved our goals. It is important to note that the success of the program has occurred only because the people involved, from the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Desert Research Institute, the University of Utah and the Station Managers and Alternates work well and hard together. Our extended family'' is doing a good job. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Collisional and Radiative Processes in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    High-pressure discharge plasmas (HPDPs) with operating pressures up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure have gained prominence in many areas of application such as EM absorbers and reflectors, remediation of waste streams, deposition and surface modification, surface cleaning and sterilization, and light source development. In particular, HPDPs are widely used as sources for the generation of non-coherent UV and VUV light such as excimer emissions in the spectral range from 50 nm to 300 nm using rare gases or rare gas admixed with other gases as the operating medium. In this talk we will discuss several common types of HPDPs (e.g. microhollow cathode discharge plasmas, dielectric barrier discharge plasmas, capillary dielectrode discharge plasmas) that are commonly used for the generation of non-coherent excimer emissions. The main focus of this talk will be on the elucidation of the underlying microscopic collisional and radiative processes in these plasmas that lead to the photon emission and that determine the efficiency and spectral characteristics of various sources. Processes of particular interest are the generation of intense, monochromatic atomic line emissions in the 90 - 130 nm range, in particular the H Lyman-alpha emission at 121.6 nm, from HPDPs in gas mixtures containing high-pressure He, Ne, or Ar with trace amounts (1which may have great potential in photolithography and related applications. The mechanism for the emission of these intense atomic VUV lines are near-resonant energy transfer processes from the excimer molecule to the diatomic gas (H2, O2, N2). This work was supported by the NSF and by DARPA/ARO and carried out in collaboration with P. Kurunczi, K.H. Schoenbach, M. Laroussi, M. Gupta, and N. Masoud. Helpful discussions with U. Kogelschatz and E. Kunhardt are gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Fabrication process scale-up and optimization for a boron-aluminum composite radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1973-01-01

    Design approaches to a practical utilization of a boron-aluminum radiator for the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The program includes studies of laboratory composite material processes to determine the feasibility of a structural and functional composite radiator panel, and to estimate the cost of its fabrication. The objective is the incorporation of boron-aluminum modulator radiator on the space shuttle.

  6. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Annual technical progress report, [1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  7. Radiation Exposures for DOE and DOE Contractor Employees - 1990. Twenty-third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. H.; Hui, T. E.; Millet, W. H.; Scholes, V. A.

    1993-11-01

    All U.S. Department of Energy and DOE contractors are required by DOE Order 5484.1, Chapter IV, to submit occupational radiation exposure records to a central depository. For 1990, data were required to be submitted for all employees who were required to be monitored in accordance with DOE Order 5480.11 and for all visitors who had a positive exposure. The data required included the total effective dose equivalent, external penetrating whole-body dose equivalent, internal dose equivalent, the shallow dose equivalent, neutron dose equivalent, and extremity dose equivalent. Data regarding the exposed individuals included the individual's age, sex, and occupation category. This report is a summary of data reported by DOE and DOE contractors for the calendar year 1990.

  8. Application of radiation processing in asia and the pacific region: Focus on malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Dahlan, Khairul Zaman HJ.

    1995-09-01

    Applications of radiation processing in Malaysia and other developing countries in Asia and the Pacific region is increasing as the countries move toward industrialisation. At present, there are more than 85 gamma facilities and 334 electron accelerators in Asia and the Pacific region which are mainly in Japan, Rep. of Korea and China. The main applications which are in the interest of the region are radiation sterilisation of medical products; radiation crosslinking of wire and cable, heat shrinkable film and tube, and foam; radiation curing of surface coatings, printing inks and adhesive; radiation vulcanisation of natural rubber latex; radiation processing of agro-industrial waste; radiation treatment of sewage sludge and municipal waste; food irradiation; tissue grafts and radiation synthesis of bioactive materials.

  9. Factors contributing to process variance in annual survival of female greater sage-grouse in Montana.

    PubMed

    Moynahan, Brendan J; Lindberg, Mark S; Thomas, Jack Ward

    2006-08-01

    Populations of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined by 69-99% from historic levels, and information on population dynamics of these birds at a landscape scale is essential to informed management. We examined the relationships between hen survival and a suite of landscape-scale habitat and environmental conditions. We radio-marked 237 female Sage-Grouse and measured 426 vegetation plots during 2001-2004 at four sites in a 3200-km2 landscape in north-central Montana, USA. We used program MARK to model monthly survival rates for 11 seasonal intervals. There was strong support for the best-approximating model (AICc weight = 0.810), which indicated that (1) hen survival varied by season within years and by year within seasons, (2) nesting hens had higher nesting-season survival than non-nesting hens, and (3) individuals at one site had lower hunting-season survival than at other sites. We observed considerable variation in hen survival. Process variation was 0.255, with an expected range of annual survival of 0.12 to 1.0. The ratio of process to total variation was 0.999, indicating that observed variation was real and not attributable to sampling variation. We observed a nearly fourfold difference in maximum and minimum annual survival, ranging from 0.962 +/- 0.024 (mean +/- SE) for nesting hens in 2001-2002 to 0.247 +/- 0.050) for non-nesters in 2003-2004. Low annual survival in 2003 resulted from the compounded effects of a West Nile virus outbreak in August and a severe winter in 2003-2004. Increased hen mortality associated with severe winter weather contrasts with prior beliefs that Sage-Grouse populations are typically unaffected by winter weather conditions and underscores the importance of protecting winter sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitats.

  10. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

  11. Improvements in opti-chromic dosimeters for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters consisting of radiachromic dye in flourinated polymer tubing have been introduced as a dosimetry system in the range from 10 1 to 5 × 10 4 Gy. Batches of "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters have been produced to evaluate performance under large scale industrial conditions. A systematic study was undertaken to determine the effect of various dosimeter parameters on radiation sensitivity, shelf life, and response characteristics at the higher absorbed doses. These parameters were (A) Type of flourinated polymer tubing; (B) Organic solvent used to activate the radiachromic dye; (C) Concentration of radiachromic dye; (D) Additives to provide proper viscosity, color stability, and high-dose response. Prototype batches were produced and experimental dosimeters exposed to a range of absorbed doses and the response measured as a function of shelf life and dose. The results of the study are presented, and an improved formulation recommended for application to Food Processing. Other formulations may be of value in specific requirements of sensitivity or temperature.

  12. Improvement of electron beam shape control in radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, A.; Fang, R.; Kuntz, F.

    1994-05-01

    The development of radiation processing using electron accelerators requires good control of the treatment parameters to improve the dosimetry quality. Especially, the analysis of the shape of the scanned electron beam that interacts with the product, is of prime necessity. A Multiwire Beam Shape Analyser (MBSA) has been developed by the AERIAL Laboratory in order to insure good monitoring of the scanning length and uniformity. This device consists of an aluminum beam-stop covered with a mesh of individually insulated stainless steel wires, placed under the scanning cone. The current generated by the impact of the electron beam on each wire is converted into voltage. After pulse shaping and multiplexing of the different channels, the beam profile can be displayed on an oscilloscope or on a PC screen. A prototype is now operating on an experimental irradiation plant based on a 2.5 MeV /300 W Van de Graaff electron accelerator. It allows almost continuous visualization of the beam profile (between two conveyor passes) and its response was compared to classical film dosimeters (Gafchromic, FWT 60.00). Considering FWHM and homogeneous treatment regions of the profiles, MBSA and the dosimeters give similar responses and variations remain lower than ± 12%. The acquisition of an electrical signal corresponding to the beam profile in air constitutes the original aspect of the MBSA and is in keeping with the general pattern of continuous control and automation of the irradiation processes. Hereafter, much work has to be done to adapt this device to an industrial use (higher energy, high power electron beams, non-destructive measurements…).

  13. FY06 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, Charles H.; Zhang, Yanwen; Shutthanandan, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe progress in the development of new materials for portable, room-temperature, gamma-radiation detection at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site in Washington State. High Z, high resistivity, amorphous semiconductors are being designed for use as solid-state detectors at near ambient temperatures; principles of operation are analogous to single-crystal semiconducting detectors. Amorphous semiconductors have both advantages and disadvantages compared to single crystals, and this project is developing methods to mitigate technical problems and design optimized material for gamma detection. Several issues involved in the fabrication of amorphous semiconductors are described, including reaction thermodynamics and kinetics, the development of pyrolytic coating, and the synthesis of ingots. The characterization of amorphous semiconductors is described, including sectioning and polishing protocols, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, particle-induced X-ram emission, Rutherford backscattering, and electrical testing. Then collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is discussed in the areas of Hall-effect measurements and current voltage data. Finally, we discuss the strategy for continuing the program.

  14. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1997-01-01

    'The specific aims listed in the original application will essentially be pursued as indicated. The major goal of the grant is to characterize a human homologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad9 checkpoint control, radioresistance and chemoresistance gene, which is called HRAD9. The purpose is to gain information about the gene, including its structure and function, such that it can potentially be developed as a human genetic marker indicative of hypersensitivity to the deleterious effects associated with exposure to radiations or certain chemicals. The specific aims are divided into two major sections. The first section includes experiments designed to characterize the HRAD9 gene at the molecular level. Specifically, the genomic version of the gene will be isolated and its DNA sequence determined, in vitro mutagenesis will be used to assess structure/function relationships, and expression in cells and tissues will be examined. The second major set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer. For this aim, human HRAD9 mutants will be constructed and characterized. In addition, the status of HRAD9 in cancer cells and tissues will be assessed.'

  15. Community Radiation Monitoring Program; Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.N.; McArthur, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (U of U). This eleventh year of the program began in the summer of 1991 and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE-sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which the DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of those efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Managers and program representatives in 19 communities adjacent to and downwind from the NTS. These Managers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded, through their training, experience, community standing, and effort, in becoming a very visible, able and valuable asset in this link.

  16. Community radiation monitoring program. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.N.

    1994-08-01

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UUNEL). The thirteenth year of this program began in the fall of 1992, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE--sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the then-existing EPA monitoring network around the NTS, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah, and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Station Managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These mangers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded through their training, experience, community standing, and effort in becoming a very visible, able, and valuable asset in this link.

  17. Community Radiation Monitoring Program. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.N.

    1993-05-01

    The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE); the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UNEL). The twelfth year of the program began in the fall of 1991, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE-sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The program began as an outgrowth of activities that occurred during the Three Mile Island incident in 1979. The local interest and public participation that took place there were thought to be transferrable to the situation at the NTS, so, with adaptations, that methodology was implemented for this program. The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the existing EPA monitoring network, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as station managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These managers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded, through their training, experience, community standing, and effort, in becoming a very visible, able and valuable asset in this link.

  18. Radiative-Convective Processes in Regulating Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Li, X.; Ho, C.-H.

    2000-01-01

    Relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and cloud/water vapor reveals important information about radiative-climate feedbacks. Many previous studies have found that cloud amount and SST are positively correlated for SST between 28-29.5 C, for SST greater than 29.5 C, cloud amount actually decreases with increasing SST. The breakdown of SST-cloud correlation at 29.5 C was suggested to be related to the formation of localized hot spots with very high SST due to increased solar radiation in regions of strong subsidence forced by convection elsewhere. In this study, the breakdown is related to the radiative cooling in the subsidence regime over the cold pool surrounding the warm pool. We show model and observational evidence that radiative cooling over the cold pool limits the strength of SST-induced tropical circulation. As a result, occurrence of convection is also limited when SST contrast between the warm pool and cold pool is large.

  19. Nuclear Fragmentation Processes Relevant for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for human space explorations such-as a moon base or a trip to Mars. Models have been developed in order to predict the radiation exposure to astronauts and to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials, and a key ingredient in these models is the physics of nuclear fragmentations. We have developed a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the radiation dose behind shielding materials due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  20. Estimation of annual effective dose and radiation hazards due to natural radionuclides in Mount Homa, southwestern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Otwoma, D; Patel, J P; Bartilol, S; Mustapha, A O

    2013-08-01

    The radiological hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material in Mount Homa in southwestern Kenya was investigated after 210 point measurements and 44 samples were analysed. In situ measured average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air using survey meters was found to vary from 154.8 to 2280.6 nGy h(-1). The mean (range) values of radioactive concentrations measured using an HpGe detection system for (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 915 ± 3 (64-3017), 195 ± 8 (17-1447) and 409 ± 4 (23-1369) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The calculated range of the annual effective dose for a person living in Homa Mountain area varied from 28.6 to 1681.2, with a mean of 470.4 µSv. All calculated average radiological indices, namely Radium equivalent, Representative level, Gamma activity, External and Internal hazard, were higher than the limits set by various national and international bodies. These results imply that Mount Homa region is a high background radiation area.

  1. Proceedings of the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program Annual Technical Exchange Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1995 Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program (ESP) Annual Technical Exchange Meeting. The ESP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development. The meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users (for example, EM focus areas), and other interested parties within EM. During this meeting, developers of ESP-funded technologies describe the problems and needs addressed by their technologies; the technical approach, accomplishments, and resolution of issues; the strategy and schedule for commercialization; and evolving potential applications. Presenters are asked to address the following areas: Target waste management problem, waste stream, or data need; scientific background and technical approach; technical accomplishments and resolution of technical issues; schedule and strategy for commercializing and implementing the technology or acquiring needed data; potential alternate applications of the technology or data, including outside of DOE/EM. The meeting is not a program review of the individual tasks or subtasks; but instead focuses on the technical aspects and implementation of ESP-sponsored technology or data. The meeting is also attended by members of the ESP Technical Review Team, who have the opportunity at that time to review the ESP as a whole.

  2. Dosimetry in radiation processing in the U.S.S.R.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalova, V. V.; Gurskii, M. N.; Pikaev, A. K.

    The paper is devoted to the methods of dosimetry used in radiation processing in the USSR. The information on film, solid state and liquid dosimeters is presented. The special attention is paid to the dosimeters that are lot produced. The examples of the application of dosimeters in different radiation technological processes are described. The aspects of standartization of dosimetric measurements are discussed.

  3. Radiation Characteristics of a 0.11 Micrometer Modified Commercial CMOS Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poivey, Christian; Kim, Hak; Berg, Melanie D.; Forney, Jim; Seidleck, Christina; Vilchis, Miguel A.; Phan, Anthony; Irwin, Tim; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Saigusa, Rajan K.; Mirabedini, Mohammad R.; Finlinson, Rick; Suvkhanov, Agajan; Hornback, Verne; Sung, Jun; Tung, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    We present radiation data, Total Ionizing Dose and Single Event Effects, on the LSI Logic 0.11 micron commercial process and two modified versions of this process. Modified versions include a buried layer to guarantee Single Event Latchup immunity.

  4. Pulsed combustion process for black liquor gasification. Second annual report, [November 1990--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This second annual report summarizes the work accomplished during the period November 1990 through February 1992 for DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-90CE40893. The overall project objective is to field test an energy-efficient, innovative black liquor recovery system at a significant industrial scale. This is intended to demonstrate the maturity of the technology in an industrial environment and serve as an example to the industry of the safer and more energy-efficient processing technique. The project structure is comprised of three primary activities: process characterization testing, scale-up hardware development, and field testing. The objective of the process characterization testing was to resolve key technical issues regarding the black liquor recovery process that were identified during earlier laboratory verification tests. This was intended to provide a sound engineering data base for the design, construction and testing of a nominal 1.0 TPH integrated black liquor recovery gasifier. The objective of the scale-up hardware development effort was to ensure that key hardware components, in particular the pulse heater module, would perform reliably and safely in the field. Finally, the objective of the field test is to develop an industrial data base sufficient to demonstrate the capabilities and performance of the operating system with respect to thermal efficiency, product quality, fuel handling, system control, reliability and cost. These tests are to provide long-term and continuous operating data at a capacity unattainable in the bench-scale apparatus.

  5. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  6. Processes of annual moraine formation at a temperate alpine valley glacier: glacier dynamics and climatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the first detailed sedimentological study of annual moraines formed by an alpine valley glacier. The moraines have been formed since at least AD 1980 by a subsidiary lobe of Gornergletscher, Switzerland, that advances up a reverse bedrock slope. They reach heights of 0.5-1.5 m, widths of up to 6 m and lengths of up to several hundreds of metres. Sediments in these moraines comprise proglacial outwash and debris flow units; subglacial traction till is absent entirely. Based on four representative sections, three genetic process combinations have been identified. (1) Inefficient bulldozing of a gently-sloping ice margin transfers proglacial sediments onto the ice, causing differential ablation and dead-ice incorporation upon retreat. (2) Terrestrial ice-contact fans are formed by the dumping of englacial and supraglacial material from point sources such as englacial conduit fills. Debris flows and associated fluvial sediments are stacked against a temporarily stationary margin at the start, and deformed during glacier advance in the remainder, of the accumulation season. (3) A steep ice margin without supraglacial input leads to efficient bulldozing and deformation of pre-existing foreland sediments by wholesale folding. Ice surface slope appears to be a key control on the type of process responsible for moraine formation in any given place and year. The second and third modes result in stable and higher moraines that have a higher preservation potential than those containing dead ice. Analysis of the spacing and climatic records at Gornergletscher reveal that winter temperature controls marginal retreat and hence moraine formation. However, any climatic signal is complicated by other factors, most notably the presence of a reverse bedrock slope, so that the extraction of a clear climatic signal is not straightforward. This study highlights the complexity of annual moraine formation in high-mountain environments and suggests avenues for further

  7. Decay processes and radiative cooling of small anionic copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Christian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael W.; George, Sebastian; Guzmán-Ramírez, Gregorio; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Schweikhard, Lutz; Wolf, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The decay of copper clusters Cun- with size n =4 -7 , produced in a metal ion sputter source, was studied in an electrostatic ion-beam trap. The neutral products after electron emission and fragmentation were monitored for ion storage times of up to a second. The observations indicated the presence of radiative cooling. The energy distributions of the remaining clusters were probed by laser irradiation up to several further seconds of storage time. This defined excitation lead to photoinduced decay signals which, again, showed signs of radiative cooling for Cu6,7 -, not, however, for Cu4,5 -.

  8. Twelfth Annual Warren K. Sinclair Keynote Address--the Influence of the NCRP on Radiation Protection in the United States: Guidance and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kase, Kenneth R

    2016-02-01

    The Warren K. Sinclair Keynote Address for the 2015 Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) describes the Council's influence in the development of radiation protection guidance in the United States since its founding in 1929 as the U.S. Advisory Committee on X-Ray and Radium Protection. The National Bureau of Standards (NBS) was the coordinating agency for the Advisory Committee, and its reports were published as NBS handbooks. In 1946, the Advisory Committee was renamed the National Committee on Radiation Protection and remained so until NCRP was chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1964. In 1931, the U.S. Advisory Committee on X-Ray and Radium Protection proposed the first formal standard for protecting people from radiation sources as NBS Handbook 15 and issued the first handbook on radium protection, NBS Handbook 18. Revised recommendations for external exposure were issued in 1936 and for radium protection in 1938 and remained in force until 1948. Throughout its 86 y history, the Council and its predecessors have functioned as effective advisors to the nation on radiation protection issues and have provided the fundamental guidance and recommendations necessary for the regulatory basis of the control of radiation exposure, radiation-producing devices, and radioactive materials in the United States.

  9. Expected and unexpected achievements and trends in radiation processing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    2003-06-01

    The last four decades produced exponential development in the polymer processing. Radiation processing—initiated also about 40 years ago—yielded a similar pathway of development in the beginning, mostly in the radiation crosslinking of polymers and in the radiation sterilization of polymer products. There are some unexpected results in the developments of the radiation chemistry of polymers utilized well in the polymer processing today. The most dynamical developments of the microelectronics in our days are based on the efficient utilization of radiation-crosslinkable negative photoresist polymers and the radiation degradable positive photoresist polymers. Rapid prototyping and rapid tooling are indispensable methods in the continuously renewing manufacturing technologies of metal and plastic parts for almost all the industrial branches. Polymer composite manufacturing is also profited in many ways from the experiences of radiation technology. Compatibilization through radiation-reactive monomers and oligomers is attacking two great fields of the future polymer processing. Recycling of commingled polymer wastes, and manufacturing new type of alloys of different synthetic as well as natural polymers are requiring well-engineered interface, which can be achieved by radiation processing in a technically feasible and economically viable way.

  10. Improving degradation of paracetamol by integrating gamma radiation and Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-González, Germán; Rivas-Ortiz, Iram B; González-Labrada, Katia; Rapado-Paneque, Manuel; Chávez-Ardanza, Armando; Nuevas-Paz, Lauro; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises J

    2016-10-14

    Degradation of paracetamol (N-(4-hydroxiphenyl)acetamide) in aqueous solution by gamma radiation, gamma radiation/H2O2 and gamma radiation/Fenton processes was studied. Parameters affecting the radiolysis of paracetamol such as radiation dose, initial concentration of pollutant, pH and initial oxidant concentration were investigated. Gamma radiation was performed using a (60)Co source irradiator. Paracetamol degradation and mineralization increased with increasing absorbed radiation dose, but decreased with increasing initial concentration of the drug in aqueous solution. The addition of H2O2 resulted in an increased effect on irradiation-driven paracetamol degradation in comparison with the performance of the irradiation-driven process alone: paracetamol removal increased from 48.9% in the absence of H2O2 to 95.2% for H2O2 concentration of 41.7 mmol/L. However, the best results were obtained with gamma radiation/Fenton process with 100% of the drug removal at 5 kGy, for optimal H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations at 13.9 and 2.3 mmol/L, respectively, with a high mineralization of 63.7%. These results suggest gamma radiation/H2O2 and gamma radiation/Fenton processes as promising methods for paracetamol degradation in polluted wastewaters.

  11. Microscopic Processes On Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Sol, H.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.; Nordlund, A.; Fredriksen, J.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  12. Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A A

    1980-06-01

    Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

  13. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  14. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  15. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  16. Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing.

    PubMed

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R; Hlavacek, William S; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  17. Effectiveness of radiation processing in elimination of Aeromonas from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Vandan; Bandekar, Jayant R.

    2011-08-01

    Genus Aeromonas has emerged as an important human pathogen because it causes a variety of diseases including gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal infections. Contaminated water, sprouts, vegetables, seafood and food of animal origin have been considered to be the important sources of Aeromonas infection. In the present study, radiation sensitivity of indigenous strains of Aeromonas spp. from different food samples was evaluated. The decimal reduction dose (D10) values of different Aeromonas isolates in saline at 0-4 °C were in the range of 0.031-0.046 kGy. The mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were inoculated with a cocktail of five most resistant isolates (A. salmonicida Y567, A. caviae A85, A. jandaei A514A, A. hydrophila CECT 839T and A. veronii Y47) and exposed to γ radiation to study the effectiveness of radiation treatment in elimination of Aeromonas. D10 values of Aeromonas cocktail in mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were found to be 0.081±0.001, 0.089±0.003 and 0.091±0.003 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples. No recovery of Aeromonas was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 (mixed sprouts) and 7 days (chicken and fish samples), even after enrichment and selective plating. This study demonstrates that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could result in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples.

  18. Quantum information processing with long-wavelength radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, David; Weidt, Sebastian; Randall, Joseph; Lekitsch, Bjoern; Webster, Simon; Navickas, Tomas; Grounds, Anton; Rodriguez, Andrea; Webb, Anna; Standing, Eamon; Pearce, Stuart; Sari, Ibrahim; Kiang, Kian; Rattanasonti, Hwanjit; Kraft, Michael; Hensinger, Winfried

    To this point, the entanglement of ions has predominantly been performed using lasers. Using long wavelength radiation with static magnetic field gradients provides an architecture to simplify construction of a large scale quantum computer. The use of microwave-dressed states protects against decoherence from fluctuating magnetic fields, with radio-frequency fields used for qubit manipulation. I will report the realisation of spin-motion entanglement using long-wavelength radiation, and a new method to efficiently prepare dressed-state qubits and qutrits, reducing experimental complexity of gate operations. I will also report demonstration of ground state cooling using long wavelength radiation, which may increase two-qubit entanglement fidelity. I will then report demonstration of a high-fidelity long-wavelength two-ion quantum gate using dressed states. Combining these results with microfabricated ion traps allows for scaling towards a large scale ion trap quantum computer, and provides a platform for quantum simulations of fundamental physics. I will report progress towards the operation of microchip ion traps with extremely high magnetic field gradients for multi-ion quantum gates.

  19. Resonant electron diffusion as a saturation process of the synchrotron maser instability. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of resonant electron diffusion as an effective saturation process of the auroral kilometric radiation has been formulated. The auroral kilometric radiation is assumed to be amplified by the synchrotron maser instability that is driven by an electron distribution of the loss-cone type. The calculated intensity of the saturated radiation is found to have a significantly lower value in comparison with that caused by the quasi-linear diffusion process as an alternative saturation process. This indicates that resonant electron diffusion dominates over quasi-linear diffusion in saturating the synchrotron maser instability.

  20. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 19th, Las Vegas, NV, July 20-22, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of research concerning the effects of nuclear and space radiation are presented. Topics discussed include the basic mechanisms of nuclear and space radiation effects, radiation effects in devices, and radiation effects in microcircuits, including studies of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in MOS structures, silicon solar cell damage from electrical overstress, radiation-induced charge dynamics in dielectrics, and the enhanced radiation effects on submicron narrow-channel NMOS. Also examined are topics in SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, hardness assurance and testing, energy deposition, desometry, and radiation transport, and single event phenomena. Among others, studies are presented concerning the limits to hardening electronic boxes to IEMP coupling, transient radiation screening of silicon devices using backside laser irradiation, the damage equivalence of electrons, protons, and gamma rays in MOS devices, and the single event upset sensitivity of low power Schottky devices.

  1. Role of additives in wood polymer composites. Relationship to analogous radiation grafting and curing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Garnett, John L.; Mohajerani, Shahroo

    1999-08-01

    Wood polymer composites (WPC) were prepared by impregnating an Australian softwood, Pinus radiata with methyl methacrylate which subsequently underwent in situ polymerisation utilising either γ radiation or the catalyst-accelerator method. Novel additives including thermal initiator, crosslinking agents, an inclusion compound and oxygen scavenger were incorporated to improve the polymer loading and properties of the resulting WPC. Polymer loadings of WPC obtained utilising the accelerator-catalyst method corresponded well with those obtained using γ radiation with 20 kGy radiation dose. The mechanistic significance of the current work in analogous radiation grafting and curing processes is discussed.

  2. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D - Annual report input for 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1996-10-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been completed at Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany, Oregon (TWCA) to provide {approximately}800-kg of applicable product forms, and two billets have been extruded from the ingot. Chemical compositions of the ingot and both extruded billets were acceptable. Material from these billets will be converted into product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor structure. Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RD Program, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RD components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, is continuing. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by electron beam, resistance, and friction welding processes and to Inconel 625 by friction welding.

  3. The scrapie disease process is unaffected by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.; Farquhar, C.F.; McConnell, I.; Davies, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The incubation period of scrapie, its degenerative neuropathology and the replication of its causal unconventional virus are all tightly controlled parameters of the experimental disease in mice. Each parameter can vary depending on the strain and dose of virus, on the route of infection, and on the host genotype. Exposure to whole-body gamma-irradiation from Cesium 137 has no effect on the progress or development of the disease, based on the three independent indices of incubation period, neuropathology, or infectibility by high or low doses of virus. These results are based on an extensive series of experiments in many mouse strains and are consistent using different strains (ME7, 22A, 79A, 87V) and doses of virus, routes of infection, timing and dose of radiation (3-15 Gy) administered as single or fractionated exposures with or without bone-marrow (b.m.) replacement therapy. Levels of infection in the spleen are unaltered after lethal whole-body irradiation of the scrapie-infected host, despite several-fold reductions in tissue mass due to the loss of proliferating myeloid and lymphoid precursor cells and their progeny. Contrary to our earlier suggestion, scrapie infection with the 22A virus does not reduce the effectiveness of post-exposure bone-marrow replacements to recolonize an infected host after repeated ionizing radiation totalling 15Gy. This work narrows the search for the candidate cells and biosynthetic systems which replicate the virus in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. Many programmed cellular events are radiation sensitive but protein synthesis is extremely radioresistant.

  4. 24 CFR 903.23 - What is the process by which HUD reviews, approves, or disapproves an Annual Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the process by which HUD reviews, approves, or disapproves an Annual Plan? 903.23 Section 903.23 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC...

  5. Latest Development of Infrared Radiation Heating for Food Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) heating could be an alternative technology for thermal and dehydration processing of food and agricultural products with many advantages, including high process and energy efficiencies, high product quality, improved food safety and reduced environmental pollution. This paper reviews ...

  6. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  7. 1986 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 23rd, Providence, RI, July 21-23, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Thomas D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on the effects of nuclear and space radiation on electronic hardware gives attention to topics in the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, electronic device radiation hardness assurance, SOI/SOS radiation effects, spacecraft charging and space radiation, IC radiation effects and hardening, single-event upset (SEU) phenomena and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Specific treatments encompass the generation of interface states by ionizing radiation in very thin MOS oxides, the microdosimetry of meson energy deposited on 1-micron sites in Si, total dose radiation and engineering studies, plasma interactions with biased concentrator solar cells, the transient imprint memory effect in MOS memories, mechanisms leading to SEU, and the vaporization and breakdown of thin columns of water.

  8. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  9. Development of Data Processing and Analysis Tools for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillet, N.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dumas, M.; Palau, J.-M.; Calvet, M.-C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the data processing methods and techniques of measurements made by several miniature radiation spectrometers flying on different types of carriers within the Earth's atmosphere at aviation and balloon altitudes.

  10. Radiation processing of water, oxygen and ozone ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teolis, Benjamin D.

    This thesis investigates sputtering, radiolysis and structural changes produced by ion irradiation in H2O, O2 and O 3 ices using several experimental techniques: mass spectrometry, microbalance gravimetry, reflectance spectroscopy and sputter depth profiling. The first measurements of the angular dependence of the sputtering of water ice are presented, showing that (i) the sputtering yield exhibits a cos -1.3theta dependence on the incidence angle theta of the projectiles (100 keV protons) and (ii) that the sputtered flux of H2O is more forward directed than that of O2. Using 100 keV Ar + projectiles, a complex fluence dependence in the sputtered flux of O2 is also identified. The fluence dependence is determined by (i) the thermal and irradiation history of the water ice and (ii) the deposition of ice overlayers. These results are explained by the production of trapped O2 in the ice, with the O2 concentration being governed by the rates of production, diffusion and removal of O 2 from the ice surface by sputtering and/or thermal desorption. Sputter depth profile measurements show that the primary fluence dependence of O 2 sputtering is due to the accumulation of trapped O2, and that O2 is produced preferentially near the ice surface due to out-diffusion of hydrogen in the form of H2 from that region. Removal of O2 from the surface is blocked if H2O is condensed concurrently with Ar+ irradiation, resulting in an enhancement of the concentration of O2 in the ice which is sufficient for the generation of ozone. This result represents the first reported synthesis of ozone by radiolysis of pure water ice, and may help to explain the presence of O3 in the surfaces of icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where sputtered and sublimed H2O recondense onto surfaces that are simultaneously subject to irradiation by magnetospheric ions. As in the case of water ice, the sputtering yields of solid O2 and O3 were found to depend on the occurrence of radiation chemistry in the

  11. Uniform bulk Material Processing using Multimode Microwave Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughan, Worth E.

    1999-06-18

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE{sub 10}-mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE{sub 11}-, TE{sub 01}- and TM{sub 01}-cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  12. Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughn, Worth E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  13. Determination of volatiles produced during radiation processing in Laurus cinnamomum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salum, D. C.; Araújo, M. M.; Fanaro, G. B.; Purgatto, E.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    In order to protect food from pathogenic microorganisms as well as increase its shelf-life, while keeping sensorial properties (e.g., odor and taste), which are important properties required by spice buyers, it is necessary to analyze volatile formation from irradiation of medicinal and food herbs. Possible changes in the odor of these herbs are evaluated by characterizing different radiation doses and effects on sensorial properties, in order to allow better application of the irradiation technology. The aim of the present study was to analyze volatile formation on cinnamon ( Laurus cinnamomum) samples after gamma irradiation. These samples were irradiated into plastic packages using a 60Co facility. Radiation doses applied were 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy. For the analysis of the samples, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was applied, while for the analysis of volatile compounds, CG/MS. Spice irradiation showed the highest decrease in volatile compounds. For L. cinnamomum, the irradiation decreased volatile compounds by nearly 56% and 89.5%, respectively, comparing to volatile from a sample which had not been previously irradiated.

  14. Basic physical and chemical processes in space radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.; Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of space ionizing radiation on polymers is investigated in terms of operative physical and chemical processes. A useful model of charged particle impact with a polymer was designed. Principle paths of molecular relaxation were identified and energy handling processes were considered. The focus of the study was on energy absorption and the immediately following events. Further study of the radiation degradation of polymers is suggested.

  15. Microwave-assisted chemical process for treatment of hazardous waste: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R.; Nandi, S.P.; Cleaveland, D.C.

    1987-10-01

    Microwave energy provides rapid in situ uniform heating and can be used to initiate chemical processes at moderate temperatures. We investigate the technical feasibility of microwave-assisted chemical processes for detoxification of liquid hazardous waste. Trichloroethylene, a major constituent of waste streams, was selected for this detoxification study. Experiments were performed to investigate the oxidative degradation of trichloroethylene over active carbons (with and without catalysts) in air streams with microwave in situ heating, and to examine the feasibility of regenerating the used carbons. This study established that trichloroethylene in a vapor stream can be adsorbed at room temperature on active carbon beds that are loaded with Cu and Cr catalysts. When the bed is heated by a microwave radiation to moderate temperatures (<400/sup 0/C) while a moist air stream is passed through it, the trichloroethylene is readily converted into less-noxious products such as HCl, CO, CO/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/. Conversion higher than 80% was observed. Furthermore, the used carbon bed can be conveniently regenerated by microwave heating while a moist-N/sub 2/ or moist-air stream is passed through the bed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Theory of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.; Lin, J.-T.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the influence of intense laser radiation on gas-phase molecular rate processes. Representations of the radiation field, the particle system, and the interaction involving these two entities are discussed from a general rather than abstract point of view. The theoretical methods applied are outlined, and the formalism employed is illustrated by application to a variety of specific processes. Quantum mechanical and semiclassical treatments of representative atom-atom and atom-diatom collision processes in the presence of a field are examined, and examples of bound-continuum processes and heterogeneous catalysis are discussed within the framework of both quantum-mechanical and semiclassical theories.

  17. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  18. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1993-08-31

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  19. Investigation of radiation keeping property of barite coated cloth via image processing method

    SciTech Connect

    Kilincarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.; Molla, T.; Akarslan, F.

    2012-09-06

    Preservative clothes which are able to absorb radiation beam are needed not only for saving people working at radioactive environment but also for saving others from natural and man-made radiation sources we are exposed in daily life. Barite is a mineral which can be used for armour plating because of high atomic numbered element barium constituent of barite. In this study, armour plating property of barite was applied to fabrics. Barite coated fabric having characteristic of keeping radiation was obtained by penetrating barite on cloth via coating method. Radiation keeping property of fabrics obtained was determined via image processing. The results of experiments showed that barite coated fabrics have blocked radiation more than normal fabrics have done.

  20. Enhancing Cloud Radiative Processes and Radiation Efficiency in the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Iacono, Michael J.

    2015-03-09

    The objective of this research has been to evaluate and implement enhancements to the computational performance of the RRTMG radiative transfer option in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Efficiency is as essential as accuracy for effective numerical weather prediction, and radiative transfer is a relatively time-consuming component of dynamical models, taking up to 30-50 percent of the total model simulation time. To address this concern, this research has implemented and tested a version of RRTMG that utilizes graphics processing unit (GPU) technology (hereinafter RRTMGPU) to greatly improve its computational performance; thereby permitting either more frequent simulation of radiative effects or other model enhancements. During the early stages of this project the development of RRTMGPU was completed at AER under separate NASA funding to accelerate the code for use in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Earth Observing System GEOS-5 global model. It should be noted that this final report describes results related to the funded portion of the originally proposed work concerning the acceleration of RRTMG with GPUs in WRF. As a k-distribution model, RRTMG is especially well suited to this modification due to its relatively large internal pseudo-spectral (g-point) dimension that, when combined with the horizontal grid vector in the dynamical model, can take great advantage of the GPU capability. Thorough testing under several model configurations has been performed to ensure that RRTMGPU improves WRF model run time while having no significant impact on calculated radiative fluxes and heating rates or on dynamical model fields relative to the RRTMG radiation. The RRTMGPU codes have been provided to NCAR for possible application to the next public release of the WRF forecast model.

  1. Consistency among microphysics-convection-radiation processes in a numerical forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Soo Ya; Park, Raeseol; Hong, Song-You

    2016-04-01

    Radiative fluxes are mainly affected by the cloud optical properties calculated with effective radius, water path of hydrometeors, and cloud fraction. A prognostic cloud fraction scheme, which considers the cloud fraction with increments as a result of each physics process, is implemented in the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) (Park et al., 2016). However, the original RRTMG scheme does not consider the hydrometeor information from convection processes, resulting in inconsistency between cloud process and radiation activity. To ensure consistency among physics processes, the amount of hydrometeors from both the cumulus parameterization scheme (CPS) and microphysics schemes is explicitly taken into account in computing radiative fluxes. The effects of this modification are tested for a heavy rainfall over Korea to identify the feedback between the precipitation and radiation processes. It is found that the information of hydrometeors from CPS tends to increase water path, which leads to larger cloud optical depth and cooling. Skill scores of the simulated precipitation in a medium-range forecast testbed confirm benefits of the consistent treatment of hydrometeors in both CPS and radiation processes.

  2. Experimental studies of some moderately fast processes initiated by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J.; Hodgson, B. W.; M. Hoey, Brigid; Land, E. J.; Lea, J. S.; Lindley, Elizabeth J.; Rushton, F. A. P.; Swallow, A. J.

    Numerous improvements have been made to the Paterson Institute linear accelerator since its installation in 1967. New light sources, improved light guidance, smaller cells and a wider range of photo-detecting devices are now in routine use. Data are collected and processed by a computer-based method which has replaced the original oscilloscope-based system. Processes taking place over more than a few seconds can be studied with an arrangement combining pulse radiolysis with an ordinary spectrophotometer and arrangements for "single-shot" studies of faster processes are now being designed. Detection methods are also available which do not rely on transmission of light, and transient changes in conductivity can be measured. Among the systems which have been extensively studied are the Fricke dosimeter, in which measured overall yields can now be quantitatively correlated with the rate constants of 34 individual reactions taking place. Studies have also been conducted with peptides and proteins in which electrochemically-driven charge transfers have been demonstrated between methionine, tryptophan, tyrosine and cysteine/cystine units. Free radical reactions in Mitomycin C have been elucidated which are consistent with pulse radiolysis observations and the formation of radiolytic products as determined by HPLC. Adriamycin reduction has also been studied: the Adriamycin semiquinone is unusually stable with respect to dismutation but its lifetime is limited by a decomposition process in which daunosamine is expelled. The expulsion is followed by a further rearrangement. Many of the reactions investigated require tens or hundreds of seconds to reach essential completion.

  3. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  4. Double Langmuir frequency radiation due to transformation processes in turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. N.; Panchenko, V. G.; Beloshenko, N. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the transformation process of longitudinal Langmuir wave into the transverse electromagnetic wave in turbulent plasma subjected to an upper hybrid pump. The case, when upper hybrid pump wave decays into daughter and ion - sound waves is considered. The transformation of the Langmuir wave into electromagnetic one is considered as the possible mechanism of energy radiation from the plasma. It is shown that the frequency of such radiation is chosen to be near double electron Langmuir frequency 2ωpe . These results give us the possibility to explain the nature of radiation from the laboratory and cosmic plasmas (particularly, from the solar crown).

  5. Effects of low-intensity ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation on inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, K V; Shumilina, Yu V; Yakushina, V S; Gapeev, A B; Sadovnikov, V B; Chemeris, N K

    2004-04-01

    Low-intensity ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation (42 GHz, 100 microW/cm(2)) reduces the severity of inflammation and inhibits production of active oxygen forms by inflammatory exudate neutrophils only in mice with inflammatory process. These data suggest that some therapeutic effects of electromagnetic radiation can be explained by its antiinflammatory effect which is realized via modulation of functional activity of neutrophils in the focus of inflammation.

  6. Role of impurity molecules in radiation-initiated processes in solid carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kavetskii, V.G.; Yudin, I.V.

    1992-09-01

    Extension of the use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medicinal preparations is stimulating the study of radiation-initiated processes in solid polyhydroxyl matrixes containing impurities of various organic substances. Such investigations make it possible to establish common characteristics of the effect of impurity molecules on the radiolysis of organic crystals. The materials of the investigation were lactose and rhamnose, precipitated by slow evaporation of the solvent from saturated aqueous solutions with different dihydroxyacetone contents. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  8. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  9. State institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" 2012 annual report.

    PubMed

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovych, L

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 annual results of NRCRM activity in research and its implementation in healthcare practice, aid to survivors, and international collaboration were summarized in the report by Director General of the NRCRM D.A. Bazyka at the Scientific Council meeting of NAMS on March 26, 2013.

  10. The EM SSAB Annual Work Plan Process: Focusing Board Efforts and Resources - 13667

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ralph

    2013-07-01

    One of the most daunting tasks for any new member of a local board of the Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) is to try to understand the scope of the clean-up activities going on at the site. In most cases, there are at least two or three major cleanup activities in progress as well as monitoring of past projects. When planning for future projects is added to the mix, the list of projects can be long. With the clean-up activities involving all major environmental media - air, water, soils, and groundwater, new EM SSAB members can find themselves totally overwhelmed and ineffective. Helping new members get over this initial hurdle is a major objective of EM and all local boards of the EM SSAB. Even as members start to understand the size and scope of the projects at a site, they can still be frustrated at the length of time it takes to see results and get projects completed. Many project and clean-up timelines for most of the sites go beyond 10 years, so it's not unusual for an EM SSAB member to see the completion of only 1 or 2 projects over the course of their 6-year term on the board. This paper explores the annual work planning process of the EM SSAB local boards, one tool that can be used to educate EM SSAB members into seeing the broader picture for the site. EM SSAB local work plans divide the site into projects focused on a specific environmental issue or media such as groundwater and/or waste disposal options. Projects are further broken down into smaller segments by highlighting major milestones. Using these metrics, local boards of the EM SSAB can start to quantify the effectiveness of the project in achieving the ultimate goal of site clean-up. These metrics can also trigger board advice and recommendations for EM. At the beginning of each fiscal year, the EM SSAB work plan provides a road map with quantifiable checkpoints for activities throughout the year. When the work plans are integrated with site-specific, enforceable

  11. General description of electromagnetic radiation processes based on instantaneous charge acceleration in ''endpoints''

    SciTech Connect

    James, Clancy W.; Falcke, Heino; Huege, Tim; Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-11-15

    We present a methodology for calculating the electromagnetic radiation from accelerated charged particles. Our formulation - the 'endpoint formulation' - combines numerous results developed in the literature in relation to radiation arising from particle acceleration using a complete, and completely general, treatment. We do this by describing particle motion via a series of discrete, instantaneous acceleration events, or 'endpoints', with each such event being treated as a source of emission. This method implicitly allows for particle creation and destruction, and is suited to direct numerical implementation in either the time or frequency domains. In this paper we demonstrate the complete generality of our method for calculating the radiated field from charged particle acceleration, and show how it reduces to the classical named radiation processes such as synchrotron, Tamm's description of Vavilov-Cherenkov, and transition radiation under appropriate limits. Using this formulation, we are immediately able to answer outstanding questions regarding the phenomenology of radio emission from ultra-high-energy particle interactions in both the earth's atmosphere and the moon. In particular, our formulation makes it apparent that the dominant emission component of the Askaryan effect (coherent radio-wave radiation from high-energy particle cascades in dense media) comes from coherent 'bremsstrahlung' from particle acceleration, rather than coherent Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation.

  12. Radiative transfer in real atmospheres. [the implications for recognition processing of multispectral remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of multiple radiation scattering in an atmosphere characterized by various amounts of aerosol absorption and different particle size distributions was investigated. The visible part of the spectrum was emphasized, including the effect of ozone absorption. An atmosphere bounded by a nonhomogenous, Lambertian surface was also studied, along with the effect of background radiation on target in terms of various atmopheric and geometric conditions. Results of the investigation indicate that comtaminated atmospheres can change the radiation field by a considerable amount, and that the effect of non-uniform surface significantly alters the intrinsic radiation from a target element. The implications of these results for the recognition processing of multispectral remote sensing data is discussed.

  13. Radiative association of He(23P) with lithium cations: Π → Σ processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámečníková, Martina; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.; Soldán, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    The radiative association processes originating in the 13 Π continuum of the He (23 P) +Li+ collisional system are investigated in this study. The calculations of the dynamic collision processes are based on highly accurate state-of-the-art ab initio calculations of the potential energy functions for the 13 Π and the three lowest 3Σ states of HeLi+ and the associated transition dipole-moment functions. Cross-sections for the spontaneous and stimulated radiative association processes are calculated as functions of collision energy. The corresponding rate coefficients characterizing the efficiency of the formation of the molecular ion in its a3Σ+ , b3Σ+ , and c3Σ+ states from the initial 13 Π state are obtained over a wide range of temperatures. At very low temperatures the 1 → b process has a maximum rate-coefficient value of about 7.9 ×10-13cm3s-1 , whereas process 1 → a reaches its maximum value of 2.0 ×10-13cm3s-1 at a temperature of about 500 K. Altogether the three radiative association processes investigated here can be considered as the continuum-to-bound state radiative transition part of the total quenching of the initial collision channel.

  14. Radiation effects and micromechanics of SiC/SiC composites. Annual technical report, November 15, 1991--November 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1992-12-01

    The basic displacement damage process in SiC has been fully explored, and the mechanisms identified. Major modifications have been made to the theory of damage dosimetry in Fusion, Fission and Ion Simulation studies of Sic. For the first time, calculations of displacements per atoms in SiC can be made in any irradiation environment. Applications to irradiations in fusion first wall neutron spectra (ARIES and PROMETHEUS) as well as in fission spectra (HIFIR and FFTF) are given. Nucleation of helium-filled cavities in SiC was studied, using concepts of stability theory to determine the size of the critical nucleus under continuous generation of helium and displacement damage. It is predicted that a bimodal distribution of cavity sizes is likely to occur in heavily irradiated SiC. A study of the chemical compatibility of SiC composite structures with fusion reactor coolants at high-temperatures was undertaken. It was shown that SiC itself is chemically very stable in helium coolants in the temperature range 500--1000{degree}C. However, current fiber/matrix interfaces, such as C and BN are not. The fracture mechanics of high-temperature matrix cracks with bridging fibers is now in progress. A fundamentally unique approach to study the propagation and interaction of cracks in a composite was initiated. The main focus of our research during the following period will be : (1) Theory and experiments for the micro-mechanics of high-temperature failure; and (2) Analysis of radiation damage and microstructure evolution.

  15. Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2009-02-01

    The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to

  16. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  17. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  18. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations and process engineering. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioglio, G.; McCorkle, K.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Rode, J.S.

    1980-03-01

    A program to investigate thermochemical water splitting has been under way at General Atomic Company (GA) since October 1972. This document is an annual progress report of Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored process development work on the GA sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. The work consisted of laboratory bench-scale investigations, demonstration of the process in a closed-loop cycle demonstrator, and process engineering design studies. A bench-scale system, consisting of three subunits, has been designed to study the cycle under continuous flow conditions. The designs of subunit I, which models the main solution reaction and product separation, and subunit II, which models the concentration and decomposition of sulfuric acid, were presented in an earlier annual report. The design of subunit III, which models the purification and decomposition of hydrogen iodide, is given in this report. Progress on the installation and operation of subunits I and II is described. A closed-loop cycle demonstrator was installed and operated based on a DOE request. Operation of the GA sulfur-iodine cycle was demonstrated in this system under recycle conditions. The process engineering addresses the flowsheet design of a large-scale production process consisting of four chemical sections (I through IV) and one helium heat supply section (V). The completed designs for sections I through V are presented. The thermal efficiency of the process calculated from the present flowsheet is 47%.

  19. The Collisional and Radiative Processes of the Hydroxyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Kristen Lisa

    1995-01-01

    The OH radical is an important species in the chemistry of atmospheric and combustion environments, where an understanding of OH concentration and chemistry is necessary to create and validate chemical models. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is used with great success in OH detection, but OH LIF measurements require a vast knowledge of the collisional and spectroscopic properties of OH. Information is still lacking, especially concerning vibrational levels v^' > 0 of the rm A^2Sigma^+ electronic state. We investigate transition probabilities and collisional processes of these higher vibrational levels. Experimental vibrational band transition probabilities from v^' = 3 and 2 of OH rm A^2Sigma^+ are needed to determine the electronic transition moment for the rm A^2Sigma^+ -rm X^2Pi_{i } system to calculate a consistent set of rotational and vibrational dependent transition probabilities for uses including rm X^2Pi_ {i} temperature determinations and rm A^2Sigma^+ and rm X^2Pi_{i} nascent population determinations. Using LIF in a low -pressure CH_4/O_2 flame, we measured relative emission intensities for vibrational bands (3,0) through (3,5) and (2,0) through (2,6). Our emission intensities have been used in another study to determine the best rm A^2 Sigma^+-rm X^2 Pi_{i} electronic transition moment. For quantitative OH concentration measurements in high pressure flames exciting the predissociative v ^' = 3 level, one must account for vibrational energy transfer (VET). We measure the amounts of VET occurring from v^' = 3 in CH_4/O_2 , CH_4/air, and H _2/O_2 flames at pressures between 14 and 760 Torr. Significant amounts of VET occur in all flames and must be accounted for to get accurate OH concentrations. Stratospheric OH concentration measurement employs OH rm A^2Sigma^+v ^' = 1 excitation, which requires accurate VET and quenching cross sections for major colliders. We use LIF to measure the v^ ' = 1 VET and quenching cross sections for N_2, O_2 and CO_2

  20. Process-based distributed hydrological modelling of annual floods in the Upper Zambezi using the Desert Flood Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhardt, Markus; Sven, Kralisch; Manfred, Fink; Daniel, Butchart-Kuhlmann; Anthony, Chabala; Melanie, Fleischer; Jörg, Helmschrot; Wilson, Phiri; Tina, Trautmann; Henry, Zimba; Imasiku, Nyambe

    2016-04-01

    Wetland areas are especially sensitive to changes in hydrological conditions. The catchment of the Luanginga River, a tributary of the Upper Zambezi which covers about 33000 km², shows this characteristic in an exemplary way. Ranging from the Angolan highlands to the Barotse floodplain of the Zambezi River , it is characterized by an annual flow regime and extensive wetland areas. Due to its annual flooding with peak times in April, the area features exceptionally fertile soils with high agricultural production and is further known for its rich cultural heritage, making it especially sensitive to changes of hydrological conditions . To identify possible changes related to projected climate and land management change, especially in the area of the floodplain, there is a need to apply a process-based distributed hydrological model of the annual floods . Remote sensing techniques have shown to be appropriate to identify the extend of the important flooding and were used to validate the model in space and time. The results of this research can be used as a basis with which to provide evidence-based advice and information for all decision-makers and stakeholders in the region. For this assessment , such a modelling approach is applied to adequately represent hydrological processes and to address key water resources management issues at sub-basin levels. Introducing a wetland simulation extension, the model allows to represent the annual flood regime of the system and thus to address the effect of climate change and upstream land use changes on flow regimes in the downstream watershed. In order to provide a basis for model validation and calibration, the inundated area was determined using the Desert Flood Index (DFI), which was generated from a time series of Landsat images. We will give a short introduction to the study area and related water resources management problems, present the intended model structure and show first simulations and model validation results

  1. Investigation of high-Tc superconducting tunnel junction after laser radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broslavez, U. U.; Fomitchev, A. A.; Yakshin, Mikhail A.

    1995-03-01

    We investigate dynamic resistance (dV/dI) of high-Tc superconducting thin films and tunnel junction after laser radiation processing. The films of YBaCuO were prepared by laser and magnetron ablation on Al2O3 substrates. The tunnel junctions were made by fine silver wires attached to the processing surfaces. The resistance (dV/dI) was determined by a four-probe measurement. The YAG laser operating in Q-switched mode was used to interact with superconductors. The anomaly is observed in the current-voltage curve of the junction after radiation interaction. We observe hysteresis in the shape of V(I) curve. These effects are not observed without laser radiation interaction and in this case the behavior of tunnel junction is described for the standard BCS theory.

  2. Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang

    2007-07-01

    Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. A Markov decision process approach to temporal modulation of dose fractions in radiation therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Ghate, A; Phillips, M H

    2009-07-21

    The current state of the art in cancer treatment by radiation optimizes beam intensity spatially such that tumors receive high dose radiation whereas damage to nearby healthy tissues is minimized. It is common practice to deliver the radiation over several weeks, where the daily dose is a small constant fraction of the total planned. Such a 'fractionation schedule' is based on traditional models of radiobiological response where normal tissue cells possess the ability to repair sublethal damage done by radiation. This capability is significantly less prominent in tumors. Recent advances in quantitative functional imaging and biological markers are providing new opportunities to measure patient response to radiation over the treatment course. This opens the door for designing fractionation schedules that take into account the patient's cumulative response to radiation up to a particular treatment day in determining the fraction on that day. We propose a novel approach that, for the first time, mathematically explores the benefits of such fractionation schemes. This is achieved by building a stylistic Markov decision process (MDP) model, which incorporates some key features of the problem through intuitive choices of state and action spaces, as well as transition probability and reward functions. The structure of optimal policies for this MDP model is explored through several simple numerical examples.

  4. The Annual Cosmic-Radiation Intensities 1391 - 2014; The Annual Heliospheric Magnetic Field Strengths 1391 - 1983, and Identification of Solar Cosmic-Ray Events in the Cosmogenic Record 1800 - 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; Beer, J.

    2015-10-01

    The annual cosmogenic ^{10}Be ice-core data from Dye 3 and the North Greenland Ice-core Project (NGRIP), and neutron-monitor data, 1951 - 2014, are combined to yield a record of the annual cosmic-ray intensity, 1391 - 2014. These data were then used to estimate the intensity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), 1391 - 1983. All of these annual data are provided in the Electronic Supplementary Material. Analysis of these annual data shows that there were significant impulsive increases in ^{10}Be production in the year following the very large solar cosmic-ray events of 1942, 1949, and 1956. There was an additional enhancement that we attribute to six high-altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. All of these enhancements result in underestimates of the strength of the HMF. An identification process is defined, resulting in a total of seven impulsive ^{10}Be events in the interval 1800 - 1942 prior to the first detection of a solar cosmic-ray event using ionization chambers. Excision of the ^{10}Be impulsive enhancements yields a new estimate of the HMF, designated B(PCR-2). Five of the seven ^{10}Be enhancements prior to 1941 are well correlated with the occurrence of very great geomagnetic storms. It is shown that a solar cosmic-ray event similar to that of 25 July 1946, and occurring in the middle of the second or third year of the solar cycle, may merge with the initial decreasing phase of the 11-year cycle in cosmic-ray intensity and be unlikely to be detected in the ^{10}Be data. It is concluded that the occurrence rate for solar energetic-particle (SEP) events such as that on 23 February 1956 is about seven per century, and that there is an upper limit to the size of solar cosmic-ray events.

  5. Food packaging materials and radiation processing of food: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.

    Food is usually packaged to prevent microbial contamination and spoilage. Ionizing radiation can be applied to food-packaging materials in two ways: (i) sterilization of packaging materials for aseptic packaging, and (ii) radiation processing of prepackaged food. In aseptic packaging, a sterile package is filled with a sterile product in a microbiologically controlled environment. In irradiation of prepackaged food, the food and the packaging material are irradiated simultaneously. For both applications, the radiation stability of the packaging material is a key consideration if the technology is to be used successfully. To demonstrate the radiation stability of the packaging material, it must be shown that irradiation does not significantly alter the physical and chemical properties of the material. The irradiated material must protect the food from environmental contamination while maintaining its organoleptic and toxicological properties. Single-layer plastics cannot meet the requirements of either application. Multilayered structures produced by coextrusion would likely satisfy the demands of radiation processing prepackaged food. In aseptic packaging, the package is irradiated prior to filling, making demands on toxicological safety less stringent. Therefore, multilayered structures produced by coextrusion, lamination or co-injection moulding could satisfy the requirements.

  6. Coherent control of radiation patterns of nonlinear multiphoton processes in nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Papoff, Francesco; McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. We derive conditions on the external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. The control introduces narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26155833

  7. E-Beam Processing of Polymer Matrix Composites for Multifunctional Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Wilson, John W.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Chang, Chie K.; Kiefer, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Aliphatic polymers were identified as optimum radiation shielding polymeric materials for building multifunctional structural elements for in-space habitats. Conceptual damage tolerant configurations of polyolefins have been proposed, but many manufacturing issues relied on methods and materials which have sub-optimal radiation shielding characteristics (for example, epoxy matrix and adhesives). In the present approach, we shall investigate e-beam processing technologies for inclusion of high-strength aliphatic polymer reinforcement structures into a highly cross-linked polyolefin matrix. This paper reports the baseline thermo-mechanical properties of low density polyethylene and highly crystallized polyethylene.

  8. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 14th, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va., July 12-15, 1977, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Topics related to processing and hardness assurance are considered, taking into account the radiation hardening of CMOS technologies, technological advances in the manufacture of radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuits, CMOS hardness assurance through process controls and optimized design procedures, the application of operational amplifiers to hardened systems, a hard off-the-shelf SG1524 pulse width modulator, and the gamma-induced voltage breakdown anomaly in a Schottky diode. Basic mechanisms are examined, giving attention to chemical and structural aspects of the irradiation behavior of SiO2 films on silicon, experimental observations of the chemistry of the SiO2/Si interface, leakage current phenomena in irradiated SOS devices, the avalanche injection of holes into SiO2, the low-temperature radiation response of Al2O3 gate insulators, and neutron damage mechanisms in silicon at 10 K. Other subjects discussed are related to radiation effects in devices and circuits, space radiation effects, and aspects of simulation, energy deposition, and dosimetry.

  9. Review on the production process and uses of controlled rheology polypropylene—Gamma radiation versus electron beam processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugão, A. B.; Otaguro, H.; Parra, D. F.; Yoshiga, A.; Lima, L. F. C. P.; Artel, B. W. H.; Liberman, S.

    2007-11-01

    Controlled rheology polypropylene grades are established commodities in the polymer processing market. However, new types, mainly the so-called high melt strength polypropylene (HMSPP) grades, are being introduced in the last two decades and radiation processing has played an important role. The melt strength properties of a polymer increases with molecular weight and with long-chain branching due to the increase in the entanglement level. As polypropylene (PP) is a linear polymer, the way to improve its elongational viscosity is by the production of a bi-modal polymer. Basell's patents claim the production of long-chain branching on PP by irradiating with electrons under oxygen free atmosphere, followed by two heating steps to allow radical recombination and annihilation reaction. Some other companies have issued patents using electron beam processing, but so far there is no actual production other than the Basell one. As a result of a research joint effort, IPEN, BRASKEM (the biggest Brazilian polymer producer) and EMBRARAD (the major Brazilian radiation processing center) developed a new process to produce HMSPP based on gamma processing. This paper will address some characteristics of each technology and the main industrial opportunities.

  10. Sensorial analysis evaluation in cereal bars preserved by ionizing radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Araújo, M. M.; Fanaro, G. B.; Rela, P. R.; Mancini-Filho, J.

    2007-11-01

    Gamma-rays utilized as a food-processing treatment to eliminate insect contamination is well established in food industries. Recent troubles in Brazilian cereal bars commercialization require a special consumer's attention because some products were contaminated by insects. To solve the problem, food-irradiation treatment was utilized as a safe and effective solution. The final product was free of insect contamination. The aim of this study was to determine the best radiation dose processing utilized to disinfestations and detect some change on sensorial characteristic by sensorial analysis in cereal bars. In this study, three different kinds of cereal bars were purchased in São Paulo (Brazil) in supermarkets and irradiated with 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 kGy at "Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares" (IPEN-CNEN/SP). The samples were treated with ionizing radiation using a 60Co gamma-ray facility (Gammacell 220, A.E.C.L.). That radiation doses were used successfully as an anti-insect treatment in the cereal bars, since in some food industries doses up to 3.0 kGy are used to guarantee at least a dose of 1.0 kGy in internal cereal bars package. Sensorial analysis was necessary since cereal bars contain ingredients very sensitive to ionizing radiation process.

  11. Effect of radiation process on antinutrients and HCl extractability of calcium, phosphorus and iron during processing and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, ElShazali Ahmed; Abdelraheem Ali, Nahid; Ahmed, Salma Hashim; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A.; Babiker, Elfadil E.

    2010-07-01

    Whole and dehulled flours of millet cultivars Ashana and Dembi were stored for 30 and 60 days before and after radiation and/or cooking. Phytic acid and polyphenols contents were assayed for all treatments. The results revealed that the storage period was found to have no effect on phytate and polyphenols contents. Moreover, dehulling of the grains reduced more than 50% of phytate and polyphenols of both cultivars. Cooking of the raw whole and dehulled flour significantly ( P≤0.05) reduced phytate and polyphenols contents for both cultivars. Radiation process alone had no effect on phytate and polyphenols contents but when followed by cooking significantly ( P≤0.05) reduced the level of such antinutrients for the whole and dehulled flour of both cultivars. Dehulling alone significantly ( P≤0.05) decreased Ca and P content but slightly decreased Fe content. Radiation alone or in combination with cooking was found to have slight effect on minerals content of the whole and dehulled raw flour for both cultivars. Cooking alone or in combination with radiation of whole or dehulled raw flour significantly ( P≤0.05) improved the extractable Ca but had no significant ( P≤0.05) effect on extractable P and Fe for both cultivars.

  12. Process development studies of the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol. Semi annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1981-04-01

    Progress in the following process development studio is reported: economic evaluation of hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation schemes, economic evaluation of alternative fermentation processes, raw materials evaluation, and evaluation of pretreatment process. Microbiological and enzymatic studies reported are: production of cellulase enzyme from high yielding mutants, hydrolysis reactor development, xylose fermentation, and xylanese production. Fermentation and separation processes include: process development studies on vacuum fermentation and distillation, evaluation of low energy separations processes, large scale hollow fiber reactor development. (MHR)

  13. Towards a Process-based Representation of Annual Crops Within the Land Surface Model JULES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Hoof, C.; Vidale, P.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a generic crop structure within the Joint UK Land surface Exchange Scheme JULES (Cox, 1998) that is able to evaluate the interaction between growing crops and the environment at large scales for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. JULES was designed to simulate land surface processes in natural ecosystems. The importance of representing agricultural land within global biosphere models has been pointed out in many studies (De Noblet-Ducoudre et al., 2004; Bondeau 2005 et al.). Prior to any model development, the sensitivity of JULES to morphological and physiological differences between natural vegetation and crops has been investigated by reparameterising a natural C3 grass into a C3 crop. For a case study of fallow versus wheat at Grignon (France), the model output shows important soil water savings after crop harvest at the beginning of the summer. Owing to the lack of a rooting system, the deeper soil moisture cannot contribute anymore to the moisture flux to the atmosphere. On a shorter timescale, the harvest, and by consequence the sudden appearance of bare soil, also disrupt the energy and momentum fluxes between surface and atmosphere. Having established the sensitivity of the JULES system to a crop-like forcing, some components from the crop model SUCROS (Goudriaan and van Laar, 1994) that are relevant to the global water, energy and carbon cycles, have been introduced in JULES. The new version of JULES, denoted by JULES-SUCROS, incorporates crops and natural vegetation within a single modelling framework, without discontinuity in the photosynthesis-assimilation scheme between both vegetation types. Simulations have been performed with JULES-SUCROS for wheat at the Grignon site in current and doubled CO2 atmospheric conditions. Changing atmospheric conditions in JULES-SUCROS affects the sowing date and the length of the growing season. The results show that the positive effect of the CO2 fertilisation partly

  14. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  15. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  16. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  17. Effects of simultaneous radiofrequency radiation and chemical exposure of mammalian cells. Volume 1. Annual report, 2 January-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.

    1987-08-01

    The major objective of this project was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation (RFR), at power densities and specific absorption rate (SAR) values which can result in temperature increases in the exposure medium, can affect the extent of chemically induced toxicity, mutagenicity, sister chromatid exchange, or chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells. The in-vitro system used for toxicity and mutagenicity studies is the mouse leukemic L5178Y cell thymidine kinase locus mutation assay.

  18. The Interaction of Radiative and Dynamical Processes during a Simulated Sudden Stratospheric Warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Blackshear, W. T.; Fairlie, T. D.; Grose, W. L.; Turner, R. E.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of a spontaneous sudden stratospheric warming that occurred during a 2-year integration of the Langley Research Center Atmospheric Simulation Model is presented. The simulated warming resembles observed `wave 1' warmings in the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere and provides an opportunity to investigate the radiative and dynamical processes occurring during the warming event. Isentropic analysis of potential vorticity sources and sinks indicates that dynamically induced departures from radiative equilibrium play an important role in the warming event. Enhanced radiative cooling associated with a series of upper stratospheric warm pools leads to radiative dampening within the polar vortex. Within the `surf zone' large-scale radiative cooling leads to diabatic advection of high potential vorticity air from aloft. Lagrangian area diagnostics of the simulated warming agree well with LIMS analyses. Dynamical mixing is shown to account for the majority of the decrease in the size of the polar vortex during the simulated warming. An investigation of the nonlinear deformation of material lines that are initially coincident with diagnosed potential vorticity isopleths is conducted to clarify the relationship between the Lagrangian area diagnostics and potential vorticity advection during wave breaking events.

  19. Inter-annual variability of exchange processes at the outer Black Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Wobus, Fred; Yuan, Dongliang; Wang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    The advection of cold water below the surface mixed layer has a significant role in shaping the properties of the Cold Intermediate Layer (CIL) in the Black Sea, and thus the horizontal redistribution of nutrients. The minimal temperature of the CIL in the southwest deep region of the sea in summer was shown to be lower than the winter surface temperature at the same location, indicating the horizontal advective nature of CIL formation in the area (Kolesnikov, 1953). In addition to advection in the deep area of the sea, the transport of cold waters from the northwest Black Sea shelf across the shelf break in winter was shown to contribute to the formation of the CIL (Filippov, 1968; Staneva and Stanev, 1997). However less is known of the exchanges between the CIL waters and the outer shelf areas in summer, when a surface mixed layer and the underlying seasonal thermocline are formed. Ivanov et al. (1997) suggested that the cross frontal exchange within the CIL is strongly inhibited, so that CIL waters formed in the deep sea (i.e. offshore of the Rim Current) do not replenish the CIL waters onshore of the Rim Current (also known as near-bottom shelf waters, or BSW), due to strong cross frontal gradients in potential vorticity (PV). To the contrary, Shapiro et al. (2011) analysed in-situ observations over the period of 1950-2001 and showed a high correlation between the CIL temperatures in the open sea and outer shelf. However, the statistical methods alone were not able to clearly establish the relation between the cause and the consequences. In this study we use a 3D numerical model of the Black Sea (NEMO-SHELF-BLS) to quantify the exchange of CIL waters between the open sea and the outer northwest Black Sea shelf and to assess its significance for the replenishment of BSW on the outer shelf. The model has a resolution of 1/16º latitude × 1/12º longitude and 33 levels in the vertical. In order to represent near-bottom processes better, the model uses a hybrid

  20. Investigation of microscopic radiation damage in waste forms using ODNMR and AEM techniques. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.

    1997-09-01

    'This project seeks to understand the microscopic effects of radiation damage in nuclear waste forms. The authors approach to this challenge encompasses studies in electron microscopy, laser spectroscopy, and computational modeling and simulation. During this first year of the project, efforts have focused on a-decay induced microscopic damage in crystalline orthophosphates (YPO{sub 4} and LuPO{sub 4}) that contain the short-lived a-emitting isotope {sup 244}Cm (t{sub 1/2} = 18.1 y). The samples that they studied were synthesized in 1980 and the initial {sup 244}Cm concentration was {approximately}1%. Studying these materials is of importance to nuclear waste management because of the opportunity to gain insight into accumulated radiation damage and the influence of aging on such damage. These factors are critical to the long-term performance of actual waste forms [1]. Lanthanide orthophosphates, including LuPO{sub 4} and YPO{sub 4}, have been suggested as waste forms for high level nuclear waste [2] and potential hosts for excess weapons plutonium [3,4]. The work is providing insight into the characteristics of these previously known radiation-resistant materials. They have observed loss of crystallinity (partial amorphization) as a direct consequence of prolonged exposure to intense alpha radiolysis in these materials. More importantly, the observation of microscopic cavities in these aged materials provides evidence of significant chemical decomposition that may be difficult to detect in the earlier stages of radiation damage. The preliminary results show that, in characterizing crystalline compounds as high level nuclear waste forms, chemical decomposition effects may be more important than lattice amorphization which has been the focus of many previous studies. More extensive studies, including in-situ analysis of the dynamics of thermal annealing of self-radiation induced amorphization and cavity formation, will be conducted on these aged {sup 244}Cm

  1. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  2. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  3. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1985: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. This is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages-at-irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the development period. The basic experiment under the contract contains 1,680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in October 1972. The annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of November 21, 1984 through November 20, 1985.

  4. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report, 1988: Health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining, in a carefully controlled animal experiment, the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. This is a long-term (life span) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages-at-irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the developmental period. The basic experiment under the contract contains 1,680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in February 1973. The annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of November 21, 1987 through November 20, 1988.

  5. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1986: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. This is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages-at-irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the development period. The basis experiment under this contract contains 1,680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in October 1972. The annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of November 21, 1985 through November 20, 1986.

  6. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1984: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experimentthe life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. This is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages-at-irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the developmental period. The basic experiment under this contract contains 1,680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in October 1972. This annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of November 21, 1983 through November 20, 1984.

  7. Radiation-induced crosslinking of polyacrylonitrile fibers and the subsequent regulative effect on the preoxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weihua; Wang, Mouhua; Xing, Zhe; Qi, Yingna; Wu, Guozhong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the radiation effect on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers as well as on the preoxidation process, PAN fibers were irradiated by γ-rays at room temperature at 50-500 kGy in vacuum and then were thermally oxidized in air. Gel fraction determination indicated that γ irradiation led to the predominant crosslinking of PAN fibers, with G values (the number of event per 100 eV absorbed) of G(X)=0.28 and G(S)=0.16 for chain crosslinking and scission, respectively. It was found that irradiation caused a slight change in the crystal structure and tensile strength at low dose. Radiation led to a reduction of the onset temperature of cyclization reaction and moderated the exothermic behavior. The density of the PAN fibers after thermal oxidation was used to evaluate the preoxidation extent. It was proven that radiation could significantly accelerate the preoxidation process and consequently shortened the preoxidation time. Radiation crosslinking may have potential application in the production of PAN-based carbon fibers.

  8. Decomposition of two haloacetic acids in water using UV radiation, ozone and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunping; Guo, Jinsong; Yang, Min; Junji, Hirotsuji; Deng, Rongsen

    2009-03-15

    The decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), from water was studied by means of single oxidants: ozone, UV radiation; and by the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by combinations of O(3)/UV radiation, H(2)O(2)/UV radiation, O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/H(2)O(2)/UV radiation. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to elucidate the decomposition of HAAs. Single O(3) or UV did not result in perceptible decomposition of HAAs within the applied reaction time. O(3)/UV showed to be more suitable for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA in water among the six methods of oxidation. Decomposition of DCAA was easier than TCAA by AOPs. For O(3)/UV in the semi-continuous mode, the effective utilization rate of ozone for HAA decomposition decreased with ozone addition. The kinetics of HAAs decomposition by O(3)/UV and the influence of coexistent humic acids and HCO(3)(-) on the decomposition process were investigated. The decomposition of the HAAs by the O(3)/UV accorded with the pseudo-first-order mode under the constant initial dissolved O(3) concentration and fixed UV radiation. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the decomposition of DCAA was more than four times that for TCAA. Humic acids can cause the H(2)O(2) accumulation and the decrease in rate constants of HAAs decomposition in the O(3)/UV process. The rate constants for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA decreased by 41.1% and 23.8%, respectively, when humic acids were added at a concentration of 1.2mgTOC/L. The rate constants decreased by 43.5% and 25.9%, respectively, at an HCO(3)(-) concentration of 1.0mmol/L.

  9. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  10. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  11. Cellulose based cationic adsorbent fabricated via radiation grafting process for treatment of dyes waste water.

    PubMed

    Goel, Narender Kumar; Kumar, Virendra; Misra, Nilanjal; Varshney, Lalit

    2015-11-05

    A cationized adsorbent was prepared from cellulosic cotton fabric waste via a single step-green-radiation grafting process using gamma radiation source, wherein poly[2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PMAETC) was covalently attached to cotton cellulose substrate. Radiation grafted (PMAETC-g-cellulose) adsorbent was investigated for removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions using two model dyes: Acid Blue 25 (AB25) and Acid Blue 74 (AB74). The equilibrium adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, whereas kinetic data was analyzed by pseudo first order, pseudo second order, intra particle diffusion and Boyd's models. The PMAETC-g-cellulose adsorbent with 25% grafting yield exhibited equilibrium adsorption capacities of ∼ 540.0mg/g and ∼ 340.0mg/g for AB25 and AB74, respectively. Linear and nonlinear fitting of adsorption data suggested that the equilibrium adsorption process followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, whereas, the kinetic adsorption process followed pseudo-second order model. The multi-linearities observed in the intra-particle kinetic plots suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling process in the adsorption of acid dyes on the adsorbent, which was further supported by Boyd's model. The adsorbent could be regenerated by eluting the adsorbed dye from the adsorbent and could be repeatedly used.

  12. Constraints to the potential efficiency of converting solar radiation into phytoenergy in annual crops: from leaf biochemistry to canopy physiology and crop ecology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; Struik, Paul C

    2015-11-01

    A new simple framework was proposed to quantify the efficiency of converting incoming solar radiation into phytoenergy in annual crops. It emphasizes the need to account for (i) efficiency gain when scaling up from the leaf level to the canopy level, and (ii) efficiency loss due to incomplete canopy closure during early and late phases of the crop cycle. Equations are given to estimate losses due to the constraints in various biochemical or physiological steps. For a given amount of daily radiation, a longer daytime was shown to increase energy use efficiency, because of the convex shape of the photosynthetic light response. Due to the higher cyclic electron transport, C4 leaves were found to have a lower energy loss via non-photochemical quenching, compared with C3 leaves. This contributes to the more linear light response in C4 than in C3 photosynthesis. Because of this difference in the curvature of the light response, canopy-to-leaf photosynthesis ratio, benefit from the optimum acclimation of the leaf nitrogen profile in the canopy, and productivity gain from future improvements in leaf photosynthetic parameters and canopy architecture were all shown to be higher in C3 than in C4 species. The indicative efficiency of converting incoming solar radiation into phytoenergy is ~2.2 and 3.0% in present C3 and C4 crops, respectively, when grown under well-managed conditions. An achievable efficiency via future genetic improvement was estimated to be as high as 3.6 and 4.1% for C3 and C4 crops, respectively.

  13. Identification of Diurnal, Seasonal and Inter-Annual Variability Across SE Asian Field Observations of key Water Cycle Variables: Rainfall, net Radiation, Total Evaporation and River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solera García, M. A.; Tych, W.; Chappell, N.

    2007-12-01

    The identification of periodic patterns in water cycle variables is critical to the understanding of land-atmosphere interactions, climate change and the evaluation of General Circulation Model (GCM) output. SE Asia in particular plays a very important role on the global climate because it is a large source of energy and water fluxes into the upper atmosphere. Cycle identification is carried out following the Data Based Mechanistic (DBM) philosophy, which focuses on the use of parsimonious, rigorous models which are characterised by lack of a priori assumptions, built in uncertainty analysis and final model acceptance dependent on the physical interpretation of the results. The DBM tool used here is the Unobserved Component - Dynamic Harmonic Regression (UC-DHR) model, which is a statistical method that allows the identification of variability in time series by introducing Time Variable Parameter (TVP) estimation of harmonic components. UC-DHR is not scale dependent and was thus applied to both hourly (to investigate diurnal variation) and fortnightly datasets (for intra- and inter-annual variability). The data used in the analysis has been gathered from existing catchment datasets for three regions of tropical SE Asia, namely Northern Thailand, Central Peninsular Malaysia and Northeast Borneo. These regions were chosen because they represent the hydro-climatic gradient (seasonal to equatorial) present within the tropics and because SE Asia has the most extensive set of catchment/plot studies within the humid tropics. Results show modeling tools were able to quantify the main patterns present in the observations throughout different time scales (diurnal, intra-annual and inter-annual) and the strength of the correlation pattern between the four hydro-climatic variables. The subsequent discussion focuses on the physical processes behind those patterns (e.g. diurnal variability caused by local convection due to solar heating; impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation

  14. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Osawa, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge2Sb2Te5 film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width (ΔE/E ˜ 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layers on laser power.

  15. Radiation-dose estimates and hazard evaluations for inhaled airborne radionuclides. Annual progress report, July 1981-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Mewhinney, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The objective was to conduct confirmatory research on aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiation dose distribution in animals following inhalation and to provide prediction of health consequences in humans due to airborne radioactivity which might be released in normal operations or under accident conditions during production of nuclear fuel composed of mixed oxides of U and Pu. Four research reports summarize the results of specific areas of research. The first paper details development of a method for determination of specific surface area of small samples of mixed oxide or pure PuO/sub 2/ particles. The second paper details the extension of the biomathematical model previously used to describe retention, distribution and excretion of Pu from these mixed oxide aerosols to include a description of Am and U components of these aerosols. The third paper summarizes the biological responses observed in radiation dose pattern studies in which dogs, monkeys and rate received inhalation exposures to either 750/sup 0/C heat treated UO/sub 2/ + PuO/sub 2/, 1750/sup 0/C heat-treated (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ or 850/sup 0/C heat-treated pure PuO/sub 2/. The fourth paper described dose-response studies in which rats were exposed to (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ or pure PuO/sub 2/. This paper updates earlier reports and summarizes the status of animals through approximately 650 days after inhalation.

  16. A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

    2005-12-14

    The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

  17. An evaluation of radiation and dust hazards at a mineral sand processing plant.

    PubMed

    Johnston, G

    1991-06-01

    This three-part article discusses the results of a 2-y study on radiation and dust hazards in a mineral sand processing plant involving: (1) evaluation of external gamma radiation levels and determination of isotopic composition of the different sand products; (2) evaluation of radiation carried in long-lived radioactive dust (LLRD) particles; (3) evaluation of Rn gas concentrations within the working environs of the plant. Gamma radiation levels had a mean value of approximately 40 nSv h-1, and monazite sand returned the highest activity concentrations of 0.16% and 3.4% for 238U and 232Th, respectively. Low volume gross respirable dust sampling revealed an average long-lived airborne alpha activity concentration of 0.07 +/- 0.02 Bq m-3 and an average dust mass concentration of 3.3 +/- 2 mg m-3. Gamma spectroscopy applied to high-volume air samples showed average airborne 232Th and 238U activities of 0.012 +/- 0.004 Bq m-3 and 0.005 +/- 0.002 Bq m-3, respectively, giving an airborne 232Th: 238U ratio of 2.4:1. Air sampling using a high volume, five-stage cascade impactor indicated an average activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 3.2 microns with an associated average geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. Average radiation dose arising from the inhalation of LLRD was estimated to be 7 mSv per annum. CR-39 (polycarbonate plastic) nuclear track detectors indicated that Rn gas concentrations in the environs of the processing plant dry mill and main product warehouse ranged from 30 Bq m-3 to 220 Bq m-3, with an average value of 100 Bq m-3, which presents a possible inhaled dose from Rn daughters of 1.5 mSv y-1 (assuming an equilibrium ratio of 0.5).

  18. Effect of radiation processing on nutritional, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties of red kidney beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, S. A.; Deshpande, R.; Khamesra, Arohi; Ibrahim, Geeta; Jamdar, Sahayog N.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study dry red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), irradiated in the dose range of 0.25-10.0 kGy were evaluated for proximate composition, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties. Radiation processing up to 10 kGy did not affect proximate composition, hydration capacity and free fatty acid value. All the sensory attributes were unaffected at 1.0 kGy dose. The dose of 10 kGy, showed lower values for odor and taste, however, they were in acceptable range. Significant improvement in textural quality and reduction in cooking time was observed at dose of 10 kGy. Antioxidant activity of radiation processed samples was also assessed after normal processing such as soaking and pressure cooking. Both phenolic content and antioxidant activity evaluated in terms of DPPH free radical scavenging assay and inhibition in lipid peroxidation using rabbit erythrocyte ghost system, were marginally improved (5-10%) at the dose of 10 kGy in dry and cooked samples. During storage of samples for six months, no significant change was observed in sensory, cooking and antioxidant properties. Thus, radiation treatment of 1 kGy can be applied to get extended shelf life of kidney beans with improved functional properties without impairing bioactivity; nutritional quality and sensory property.

  19. Evaluation of phenolic compounds in maté ( Ilex paraguariensis) processed by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furgeri, C.; Nunes, T. C. F.; Fanaro, G. B.; Souza, M. F. F.; Bastos, D. H. M.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    The radiation food processing has been demonstrating great effectiveness in the attack of pathogenic agents, while little compromising nutritional value and sensorial properties of foods. The maté ( Ilex paraguariensis), widely consumed product in South America, generally in the form of infusions with hot or cold water, calls of chimarrão or tererê, it is cited in literature as one of the best sources phenolic compounds. The antioxidants action of these constituent has been related to the protection of the organism against the free radicals, generated in alive, currently responsible for the sprouting of some degenerative illness as cancer, arteriosclerosis, rheumatic arthritis and cardiovascular clutters among others. The objective of that work was to evaluate the action of the processing for gamma radiation in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage in the doses of 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. The observed results do not demonstrate significant alterations in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage processed by gamma radiation.

  20. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  1. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, J.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Ferrier, B.; Johnson, D.; Khain, A.; Lang, S.; Lynn, B.

    2001-01-01

    The response of cloud systems to their environment is an important link in a chain of processes responsible for monsoons, frontal depression, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes and other climate variations (e.g., 30-60 day intra-seasonal oscillations). Numerical models of cloud properties provide essential insights into the interactions of clouds with each other, with their surroundings, and with land and ocean surfaces. Significant advances are currently being made in the modeling of rainfall and rain-related cloud processes, ranging in scales from the very small up to the simulation of an extensive population of raining cumulus clouds in a tropical- or midlatitude-storm environment. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a multi-dimensional nonhydrostatic dynamic/microphysical cloud resolving model. It has been used to simulate many different mesoscale convective systems that occurred in various geographic locations. In this paper, recent GCE model improvements (microphysics, radiation and surface processes) will be described as well as their impact on the development of precipitation events from various geographic locations. The performance of these new physical processes will be examined by comparing the model results with observations. In addition, the explicit interactive processes between cloud, radiation and surface processes will be discussed.

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  3. The processes of modified microareas formation in the bulk of porous glasses by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, G. K.; Sergeev, M. M.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the formation of modified microareas (MAs) with changed optical properties in the bulk of porous glasses (PGs) with laser radiation is investigated. A laser module of continuous action with wavelength λ = 800 nm and power P = 120 mW was used as the source of radiation. The material used in the experiment was PG of 94.73 SiO2-4.97 B2O3-0.30 Na2O. A model that describes the processes taking place under laser radiation that lead to a modification of the glass is proposed. Our evaluation results based on experimental data are given. The results of an additional PG plate of the same composition impregnated with glycerol—a substance with a high degree of polarizability—during exposure experiments are also given. A fiber laser of continuous action with wavelength λ = 1070 nm and power P = 16.5 W was used as a source of radiation.

  4. Investigation of the foaming process of metals by synchrotron radiation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfen, Lukas; Stanzick, Heiko; Ohser, Joachim; Schladitz, Katja; Rejmankova-Pernot, Petra; Banhart, John; Baumbach, Tilo

    2003-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation imaging serves as a powerful tool for the non-destructive material characterization of metallic foams. The foaming process is visualized in situ by real-time radiography in projection image sequences. The temporal evolution of foam expansion from early pore formation over pore growth up to the collapse of the foam structure are reported. Ex situ microtomography is applied to the study of statistical distribution properties at the early foaming stages. Various image processing and analysis techniques yield quantitative results concerning pore nucleation and their early formation, film rupture and foam drainage. The similarities and differences of the metal foaming process with respect to the precursor material, its processing steps and process parameters are determinable.

  5. WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL NUCLEAR SAFETY RELATED R AND D REPORT FOR CY2008

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-10-15

    The Engineering and Technology Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks associated with key waste processing project decisions. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment (TDD). The Office of Waste Processing TDD program prioritizes and approves research and development scopes of work that address nuclear safety related to processing of highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Thirteen of the thirty-five R&D approved work scopes in FY2009 relate directly to nuclear safety, and are presented in this report.

  6. Amorphous silicon batch process cost analysis. Annual subcontract report, 11 March 1991--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, R.A.; Sherring, C.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the development of baseline manufacturing cost data to assist PVMaT monitoring teams in assessing current and future subcontracts, which an emphasis on commercialization and production. A process for the manufacture of a single-junction, large-area, a Si module was modeled using an existing Research Triangle Institute (RTI) computer model. The model estimates a required, or breakeven, price for the module based on its production process and the financial structure of the company operating the process. Sufficient detail on cost drivers is presented so the relationship of the process features and business characteristics can be related to the estimated required price.

  7. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-12-31

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable? Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells? What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate? During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  8. Adaptive information processing in auditory cortex. Annual report, 1 June 1987-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, N.M.

    1988-05-31

    The fact that learning induces frequency-specific modification of receptive fields in auditory cortex implies that the functional organization of auditory (and perhaps other sensory) cortex comprises an adaptively-constituted information base. This project initiates the first systematic investigation of adaptive information processing in cerebral cortex. A major goal is to determine the circumstances under which adaptive information processing is induced by experience. This project also addresses central hypotheses about rules that govern adaptive information processing, at three levels of spatial scale: (a) parallel processing in different auditory fields: (b) modular processing in different cortical lamina within fields; (c) local processing in different neurons within the same locus within lamina. The author emphasized determining the learning circumstances under which adaptive information processing is invoked by the brain. Current studies reveal that the frequency receptive fields of neurons in the auditory cortex, and the physiologically plastic magnocellular medial geniculate nucleus, develop frequency-specific modification such that maximal shifts in tuning are at or adjacent to the signal frequency. Further, this adaptive re-tuning of neurons develops rapidly during habituation, classical conditioning, and instrumental avoidance conditioning. The generality of re-tuning has established that AIP during learning represents a general brain strategy for the acquisition and subsequent processing of information.

  9. Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P

    2004-04-27

    The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary User Centers including: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing including (extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, high density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials data bases. A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state of the art materials characterization capabilities, high performance computing, to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized User-submitted Proposal and a User Agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provides free of charge while

  10. Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P

    2004-04-27

    The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge

  11. Genetic engineering of a radiation-resistant bacterium for biodegradation of ixed wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    'Because of their tolerance to very high levels of ionizing radiation, members of the genus Deinococcus have received considerable attention over the past years. The type species of the genus, Deinococcus radiodurans, has been studied extensively in several labs. Although researchers are only beginning to understand the mechanisms by which this Gram-positive bacterium is able to repair massive DNA damage after radiation dosages as high as 5 Mrad, it has become evident that its recombination machinery has several unique characteristics (1--4). The aim of the present studies is to engineer D. radiodurans into a detoxifier for bioremediation of complex waste mixtures, containing heavy metals, halo-organics and radionuclides, making use of its ability to be biologically active in environments where they will be exposed to high levels of radiation. For that purpose, the authors aim to clone and express several broad spectrum oxygenases and heavy metal resistance determinants, and test survival and activities of these strains in artificial mixtures of contaminants, designed to simulate DOE mixed waste streams. This report summarizes work after 0.5 year of a 3-year project. The initial studies have focused on the development of an insertional expression system for D. radiodurans R1. This effort has involved two parts, namely: (1) promoter analysis, and (2) development of insertion systems. Several studies have shown that the expression signals used by D. radiodurans differ considerably from those found in other bacteria. Although D. radiodurans contains a typical eubacterial RNA polymerase core enzyme (based on TBLASTN searches on the genome sequence), Escherichia coli promoters are not recognized in D. radiodurans and vice versa (5). To expand the basic understanding of the requirements for transcription, and to optimize expression of (heterologous) genes, they will follow two strategies. First, a promoter-probe vector is being developed for the selection of promoter

  12. Gamma radiation process for destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls (Pcbs) in transformer oils.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Nayak, Poonam; Niyogi, U K; Khandal, R K; Singh, Gurdeep

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic organic chemicals commercially used worldwide in many applications. PCBs were used in oils because of their excellent properties such as good thermal stability, flame resistance, dielectric constant, high break down voltage, high boiling point and low volatility. However, because of their adverse affects on environment and human health, the use of PCBs has been banned now. PCBs are today considered among the widespread pollutants in the global system. PCBs sources still exist in various industrial products and in waste streams such as capacitor oils, lubricating oils, transformer oils, hydraulic oils, paints, rubbers, cables, etc. Several such materials containing PCBs emanating from various sources need to be detoxified before their reuse or before going to landfill for final disposal. Various remedial technologies have been developed in the world to destroy toxic PCBs. The radiolysis has been investigated as an environment-friendly process for waste oil treatment contaminated with PCBs, which may be a better alternative to the globally most widely accepted incineration method. A study was undertaken to detoxify PCBs in transformer oil by gamma radiation using Cobalt 60 source. Analysis of PCBs in transformer oils before and after radiation was carried out by GC-MS instrument. The effect of radiation dose and destruction of PCBs in transformer oils are discussed in details in the present paper. The method used was found to be highly effective and destruction was as high as 79 %. Further, the transformer oil samples were also evaluated before and after radiation to check their quality. The properties of oils were not significantly altered by gamma radiation treatment as evident from the results given in the paper.

  13. Ionizing radiation affects human MART-1 melanoma antigen processing and presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Butterfield, Lisa H; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Meng, Wilson S; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; McBride, William H

    2004-08-15

    Radiation is generally considered to be an immunosuppressive agent that acts by killing radiosensitive lymphocytes. In this study, we demonstrate the noncytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on MHC class I Ag presentation by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have divergent consequences depending upon whether peptides are endogenously processed and loaded onto MHC class I molecules or are added exogenously. The endogenous pathway was examined using C57BL/6 murine DCs transduced with adenovirus to express the human melanoma/melanocyte Ag recognized by T cells (AdVMART1). Prior irradiation abrogated the ability of AdVMART1-transduced DCs to induce MART-1-specific T cell responses following their injection into mice. The ability of these same DCs to generate protective immunity against B16 melanoma, which expresses murine MART-1, was also abrogated by radiation. Failure of AdVMART1-transduced DCs to generate antitumor immunity following irradiation was not due to cytotoxicity or to radiation-induced block in DC maturation or loss in expression of MHC class I or costimulatory molecules. Expression of some of these molecules was affected, but because irradiation actually enhanced the ability of DCs to generate lymphocyte responses to the peptide MART-1(27-35) that is immunodominant in the context of HLA-A2.1, they were unlikely to be critical. The increase in lymphocyte reactivity generated by irradiated DCs pulsed with MART-1(27-35) also protected mice against growth of B16-A2/K(b) tumors in HLA-A2.1/K(b) transgenic mice. Taken together, these results suggest that radiation modulates MHC class I-mediated antitumor immunity by functionally affecting DC Ag presentation pathways.

  14. Effects of microphysics and radiation on mesoscale processes of a midlatitude squall line

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Hung-Neng Steve

    1994-04-01

    The understanding of the essential dynamics of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) was well addressed in the literature. Effects of different physics on mesoscale processes of MCSs are, however, not well understood at some particular aspects, such as the origins of the rear inflow and the transition zone in the radar reflectivity. The objective of this research is focused on these two aspects for a midlatitude broken-line squall system. The existence of the rear inflow in MCSs has been identified in many observational and modeling studies. Although convincing evidence has shown that physical internal to the mesoscale system and pressure gradient effects in the convective and trailing stratiform regions are undoubtedly important in developing the rear inflow, it remains unclear bow these internal processes interact with pressure effects to trigger the rear inflow. Moreover, many modeling studies have replicated the bright melting ban, but the transition zone has not been successfully simulated. With the enhanced model physics, such as radiation, in a cloud model, we can simulate these features and provide some supplemental evidences, at least in part, to explain them. The modulation of the rear inflow by microphysics, long- (LW) and shortwave (SW) radiation, and its related cloud-radiative feedback to the modeled squall line system are also discussed in this study.

  15. Scaled physical model studies of the steam drive process. First annual report, September 1977-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Doscher, T M

    1980-12-01

    Scaling laws of the heat transport mechanism in steam displacement processes are developed based upon an integral energy balance equation. Unlike the differential approach adopted by previous workers, the above scaling laws do not necessitate the use of any empirical correction factor as has been done in previous scaling calculations. The results provide a complete and consistent scale-down of the energy transport behavior, which is the critical mechanism for the success of a steam injection process. In the course of the study, the scaling problems associated with relative permeability and capillary pressure are also discussed. A method which has often been used in scaling nonthermal displacement processes is applied to reduce errors due to scaling in relative permeability. Both dimensional and inspectional analyses are applied to illustrate their use in steam processes. Scale-up laws appeared in the literature and those used in this study are compared and numerical examples are given.

  16. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5

  17. POTENTIAL AND FUTURE TRENDS ON INDUSTRIAL RADIATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN EMERGING COUNTRY - BRAZIL

    SciTech Connect

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Omi, N.M.; Rela, C.S.; Tsai, D.

    2004-10-06

    Brazil started the use of radiation technology in the seventies on crosslinking polyethylene for insulation of wire and electronic cables and sterilization of medical care devices. The present status of industrial applications of radiation shows that the use of this technology is increasing according to the economical development and the necessity to become the products manufactured in the local industries competitive in quality and price for internal and external market. The on going development activities in this area are concentrated on polymers processing (materials modification), foodstuff treatment and environmental protection. The development, the promotion and the technical support to consolidate this technology to the local industries is the main attribution of Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Research-IPEN, a governmental Institution.

  18. Leaf optical system modeled as a stochastic process. [solar radiation interaction with terrestrial vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Garratt, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A stochastic leaf radiation model based upon physical and physiological properties of dicot leaves has been developed. The model accurately predicts the absorbed, reflected, and transmitted radiation of normal incidence as a function of wavelength resulting from the leaf-irradiance interaction over the spectral interval of 0.40-2.50 micron. The leaf optical system has been represented as Markov process with a unique transition matrix at each 0.01-micron increment between 0.40 micron and 2.50 micron. Probabilities are calculated at every wavelength interval from leaf thickness, structure, pigment composition, and water content. Simulation results indicate that this approach gives accurate estimations of actual measured values for dicot leaf absorption, reflection, and transmission as a function of wavelength.

  19. Process for applying light- or radiation-curable resin composition to polyolefin moldings

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Y.; Kitadono, K.; Kondo, T.; Shinonaga, H.

    1984-08-28

    A process for applying a light- or radiation-curable resin composition onto a polyolefin molding comprising surface treating a molding of polyolefin composition composed of 99.99 to 0 wt % of a polyolefin and 0.01 to 100 wt % of an olefinic polymeric compound, having polar groups represented by the formula, COOR, -OR-, -COO-CO-, -N(-R)-R', OR -C(-R)<(-O-CH(-R')-) wherein R and R' are each a hydrogen atom or a hydrocarbon group having 1 to 8 carbon atoms, by at least one pretreatment method selected from the group consisting of a treatment with a halogenated hydrocarbon solvent, a low temperature plasma treatment, a corona discharge treatment, a flame treatment and an alkali degreasing treatment, and applying onto the thus treated molding surface a light- or radiation-curable resin composition, is disclosed.

  20. Radiation effects on materials in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-11-25

    'Sheet silicates (e.g. micas and clays) are important constituents of a wide variety of geological formations such as granite, basalt, and sandstone. Sheet silicates, particularly clays such as bentonite are common materials in near-field engineered barriers in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repositories. This is because migration of radionuclides from an underground HLW repository to the geosphere may be significantly reduced by sorption of radionuclides (e.g., Pu, U and Np) onto sheet silicates (e.g., clays and micas) that line the fractures and pores of the rocks along groundwater flowpaths. In addition to surface sorption, it has been suggested that some sheet silicates may also be able to incorporate many radionuclides, such as Cs and Sr, in the inter-layer sites of the sheet structure. However, theability of the sheet silicates to incorporate radionuclides and retard release and migration of radionuclides may be significantly affected by the near-field radiation due to the decay of fission products and actinides. for example, the unique properties of the sheet structures will be lost completely if the structure becomes amorphous due to irradiation effects. Thus, the study of irradiation effects on sheet-structures, such as structural damage and modification of chemical properties, are critical to the performance assessment of long-term repository behavior.'

  1. Improved radiation dosimetry/risk estimates to facilitate environmental management of plutonium contaminated sites. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this research is to evaluate distributions of possible alpha radiation doses to the lung, bone, and liver and associated health-risk distributions for plutonium (Pu) inhalation-exposure scenarios relevant to environmental management of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated sites. Currently available dosimetry/risk models do not apply to exposure scenarios where, at most, a small number of highly radioactive PuO{sub 2} particles are inhaled (stochastic exposure [SE] paradigm). For the SE paradigm, risk distributions are more relevant than point estimates of risk. The focus of the research is on the SE paradigm and on high specific activity, alpha-emitting (HSA-aE) particles such as 238 PuO{sub 2} . The scientific goal is to develop a stochastic respiratory tract dosimetry/risk computer model for evaluating the desired absorbed dose distributions and associated health-risk distributions, for Department of Energy (DOE) workers and members of the public. This report summarizes results after 1 year of a 2-year project.'

  2. Fundamental chemistry and thermodynamics of hydrothermal oxidation processes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cummings, P.T.; Chialvo, A.A.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this research program is to provide fundamental scientific information on the physical and chemical properties of solutes in aqueous solutions at high temperatures needed to assess and enhance the applicability of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) to the remediation of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Potential limitations to the use of HTO technology include formation of deposits (scale) from precipitation of inorganic solutes in the waste, corrosion arising from formation of strong acids on oxidation of some organic compounds (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons), and unknown effects of fluid density and phase behavior at high temperatures. Focus areas for this project include measurements of the solubility and speciation of actinides and surrogates in model HTO process streams at high temperatures, and the experimental and theoretical development of equations of state for aqueous mixtures under HTO process conditions ranging above the critical temperature of water. A predictive level of understanding of the chemical and physical properties of HTO process streams is being developed through molecular-level simulations of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Advances in fundamental understanding of phase behavior, density, and solute speciation at high temperatures and pressures contribute directly to the ultimate applicability of this process for the treatment of DOE hazardous and mixed wastes. Research in this project has been divided into individual tasks, with each contributing to a unified understanding of HTO processing problems related to the treatment of DOE wastes. This report summarizes progress attained after slightly less than two years of this three-year project.'

  3. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  4. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  5. DOE 2009 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2009 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. Acoustic-wave generation in the process of CO2-TEA-laser-radiation interaction with metal targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Ileana; Teodorescu, G.; Serbanescu-Oasa, Anca; Dragulinescu, Dumitru; Chis, Ioan; Stoian, Razvan

    1995-03-01

    Laser radiation interaction with materials is a complex process in which creation of acoustic waves or stress waves is a part of it. As a function of the laser radiation energy and intensity incident on steel target surface ultrasound signals were registered and studied. Thermoelastic, ablation and breakdown mechanisms of generation of acoustic waves were analyzed.

  7. Recycling of the used automotive lubricating oil by ionizing radiation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapin, M. A.; Duarte, C.; Sampa, M. H. O.; Sato, I. M.

    2007-11-01

    The recycling process of the used mineral oils has been gaining a very important gap in the context of environmental protection. Among mineral oils from petroleum, the lubricating oils are not entirely consumed during their use; therefore, it is necessary to apply a treatment for recuperation seeking their reuse. Moreover, the environmental legislation of countries does not allow their discard in any type of soils, rivers, lakes, oceans or sewerage systems. The conventional treatment has shown certain difficulties in the recuperation process for used oils. The ionizing radiation process is renowned in the industrial effluents treatments due to its high efficiency in the degradation of organic compounds and in the removal of metals by the action of OH rad , rad H and e aq radicals. In this work, used automotive lubricating oil was treated by the ionizing radiation process for metal removal and degradation of organic compounds. The samples were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy irradiation doses. Determination of the elements Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Mo, Nb, Cd, Sn, Ba, Bi and Pb, before and after the irradiation, was done by X-ray fluorescence technique and the organic profile was obtained by infrared spectroscopy.

  8. Reproducible radiation-damage processes in proteins irradiated by intense x-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Bennion, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have enabled femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, a novel method to determine the structure of proteins. It allows time-resolved imaging of nanocrystals that are too small for conventional crystallography. The short pulse duration helps in overcoming the detrimental effects of radiation damage because x rays are scattered before the sample has been significantly altered. It has been suggested that, fortuitously, the diffraction process self-terminates abruptly once radiation damage destroys the crystalline order. Our calculations show that high-intensity x-ray pulses indeed trigger a cascade of damage processes in ferredoxin crystals, a particular metalloprotein of interest. However, we found that the damage process is initially not completely random. Correlations exist among the protein monomers, so that Bragg diffraction still occurs in the damaged crystals, despite significant atomic displacements. Our results show that the damage process is reproducible to a certain degree, which is potentially beneficial for the orientation step in single-molecule imaging.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.; Stults, B.R.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    Part four of the PNL Annual Report for 1990 includes research in physical sciences. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: Dosimetry Research; Measurement Science; Radiological and Chemical Physics; Radiation Dosimetry; Radiation Biophysics; and Modelling Cellular Response to Genetic Damage. (FL)

  10. Qualitative Information in Annual Reports & the Detection of Corporate Fraud: A Natural Language Processing Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sunita

    2009-01-01

    High profile cases of fraudulent financial reporting such as those that occurred at Enron and WorldCom have shaken public confidence in the U.S. financial reporting process and have raised serious concerns about the roles of auditors, regulators, and analysts in financial reporting. In order to address these concerns and restore public confidence,…

  11. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Workshop on the Use of Digital Computers in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cecil L., Ed.

    Contents: Computer hardware testing (results of vendor-user interaction); CODIL (a new language for process control programing); the design and implementation of control systems utilizing CRT display consoles; the systems contractor - valuable professional or unnecessary middle man; power station digital computer applications; from inspiration to…

  12. Annual Report: Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Gao, Fei; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop growth models of CZT crystals from the melt using vertical gradient freeze (VGF) or vertical Bridgman growth as a typical process. Further, the project will perform critical experiments including single crystal growth to validate the growth models and to provide detailed data for modeling and simulation. Ideally, the project will develop growth models that will provide, for the first time, choices for optimal CZT single crystal growth from the melt based on model input. The overarching goal that guides this research proposal is to produce large, single crystals of CZT with good yield and reproducible properties. In our view this depends on 1) understanding crystal growth processes, including annealing and cool-down processing, and 2) understanding the role of defects on detector response since it is not possible, yet, to produce defect-free materials. Models of defect structure and formation are addressed. Validated models and experiments on reducing defects in melt-grown crystals are used to guide our understanding of growth processes and in-furnace annealing plus cool-down.

  13. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses: Relationships between annual limits on intake and prenatal doses. Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    This addendum describes approaches for calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from maternal intakes of radionuclides at levels corresponding to fractions or multiples of the Annual Limits on Intake (ALI). Information, concerning metabolic or dosimetric characteristics and the placental transfer of selected, occupationally significant radionuclides was presented in NUREG/CR-5631, Revision 1. That information was used to estimate levels of radioactivity in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry. Extension of MIRD methodology to accommodate gestational-stage-dependent characteristics allowed dose calculations for the simplified situation based on introduction of 1 {mu}Ci into the woman`s transfer compartment (blood). The expanded scenarios in this addendum include repeated or chronic ingestion or inhalation intakes by a woman during pregnancy and body burdens at the beginning of pregnancy. Tables present dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus relative to intakes of these radionuclides in various chemical or physical forms and from preexisting maternal burdens corresponding to ALI; complementary intake values (fraction of an ALI and {mu}Ci) that yield a dose equivalent of 0.05 rem are included. Similar tables give these measures of dose equivalency to the uterus from intakes of radionuclides for use as surrogates for embryo/fetus dose when biokinetic information is not available.

  14. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S

    2008-08-12

    The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste Processing

  15. Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.

    1980-09-24

    Research is divided into two general topics: (1) H/sup -/ formation collision processes and (2) the determination of scattering cross sections used to diagnose plasma properties. On topic (1) we investigated the effect on the H/sup +/ electron capture cross section when an alkali atom is optically pumped to its resonance state, the angular scattering in H/sup 0/ + Cs ..-->.. H/sup -/ + Cs/sup +/ collisions, and electron detachment processes in H/sup -/ and alkali and alkaline earth atom collisions. On topic (2) we completed work on the determination of the electron capture cross sections down to 10 eV for C/sup +5/, N/sup +5/, O/sup +6/ + H collisions and developed a model for the calculation of multi-ionization cross sections in energetic, highly charged ion-atom collisions.

  16. European Software Engineering Process Group Conference (2nd Annual), EUROPEAN SEPG󈨥. Delegate Material, Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-19

    The product life cycle process must be generic in essential parts and allow to create variants for different project classes * must allow seamless...Phase 2 (Step 1): Project definition Work out improvements ( Generic part) Transfer ,nto P:business units- Phase 2 (Step 2): Business unit specific ada...times Exceptions at system release New products/Versions Modified features per version Customer projects Redesign probability for ASICs r quir Iets [Il~l

  17. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    Part 3 consists of appendices 5, 6 and 7, which have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. They deal with regression analysis of pilot plant SRC-II yields to develop thermal response models of the process and the possibility of predicting yields from coal properties. The possibility of a runaway exothermal reaction under some operating conditions on the demonstration plant scale is also considered. (LTN)

  18. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  19. Investigation on the internal acceleration process of the outer radiation belt using the particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ueno, G.; Koshiishi, H.; Matsumoto, H.; Shiokawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that high energy electrons in the radiation belts often cause satellite anomalies and malfunctions. Thus, a forecast of the time variation of the energetic electrons is necessary to protect satellites in the radiation belts. Time variations of the radiation belt electrons have been modeled with the Fokker-Plank equation. Performance of the forecast using the Fokker-Planck equation depends on the parameters used in the model, so that improvement of the parameters is important for the space weather forecast. We performed data assimilation using the particle filter by a code which was developed by Miyoshi et al.[2006]. We prepare 1000 particles used for the calculation. In this study, phase space density, the diffusion coefficient, and wave amplitude, and the source amplitude of the internal acceleration compose the state vector. The observation vector consists of the differential flux measured by the Tsubasa satellite. We also apply the particle smoother to estimate the smoothed distribution. While there were several discrepancies between the simulation without the data assimilation and the observations, the data assimilation improves the simulation result, and captures the typical flux variations of the outer belt during magnetic storms. We also discuss the internal acceleration process on the basis of the source amplitude estimated through the data assimilation.

  20. Thin layer imaging process for microlithography using radiation at strongly attenuated wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, David R.

    2004-01-06

    A method for patterning of resist surfaces which is particularly advantageous for systems having low photon flux and highly energetic, strongly attenuated radiation. A thin imaging layer is created with uniform silicon distribution in a bilayer format. An image is formed by exposing selected regions of the silylated imaging layer to radiation. The radiation incident upon the silyliated resist material results in acid generation which either catalyzes cleavage of Si--O bonds to produce moieties that are volatile enough to be driven off in a post exposure bake step or produces a resist material where the exposed portions of the imaging layer are soluble in a basic solution, thereby desilylating the exposed areas of the imaging layer. The process is self limiting due to the limited quantity of silyl groups within each region of the pattern. Following the post exposure bake step, an etching step, generally an oxygen plasma etch, removes the resist material from the de-silylated areas of the imaging layer.

  1. Development of an analog processing circuit for IR-radiation power and noncontact position measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perpina, Xavier; Jorda, Xavier; Vellvehi, Miquel; Millan, Jose; Mestres, Narcis

    2005-02-01

    An analog circuit which simultaneously performs radiation power and position measurement of an IR-laser spot (wavelength 1.3 {mu}m) on a four quadrant photodiode is presented and described. Its main features are 2 MHz-bandwidth and low noise (14 mV rms) for a nominal working radiation power of 2 mW. This circuit has been implemented for the detection stage of an internal IR-laser deflection set-up, used to measure internal temperature gradients and free carrier concentration in vertical power devices. The measurements of the previously mentioned magnitudes inside the drift region of a 600 V PT-IGBT are presented under critical operation conditions. This circuit, however, can also be used in other noncontact position and power radiation detection systems that require a high bandwidth and low noise levels. Moreover, the different noise sources along the detecting system have been identified. It is shown that the main contribution to the noise level at the processing circuit output is basically introduced by its second stage (analog divisor), assuring, for a 1 mm laser spot centered at the photodetector, a maximum resolution in position measurement below 2 {mu}m.

  2. Evaluating contextual processing in diffusion MRI: application to optic radiation reconstruction for epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Tax, Chantal M W; Duits, Remco; Vilanova, Anna; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M; Hofman, Paul; Wagner, Louis; Leemans, Alexander; Ossenblok, Pauly

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical) application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning.

  3. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  4. Evaluating Contextual Processing in Diffusion MRI: Application to Optic Radiation Reconstruction for Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tax, Chantal M. W.; Duits, Remco; Vilanova, Anna; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Hofman, Paul; Wagner, Louis; Leemans, Alexander; Ossenblok, Pauly

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical) application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning. PMID:25077946

  5. Energy loss process analysis for radiation degradation and immediate recovery of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Beernink, Kevin; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    Performance degradation of a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells due to irradiation of silicon ions, electrons, and protons are investigated using an in-situ current-voltage measurement system. The performance recovery immediately after irradiation is also investigated. Significant recovery is always observed independent of radiation species and temperature. It is shown that the characteristic time, which is obtained by analyzing the short-circuit current annealing behavior, is an important parameter for practical applications in space. In addition, the radiation degradation mechanism is discussed by analyzing the energy loss process of incident particles (ionizing energy loss: IEL, and non-ionizing energy loss: NIEL) and their relative damage factors. It is determined that ionizing dose is the primarily parameter for electron degradation whereas displacement damage dose is the primarily parameter for proton degradation. This is because the ratio of NIEL to IEL in the case of electrons is small enough to be ignored the damage due to NIEL although the defect creation ratio of NIEL is much larger than that of IEL in the cases of both protons and electrons. The impact of “radiation quality effect” has to be considered to understand the degradation due to Si ion irradiation.

  6. 1989 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 26th, Marco Island, FL, July 25-29, 1989, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Agustin, Jr. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear science are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanics of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, hardness assurance and testing techniques, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, device radiation effects and hardening, radiation effects on isolation technologies, IC radiation effects and hardening, and single-event phenomena.

  7. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-06-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  8. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (size about 2-200 km). The CRMs also allow explicit interaction between out-going longwave (cooling) and in-coming solar (heating) radiation with clouds. Observations can provide the initial conditions and validation for CRM results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model, a CRM, has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades. The GCE model has been used to understand the following: 1) water and energy cycles and their roles in the tropical climate system; 2) the vertical redistribution of ozone and trace constituents by individual clouds and well organized convective systems over various spatial scales; 3) the relationship between the vertical distribution of latent heating (phase change of water) and the large-scale (pre-storm) environment; 4) the validity of assumptions used in the representation of cloud processes in climate and global circulation models; and 5) the representation of cloud microphysical processes and their interaction with radiative forcing over tropical and midlatitude regions. Four-dimensional cloud and latent heating fields simulated from the GCE model have been provided to the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) to develop and improve algorithms for retrieving rainfall and latent heating rates for TRMM and the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). More than 90 referred papers using the GCE model have been published in the last two decades. Also, more than 10 national and international universities are currently using the GCE model for research and teaching. In this talk, five specific major GCE improvements: (1

  9. Studies of Collisional and Nonlinear Radiative Processes for Development of Coherent UV and XUV Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-17

    method ( Z 1 ps) would permit time resolution of the recombination process, thereby experimentally rendering a detailed picture of the dynamics not...Plasma," Phys. Rev. Lett. §0, 1298 (1988). 45. G.- Z . Sun, E. Ott, Y. C. Lee, P. Guzdar, "Self-Focusing of Short Intense Pulses In Plasmas," Phys...of radiation to charge states Z , and Z ., to undergo a coulomb explosion1 𔄃 ,10 and develop a separation of x, is [k 0Mxv/1 - 2tx 1 (1_+Vi 20a,/x\\ T

  10. The Amplitude Nth-Power Squeezing of Radiation Fields in the Degenerate Raman Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Pan, Jin-Fang; Xu, Lei

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we study the amplitude Nth-power squeezing of radiation fields in the degenerate Raman process by using the modified effective Hamiltonian approach recently suggested by us. We found that if the field is initially in a coherent state it will not get squeezing for any Nth-power; if the field is initially in a squeezed vacuum, it may get Nth-power squeezing. The time evolution of the field fluctuation was discussed. Its dependences on power-order N, mean photon number bar-n, and squeezing angle xi are analyzed.

  11. Current status and prospects of radiation processing studies in Taiwan, R. O. C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying-Kai

    The research on radiation processing in past 5 years in Taiwan covers industrial application of radiation-induced polymerization and curing, medical application of radiosterilization of medical supplies, chemicals, and amniotic membrane for wound dressing as well as agricultural application of food irradiation and genogenesis etc. Radiation-induced polymerization applied on wood and bamboo plastic composite of methyl methacrylate, radiation curing on polyurethane and silicon rubber for biomedical material using to separate oxygen from nitrogen and on crosslinking of pp and ps for artificial skin for wound dressing were all success. Radio-sterilization of disposable medical supplies appears for immediate application after the studies of the dose requirement of several radioresistant microorganisms, dose distribution measured by chemical dosimeters of ceric sulfate and Fricke dosimeter as well as quality control system were completed. The radiosterilization study of tetracycline - HCl and few detoxic agents like atropine sulfate and toxogonin has shown the promising results on radiosterilization of chemicals, the radiosterilization of amniotic membrane for wound dressing are also success. Food irradiation on sprouting inhibition of potatoes, garlic etc, on radiodisinfestation of cereal insects, tobacco bettles, soybean insects, and flour beetles, as well as on frog legs and porks have been also discussed. The legislation on radiosterilization of medical supplies and food irradiation of 14 items has been approved by National Health Administration, R.O.C. in July of 1982 and January of 1985 respectively. Even 24 hrs-operation of 1 Mega curie irradiation plant at INER can not satisfy the requirement of radiosterilization of medical supplies. A private commercial irradiation plant is urgently needed in Taiwan other than at INER now.

  12. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  13. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  14. Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Seventh annual report, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, K.B.

    1984-08-01

    In the Geokinetics process, a pattern of blast holes is drilled from the surface, through the overburden, and into the oil shale bed. The holes are loaded with explosives and fired using a carefully planned blast system. The blast produces a fragmented mass of oil shale with high permeability. The fragmented zone constitutes an in situ retort. The project site is in the Mahogany Zone oil shale in Utah. During 1983 significant milestones were achieved. The burn of Retort No. 26 was completed on February 22, 1983, having produced 22,889 barrels of oil. By the end of July, 1983, all preparations were complete for the ignition of Retort No. 27. However, ignition was delayed until August 11, 1983, pending completion of the retort off gas processing facility. By early October, final preparations for the ignition of Retort No. 28 were completed and the retort was ignited on October 18, 1983. A facility to remove ammonia and hydrogen sulfide contaminants from Retorts No. 27 and No. 28 off gas was constructed at the site. Numerous environmental tests and experiments were conducted, primarily to gather data for permitting purposes. A pond to hold water produced by Retorts No. 27 and No. 28 was completed during August, 1983. The pond was put into service at the same time as the ignition of Retort No. 27.

  15. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This report discusses the effects on SRC yields of seven process variables (reactor temperature, SRT, hydrogen partial pressure, recycle ash and coal concentrations, gas velocity and coal type) predicted by second-order regression models developed from a data base containing pilot plant data with both Kentucky and Powhatan coals. The only effect of coal type in the model is a shift in each yield by a constant factor. Although some differences were found between the models developed from the Kentucky data base (1) (which we call Kentucky models) and the pooled coal models, the general conclusions of the previous report are confirmed by the new models and the assumption of similar behavior of the two coals appears to be justified. In some respects the dependence of the yields (MAF coal basis) on variables such as pressure and temperature are clearer than in the previous models. The principal trends which emerge are discussed.

  16. MO-B-BRB-03: Systems Engineering Tools for Treatment Planning Process Optimization in Radiation Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Kapur, A.

    2015-06-15

    The radiotherapy treatment planning process has evolved over the years with innovations in treatment planning, treatment delivery and imaging systems. Treatment modality and simulation technologies are also rapidly improving and affecting the planning process. For example, Image-guided-radiation-therapy has been widely adopted for patient setup, leading to margin reduction and isocenter repositioning after simulation. Stereotactic Body radiation therapy (SBRT) and Radiosurgery (SRS) have gradually become the standard of care for many treatment sites, which demand a higher throughput for the treatment plans even if the number of treatments per day remains the same. Finally, simulation, planning and treatment are traditionally sequential events. However, with emerging adaptive radiotherapy, they are becoming more tightly intertwined, leading to iterative processes. Enhanced efficiency of planning is therefore becoming more critical and poses serious challenge to the treatment planning process; Lean Six Sigma approaches are being utilized increasingly to balance the competing needs for speed and quality. In this symposium we will discuss the treatment planning process and illustrate effective techniques for managing workflow. Topics will include: Planning techniques: (a) beam placement, (b) dose optimization, (c) plan evaluation (d) export to RVS. Planning workflow: (a) import images, (b) Image fusion, (c) contouring, (d) plan approval (e) plan check (f) chart check, (g) sequential and iterative process Influence of upstream and downstream operations: (a) simulation, (b) immobilization, (c) motion management, (d) QA, (e) IGRT, (f) Treatment delivery, (g) SBRT/SRS (h) adaptive planning Reduction of delay between planning steps with Lean systems due to (a) communication, (b) limited resource, (b) contour, (c) plan approval, (d) treatment. Optimizing planning processes: (a) contour validation (b) consistent planning protocol, (c) protocol/template sharing, (d) semi

  17. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

  18. Quality profile of litchi ( Litchi chinensis) cultivars from India and effect of radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajare, Sachin N.; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Kumar, Sanjeev; Wadhawan, Surbhi; More, Varsha; Mishra, B. B.; Narayan Parte, Madan; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2010-09-01

    Litchi ( Litchi chinensis) is a non-climacteric tropical fruit. The fruit has a short shelf-life making its marketing difficult. Physical, biochemical, microbiological, and organoleptic properties of two major commercially grown Indian cultivars of litchi, 'Shahi' and 'China' were studied. The effect of gamma radiation processing and low temperature storage on the above parameters was evaluated to standardize the optimal process parameters for shelf-life extension of litchi. Physical and biochemical parameters analyzed included weight, moisture, pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, total and reducing sugar, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and flavonoid content. Weight, moisture content, and pH in the fresh fruit ranged between 21-26 g, 74-77%, and 3.7-4.4, respectively, whereas, total and reducing sugar ranged 10-15, and 10-13 g%, respectively. In 'Shahi' vitamin C content was found to be around 17-19 mg%, whereas, in 'China' it was 22-28 mg%. Flavonoid content was in the range of 26-34 μg catechin equivalents/g of fresh fruit. Total surface and internal bacterial load was around 4 and 3 log cfu/g, respectively. Surface yeast-mold count (YMC) was ˜3 log cfu/g whereas internal YMC was ˜2 log cfu/g. Radiation treatment reduced microbial load in a dose dependent manner. Treatment at 0.5 kGy did not significantly affect the quality parameters of the fruit. Treated fruits retained the "good" organoleptic rating during storage. Thus, radiation treatment (0.5 kGy) in combination with low temperature (4 °C) storage achieved a shelf-life of 28 days for litchi fruit.

  19. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E; Maher, Cameron A; Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities-that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization

  20. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal

  1. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because the thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150 °C for up to 5 h or to 125 °C for up to 24 h if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125 °C for up to 5 h if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of

  2. 2016 Consequence Management Advisory Division's (CMAD) Annual Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CMAD annual report for 2016 which covers activities such as radiation task force leaders annual training, national criminal enforcement response team annual training, field technology demonstrations, and a new method to detect perfluorinated compounds.

  3. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  4. Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Graphics Processing Board (GPB) Radiation Test Evaluation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George A.; Steele, Glen F.

    2013-01-01

    Large round trip communications latency for deep space missions will require more onboard computational capabilities to enable the space vehicle to undertake many tasks that have traditionally been ground-based, mission control responsibilities. As a result, visual display graphics will be required to provide simpler vehicle situational awareness through graphical representations, as well as provide capabilities never before done in a space mission, such as augmented reality for in-flight maintenance or Telepresence activities. These capabilities will require graphics processors and associated support electronic components for high computational graphics processing. In an effort to understand the performance of commercial graphics card electronics operating in the expected radiation environment, a preliminary test was performed on five commercial offthe- shelf (COTS) graphics cards. This paper discusses the preliminary evaluation test results of five COTS graphics processing cards tested to the International Space Station (ISS) low earth orbit radiation environment. Three of the five graphics cards were tested to a total dose of 6000 rads (Si). The test articles, test configuration, preliminary results, and recommendations are discussed.

  5. Radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Matsuyama, Eri; Kojima, Katsuyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the use of wavelet transform for image processing on radiation dose reduction in computed radiography (CR), by measuring various physical characteristics of the wavelet-transformed images. Moreover, we propose a wavelet-based method for offering a possibility to reduce radiation dose while maintaining a clinically acceptable image quality. The proposed method integrates the advantages of a previously proposed technique, i.e., sigmoid-type transfer curve for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment technique, as well as a wavelet soft-thresholding technique. The former can improve contrast and spatial resolution of CR images, the latter is able to improve the performance of image noise. In the investigation of physical characteristics, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and contrast-to-noise ratio of CR images processed by the proposed method and other different methods were measured and compared. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed using Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that the proposed method could improve overall image quality as compared to other methods. Our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved in hip joint radiography by using the proposed method.

  6. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

  7. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscable simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  8. Burst speciation processes and genomic expansion in the neotropical annual killifish genus Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae).

    PubMed

    García, G; Gutiérrez, V; Ríos, N; Turner, B; Santiñaque, F; López-Carro, B; Folle, G

    2014-02-01

    The extent to which genome sizes and other nucleotypic factors influence the phyletic diversification of lineages has long been discussed but remains largely unresolved. In the present work, we present evidence that the genomes of at least 16 species of the neotropical rivulid killifish genus Austrolebias are unusually large, with an average DNA content of about 5.95 ± 0.45 picograms per diploid cell (mean C-value of about 2.98 pg). They are thus larger than the genomes of very nearly all other diploid, i.e. non-(paleo) polyploid species of actinopterygian fishes so far reported. Austrolebias species appear to be conventional diploids in all other respects and there is no reason to believe that they arise from polyploid ancestors. The genome sizes reported for other rivulid killifishes, including a putative sister group, are considerably smaller and fall within the range typical of most other cyprinodontoid species. Therefore, it appears that the ancestor(s) of contemporary Austrolebias have undergone one or more episodes of genome expansion encompassing sudden speciation process during the Pleistocene. In addition, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis of a positive correlation between species richness and genome size.

  9. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  10. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  11. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A set of statistically designed experiments was used to study the effects of several important operating variables on coal liquefaction product yield structures. These studies used a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor to provide a hydrodynamically well-defined system from which kinetic data could be extracted. An analysis of the data shows that product yield structures can be adequately represented by a correlative model. It was shown that second-order effects (interaction and squared terms) are necessary to provide a good model fit of the data throughout the range studied. Three reports were issued covering the SRC-II database and yields as functions of operating variables. The results agree well with the generally-held concepts of the SRC reaction process, i.e., liquid phase hydrogenolysis of liquid coal which is time-dependent, thermally activated, catalyzed by recycle ash, and reaction rate-controlled. Four reports were issued summarizing the comprehensive SRC reactor thermal response models and reporting the results of several studies made with the models. Analytical equipment for measuring SRC off-gas composition and simulated distillation of coal liquids and appropriate procedures have been established.

  12. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  13. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  14. A 60Co multipurpose radiation processing facility at Bahia Blanca, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curzio, O. A.; Croci, C. A.

    The aim of the project is to have a multipurpose facility which will enable us to show the techno-economic viability of the irradiation process applied to regional products, important from the economic point of view. The topics will fundamentally be connected with regional themes such as food preservation and the modification of polymer structures. This project will make it possible to carry out basic and applied studies related to radiation chemistry, dosimetry and engineering irradiation processes. The facility will operate in the Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS) with a maximum activity of 18.5 PBq of Co-60. The viability and design of the irradiation facility is supported by the Government of the Buenos Aires Province since it is interested in the socio-economic benefit of this technology at the regional level.

  15. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-09-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  16. Radiation processed polychloroprene-co-ethylene-propene diene terpolymer blends: Effect of radiation vulcanization on solvent transport kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, K. A.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Chaudhari, C. V.; Kumar, Virendra; Goel, N. K.; Sabharwal, S.

    2009-03-01

    Blends of polychloroprene rubber (PCR) and ethylene propylene diene terpolymer rubber (EPDM) of different compositions were made and exposed to different gamma radiation doses. The radiation sensitivity and radiation vulcanization efficiency of blends was estimated by gel-content analysis, Charlesby-Pinner parameter determination and crosslinking density measurements. Gamma radiation induced crosslinking was most efficient for EPDM ( p0/ q0 ˜ 0.08), whereas it was the lowest for blends containing 40% PCR ( p0/ q0 ˜ 0.34). The vulcanized blends were characterized for solvent diffusion characteristics by following the swelling dynamics. Blends with higher PCR content showed anomalous swelling. The sorption and permeability of the solvent were not strictly in accordance with each other and the extent of variation in two parameters was found to be a function of blend composition. The Δ G values for solvent diffusion were in the range -2.97 to -9.58 kJ/mol and indicated thermodynamically favorable sorption for all blends. These results were corroborated by dynamic swelling, experimental as well as simulated profiles and have been explained on the basis of correlation between crosslinking density, diffusion kinetics, thermodynamic parameters and polymer-polymer interaction parameter.

  17. Automated Thermal Image Processing for Detection and Classification of Birds and Bats - FY2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Virden, Daniel J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.

    2012-09-01

    Surveying wildlife at risk from offshore wind energy development is difficult and expensive. Infrared video can be used to record birds and bats that pass through the camera view, but it is also time consuming and expensive to review video and determine what was recorded. We proposed to conduct algorithm and software development to identify and to differentiate thermally detected targets of interest that would allow automated processing of thermal image data to enumerate birds, bats, and insects. During FY2012 we developed computer code within MATLAB to identify objects recorded in video and extract attribute information that describes the objects recorded. We tested the efficiency of track identification using observer-based counts of tracks within segments of sample video. We examined object attributes, modeled the effects of random variability on attributes, and produced data smoothing techniques to limit random variation within attribute data. We also began drafting and testing methodology to identify objects recorded on video. We also recorded approximately 10 hours of infrared video of various marine birds, passerine birds, and bats near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) at Sequim, Washington. A total of 6 hours of bird video was captured overlooking Sequim Bay over a series of weeks. An additional 2 hours of video of birds was also captured during two weeks overlooking Dungeness Bay within the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bats and passerine birds (swallows) were also recorded at dusk on the MSL campus during nine evenings. An observer noted the identity of objects viewed through the camera concurrently with recording. These video files will provide the information necessary to produce and test software developed during FY2013. The annotation will also form the basis for creation of a method to reliably identify recorded objects.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  19. Acid-base behavior in hydrothermal processing of wastes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    'A major obstacle to the development of hydrothermal technology for treating DOE wastes has been a lack of scientific knowledge of solution chemistry, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. The progress over the last year is highlighted in the following four abstracts from manuscripts which have been submitted to journals. The authors also have made considerable progress on a spectroscopic study of the acid-base equilibria of Cr(VI). They have utilized novel spectroscopic indicators to study acid-base equilibria up to 380 C. Until now, very few systems have been studied at such high temperatures, although this information is vital for hydrothermal processing of wastes. The pH values of aqueous solutions of boric acid and KOH were measured with the optical indicator 2-naphthol at temperatures from 300 to 380 C. The equilibrium constant Kb-l for the reaction B(OH)3 + OH{sup -} = B(OH){sup -4} was determined from the pH measurements and correlated with a modified Born model. The titration curve for the addition of HCl to sodium borate exhibits strong acid-strong base behavior even at 350 C and 24.1 MPa. At these conditions, aqueous solutions of sodium borate buffer the pH at 9.6 t 0.25. submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Acetic Acid and HCl Acid-base titrations for the KOH-acetic acid or NH{sub 3} -acetic acid systems were monitored with the optical indicator 2-naphthoic acid at 350 C and 34 MPa, and those for the HCl;Cl- system with acridine at 380 C and up to 34 MPa (5,000 psia ). KOH remains a much stronger base than NH,OH at high temperature. From 298 K to the critical temperature of water, the dissociation constant for HCl decreases by 13 orders of magnitude, and thus, the basicity of Cl{sup -} becomes significant. Consequently, the addition of NaCl to HCl raises the pH. The pH titration curves may be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the relevant equilibrium constants and Pitzer''s formulation of the Debye- Htickel equation for the activity coefficients.'

  20. Gamma radiation in the reduction of S almonella spp. inoculated on minimally processed watercress ( Nasturtium officinalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. G.; Behrens, J. H.; Destro, M. T.; Franco, B. D. G. M.; Vizeu, D. M.; Hutzler, B.; Landgraf, M.

    2004-09-01

    Consumer attitudes towards foods have changed in the last two decades increasing requirements for freshlike products. Consequently, less extreme treatments or additives are being required. Minimally processed foods have freshlike characteristics and satisfy this new consumer demand. Besides freshness, the minimally processing also provide convenience required by the market. Salad vegetables can be source of pathogen such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp. The minimal processing does not reduce the levels of pathogenic microorganisms to safe levels. Therefore, this study was carried out in order to improve the microbiological safety and the shelf-life of minimally processed vegetables using gamma radiation. Minimally processed watercress inoculated with a cocktail of Salmonella spp was exposed to 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.2 and 1.5 kGy. Irradiated samples were diluted 1:10 in saline peptone water and plated onto tryptic soy agar that were incubated at 37°C/24 h. D 10 values for Salmonella spp. inoculated in watercress varied from 0.29 to 0.43 kGy. Therefore, a dose of 1.7 kGy will reduce Salmonella population in watercress by 4 log 10. The shelf-life was increased by 1 {1}/{2} day when the product was exposed to 1 kGy.

  1. Schools of Education in a New Era of Accountability: A Case Study of an Annual Report Process Used to Advance a Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Manuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are entering a new era, one where cost, value, and quality are at the front of mind. To proactively ensure long-term viability, institutions must operate differently. This qualitative case study examined how the St. Alexander University School of Education's Annual Report Process impacted institutional…

  2. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Veigl, Martina L.; Morgan, William F.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  3. Structure, process and annual intensive care unit mortality across 69 centers: United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS)

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, William; Martin, Greg S; Brown, Samuel M; Chang, Steven Y; Dabbagh, Ousama; Fremont, Richard D; Girard, Timothy D; Rice, Todd W; Howell, Michael D; Johnson, Steven B; O'Brien, James; Park, Pauline K; Pastores, Stephen M; Patil, Namrata T; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Putman, Maryann; Rotello, Leo; Siner, Jonathan; Sajid, Sahul; Murphy, David J; Sevransky, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hospital-level variations in structure and process may affect clinical outcomes in intensive care units (ICUs). We sought to characterize the organizational structure, processes of care, use of protocols and standardized outcomes in a large sample of U.S. ICUs. Design We surveyed 69 ICUs about organization, size, volume, staffing, processes of care, use of protocols, and annual ICU mortality. Setting ICUs participating in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS). Measurements and Main Results We characterized structure and process variables across ICUs, investigated relationships between these variables and annual ICU mortality, and adjusted for illness severity using APACHE II. Ninety-four ICU directors were invited to participate in the study and 69 ICUs (73%) were enrolled, of which 25 (36%) were medical, 24 were surgical (35%) and 20 (29%) were of mixed type, and 64 (93%) were located in teaching hospitals with a median number of 5 trainees per ICU. Average annual ICU mortality was 10.8%, average APACHE II score was 19.3, 58% were closed units and 41% had a 24-hour in-house intensivist. In multivariable linear regression adjusted for APACHE II and multiple ICU structure and process factors, annual ICU mortality was lower in surgical ICUs than in medical ICUs (5.6% lower, 95% CI 2.4%–8.8%) or mixed ICUs (4.5% lower, 95% CI 0.4%–8.7%). We also found a lower annual ICU mortality among ICUs that had a daily plan of care review (5.8% lower, 95% CI 1.6%–10.0%) and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio (1.8% lower when the ratio decreased from 2:1 to 1.5:1; 95% CI 0.25%–3.4%). In contrast, 24-hour intensivist coverage (p=0.89) and closed ICU status (p=0.16) were not associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. Conclusions In a sample of 69 ICUs, a daily plan of care review and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio were both associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. In contrast to 24-hour intensivist

  4. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space exploration.

  5. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most effect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  6. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  7. Terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin reveals correlated primary electron and proton transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Groma, G I; Hebling, J; Kozma, I Z; Váró, G; Hauer, J; Kuhl, J; Riedle, E

    2008-05-13

    The kinetics of electrogenic events associated with the different steps of the light-induced proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin is well studied in a wide range of time scales by direct electric methods. However, the investigation of the fundamental primary charge translocation phenomena taking place in the functional energy conversion process of this protein, and in other biomolecular assemblies using light energy, has remained experimentally unfeasible because of the lack of proper detection technique operating in the 0.1- to 20-THz region. Here, we show that extending the concept of the familiar Hertzian dipole emission into the extreme spatial and temporal range of intramolecular polarization processes provides an alternative way to study ultrafast electrogenic events on naturally ordered biological systems. Applying a relatively simple experimental arrangement based on this idea, we were able to observe light-induced coherent terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin with femtosecond time resolution. The detected terahertz signal was analyzed by numerical simulation in the framework of different models for the elementary polarization processes. It was found that the principal component of the terahertz emission can be well described by excited-state intramolecular electron transfer within the retinal chromophore. An additional slower process is attributed to the earliest phase of the proton pump, probably occurring by the redistribution of a H bond near the retinal. The correlated electron and proton translocation supports the concept, assigning a functional role to the light-induced sudden polarization in retinal proteins.

  8. Cell phone electromagnetic field radiations affect rhizogenesis through impairment of biochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Sharma, Ved Parkash; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Indiscriminate adoption and use of cell phone technology has tremendously increased the levels of electromagnetic field radiations (EMFr) in the natural environment. It has raised the concerns among the scientists regarding the possible risks of EMFr to living organisms. However, not much has been done to assess the damage caused to plants that are continuously exposed to EMFr present in the environment. The present study investigated the biochemical mechanism of interference of 900 MHz cell phone EMFr with root formation in mung bean (Vigna radiata syn. Phaseolus aureus) hypocotyls, a model system to study rhizogenesis in plants. Cell phone EMFr enhanced the activities of proteases (by 1.52 to 2.33 times), polyphenol oxidases (by 1.5 to 4.3 times), and peroxidases (by 1.5 to 2.0 times) in mung bean hypocotyls over control. Further, EMFr enhanced malondialdehyde (an indicator of lipid peroxidation), hydrogen peroxide, and proline content, indicating a reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative damage in hypocotyls. It was confirmed by the upregulation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and glutathione reductase) suggesting their possible role in providing protection against EMFr-induced oxidative damage. The study concluded that cell phone radiations affect the process of rhizogenesis through biochemical alterations that manifest as oxidative damage resulting in root impairment.

  9. Radiative processes of two entangled atoms outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, G.

    2016-11-01

    We consider radiative processes of a quantum system composed by two identical two-level atoms in a black-hole background. We assume that these identical two-level atoms are placed at fixed radial distances outside a Schwarzschild black hole and interacting with a quantum electromagnetic field prepared in one of the usual vacuum states, namely, the Boulware, Unruh, or Hartle-Hawking vacuum states. We study the structure of the rate of variation of the atomic energy. The intention is to identify in a quantitative way the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and the radiation reaction to the entanglement generation between the atoms as well as the degradation of entangled states in the presence of an event horizon. We find that for a finite observation time the atoms can become entangled for the case of the field in the Boulware vacuum state, even if they are initially prepared in a separable state. In addition, the rate of variation of atomic energy is not well behaved at the event horizon due to the behavior of the proper accelerations of the atoms. We show that the thermal nature of the Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacuum state allows the atoms to get entangled even if they were initially prepared in the separable ground state.

  10. Process for crosslinking methylene-containing aromatic polymers with ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for crosslinking aromatic polymers containing radiation-sensitive methylene groups (-CH2-) by exposing the polymers to ionizing radiation thereby causing crosslinking of the polymers through the methylene groups is described. Crosslinked polymers are resistant to most organic solvents such as acetone, alcohols, hydrocarbons, methylene, chloride, chloroform, and other halogenated hydrocarbons, to common fuels and to hydraulic fluids in contrast to readily soluble uncrosslinked polymers. In addition, the degree of crosslinking of the polymers depends upon the percentage of the connecting groups which are methylene which ranges from 5 to 50 pct and preferably from 25 to 50 pct of the connecting groups, and is also controlled by the level of irradiation which ranges from 25 to 1000 Mrads and preferably from 25 to 250 Mrads. The temperature of the reaction conditions ranges from 25 to 200 C and preferably at or slightly above the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The crosslinked polymers are generally more resistant to degradation at elevated temperatures such as greater than 150 C, have a reduced tendency to creep under load, and show no significant embrittlement of parts fabricated from the polymers.

  11. PREFACE: International Scientific Conference on Radiation-Thermal Effects and Processes in Inorganic Materials 2015 (RTEP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International Scientific Conference "Radiation-Thermal Effects and Processes in Inorganic Materials" is a traditional representative forum devoted to the discussion of fundamental problems of radiation physics and its technical applications. The first nine conferences were held fourfold in Tomsk, Ulan-Ude (Russia), Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan), Tashkent (Uzbekistan), Sharm El Sheikh (Egypt), the island of Cyprus. The XI conference was held in Tomsk, Russia. The program of the Conference covers a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of radiation physics, its applications and related matters. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: • Physical and chemical phenomena in inorganic materials in radiation, electrical and thermal fields; • Research methods and equipment modification states and properties of materials; • Technologies and equipment for their implementation; • The use of radiation-thermal processes in nanotechnology; • Adjacent to the main theme of the conference issues The conference was attended by leading scientists from countries near and far abroad who work in the field of radiation physics of solid state and of radiation material science. The School-Conference of Young Scientists was also held during the conference. The event was held with the financial support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects No. 15-02-20616.

  12. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Quinn

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors are well established as a valuable tool in nuclear science, astrophysics, and nuclear security applications. HPGe detectors excel in gamma-ray spectroscopy, offering excellent energy resolution with large detector sizes for high radiation detection efficiency. Although a robust fabrication process has been developed, improvement is needed, especially in developing electrical contact and surface passivation technology for position-sensitive detectors. A systematic study is needed to understand how the detector fabrication process impacts detector performance and reliability. In order to provide position sensitivity, the electrical contacts are segmented to form multiple electrodes. This segmentation creates new challenges in the fabrication process and warrants consideration of additional detector effects related to the segmentation. A key area of development is the creation of the electrical contacts in a way that enables reliable operation, provides low electronic noise, and allows fine segmentation of electrodes, giving position sensitivity for radiation interactions in the detector. Amorphous semiconductor contacts have great potential to facilitate new HPGe detector designs by providing a thin, high-resistivity surface coating that is the basis for electrical contacts that block both electrons and holes and can easily be finely segmented. Additionally, amorphous semiconductor coatings form a suitable passivation layer to protect the HPGe crystal surface from contamination. This versatility allows a simple fabrication process for fully passivated, finely segmented detectors. However, the fabrication process for detectors with amorphous semiconductors is not as highly developed as for conventional technologies. The amorphous semiconductor layer properties can vary widely based on how they are created and these can translate into varying performance of HPGe detectors with these contacts. Some key challenges include

  13. Effect of radiation processing on nutritional and sensory quality of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajare, Sachin N.; Saroj, Sunil D.; Dhokane, Varsha S.; Shashidhar, R.; Bandekar, Jayant R.

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, radiation processing of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts was carried out at doses 1 and 2 kGy. The effect of this treatment on different quality parameters like vitamin C content, total carotenoids content, sensory quality, texture, and color was determined over a storage period of 12 days at two different temperatures, a 4 and 8 °C. It was observed that treatment of irradiation (1 and 2 kGy) and storage period did not have any significant effect on vitamin C content of control as well as irradiated sprout samples stored at 4 and 8 °C. Total carotenoids content of sprouts stored at 4, as well as at 8 °C, for 12 days remained almost unchanged after irradiation as well as during storage. Sensory evaluation studies showed that irradiation had no significant effect ( p>0.05) on the ratings of any of the sensory attributes in green gram as well as garden pea sprouts and, thus, did not alter the overall acceptability of the irradiated sprouts. Textural studies revealed that there was no significant change ( p>0.05) in the firmness of irradiated sprouts (1 and 2 kGy) as compared to control samples at both the temperatures. Storage period of 12 days also did not affect the firmness of sprouts significantly. Color measurement results indicated no drastic change in the color coordinates of the green gram samples except greenness of controls stored at both the temperatures, which showed insignificant decrease in the a* values. Thus, the nutritional as well as sensory quality of minimally processed green gram and garden pea sprouts did not alter significantly after gamma irradiation with a dose of 1 and 2 kGy.

  14. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  15. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 15th, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. Mex., July 18-21, 1978, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation effects in MOS devices and circuits are considered along with radiation effects in materials, space radiation effects and spacecraft charging, SGEMP, IEMP, EMP, fabrication of radiation-hardened devices, radiation effects in bipolar devices and circuits, simulation, energy deposition, and dosimetry. Attention is given to the rapid anneal of radiation-induced silicon-sapphire interface charge trapping, cosmic ray induced errors in MOS memory cells, a simple model for predicting radiation effects in MOS devices, the response of MNOS capacitors to ionizing radiation at 80 K, trapping effects in irradiated and avalanche-injected MOS capacitors, inelastic interactions of electrons with polystyrene, the photoelectron spectral yields generated by monochromatic soft X radiation, and electron transport in reactor materials.

  16. Very Low-Power Consumption Analog Pulse Processing ASIC for Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.; Lund, J.C.; Brunett, B.A.; Laguna, G.R.; Clements, J.W.

    1999-08-23

    We describe a very-low power consumption circuit for processing the pulses from a semiconductor radiation detector. The circuit was designed for use with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector for unattended monitoring of stored nuclear materials. The device is intended to be battery powered and operate at low duty-cycles over a long period of time. This system will provide adequate performance for medium resolution gamma-ray pulse-height spectroscopy applications. The circuit incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive preamplifier, shaping amplifier, and peak sample and hold circuit. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) version of the design has been designed, built and tested. With the exception of the input field effect transistor (FET), the circuit is constructed using bipolar components. In this paper the design philosophy and measured performance characteristics of the circuit are described.

  17. Radiation processing as a post-harvest quarantine control for raisins, dried figs and dried apricots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinkaya, N.; Ozyardımci, B.; Denli, E.; Ic, E.

    2006-03-01

    The commercially packed samples of raisins, dried figs and dried apricots were irradiated using doses in the range of 0.5-1.0 kGy for disinfestation and 0.5-5.0 kGy for sensory analysis with the dose rate ranging from 1.44 to 1.92 kGy/h. Pests on dried fruits were evaluated after 0, 1, 2 and 3 months of storage for irradiated dried figs and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of storage for raisins and dried apricots. Sensory analysis of dried figs, dried apricots and raisins were carried out after 0, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of storage. The results indicated that radiation processing at low doses, (˜1.0 kGy) is an effective post-harvest treatment and quarantine control for these products with no adverse effects on sensory (marketing) attributes.

  18. Energy deposition through radiative processes in absorbers irradiated by electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuo, Tabata; Pedro, Andreo; Kunihiko, Shinoda; Rinsuke, Ito

    1994-09-01

    The component of energy deposition due to radiative processes (bremsstrahlung component) in absorbers irradiated by electron beams has been computed together with the total energy deposition by using the ITS Monte Carlo system version 3.0. Plane-parallel electron beams with energies from 0.1 to 100 MeV have been assumed to be incident normally on the slab absorber, whose thickness is 2.5 times the continuous slowing-down approximation (csda) range of the incident electrons. Absorber materials considered are elemental solids with atomic numbers between 4 and 92 (Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U). An analytic formula is given to express the depth profile of the bremsstrahlung component as a function of scaled depth (depth in units of the csda range), incident-electron energy and absorber atomic number. It is also applicable to compounds.

  19. Source and loss processes of protons of the inner radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, T. A.; Walt, M.

    1971-01-01

    The adequacy of the known source and loss processes to populate the inner radiation belt with protons is examined by calculating the equilibrium trapped-proton distribution, which would result from decay of albedo neutrons, energy-loss collisions, and radial diffusion by changes in the third adiabatic invariant. The strength of the neutron source and the rates of atmospheric energy loss are obtained from available theoretical and experimental data, and the radial-diffusion coefficient is adjusted to give agreement between theory and experiment for equatorially trapped protons with first invariants between 200 and 3000 MeV gauss. The flux intensities, energy spectrums, and radial distributions obtained by the theory are in good agreement with observations, and the radial diffusion coefficient required is consistent with dif*usion coefficients derived by a variety of other methods.-

  20. Shelf-life extension of convenience meat products sold in Indian supermarkets by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Shobita Rao, M.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2010-12-01

    A variety of ready-to-cook meat products available in Indian supermarkets (mutton mince, chicken mince, chicken chunks, and chicken legs) were studied. The samples were irradiated (2.5 kGy), or left untreated as control, and stored at 0-3 °C for up to 21 days. The effect of irradiation on the microbiological, chemical, and sensory properties was evaluated at intervals during the storage period. Irradiated samples had a longer shelf-life at 0-3 °C compared with the corresponding non-irradiated samples. Fecal coliforms were eliminated by irradiation treatment. Radiation processed samples had lower counts of Staphylococcus spp. There were no significant organoleptic changes in irradiated samples stored at chilled temperatures.

  1. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/.

  2. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A graphics processing unit–based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/. PMID:23085905

  3. Photo detection process and power spectrum estimation of optical radiation by the multichannel resonant spectrum analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaletz, O. D.; Paraskun, A. S.; Vaganov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of receiving of an energy spectrum estimation of optical radiations in the new analyzer of optical signals is considered. It is the parallel resonant optical spectrum analyzer (SPECTRUM ANALYZER). Its resolving system is a set of narrow-band optical resonators in the form of interference filters. Each optical resonator is equivalent to a system with lumped parameters. This allows us to consider only oscillations of an optical field in the form of a scalar functions and adopt as a model of analyzed signal harmonized scalar random process. The photodetector operation and average of photocurrent using an integrator and integrating circuit is considered too. On the basis of the application prolate entire spheroidal wave function theory energy spectrum estimation by the integral of photocurrent is obtained. This energy spectrum estimation is consistent and asymptotically unbiased.

  4. Application of an informatics-based decision-making framework and process to the assessment of radiation safety in nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Mark D; Myers, David S; Cash, Leigh J; Guilmette, Raymond A; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R; Boecker, Bruce B; Grissom, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between ∼1 and 100 nm, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this paper presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are already present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.

  5. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    DOE PAGES

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are alreadymore » present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.« less

  6. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R.; Boecker, Bruce B.; Grissom, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are already present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.

  7. Prediction of UV spectra and UV-radiation damage in actual plasma etching processes using on-wafer monitoring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Fukuda, Seiichi; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    UV radiation during plasma processing affects the surface of materials. Nevertheless, the interaction of UV photons with surface is not clearly understood because of the difficulty in monitoring photons during plasma processing. For this purpose, we have previously proposed an on-wafer monitoring technique for UV photons. For this study, using the combination of this on-wafer monitoring technique and a neural network, we established a relationship between the data obtained from the on-wafer monitoring technique and UV spectra. Also, we obtained absolute intensities of UV radiation by calibrating arbitrary units of UV intensity with a 126 nm excimer lamp. As a result, UV spectra and their absolute intensities could be predicted with the on-wafer monitoring. Furthermore, we developed a prediction system with the on-wafer monitoring technique to simulate UV-radiation damage in dielectric films during plasma etching. UV-induced damage in SiOC films was predicted in this study. Our prediction results of damage in SiOC films shows that UV spectra and their absolute intensities are the key cause of damage in SiOC films. In addition, UV-radiation damage in SiOC films strongly depends on the geometry of the etching structure. The on-wafer monitoring technique should be useful in understanding the interaction of UV radiation with surface and in optimizing plasma processing by controlling UV radiation.

  8. Radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Akushevich, Alexander Ilyichev

    2012-03-01

    Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated in the leading log approximation and analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Radiative corrections to the cross sections, their azimuthal distributions and Fourier coefficients are in particular focus. Kinematical regions where the radiative corrections are considerable are identified.

  9. Theoretical Studies Relating to the Interaction of Radiation with Matter: Atomic Collision Processes Occurring in the Presence of Radiation Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Zener problem (two-level atom subjected to a hyperbolic secant radiation pulse) has been extended to three level systems in which the field couples...well resemble true pulses. It also enables one to solve the two-level part of 2246 E J Robinson the problem analytically (Rosen and Zener 1932, Robiscoe...4Z(1 -Z)]N-2a 2(Z)12 dZ (8) with a 2 given in terms of the variable Z by (Robiscoe 1978, Rosen and Zener 1932) r(--c) 2F (c-a +1,c-b +1,2-c,Z) (9

  10. Control of browning of minimally processed mangoes subjected to ultraviolet radiation pulses.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Aline Ellen Duarte; Fonseca, Kelem Silva; da Silva Gomes, Wilny Karen; Monteiro da Silva, Ana Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Ebenézer; Puschmann, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The pulsed ultraviolet radiation (UVP) has been used as an alternative strategy for the control of microorganisms in food. However, its application causes the browning of minimally processed fruits and vegetables. In order to control the browning of the 'Tommy Atkins' minimally processed mango and treated with UVP (5.7 J cm(-2)) it was used 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) (0.5 μL L(-1)), an ethylene action blocker in separate stages, comprising five treatments: control, UVP (U), 1-MCP + UVP (M + U), UVP + 1-MCP (U + M) e 1-MCP + UVP + 1-MCP (M + U + M). At the 1st, 7th and 14th days of storage at 12 °C, we evaluated the color (L* and b*), electrolyte leakage, polyphenol oxidase, total extractable polyphenols, vitamin C and total antioxidant activity. The 1-MCP, when applied before UVP, prevented the loss of vitamin C and when applied in a double dose, retained the yellow color (b*) of the cubes. However, the 1-MCP reduced lightness (L*) of independent mango cubes whatever applied before and/or after the UVP. Thus, the application of 1-MCP did not control, but intensified the browning of minimally processed mangoes irradiated with UVP.

  11. Ab initio calculation of the $np \\to d ³$ radiative capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process $np \\to d\\gamma$, and the photo-disintegration processes $\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $m_\\pi \\sim 450$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $v=2,200\\ m/s$, consistent with the experimental value of $\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$.

  12. Non-Radiative Carrier Recombination Enhanced by Two-Level Process: A First-Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changes to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials. PMID:26880667

  13. Non-radiative carrier recombination enhanced by two-level process: A first-principles study

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin -Wang; ...

    2016-02-16

    In this study, non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changesmore » to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center Te2+cd in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials.« less

  14. Non-radiative carrier recombination enhanced by two-level process: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin -Wang; Wei, Su -Huai

    2016-02-16

    In this study, non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changes to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center Te2+cd in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials.

  15. Ab initio Calculation of the n p →d γ Radiative Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Nplqcd Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process n p →d γ , and the photo-disintegration processes γ(*)d →n p . In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of mπ˜450 and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine the amplitudes for these low-energy inelastic processes. At mπ˜806 MeV , using only lattice QCD inputs, a cross section σ806 MeV˜17 mb is found at an incident neutron speed of v =2 ,200 m /s . Extrapolating the short-distance contribution to the physical pion mass and combining the result with phenomenological scattering information and one-body couplings, a cross section of σlqcd(n p →d γ )=334.9 ( +5.2 -5.4 ) mb is obtained at the same incident neutron speed, consistent with the experimental value of σexpt(n p →d γ )=334.2 (0.5 ) mb .

  16. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Dario; Portale, Giuseppe; Androsch, René

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  17. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  18. 1992 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 29th, New Orleans, LA, July 13-17, 1992, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Vonno, Nick W. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of recent theoretical and experimental research related to nuclear and space radiation effects. Topics dicussed include single event phenomena, radiation effects in particle detectors and associated electronics for accelerators, spacecraft charging, and space environments and effects. The discussion also covers hardness assurance and testing techniques, electromagnetic effects, radiation effects in devices and integrated circuits, dosimetry and radiation facilities, isolation techniques, and basic mechanisms.

  19. Modelling of three-dimensional transient conjugate convection-conduction-radiation heat transfer processes and turbulence in building spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Stephen Edward

    1998-12-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented the results of which are used to identify numerical methods capable of solving the equation sets that define the various categories of fluid flow and heat transfer that apply to air movement within buildings. The background to turbulence modelling is discussed together with the treatment of near-wall regions to which turbulence models are inapplicable. A further survey into the application of CFD methods to air movement within buildings is presented together with an appraisal of the success of these studies in terms of realistic modelling. From this survey it is concluded that there is a need to integrate surface radiation heat transfer methods within CFD procedures in order to provide a fully coupled model. The equation set describing advection, convection and conduction processes together with the k-ɛ turbulence model are presented and the development of this equation set into the final mathematical model described. Details of the numerical procedure adopted for solution of the equation set are provided together with a general approach to the incorporation of radiation heat transfer within the same solution scheme. Shortwave and longwave radiation heat transfer processes in buildings are discussed and the geometric requirements for the numerical simulation of radiation process identified. A general numerical method for handling room geometry is presented together with a method for linking building surface and CFD grid geometries. A method for incorporating shortwave solar radiation together with an approximate method for longwave radiation within the CFD solution scheme is detailed dispensing with the need for an involved iterative approach. A computer program has been developed from these mathematical models which is capable of solving coupled three-dimensional convection, conduction and radiation heat transfer processes. The program has been applied to a set of test

  20. Cosmic Radiation | RadTown USA | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-05-16

    Radiation from space is constantly hitting the Earth. Radiation from space is called cosmic radiation. Cosmic radiation makes up about five percent of annual radiation exposure of an average person in the United States.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Space Radiation Processing in Lunar Soil Ilmenite: Combining Perspectives from Surface Science and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions mostly from the solar wind play a major role in lunar space weathering because they contribute structural and chemical changes to the space-exposed surfaces of lunar regolith grains. In mature mare soils, ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains in the finest size fraction have been shown in transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies to exhibit key differences in their response to space radiation processing relative to silicates [1,2,3]. In ilmenite, solar ion radiation alters host grain outer margins to produce 10-100 nm thick layers that are microstructurally complex, but dominantly crystalline compared to the amorphous radiation-processed rims on silicates [1,2,3]. Spatially well-resolved analytical TEM measurements also show nm-scale compositional and chemical state changes in these layers [1,3]. These include shifts in Fe/Ti ratio from strong surface Fe-enrichment (Fe/Ti >> 1), to Fe depletion (Fe/Ti < 1) at 40-50 nm below the grain surface [1,3]. These compositional changes are not observed in the radiation-processed rims on silicates [4]. Several mechanism(s) to explain the overall relations in the ilmenite grain rims by radiation processing and/or additional space weathering processes were proposed by [1], and remain under current consideration [3]. A key issue has concerned the ability of ion radiation processing alone to produce some of the deeper- penetrating compositional changes. In order to provide some experimental constraints on these questions, we have performed a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field-emission scanning transmission electron (FE-STEM) study of experimentally ion-irradiated ilmenite. A key feature of this work is the combination of analytical techniques sensitive to changes in the irradiated samples at depth scales going from the immediate surface (approx.5 nm; XPS), to deeper in the grain interior (5-100 nm; FE-STEM).

  2. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R.; Hlavacek, William S.; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E.; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    Summary This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  3. QED radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons with the next-to-leading accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Akushevich, Igor V.; Ilyichev, Alexander; Shumeiko, Nikolai M

    2014-08-01

    Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated with the next-to-leading (NLO) accuracy. The contributions of loops and two photon emission were presented in analytical form. The covariant approach of Bardin and Shumeiko was used to extract the infrared divergence. All contributions to the radiative correction were presented in the form of the correction to the leptonic tensor thus allowing for further applications in other experiments, e.g., deep inelastic scattering. The radiative corrections (RC) to the cross sections and polarization asymmetries were analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of the current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Specific attention was paid on analyzing kinematical conditions for the process with large radiative effect when momenta of two photons in the final state are collinear to momenta of initial and final electrons, respectively.

  4. Two-parametric model of electron beam in computational dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazurik, V. M.; Lazurik, V. T.; Popov, G.; Zimek, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Computer simulation of irradiation process of various materials with electron beam (EB) can be applied to correct and control the performances of radiation processing installations. Electron beam energy measurements methods are described in the international standards. The obtained results of measurements can be extended by implementation computational dosimetry. Authors have developed the computational method for determination of EB energy on the base of two-parametric fitting of semi-empirical model for the depth dose distribution initiated by mono-energetic electron beam. The analysis of number experiments show that described method can effectively consider random displacements arising from the use of aluminum wedge with a continuous strip of dosimetric film and minimize the magnitude uncertainty value of the electron energy evaluation, calculated from the experimental data. Two-parametric fitting method is proposed for determination of the electron beam model parameters. These model parameters are as follow: E0 - energy mono-energetic and mono-directional electron source, X0 - the thickness of the aluminum layer, located in front of irradiated object. That allows obtain baseline data related to the characteristic of the electron beam, which can be later on applied for computer modeling of the irradiation process. Model parameters which are defined in the international standards (like Ep- the most probably energy and Rp - practical range) can be linked with characteristics of two-parametric model (E0, X0), which allows to simulate the electron irradiation process. The obtained data from semi-empirical model were checked together with the set of experimental results. The proposed two-parametric model for electron beam energy evaluation and estimation of accuracy for computational dosimetry methods on the base of developed model are discussed.

  5. Radiative levitation in carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars with s-process enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrozis, E.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    A significant fraction of all metal-poor stars are carbon-rich. Most of these carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars also show enhancement in elements produced mainly by the s-process (CEMP-s stars), and evidence suggests that the origin of these non-standard abundances can be traced to mass transfer from a binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companion. Thus, observations of CEMP-s stars are commonly used to infer the nucleosynthesis output of low-metallicity AGB stars. A crucial step in this exercise is understanding what happens to the accreted material after mass transfer ceases. Here we present models of the post-mass-transfer evolution of CEMP-s stars considering the physics of thermohaline mixing and atomic diffusion, including radiative levitation. We find that stars with typical CEMP-s star masses, M ≈ 0.85 M⊙, have very shallow convective envelopes (Menv ≲ 10-7 M⊙). Hence, the surface abundance variations arising from the competition between gravitational settling and radiative levitation should be orders of magnitude larger than observed (e.g. [C/Fe] < -1 or [C/Fe] > +4). Lower-mass stars (M ≈ 0.80 M⊙) retain thicker convective envelopes and thus show variations more in line with observations, but are generally too unevolved (log g > 4) when they reach the age of the Universe. We are therefore unable to reproduce the spread in the observed abundances with these models and conclude that some other physical process must largely suppress atomic diffusion in the outer layers of CEMP-s stars. We demonstrate that this could be achieved by some additional (turbulent) mixing process operating at the base of the convective envelope, as found by other authors. Alternatively, mass-loss rates around 10-13 M⊙yr-1 could also negate most of the abundance variations by eroding the surface layers and forcing the base of the convective envelope to move inwards in mass. Since atomic diffusion cannot have a substantial effect on the surface abundances of CEMP

  6. Experimental determination of physical processes in space, leading to deviations of radio synchrotron radiation spectra from the power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men', A. V.

    2008-02-01

    We present universal formulas for spectral characteristics of cosmic radio sources of synchrotron radiation upon the presence of spectral density maxima at certain frequencies (spectra with negative curvature) taking into account most typical physical processes observed in space. On the basis of long-term observations of angular radiation structure of cosmic radio sources in the decameter wavelength range by the URAN radio interferometer system, we determine most probable physical processes resulting in spectra with extremum values for several quasars, radio galaxies, and their separate components. On the basis of these data, we estimate some parameters of cosmic medium, magnetic field, and angular sizes of compact radio sources and their components.

  7. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  8. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE PAGES

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; ...

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  9. Tropical Convective Responses to Microphysical and Radiative Processes: A Sensitivity Study With a 2D Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic cloud schemes are increasingly used in weather and climate models in order to better treat cloud-radiation processes. Simplifications are often made in such schemes for computational efficiency, like the scheme being used in the National Centers for Environment Prediction models that excludes some microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction. In this study, sensitivity tests with a 2D cloud resolving model are carried out to examine effects of the excluded microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction on tropical thermodynamics and cloud properties. The model is integrated for 10 days with the imposed vertical velocity derived from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment. The experiment excluding the depositional growth of snow from cloud ice shows anomalous growth of cloud ice and more than 20% increase of fractional cloud cover, indicating that the lack of the depositional snow growth causes unrealistically large mixing ratio of cloud ice. The experiment excluding the precipitation-radiation interaction displays a significant cooling and drying bias. The analysis of heat and moisture budgets shows that the simulation without the interaction produces more stable upper troposphere and more unstable mid and lower troposphere than does the simulation with the interaction. Thus, the suppressed growth of ice clouds in upper troposphere and stronger radiative cooling in mid and lower troposphere are responsible for the cooling bias, and less evaporation of rain associated with the large-scale subsidence induces the drying in mid and lower troposphere.

  10. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  11. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  12. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  13. 24 CFR 903.23 - What is the process by which HUD reviews, approves, or disapproves an Annual Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the plan. When the PHA submits its Annual Plan to HUD, including any significant amendment or... significant amendments or modifications to the plan) will be limited to the information required by § 903.7(b... disapprove any significant amendment or modification to the plan, only if HUD determines that the plan,...

  14. CSU-FDA (Colorado State Univ. -Food and Drug Administration) Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory. Annual report - 1982: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. The study is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages at irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the development period. This annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of January 1 through December 31, 1982.

  15. Measurements and simulation of the radiation build-up process in a prebunched free-electron maser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Gilutin, L.; Pinhasi, Y.; Cohen, M.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical studies of the radiation buildup process in a prebunched free-electron maser oscillator (FEM), were carried out at Tel-Aviv University (TAU) and at the University of Maryland (UMD), and compared to the experimental measurements taken on the prebunched beam FEM experiments in TAU. We present measurements of the temporal evolution of radiation excited from noise until a steady-state operation is established. The evolution of the spectral characteristics of the radiation was investigated using the data collected by a fast digitizing scope, which recorded the IF signal obtained from heterodyning the laser radiation with a stable local oscillator. The mode competition process was observed. The experimental results were compared to analytical calculations of the spontaneous emission power and small-signal gain. Nonlinear {open_quote}amplifier{close_quote} simulation codes were employed for calculation of the extraction efficiency and saturation power. Multi-frequency simulations of the mode competition process were carried out using simulation (MALT ID) code, which is based on a space-time one-dimensional model of a free-electron laser oscillator. Conditions for establishment of single-(longitudinal) mode operation were identified and compared to the experimental measurements. Prebunching of the e-beam current permits external interference in the mode competition and coherence build-up process. We found experimentally and confirmed numerically that prebunching can determine the frequency of oscillation if the e-beam is injected with a sufficient bunching power, and shortens the oscillation buildup and coherence establishment time.

  16. Inactivation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus in chicken meat and exudate using high pressure processing, gamma radiation, and ultraviolet light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stapylococcus saprophyticus is a common contaminant in foods and causes urinary tract infections in humans. Three nonthermal food safety intervention technologies used to improve the safety foods include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV-C). A...

  17. Use of lasers in the investigation of radiation-induced processes in the ionic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyn, V. M.; Korepanov, V. I.; Yakovlev, V. Y.

    1995-08-01

    In the study of F-H pair formation in alkali halides due to excitation of the electronic subsystem, the information of short life time states of the self-trapped excitons plays an important role. In this paper we present recent achievements in such a direction obtained by using lasers. Short pulses of laser radiation are used in the measurement of transient absorption spectra obtained by band-to-band excitation and by selective optical conversion of the short-lived defects. With nanosecond luminescence spectroscopy in double-cascade excitation, we acquired data for KJ explaining the evolution (pi) 1 and (pi) 2 luminescence bands at different power laser pulses. We interprete these data in terms of frequent mutual transitions between 'on-' and 'off-center' equilibrium states of self-trapped excitons. The processes of energy transfer in self-trapped excitons connected with monomers of impurity ions in mixed crystal are studied. Also, impurity recombination luminescence is investigated in fractional annealing of Vk centers at 80-200 K. It is shown that luminescence intensity of heteronuclear excitons correlates with number of own but not with heteronuclear Vk centers. Impurity luminescence in these crystals occur at exciton with core of Cl2 type conversion to heteronuclear exciton.

  18. Non-radiative processes in protonated diazines, pyrimidine bases and an aromatic azine.

    PubMed

    Pino, Gustavo A; Feraud, Géraldine; Broquier, Michel; Grégoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2016-07-27

    The excited state lifetimes of DNA bases are often very short due to very efficient non-radiative processes assigned to the ππ*-nπ* coupling. A set of protonated aromatic diazine molecules (pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine C4H5N2(+)) and protonated pyrimidine DNA bases (cytosine, uracil and thymine), as well as the protonated pyridine (C5H6N(+)), have been investigated. For all these molecules except one tautomer of protonated uracil (enol-keto), electronic spectroscopy exhibits vibrational line broadening. Excited state geometry optimization at the CC2 level has been conducted to find out whether the excited state lifetimes measured from line broadening can be correlated to the calculated ordering of the ππ* and nπ* states and the ππ*-nπ* energy gap. The short lifetimes, observed when one nitrogen atom of the ring is not protonated, can be rationalized by relaxation of the ππ* state to the nπ* state or directly to the electronic ground state through ring puckering.

  19. Simulations of microphysical, radiative, and dynamical processes in a continental-scale forest fire smoke plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Douglas L.; Toon, Owen B.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of a large forest fire smoke plume on atmospheric processes is studied through a numerical model of meteorology, aerosols, and radiative transfer. The simulated smoke optical depths at 0.63-micron wavelength are in agreement with analyses of satellite data and show values as high as 1.8. The smoke has an albedo of 35 percent, or more than double the clear-sky value, and cools the surface by as much as 5 K. An imaginary refractive index, n sub im, of 0.01 yields results which closely match the observed cooling, single scattering albedo, and the Angstrom wavelength exponent. An n exp im of 0.1, typical of smoke from urban fires, produces 9 K cooling. Coagulation causes the geometric mean radius by number to increase from the initial value of 0.08 micron to a final value of 0.15 micron, while the specific extinction and absorption increase by 40 and 25 percent, respectively.

  20. Radiation effects from first principles : the role of excitons in electronic-excited processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Bryan Matthew

    2009-09-01

    Electron-hole pairs, or excitons, are created within materials upon optical excitation or irradiation with X-rays/charged particles. The ability to control and predict the role of excitons in these energetically-induced processes would have a tremendous impact on understanding the effects of radiation on materials. In this report, the excitonic effects in large cycloparaphenylene carbon structures are investigated using various first-principles methods. These structures are particularly interesting since they allow a study of size-scaling properties of excitons in a prototypical semi-conducting material. In order to understand these properties, electron-hole transition density matrices and exciton binding energies were analyzed as a function of size. The transition density matrices allow a global view of electronic coherence during an electronic excitation, and the exciton binding energies give a quantitative measure of electron-hole interaction energies in these structures. Based on overall trends in exciton binding energies and their spatial delocalization, we find that excitonic effects play a vital role in understanding the unique photoinduced dynamics in these systems.

  1. Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure

    DOEpatents

    Hondorp, Hugh L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

  2. Simulation of energy-dependent electron diffusion processes in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Zhang, X.-J.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and local diffusion processes induced by various plasma waves govern the highly energetic electron dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts, causing distinct characteristics in electron distributions at various energies. In this study, we present our simulation results of the energetic electron evolution during a geomagnetic storm using the University of California, Los Angeles 3-D diffusion code. Following the plasma sheet electron injections, the electrons at different energy bands detected by the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) instruments on board the Van Allen Probes exhibit a rapid enhancement followed by a slow diffusive movement in differential energy fluxes, and the radial extent to which electrons can penetrate into depends on energy with closer penetration toward the Earth at lower energies than higher energies. We incorporate radial diffusion, local acceleration, and loss processes due to whistler mode wave observations to perform a 3-D diffusion simulation. Our simulation results demonstrate that chorus waves cause electron flux increase by more than 1 order of magnitude during the first 18 h, and the subsequent radial extents of the energetic electrons during the storm recovery phase are determined by the coupled radial diffusion and the pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves and plasmaspheric hiss. The radial diffusion caused by ULF waves and local plasma wave scattering are energy dependent, which lead to the observed electron flux variations with energy dependences. This study suggests that plasma wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere are crucial for the energy-dependent intrusions of several hundred keV to several MeV electrons.

  3. Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.

    2013-05-15

    We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (∼100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

  4. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Doehrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Roth, Stephan V.; Bommel, Sebastian; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2013-04-15

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  5. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Döhrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Bommel, Sebastian; Risch, Johannes F H; Mannweiler, Roman; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V

    2013-04-01

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibilities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  6. Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational radiation: Signal processing strategies and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce; Romano, Joseph D.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze the signal processing required for the optimal detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation using laser interferometric detectors. Starting with basic assumptions about the statistical properties of a stochastic gravity-wave background, we derive expressions for the optimal filter function and signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-correlation of the outputs of two gravity-wave detectors. Sensitivity levels required for detection are then calculated. Issues related to (i) calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for arbitrarily large stochastic backgrounds, (ii) performing the data analysis in the presence of nonstationary detector noise, (iii) combining data from multiple detector pairs to increase the sensitivity of a stochastic background search, (iv) correlating the outputs of 4 or more detectors, and (v) allowing for the possibility of correlated noise in the outputs of two detectors are discussed. We briefly describe a computer simulation that was used to ``experimentally'' verify the theoretical calculations derived in the paper, and which mimics the generation and detection of a simulated stochastic gravity-wave signal in the presence of simulated detector noise. Numerous graphs and tables of numerical data for the five major interferometers (LIGO-WA, LIGO-LA, VIRGO, GEO-600, and TAMA-300) are also given. This information consists of graphs of the noise power spectra, overlap reduction functions, and optimal filter functions; also included are tables of the signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity levels for cross-correlation measurements between different detector pairs. The treatment given in this paper should be accessible to both theorists involved in data analysis and experimentalists involved in detector design and data acquisition.

  7. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Bommel, Sebastian; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-04-01

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  8. Radiation-Induced Processing of Hydrocarbons in Environments Relevant to Pluto

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    residue were also performed. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 54 14. SUBJECT TERMS Pluto, Kuiper Belt , cosmic radiation, infrared spectroscopy, ice analogs... Kuiper Belt , cosmic radiation, infrared spectroscopy, ice analogs, exobiology 2 Acknowledgments: I would like to offer my sincere thanks...distinct group of these objects of the outer solar system is classified as the Edgeworth- Kuiper Belt . The belt is defined as a disk-shaped region

  9. Radiation processing techniques in remediation of pollutants, and the role of the IAEA in supporting capacity building in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Saeid, S. Mohammad.; Sampa, M. H.; Safrany, A.; Sabharwal, S.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2012-08-01

    Radiation treatment, or a combination of radiation with conventional biological-chemical-physical processes, can help in the remediation of contaminated surfaces and in combating industrial chemical effluents and air pollution. The use of ionizing radiation as a powerful tool for inactivation of microbes is a valuable option to address likely threats from biohazard contamination that could be introduced either deliberately or inadvertently into areas where the public are exposed to, as well as for treatment of volatile organic compounds and similar hazardous chemical agents is an emerging development in tackling harmful pollutants. The role of the IAEA has been crucial both in supporting the development of local capabilities as well as in fostering international cooperation due to the multidisciplinary expertise required for achieving sustainable benefits. The IAEA is implementing Coordinated Research Projects, (CRP) thematic topical reviews of issues and challenges involved, and Technical Cooperation (TC) assistance in establishing and maintaining infrastructure in the MS. This paper will give an insight into the above mentioned IAEA activities, with examples of successes achieved through CRPs, as well as challenges on the road for broader dissemination of radiation processing technology for environmental remediation.

  10. Transient radiation responses of silica-based optical fibers: Influence of modified chemical-vapor deposition process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.; Meunier, J.-P.

    2006-01-15

    We characterized the behaviors of eight prototype single-mode optical fibers, made by the modified chemical-vapor deposition process, under pulsed x-ray ({approx}1 MeV) irradiation. For this purpose, we measured the time-dependent changes (10{sup -6}-10{sup 2} s) in the radiation-induced attenuation at 1.55 and 1.31 {mu}m after exposure to an x-ray pulse. By using a dedicated set of prototype germanosilicate fibers with carefully designed process parameters, we show the predominant impact on their vulnerability of the two codopants (germanium and phosphorus) incorporated in their claddings ({approx}0.3 Wt %). Compared to these influences on the radiation-induced loss levels and recovery kinetics, the impacts of the preform deposition temperature and of the fiber drawing tension on the fiber radiation sensitivity are less important. However, our results show that lowering the standard preform deposition temperature from 2000 to 1600 deg. C and the drawing tension from 140 to 20 g slightly decreases the induced losses at both wavelengths. We propose some hypotheses on the radiation-induced defects and physical mechanisms at the origin of these influences.

  11. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-17

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results in up to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.

  12. Eleventh annual Warren K. Sinclair keynote address-science, radiation protection and NCRP: building on the past, looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Bushberg, Jerrold T

    2015-02-01

    The many reports and other authoritative documents developed and published by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have been of great service to the nation and the radiation protection community since its Congressional charter was signed into law 50 y ago. There will be a continuing need for NCRP to identify the principles upon which radiation protection is to be based and to provide guidance on best practices for the practical application of those principles for the many beneficial uses of radiation in society. The unique and invaluable resource that is NCRP is in large part due to the selfless dedication and numerous contributions of its Council and scientific committee members. The multidisciplinary composition of these leading experts and their collective input on complex questions provide a unique synergy that results in a comprehensive and well-balanced approach to addressing current and future radiation protection challenges. Subsequent articles in these proceedings covering a broad range of relevant topics will review sentinel accomplishments of the past as well as current work and future challenges that are in keeping with NCRP's mission to advance the science of radiation protection in the public interest.

  13. Cascaded second-order processes for the efficient generation of narrowband terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirmi, Giovanni; Hemmer, Michael; Ravi, Koustuban; Reichert, Fabian; Zapata, Luis E.; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Çankaya, Hüseyin; Ahr, Frederike; Mücke, Oliver D.; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2017-02-01

    The generation of high-energy narrowband terahertz radiation has gained heightened importance in recent years due to its potentially transformative impact on spectroscopy, high-resolution radar and more recently electron acceleration. Among various applications, such terahertz radiation is particularly important for table-top free electron lasers, which are at the moment a subject of extensive research. Second-order nonlinear optical methods are among the most promising techniques to achieve the required coherent radiation with energy > 10 mJ, peak field > 100 MV m‑1, and frequency between 0.1 and 1 THz. However, they are conventionally thought to suffer from low efficiencies < ∼10‑3, due to the high ratio between optical and terahertz photon energies, in what is known as the Manley-Rowe limitation. In this paper, we review the current second-order nonlinear optical methods for the generation of narrowband terahertz radiation. We explain how to employ spectral cascading to increase the efficiency beyond the Manley-Rowe limit and describe the first experimental results in the direction of a terahertz-cascaded optical parametric amplifier, a novel technique which promises to fully exploit spectral cascading to generate narrowband terahertz radiation with few percent optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency.

  14. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Dandeneau, C.

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL, simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties.

  15. Radiation processing to ensure safety of minimally processed carrot (Daucus carota) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus): optimization of dose for the elimination of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Dhokane, V S; Hajare, S; Shashidhar, R; Sharma, A; Bandekar, J R

    2006-02-01

    Minimally processed vegetables are in demand, because they offer convenience to consumers. However, these products are often unsafe because of possible contamination with pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Shigella species. Therefore, this study was carried out to optimize the radiation dose necessary to ensure the safety of precut carrot and cucumber. Decimal reduction doses (D-values) of Salmonella Typhimurium MTCC 98 were ca. 0.164 kGy in carrot samples and 0.178 kGy in cucumber samples. D-values of Listeria monocytogenes were determined to be 0.312 and 0.345 kGy in carrot and cucumber samples, respectively. Studies of inoculated, packaged, minimally processed carrot and cucumber samples showed that treatment with a 1-kGy dose of gamma radiation eliminated up to 4 log CFU/g of Salmonella Typhimurium and 3 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes. However, treatment with a 2-kGy dose was necessary to eliminate these pathogens by 5 log CFU/g. Storage studies showed that both Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes were able to grow at 10 degrees C in inoculated control samples. Neither of these pathogens could be recovered from radiation-processed samples after storage for up to 8 days.

  16. Effect of post harvest radiation processing and storage on the volatile oil composition and glucosinolate profile of cabbage.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Variyar, Prasad S; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Sharma, Arun

    2014-05-15

    Effect of radiation processing (0.5-2 kGy) and storage on the volatile oil constituents and glucosinolate profile of cabbage was investigated. Among the volatile oil constituents, an enhancement in trans-hex-2-enal was noted on irradiation that was attributed to the increased liberation of precursor linolenic acid mainly from monogalactosyl diacyl glycerol (MGDG). Irradiation also enhanced sinigrin, the major glucosinolate of cabbage that accounted for the enhanced allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) in the volatile oils of the irradiated vegetable. During storage the content of trans-hex-2-enal increased immediately after irradiation and then returned to the basal value within 24h while the content of sinigrin and AITC increased post irradiation and thereafter remained constant during storage. Our findings on the enhancement in potentially important health promoting compounds such as sinigrin and AITC demonstrates that besides extending shelf life and safety, radiation processing can have an additional advantage in improving the nutritional quality of cabbage.

  17. Development of an intelligent grinding wheel for in-process monitoring of ceramic grinding. Semi-annual report {number_sign}3

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, S.; Gao, R.; Guo, C.; Varghese, B.; Pathare, S.

    1998-03-26

    This is the third semi-annual report for the project. The overall objective of this project is to develop sensor-integrated intelligent diamond wheels for grinding of ceramics. Such wheels will be smart enough to monitor and supervise both the wheel preparation and grinding processes without the need to instrument the machine tool. Intelligent wheels will utilize re-useable cores integrated with sensors: to measure the acoustic emission (AE) and grinding force. Signals from the sensors will be transmitted from a rotating wheel to a receiver by telemetry. Wheels will be trained to recognize distinct characteristics associated with truing, dressing and grinding. The technical progress is summarized in this report.

  18. Collisional and Radiative Processes in Adiabatic Deceleration, Deflection, and Off-Axis Trapping of a Rydberg Atom Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, Ch.; Hogan, S. D.; Schmutz, H.; Agner, J. A.; Merkt, F.

    2011-02-18

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90 deg., decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25 {mu}s, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed.

  19. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1988-07-01

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  20. Highly biocompatible, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite synthesized in a solvothermal process driven by high energy density microwave radiation

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Dariusz; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Malka, Iwona; Kedzierska, Aleksandra; Lojkowski, Witold; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan; Kolodziejczyk-Mierzynska, Małgorzata; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    A microwave, solvothermal synthesis of highly biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowder was developed. The process was conducted in a microwave radiation field having a high energy density of 5 W/mL and over a time less than 2 minutes. The sample measurements included: powder X-ray diffraction, density, specific surface area, and chemical composition. The morphology and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior analysis was conducted using a simultaneous thermal analysis technique coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests of heated samples were performed. A degradation test and a biocompatibility study in vitro using human osteoblast cells were also conducted. The developed method enables the synthesis of pure, fully crystalline hexagonal HAp nanopowder with a specific surface area close to 240 m2/g and a Ca/P molar ratio equal to 1.57. TEM measurements showed that this method results in particles with an average grain size below 6 nm. A 28-day degradation test conducted according to the ISO standard indicated a 22% loss of initial weight and a calcium ion concentration at 200 μmol/dm3 in the tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride test solution. The cytocompatibility of the obtained material was confirmed in a culture of human bone derived cells, both in an indirect test using the material extract, and in direct contact. A quantitative analysis was based on the 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. Viability assay as well as on DNA content measurements in the PicoGreen test. Indirect observations were performed at one point in time according to the ISO standard for in vitro cytotoxicity (ie, after 24 hours of cell exposure to the extracts). The direct contact tests were completed at three time points: after 24 hours, on day 7, and on day 14 of a culture in an osteogenic

  1. High-spatial resolution numerical simulations of in-water radiative transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alimonte, D.; Kajiyama, T.; Zibordi, G.

    2012-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of radiative processes allow for addressing optical radiometric problems strictly linked to complex geometries. Within such a context, MC simulations have been used to investigate uncertainties affecting in-water radiometric measurements performed with free-fall optical profilers commonly utilized for the vicarious calibration of space sensors or the validation of satellite ocean color primary products (e.g, the normalized water leaving radiance). Specifically, a MC code (henceforth called MOX) has been developed to simulate in-water and above-water radiometric fields with high spatial-resolution (up to 1 cm) over a 2-dimensional (2D) domain of tens of meters. This has been achieved by exploiting high performance computing (HPC) solutions (e.g., parallel programs and job-scheduling based on novel performance prediction and optimization schemes) to trace up to 10^12 photons. A dedicated study, focused on the simulation of in-water radiometric fields, has led to the generation of virtual optical profiles accounting for perturbations due to light focusing effect by sea-surface gravity and capillary waves at a spatial resolution comparable to that of actual measurements. Different from field experiments, which are often constrained by environmental factors like illumination conditions and sea-water optical properties, numerical simulations permits analyzing realistic cases whereas allowing for a free input parameter selection. MOX simulations have shown that uncertainties induced by focusing effects upon radiometric data products can be reduced by slowing the deployment speed of free-fall optical profilers, rather than increasing the sampling frequency (i.e., while keeping the same number of samples per depth unit). This result has confirmed the appropriateness of profiling techniques (i.e., multicasting) so far solely supported by a limited number of field measurements and has additionally suggested the possibility of investigating further

  2. CT Radiation Dose Management: A Comprehensive Optimization Process for Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Anushri; Kortesniemi, Mika; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2016-09-01

    Rising concerns of radiation exposure from computed tomography have caused various advances in dose reduction technologies. While proper justification and optimization of scans has been the main focus to address increasing doses, the value of dose management has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this article is to explain the importance of dose management, provide an overview of the available options for dose tracking, and discuss the importance of a dedicated dose team. The authors also describe how a digital radiation tracking software can be used for analyzing the big data on doses for auditing patient safety, scanner utilization, and productivity, all of which have enormous personal and institutional implications. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  3. Standardization Process for Space Radiation Models Used for Space System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Daly, Eamonn; Brautigam, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The space system design community has three concerns related to models of the radiation belts and plasma: 1) AP-8 and AE-8 models are not adequate for modern applications; 2) Data that have become available since the creation of AP-8 and AE-8 are not being fully exploited for modeling purposes; 3) When new models are produced, there is no authorizing organization identified to evaluate the models or their datasets for accuracy and robustness. This viewgraph presentation provided an overview of the roadmap adopted by the Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models.

  4. Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) Update, 2012, Presented at the 32nd Annual International Dosimetry and Records Symposium, June 2-6, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-01

    A series of graphs gives data through the year 2012 for annual collective doses, collective dose per reactor, number of individuals with measurable doses both in total and per reactor, number of reactors, electricity generated, measurable doses per individual and per megawatt-year, and collective outage hours. Reactors considered include BWR, PWR, and LWR. Also, the total effective dose equivalent for the period 2010-2012 is tabulated for each nuclear power plant considered, and the change over 2009-2011.

  5. Effects of quenching, irradiation, and annealing processes on the radiation hardness of silica fiber cladding materials (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jianxiang; Gong, Renxiang; Xiao, Zhongyin; Luo, Wenyun; Wu, Wenkai; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-ding; Pang, Fufei; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-07-01

    Silica optical fiber cladding materials were experimentally treated by a series of processes. The treatments involved quenching, irradiation, followed by annealing and subsequent re-irradiation, and they were conducted in order to improve the radiation hardness. The microstructural properties of the treated materials were subsequently investigated. Following the treatment of the optical fiber cladding materials, the results from the electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis demonstrated that there was a significant decrease in the radiation-induced defect structures. The ESR signals became significantly weaker when the samples were annealed at 1000 °C in combination with re-irradiation. In addition, the microstructure changes within the silica optical fiber cladding material were also analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Sisbnd Osbnd Si bending vibrations at ω3 = 800-820 cm-1 and ω4 = 1000-1200 cm-1 (with longitudinal optical (LO) and transverse optical (TO) splitting bands) were relatively unaffected by the quenching, irradiation, and annealing treatments. In particular, the annealing process resulted in the disappearance of the defect centers; however, the LO and TO modes at the ω3 and ω4 bands were relatively unchanged. With the additional support of the ESR test results, we can conclude that the combined treatment processes can significantly enhance the radiation hardness properties of the optical fiber cladding materials.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing

    SciTech Connect

    Laderman, S; Pianetta, P

    1993-03-01

    Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

  7. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part I. Model development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) dry-peeling has emerged as an effective non-chemical alternative to conventional lye and steam methods of peeling tomatoes. Successful peel separation induced by IR radiation requires the delivery of a sufficient amount of thermal energy onto tomato surface in a very short duration. Th...

  8. Determination of Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the shielded dose equivalent due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  9. Effectiveness of radiation processing in elimination of Campylobacter from poultry meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Amol D.; Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Bandekar, Jayant R.; Kapadnis, Balu P.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter, a common poultry intestine commensal, is a well known cause of human gastric illnesses across the globe. Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is a major cause of Campylobacter related infections. In the present study, radiation sensitivity of indigenous strains of C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from poultry was evaluated. The decimal reduction dose (D 10) values of different Campylobacter isolates at 0-4 °C in saline and blood broth were in the range of 0.120-0.210 kGy and 0.170-0.234 kGy, respectively. D 10 values in chicken meat homogenate for Campylobacter were in the range of 0.110-0.190 kGy. Chicken meat samples were inoculated with C. jejuni and exposed to gamma radiation to study the effectiveness of radiation treatment in elimination of Campylobacter. Radiation treatment with a dose of 1 kGy could achieve complete elimination of 10 5 CFU of Campylobacter/g in poultry meat samples. No recovery of Campylobacter was observed, even after enrichment and selective plating in 1 kGy treated chicken meat samples stored at 4 °C up to 7 days. Present study shows that irradiation of poultry meat with 1 kGy can ensure safety of poultry meat.

  10. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  11. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  12. Radiation induced changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the granary weevil and their relationships to desiccation and adult mortality: Annual report, February 16, 1987-November 20, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sriharan, S.

    1987-01-01

    The overall goals and objectives as envisaged for the year (1987) have been pursued. The report of the work may broadly be outlined into two components: post irradiation mortality studies at different combinations of temperature and humidity (studies on the rate of moisture-loss in irradiated weevils and correlation with mortality); and extraction of epicuticular hydrocarbons Sitophilus granarius (L) for both irradiated and control (elucidate the after effects of irradiation and determination of radiation induced changes if any, in the cuticular hydrocarbons of weevils as a result of gamma radiation). 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing Using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for Use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-sq cm/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  14. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  15. Signal Processing and Its Effect on Scanning Efficiencies for a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-energy Radiation.

    PubMed

    Marianno, Craig M

    2015-07-01

    Signal processing within a radiation detector affects detection efficiency. Currently, organizations such as private industry, the U.S. Navy, Army, and Air Force are coupling some detector systems with data collection devices to survey large land areas for radioactive contamination. As detector technology has advanced and analog data collection has turned to digital, signal processing is becoming prevalent in some instruments. Using a NIST traceable (241)Am source, detection efficiency for a field instrument for detecting low-energy radiation (FIDLER) was examined for both a static and scanning mode. Experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies. Stationary data compared nicely to the theoretical results. Conversely, scanning detection efficiencies were considerably different from their theoretical counterparts. As speed increased, differences in detection efficiency approached two orders of magnitude. To account for these differences, a quasi time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation was created mimicking the signal processing undertaken by the FIDLER detection system. By including signal processing, experimental results fell within the bounds of the Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies, thus demonstrating the negative effects of such processing on detection efficiencies.

  16. Feasibility of a novel approach for fast, economical determination of radiation damage in nuclear reactor cores. [Annual report, November 1, 1992--October 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1993-07-07

    Progress was made in the following areas: radioinduced segregation (modeling and experiment), deformation of irradiated microstructures, stress corrosion cracking of irradiated microstructures, and development of an apparatus to determine the role of deformation on the radiation microstructure in-situ. Materials used were based on Ni-Cr-Fe and 304L.

  17. Second Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.; Briggs, Samuel A.

    2016-12-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the current results and on-going activity towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program.

  18. Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

  19. Radiated energy and the rupture process of the Denali fault earthquake sequence of 2002 from broadband teleseismic body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2004-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and velocity-squared records of P and SH body waves recorded at teleseismic distances are analyzed to determine the rupture characteristics of the Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 (MW 7.9, Me 8.1). Three episodes of rupture can be identified from broadband (???0.1-5.0 Hz) waveforms. The Denali fault earthquake started as a MW 7.3 thrust event. Subsequent right-lateral strike-slip rupture events with centroid depths of 9 km occurred about 22 and 49 sec later. The teleseismic P waves are dominated by energy at intermediate frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) radiated by the thrust event, while the SH waves are dominated by energy at lower frequencies (0.05-0.2 Hz) radiated by the strike-slip events. The strike-slip events exhibit strong directivity in the teleseismic SH waves. Correcting the recorded P-wave acceleration spectra for the effect of the free surface yields an estimate of 2.8 ?? 1015 N m for the energy radiated by the thrust event. Correcting the recorded SH-wave acceleration spectra similarly yields an estimate of 3.3 ?? 10 16 N m for the energy radiated by the two strike-slip events. The average rupture velocity for the strike-slip rupture process is 1.1??-1.2??. The strike-slip events were located 90 and 188 km east of the epicenter. The rupture length over which significant or resolvable energy is radiated is, thus, far shorter than the 340-km fault length over which surface displacements were observed. However, the seismic moment released by these three events, 4 ?? 1020 N m, was approximately half the seismic moment determined from very low-frequency analyses of the earthquake. The difference in seismic moment can be reasonably attributed to slip on fault segments that did not radiate significant or coherent seismic energy. These results suggest that very large and great strike-slip earthquakes can generate stress pulses that rapidly produce substantial slip with negligible stress drop and little discernible radiated

  20. A Detailed Analysis of the Influence of Eddy Exchange Processes upon the Development of Radiation Fog.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Institute of Atmospheric Sciences AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS S.D. School of Mines and Technology Rapid City, SD 57701-3995 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME...RADIATION FOG FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT RONALD M. WELCH APRIL 1986 U. S. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE CONTRACT NO. DAAG29-83-K-0165 INSTITUTE OF ATMOSPHERIC ...cooling causes development of large liquid water contents during turbulently quiet periods. Subsequent destabilization mixes the upper level liquid

  1. Narrow-band radiation wavelength measurement by processing digital photographs in RAW format

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T

    2012-12-31

    The technique of measuring the mean wavelength of narrow-band radiation in the 455 - 625-nm range using the image of the emitting surface is presented. The data from the camera array unprocessed by the built-in processor (RAW format) are used. The method is applied for determining the parameters of response of holographic sensors. Depending on the wavelength and brightness of the image fragment, the mean square deviation of the wavelength amounts to 0.3 - 3 nm. (experimental techniques)

  2. A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180 nm HV-SOI process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Krüger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffers from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry which mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples.

  3. Effect of electron beam radiation processing on mechanical and thermal properties of fully biodegradable crops straw/poly (vinyl alcohol) biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Fully biodegradable biocomposites based on crops straw and poly(vinyl alcohol) was prepared through thermal processing, and the effect of electron beam radiation processing with N,N-methylene double acrylamide as radiation sensitizer on mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites were investigated. The results showed that, when the radiation dose were in the range of 0-50 kGy, the mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites could be improved significantly through the electron beam radiation processing, and the interface compatibility was also improved because of the formation of stable cross-linked network structure, when the radiation dose were above the optimal value (50 kGy), the comprehensive properties of the biocomposites were gradually destroyed. EB radiation processing could be used as an effective technology to improve the comprehensive performance of the biocomposites, and as a green and efficient processing technology, radiation processing takes place at room temperature, and no contamination and by-product are possible.

  4. Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, C.W.

    1992-06-01

    This progress report relates progress in the various research projects evaluating the late health effects, both somatic and genetic, resulting from radiation exposure of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the collection and utilization of the various epidemiological data bases. These include the Life Span Study, (LSS) cohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort, the In Utero cohort, the leukemia registry and the F-1 Study population. Important progress has been made in using RERF Tumor and Tissue Registry records for evaluation of cancer incidence and radiation risk estimates for comparison with cancer mortality and risk in the LSS cohort. At the present time, a manuscript on the incidence of solid tumors (1950-1987) is undergoing internal and external review for publication as an RERF Technical report (TR) and for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. In addition, manuscripts are in preparation on (1) a comprehensive report on the incidence of hematological cancers, including analysis of leukemia by cell type (1950-1987), (2) a general description of Tumor Registry operations and (3) a comparison of incidence- and mortality-based estimates of radiation risk in the LSS cohort.

  5. Applications of radiation processing in combination with conventional treatments to assure food safety: New development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Turgis, M.; Borsa, J.; Millette, M.; Salmieri, S.; Caillet, S.; Han, J.

    2009-11-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils (Eos) were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative bacterial radiosensitivity (RBR) of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonellatyphi in culture media under different atmospheric conditions. The selected Eos were tested for their ability to reduce the dose necessary to eliminate E. coli and S.typhi in medium fat ground beef (23% fat) and Listeria in ready-to-eat carrots when packed under air or under atmosphere rich in oxygen (MAP). Results have demonstrated that depending of the compound added and the combined treatment used, the RBR increased from 2 to 4 times. In order to evaluate the industrial feasibility, EOs were added in ground beef at a concentration which does not affect the taste and treated at a dose of 1.5 kGy. The content of total mesophilic aerobic, E. coli, Salmonella, total coliform, lactic acid bacteria, and Pseudomonas was determined during 28 days. The results showed that the combined treatment (radiation and EOs) can eliminate Salmonella and E. coli when done under air. When done under MAP, Pseudomonas could be eliminated and a shelf life of more than 28 days was observed. An active edible coating containing EOs was also developed and sprayed on ready-to-eat carrots before radiation treatment and Listeria was evaluated. A complete inhibition of Listeria was obtained at a dose of 0.5 kGy when applied under MAP. Our results have shown that the combination of an edible coating, MAP, and radiation can be used to maintain the safety of meat and vegetables.

  6. Radiative processes in air excited by an ArF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1988-01-01

    The emission spectrum of air that is excited by an ArF laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the conditions under which fluorescence from O2 can be used for the measurement of temperature in aerodynamic flows. In addition to the expected fluorescence from O2, the spectrum from excitation with an intense laser beam is shown to contain significant contributions from the near-resonant Raman fundamental and overtone bands, the four-photon fluorescence excitation of C produced from ambient CO2, and possibly the three-photon excitation of O(2+). The nature of the radiative interactions contributing to these additional features is described.

  7. Effect of radiation processing in elimination of Klebsiella pneumoniae from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Raj Kamal; Nagar, Vandan; Shashidhar, Ravindranath

    2015-10-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as an important foodborne pathogen which causes severe infections that include meningitis, bronchitis, bacteremia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections in humans and animals. It is well known to most clinicians as a cause of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Klebsiella is an opportunistic pathogen, that primarily attacks neonates, infants, elderly and immuno-compromised patients and therefore impose a serious, emerging public health hazard globally. Contaminated sprouts, vegetables, seafood and other animal meat products are considered as main sources of Klebsiella infection. In the current study, radiation sensitivity of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 was determined in different food samples. The decimal reduction dose (D10) values of K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 in saline and nutrient broth at 0-4 °C were 0.116±0.009, 0.136±0.005 kGy, respectively. The mixed sprouts, fish and poultry samples were inoculated with K. pneumoniae MTCC 109 and exposed to gamma radiation to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation treatment in the elimination of K. pneumoniae. D10 values of K. pneumoniae in mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples were found to be 0.142±0.009, 0.125±0.0004 and 0.277±0.012 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×105 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from these food samples. No recovery of K. pneumoniae was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 days, even after enrichment and selective plating. This study shows that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could lead to the complete elimination of 3.1±1.8×105 CFU/g of K. pneumoniae from mixed sprouts, poultry and fish samples.

  8. Photoinduced processes in solid polymer solutions of dyes in an interference field of laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sizykh, A G; Tarakanova, E A

    1998-12-31

    An investigation was made of the relationships governing the photochemical mechanism of formation of light-induced gratings in solid polymer solutions of a dye with a high quantum yield of the triplet states. The combined analysis of the results of real and numerical experiments was made for a solution of eosin K in gelatin. The protonation rate constant of the dye was measured and the dependence of the diffraction efficiency on the duration of irradiation was explained taking diffusion of the dye into account. A method was proposed for determination of the duffusion coefficient in a spatially modified interference field of the laser radiation. The diffusion coefficients were found. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  9. DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

  10. Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1983: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog. Report for 1 January-20 November 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human beings from medical exposure during early development. This is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages at irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the developmental period. The basic experiment under this contract contains 1680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in October 1972. This annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of January 1 through November 20, 1983.

  11. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  12. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... same plant through chemical reaction, including any associated processes (e.g., purification... plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2 chemicals in excess of specified thresholds. 713... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  13. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... same plant through chemical reaction, including any associated processes (e.g., purification... plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2 chemicals in excess of specified thresholds. 713... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  14. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... same plant through chemical reaction, including any associated processes (e.g., purification... plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2 chemicals in excess of specified thresholds. 713... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  15. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... same plant through chemical reaction, including any associated processes (e.g., purification... plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2 chemicals in excess of specified thresholds. 713... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  16. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... same plant through chemical reaction, including any associated processes (e.g., purification... plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2 chemicals in excess of specified thresholds. 713... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  17. Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun

    2011-02-15

    This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

  18. Radiative and convective properties of 316L Stainless Steel fabricated using the Laser Engineered Net Shaping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, Jonathan

    Temperature evolution of metallic materials during the additive manufacturing process has direct influence in determining the materials microstructure and resultant characteristics. Through the power of Infrared (IR) thermography it is now possible to monitor thermal trends in a build structure, giving the power to adjust building parameters in real time. The IR camera views radiation in the IR wavelengths and determines temperature of an object by the amount of radiation emitted from the object in those wavelengths. Determining the amount of radiation emitted from the material, known as a materials emissivity, can be difficult in that emissivity is affected by both temperature and surface finish. It has been shown that the use of a micro-blackbody cavity can be used as an accurate reference temperature when the sample is held at thermal equilibrium. A micro-blackbody cavity was created in a sample of 316L Stainless Steel after being fabricated during using the Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) process. Holding the sample at thermal equilibrium and using the micro-blackbody cavity as a reference and thermocouple as a second reference emissivity values were able to be obtained. IR thermography was also used to observe the manufacturing of these samples. When observing the IR thermography, patterns in the thermal history of the build were shown to be present as well as distinct cooling rates of the material. This information can be used to find true temperatures of 316L Stainless Steel during the LENS process for better control of desired material properties as well as future work in determining complete energy balance.

  19. [Effect of infrared low-intensity laser radiation on a mutation process and proliferative corneal activity in experimental cerebral hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Shurygina, I P; Galenkina, N M; Shkurat, T P

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the impact of infrared low-intensity laser radiation (IRLILR) on a mutation process and the proliferative activity of the animal cornea during stimulation of circulatory brain hypoxia. During an experiment on laboratory albino rats, IRLILR was studied for its impact on the level of chromosomal rearrangements and the mitotic index in the corneal cells was calculated in circulatory brain hypoxia. Laser exposure during stimulation of circulatory brain hypoxia favors normalization of the level of chromosomal aberrations and a mitotic cycle in the rat corneal epithelial cells. The experimental findings suggest that IRLILR may be used in ophthalmological care for antihypoxic purposes.

  20. Contamination dose from photoneutron processes in bodily tissues during therapeutic radiation delivery.

    PubMed

    Difilippo, F; Papiez, L; Moskvin, V; Peplow, D; DesRosiers, C; Johnson, J; Timmerman, R; Randall, M; Lillie, R

    2003-10-01

    Dose to the total body from induced radiation resulting from primary exposure to radiotherapeutic beams is not detailed in routine treatment planning though this information is potentially important for better estimates of health risks including secondary cancers. This information can also allow better management of patient treatment logistics, suggesting better timing, sequencing, and conduct of treatment. Monte Carlo simulations capable of taking into account all interactions contributing to the dose to the total body, including neutron scattering and induced radioactivity, provide the most versatile and accurate tool for investigating these effects. MCNPX code version 2.2.6 with full IAEA library of photoneutron cross sections is particularly suited to trace not only photoneutrons but also protons and heavy ion particles that result from photoneutron interactions. Specifically, the MCNPX code is applied here to the problem of dose calculations in traditional (non-IMRT) photon beam therapy. Points of calculation are located in the head, where the primary irradiation has been directed, but also in the superior portion of the torso of the ORNL Mathematical Human Phantom. We calculated dose contributions from neutrons, protons, deutrons, tritons and He-3 that are produced at the time of photoneutron interactions in the body and that would not have been accounted for by conventional radiation oncology dosimetry.

  1. Spin-flip processes and radiative decay of dark intravalley excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodeniuk, A. O.; Basko, D. M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study of radiative decay of dark intravalley excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. This decay necessarily involves an electronic spin flip. The intrinsic decay mechanism due to interband spin-flip dipole moment perpendicular to the monolayer plane, gives a rate about 100-1000 times smaller than that of bright excitons. However, we find that this mechanism also introduces an energy splitting due to a local field effect, and the whole oscillator strength is contained in the higher-energy component, while the lowest-energy state remains dark and needs an extrinsic spin-flip mechanism for the decay. Rashba effect due to a perpendicular electric field or a dielectric substrate, gives a negligible radiative decay rate (about 107 times slower than that of bright excitons). Spin flip due to Zeeman effect in a sufficiently strong in-plane magnetic field can give a decay rate comparable to that due to the intrinsic interband spin-flip dipole.

  2. Advanced process of microbiological control of wastewater in combined system of disinfection with UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Bilotta, P; Daniel, L A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a methodology with superior efficiency for inactivating pathogenic indicators commonly found in domestic sewage. The adopted method was based on synergistic effect resulting from the introduction of a UV radiation pre-disinfection stage of sewage followed by secondary treatment. A pilot unit was installed in the sewage treatment plant of the University of São Paulo to simulate the combined system in full-scale operational conditions. Its performance was evaluated through microbiological examinations for determining Escherichia coli, total coliforms and coliphages. The application of UV radiation at 5.1 mW/cm(2) for 10 s of exposure in the first disinfection stage was enough to reduce the surviving number of E. coli around 100 times, in comparison to the conventional method. Therefore, based on experimental data, it is possible to conclude that combining treatment and pre-disinfection stage is an effective potential technique to produce effluents with lower degree of contamination by pathogenic organisms.

  3. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  4. The PROCESS experiment: amino and carboxylic acids under Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in low-earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Audrey; Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Poch, Olivier; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Cloix, Mégane; Macari, Frédérique; Raulin, Francois; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    2012-05-01

    The search for organic molecules at the surface of Mars is a top priority of the next Mars exploration space missions: Mars Science Laboratory (NASA) and ExoMars (ESA). The detection of organic matter could provide information about the presence of a prebiotic chemistry or even biological activity on this planet. Therefore, a key step in interpretation of future data collected by these missions is to understand the preservation of organic matter in the martian environment. Several laboratory experiments have been devoted to quantifying and qualifying the evolution of organic molecules under simulated environmental conditions of Mars. However, these laboratory simulations are limited, and one major constraint is the reproduction of the UV spectrum that reaches the surface of Mars. As part of the PROCESS experiment of the European EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station, a study was performed on the photodegradation of organics under filtered extraterrestrial solar electromagnetic radiation that mimics Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions. Glycine, serine, phthalic acid, phthalic acid in the presence of a mineral phase, and mellitic acid were exposed to these conditions for 1.5 years, and their evolution was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after their retrieval. The results were compared with data from laboratory experiments. A 1.5-year exposure to Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in space resulted in complete degradation of the organic compounds. Half-lives between 50 and 150 h for martian surface conditions were calculated from both laboratory and low-Earth orbit experiments. The results highlight that none of those organics are stable under low-Earth orbit solar UV radiation conditions.

  5. Processes Driving the Adaptive Radiation of a Tropical Tree (Diospyros, Ebenaceae) in New Caledonia, a Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Paun, Ovidiu; Turner, Barbara; Trucchi, Emiliano; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-03-01

    Due to its special geological history, the New Caledonian Archipelago is a mosaic of soil types, and in combination with climatic conditions this results in a heterogeneous environment across relatively small distances. A group of over 20 endemic species of Diospyros (Ebenaceae) has rapidly and recently radiated on the archipelago after a single long-distance dispersal event. Most of the Diospyros species in the radiating group are morphologically and ecologically well differentiated, but they exhibit low levels of DNA variability. To investigate the processes that shaped the diversification of this group we employed restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Over 8400 filtered SNPs generally confirm species delimitations and produce a well-supported phylogenetic tree. Our analyses document local introgression, but only a limited potential for gene flow over longer distances. The phylogenetic relationships point to an early regional clustering among populations and species, indicating that allopatric speciation with respect to macrohabitat (i.e., climatic conditions) may have had a role in the initial differentiation within the group. A later, more rapid radiation involved divergence with respect to microhabitat (i.e., soil preference). Several sister species in the group show a parallel divergence in edaphic preference. Searches for genomic regions that are systematically differentiated in this replicated phenotypic divergence pointed to loci potentially involved in ion binding and cellular transport. These loci appear meaningful in the context of adaptations to soil types that differ in heavy-metal and mineral content. Identical nucleotide changes affected only two of these loci, indicating that introgression may have played a limited role in their evolution. Our results suggest that both allopatric diversification and (parapatric) ecological divergence shaped successive rounds of speciation in the Diospyros radiation on New Caledonia.

  6. Processes Driving the Adaptive Radiation of a Tropical Tree (Diospyros, Ebenaceae) in New Caledonia, a Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Paun, Ovidiu; Turner, Barbara; Trucchi, Emiliano; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Due to its special geological history, the New Caledonian Archipelago is a mosaic of soil types, and in combination with climatic conditions this results in a heterogeneous environment across relatively small distances. A group of over 20 endemic species of Diospyros (Ebenaceae) has rapidly and recently radiated on the archipelago after a single long-distance dispersal event. Most of the Diospyros species in the radiating group are morphologically and ecologically well differentiated, but they exhibit low levels of DNA variability. To investigate the processes that shaped the diversification of this group we employed restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Over 8400 filtered SNPs generally confirm species delimitations and produce a well-supported phylogenetic tree. Our analyses document local introgression, but only a limited potential for gene flow over longer distances. The phylogenetic relationships point to an early regional clustering among populations and species, indicating that allopatric speciation with respect to macrohabitat (i.e., climatic conditions) may have had a role in the initial differentiation within the group. A later, more rapid radiation involved divergence with respect to microhabitat (i.e., soil preference). Several sister species in the group show a parallel divergence in edaphic preference. Searches for genomic regions that are systematically differentiated in this replicated phenotypic divergence pointed to loci potentially involved in ion binding and cellular transport. These loci appear meaningful in the context of adaptations to soil types that differ in heavy-metal and mineral content. Identical nucleotide changes affected only two of these loci, indicating that introgression may have played a limited role in their evolution. Our results suggest that both allopatric diversification and (parapatric) ecological divergence shaped successive rounds of speciation in the Diospyros radiation on New Caledonia. PMID:26430059

  7. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, H.L.

    1980-01-04

    This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

  8. Automated solar cell assembly team process research. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M J; Hogan, S J; Darkazalli, G; Breen, W F; Murach, J M; Sutherland, S F; Patterson, J S

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work done under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, Phase 3A, which addresses problems that are generic to the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Spire`s objective during Phase 3A was to use its light soldering technology and experience to design and fabricate solar cell tabbing and interconnecting equipment to develop new, high-yield, high-throughput, fully automated processes for tabbing and interconnecting thin cells. Areas that were addressed include processing rates, process control, yield, throughput, material utilization efficiency, and increased use of automation. Spire teamed with Solec International, a PV module manufacturer, and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell`s Center for Productivity Enhancement (CPE), automation specialists, who are lower-tier subcontractors. A number of other PV manufacturers, including Siemens Solar, Mobil Solar, Solar Web, and Texas instruments, agreed to evaluate the processes developed under this program.

  9. Development of Physics-Based Numerical Models for Uncertainty Quantification of Selective Laser Melting Processes - 2015 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-08

    The primary goal of the proposed research is to characterize the influence of process parameter variability inherent to Selective Laser Melting (SLM) on components manufactured with the SLM technique for space flight systems and their performance.

  10. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator: Annual report, October 1986-October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Fermentation costs (which increase with higher product concentration) traditionally must be balanced against product recovery costs (which decrease with product concentration). A novel reactor-separator process has been developed at Purdue University to minimize product inhibition of fermentation rates. This has been shown to exhibit very high productivities - simultaneously producing and removing a inhibitory product while maintaining a high viable cell concentration in the reactor. The objective of this study is to develop an energy efficient and economical process to convert food wastes to usable chemicals. Work is divided into two major efforts (a) an applied phase which involves design and building a whey to ethanol process as well as process design and optimization and (b) a basic phase which involves investigating alternative fermentation systems and fundamental research on immobilized cell reactor systems. Accomplishments are discussed. 116 refs., 80 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1994-03-15

    The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

  12. Effect of residual monomer on radiochemical and light radiation processes in polymethyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Khamidova, L.G.; Zhdanov, G.S.; Milinchuk, V.K.

    1988-03-01

    The radiochemical yield of paramagnetic centers at 77 K varies from 1.2 in a polymer with a 0.2% weight concentration of MMA to 2.35 in a polymer containing 6.3% MMA. At 273 K, the radiochemical yield of macroradicals varies from 1.7 (0.2% MMA) to 3.2 (2.4% MMA). The high radiochemical yield of binding of residual monomer (G/sub MMA/ = 5.6 x 10/sup 2/ and 2.4 x 10/sup 2/ at 300 and 77 K) indicates the existence of associates of molecules of the monomer. It was hypothesized that radiation damage initially develops in defective regions of the polymer where the molecules of the monomer are primarily concentrated.

  13. Quantum-Electrodynamic Processes in a Radiation-Dominated Robertson-Walker Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Tsaregorodtsev, L. I.

    Quantum electrodynamics in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe with the line element ds2=dt2 - a2(t)(dx2+dy2+dz2) (radiation-dominated universe) is considered. The differential probability of bremsstrahlung of an electron in the external gravitational field and the differential probability of an electron-positron pair and photon creation from the vacuum are calculated by using the perturbative S-matrix formalism. The behavior of these probabilities in different kinematic regions is investigated. The total probabilities are shown to be finite. In conclusion, the total probability of a pair and photon creation from vacuum We is compared with the total probability of pair production due to an expansion of the universe W0. The comparison shows that We=1.9·10-2W0 at about the Compton time of an electron.

  14. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-12-31

    Under the current grant, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the bench scale evaluation and further development of the anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. This concept has been developed and patented by UTSI under US Patent No. 4,917,874. The developmental program proposed under this DOE grant includes screening of commercially available resins to select three candidate resins for further study. These three resins will undergo a series of experiments designed to test the resins` performance under different process conditions (including the use of spent MHD seed material). The best of these resins will be used in optimizing the regeneration step and in testing the effects of performance enhancers. The process schematic developed from the results will be used to estimate the related economics. During this reporting period, October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992, analysis of batch mode screening experiments was completed to select three candidate resins for process variables study in the fixed-bed set-up. This setup was modified and the experiments were carded out to evaluate effects of major process variables. The analysis of fixed-bed experiments is going on and we have also started simple batch mode experiments to identify desirable conditions for resin regeneration step. We have also started simple process engineering type calculations to determine the trade-off between the solution concentration and the resulting evaporation/concentration load.

  15. Thermodynamic and stochastic theory of hydrodynamic and power-producing processes. [Annual report], September 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.

    1992-09-16

    Thermodynamics of the transport processes of diffusion, thermal conduction, and viscous flow at a macroscopic level are developed for the simplest cases of one-dimensional transport in fluids for individual linear and nonlinear processes approaching a stationary non-equilibrium state. Formulation has started of thermodynamic and stochastic theory of combinations of transport processes. Global thermodynamic and stochastic theory of open chemical systems frar from equilibrium is continued with analysis of a broad class of isothermal, multicomponent reaction mechanisms with multiple steady states with assumed local equilibrium. Stationary solutions are obtained of the master equation for single and multi-intermediate autocatalytic chemical systems. A kinetic potential is identified that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors. A second-order response theory was developed to investigate the effects of external periodic perturbations on a chemical reaction at a stable steady state in an open reactor.

  16. Multi-energy optimized processing: The use of high intensity ultrasonic and electromagnetic radiation for biofuel production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, Matthew Mason

    This work aimed to improve the understanding of the use of microwaves and ultrasound for chemical processes. Using biodiesel production as the case for study, the non-linear effects of high intensity ultrasonics, electromagnetic loss, and microwave heating were explored. Cavitation and atomization phenomena were used to describe the process of ultrasonic emulsification. The dielectric loss mechanisms pertinent to the biodiesel production materials were described as the connection to between the effects of ultrasonic emulsification and microwave heating. Superheating and anisothermal heating phenomena were identified as the specific advantages afforded by microwave heating. High intensity ultrasonics was found to be capable of creating emulsions of biodiesel reactants with uniform dispersed phase droplets. Through optical microscopy, the ability to control the dispersed phase droplet size by altering the frequency and intensity of ultrasound was confirmed. This ultrasonic technique was investigated by measuring complex permittivity of the emulsions from 500 MHz and 5 GHz. The dielectric loss of emulsions consisting of methanol and soybean oil indicated that ultrasonic treatments could be used to alter the microwave absorption. Microwave heating tests of ultrasonically formed emulsions confirmed the permittivity results practically. The superheated boiling point of methanol and heating rate of methanol was extended to higher temperatures and rates in ultrasonically formed emulsions. Microwave heating of ultrasonically mixed emulsions was shown to result in faster transesterification relations than microwave heating of conventionally mixed emulsions. Finally, utilizing ultrasonics to optimize microwave absorption was shown capable of transesterification without catalyst.

  17. Dependence of diffusive radiative transfer on grain-size, temperature, and Fe-content: Implications for mantle processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2005-08-01

    stable, weak convection. That radiative transfer is linked to chemical composition and grain-size suggests that this process impacts planetary evolution through the non-linear feedback with rheology.

  18. Radiative and collisional processes in translationally cold samples of hydrogen Rydberg atoms studied in an electrostatic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Ch; Agner, J. A.; Pillet, P.; Merkt, F.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic beams of hydrogen atoms, prepared selectively in Rydberg-Stark states of principal quantum number n in the range between 25 and 35, have been deflected by {90}\\circ , decelerated and loaded into off-axis electric traps at initial densities of ≈ {10}6 atoms cm-3 and translational temperatures of 150 mK. The ability to confine the atoms spatially was exploited to study their decay by radiative and collisional processes. The evolution of the population of trapped atoms was measured for several milliseconds in dependence of the principal quantum number of the initially prepared states, the initial Rydberg-atom density in the trap, and the temperature of the environment of the trap, which could be varied between 7.5 and 300 K using a cryorefrigerator. At room temperature, the population of trapped Rydberg atoms was found to decay faster than expected on the basis of their natural lifetimes, primarily because of absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation field. At the lowest temperatures investigated experimentally, the decay was found to be multiexponential, with an initial rate scaling as {n}-4 and corresponding closely to the natural lifetimes of the initially prepared Rydberg-Stark states. The decay rate was found to continually decrease over time and to reach an almost n-independent rate of more than (1 ms)-1 after 3 ms. To analyze the experimentally observed decay of the populations of trapped atoms, numerical simulations were performed which included all radiative processes, i.e., spontaneous emission as well as absorption and emission stimulated by the thermal radiation. These simulations, however, systematically underestimated the population of trapped atoms observed after several milliseconds by almost two orders of magnitude, although they reliably predicted the decay rates of the remaining atoms in the trap. The calculations revealed that the atoms that remain in the trap for the longest times have larger absolute values of the

  19. SU-E-T-452: Identifying Inefficiencies in Radiation Oncology Workflow and Prioritizing Solutions for Process Improvement and Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, N; Driewer, J; Denniston, K; Zhen, W; Enke, C; Jacobs, K; Poole, M; McMahon, R; Wilson, K; Yager, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Successful radiation therapy requires multi-step processes susceptible to unnecessary delays that can negatively impact clinic workflow, patient satisfaction, and safety. This project applied process improvement tools to assess workflow bottlenecks and identify solutions to barriers for effective implementation. Methods: We utilized the DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) methodology, limiting our scope to the treatment planning process. From May through December of 2014, times and dates of each step from simulation to treatment were recorded for 507 cases. A value-stream map created from this dataset directed our selection of outcome measures (Y metrics). Critical goals (X metrics) that would accomplish the Y metrics were identified. Barriers to actions were binned into control-impact matrices, in order to stratify them into four groups: in/out of control and high/low impact. Solutions to each barrier were then categorized into benefit-effort matries to identify those of high benefit and low effort. Results: For 507 cases, the mean time from simulation to treatment was 235 total hours. The mean process and wait time were 60 and 132 hours, respectively. The Y metric was to increase the ratio of all non-emergent plans completed the business day prior to treatment from 47% to 75%. Project X metrics included increasing the number of IMRT QAs completed at least 24 hours prior to treatment from 19% to 80% and the number of non-IMRT plans approved at least 24 hours prior to treatment from 33% to 80%. Intervals from simulation to target contour and from initial plan completion to plan approval were identified as periods that could benefit from intervention. Barriers to actions were binned into control-impact matrices and solutions by benefit-effort matrices. Conclusion: The DMAIC method can be successfully applied in radiation therapy clinics to identify inefficiencies and prioritize solutions for the highest impact.

  20. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1993--January 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Yokimcus, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of the research presented in this report is to advance the development and acceptance of thin-film photovoltaic modules by increasing the understanding of film growth and processing and its relationship to materials properties and solar cell performance. The specific means toward meeting this larger goal include: (1) investigating scalable, cost-effective deposition processes; (2) preparing thin-film materials and device layers and completed cell structures; (3) performing detailed material and device analysis; and (4) participating in collaborative research efforts that address the needs of PV-manufacturers. These objectives are being pursued with CuInSe{sub 2}, CdTe and a-Si based solar cells.

  1. Studies of Collisional and Nonlinear Radiative Processes for Development of Coherent UV and XUV Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-04

    excited 117,119 by strong-field processes without extensive loss of more weakly bound outer valence electrons. It is expected that this feature of the...spring that are expected to raise the output energy to - 1 J or, perhaps, somewhat above. A more detailed characterization of the pulse shape 13 for this...pulse width taken at point (A) In Fig. (1) using 4-wave mixing process. (a) Measured third-order autocorrelatlon function of 260 fs pulse showing clear

  2. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Taulbee, D.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Fei, Y.; Robl, T.; Derbyshire, F.

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993 under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27286 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The PDU was assembled, instrumented and tested during this fiscal year. Along with the major activity of commissioning the 50-lb/hr retort, work was also completed in other areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of model compounds in a fixed bed reactor were continued. Additionally, as part of the effort to investigate niche market applications for KENTORT II-derived products, a study of the synthesis of carbon fibers from the heavy fraction of KENTORT II shale oil was initiated.

  3. Coal hydrogasification process development. Volume II. Peat studies. Second annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, K.M.; Rosemary, J.K.

    1980-10-20

    This report describes work performed on a program directed towards investigating the effects of peat hydrogasification in an entrained flow reactor. The program was conducted in three phases: peat dense-phase feed system flow studies, hydrogasification entrained flow reactor testing, and preliminary peat process economic evaluations. The peat dense-phase feeding studies included low-pressure (below 150 psig) testing at nominal solid peat flow rates of 1 ton/hr and analytical modeling efforts. The hydrogasification reactor testing was performed at peat flow rates of over 1000 lb/hr and reactor temperatures to 1900/sup 0/F in hydrogen atmospheres from 500 to 1000 psig. A simple analytical kinetic model was developed to predict total carbon conversion as a function of reactor operating variables and its agreement with experimental data was found to be excellent. Finally, preliminary process economics were established for three variations of the Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Flash Hydropyrolysis Process with the cost of high-Btu gas ranging from $3.43 to $4.06 per million Btu.

  4. Ethylene vinyl acetate based radiation grafted hydrophilic matrices: Process parameter standardization, grafting kinetics and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Mondal, R. K.; Dubey, K. A.; Grover, V.; Panicker, L.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Varshney, L.

    2016-08-01

    A transparent, elastomeric, grafted matrix for several potential applications was synthesized by single-step simultaneous radiation grafting of methacrylic acid onto ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). CuSO4 was found to be the most suitable homo-polymerization inhibitor among different inhibitors tried. The grafting kinetics was found to be a strong function of dose rate (D) and monomer content (M) and an equation relating grafting rate Rg=Kg [M]1.13D0.23 was deduced. Crystallinity of the grafted matrices as assessed from XRD and DSC measurements indicated decrease in crystalline content with increase in grafting yield, suggesting crystalline domain of EVA get disrupted on grafting. Elastic modulus increased linearly with the increase in grafting yield, though elongation at break decreased precipitously from 900% to 30% at even ~9% grafting. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed three step weight loss of the grafted EVA matrix. The grafting of MAA resulted in increase in surface energy mainly due to enhanced polar component.

  5. Radiative Processes in Graphene and Similar Nanostructures in Strong Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. P.; Gitman, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Low-energy single-electron dynamics in graphene monolayers and similar nanostructures is described by the Dirac model, being a 2+1 dimensional version of massless QED with the speed of light replaced by the Fermi velocity vF ≃ c/300. Methods of strong-field QFT are relevant for the Dirac model, since any low-frequency electric field requires a nonperturbative treatment of massless carriers in the case it remains unchanged for a sufficiently long time interval. In this case, the effects of creation and annihilation of electron-hole pairs produced from vacuum by a slowly varying and small-gradient electric field are relevant, thereby substantially affecting the radiation pattern. For this reason, the standard QED text-book theory of photon emission cannot be of help. We construct the Fock-space representation of the Dirac model, which takes exact accounts of the effects of vacuum instability caused by external electric fields, and in which the interaction between electrons and photons is taken into account perturbatively, following the general theory (the generalized Furry representation). We consider the effective theory of photon emission in the first-order approximation and construct the corresponding total probabilities, taking into account the unitarity relation.

  6. Shelf life extension of sugarcane juice using preservatives and gamma radiation processing.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Bibhuti B; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2011-10-01

    Preserving raw sugarcane juice is a challenging problem. Sugarcane juice turns brown soon after its extraction and gets spoiled due to fermentation within hours. A combination of gamma radiation (5 kGy) with permitted preservatives and low temperature storage (10 °C) could preserve raw sugarcane juice for more than a month. The preservatives used were citric acid (0.3%), sodium benzoate (0.015%), potassium sorbate (0.025%), and sucrose (10%). The treatment helped in extending the shelf life to 15 d at ambient temperature (26 ± 2 °C) and 35 d at 10 °C. The microbial load was found to be below detectable limit within this period. The biochemicals like phenolics and flavonoids were not found to be affected by addition of these preservatives. The antioxidant activities including free radical scavenging activity, nitrite scavenging activity, and reducing power were also not significantly affected. The sensory evaluation scores showed that the juice with this combination treatment was highly acceptable.

  7. A novel experimental approach to investigate radiolysis processes in liquid samples using collimated radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polin, Chris Wardlow, Nathan; McQuaid, Harold; Orr, Philip; Villagomez-Bernabe, Balder; Figueira, Catarina; Alexander, Grace; Currell, Fred J.; Srigengan, Shajeth; Brun, Emilie; Gilles, Manon; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile

    2015-03-15

    Here is detailed a novel and low-cost experimental method for high-throughput automated fluid sample irradiation. The sample is delivered via syringe pump to a nozzle, where it is expressed in the form of a hanging droplet into the path of a beam of ionising radiation. The dose delivery is controlled by an upstream lead shutter, which allows the beam to reach the droplet for a user defined period of time. The droplet is then further expressed after irradiation until it falls into one well of a standard microplate. The entire system is automated and can be operated remotely using software designed in-house, allowing for use in environments deemed unsafe for the user (synchrotron beamlines, for example). Depending on the number of wells in the microplate, several droplets can be irradiated before any human interaction is necessary, and the user may choose up to 10 samples per microplate using an array of identical syringe pumps, the design of which is described here. The nozzles consistently produce droplets of 25.1 ± 0.5 μl.

  8. A novel experimental approach to investigate radiolysis processes in liquid samples using collimated radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Chris; Wardlow, Nathan; McQuaid, Harold; Orr, Philip; Villagomez-Bernabe, Balder; Figueira, Catarina; Alexander, Grace; Srigengan, Shajeth; Brun, Emilie; Gilles, Manon; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile; Currell, Fred J.

    2015-03-01

    Here is detailed a novel and low-cost experimental method for high-throughput automated fluid sample irradiation. The sample is delivered via syringe pump to a nozzle, where it is expressed in the form of a hanging droplet into the path of a beam of ionising radiation. The dose delivery is controlled by an upstream lead shutter, which allows the beam to reach the droplet for a user defined period of time. The droplet is then further expressed after irradiation until it falls into one well of a standard microplate. The entire system is automated and can be operated remotely using software designed in-house, allowing for use in environments deemed unsafe for the user (synchrotron beamlines, for example). Depending on the number of wells in the microplate, several droplets can be irradiated before any human interaction is necessary, and the user may choose up to 10 samples per microplate using an array of identical syringe pumps, the design of which is described here. The nozzles consistently produce droplets of 25.1 ± 0.5 μl.

  9. Effects of climate and lifeform on dry matter yield (epsilon) from simulations using BIOME BGC. [ecosystem process model for vegetation biomass production using daily absorbed photosynthetically active radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Running, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An ecosystem process simulation model, BIOME-BGC, is used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the factors that may cause the dry matter yield (epsilon) and annual net primary production to vary for different ecosystems. At continental scales, epsilon is strongly correlated with annual precipitation. At a single location, year-to-year variation in net primary production (NPP) and epsilon is correlated with either annual precipitation or minimum air temperatures. Simulations indicate that forests have lower epsilon than grasslands. The most sensitive parameter affecting forest epsilon is the total amount of living woody biomass, which affects NPP by increasing carbon loss by maintenance respiration. A global map of woody biomass should significantly improve estimates of global NPP using remote sensing.

  10. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  11. Two-electron processes in multiple ionization under strong soft-x-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Mazza, T.; Karamatskos, E. T.; Markellos, D.; Bakhtiarzadeh, S.; Rafipoor, A. J.; Kelly, T. J.; Walsh, N.; Costello, J. T.; O'Keeffe, P.; Gerken, N.; Martins, M.; Lambropoulos, P.; Meyer, M.

    2016-07-01

    In a combined experimental and theoretical study we have investigated the ionization of atomic argon upon irradiation with intense soft-x-ray pulses of 105 eV photon energy from the free-electron laser FLASH. The measured ion yields show charge states up to Ar7 +. The comparison with the theoretical study of the underlying photoionization dynamics highlights the importance of excited states in general and of processes governed by electron correlation in particular, namely, ionization with excitation and shake-off, processes usually inaccessible by measurements of ionic yields only. The Ar7 + yield shows a clear deviation from the predictions of the commonly used model of sequential ionization via single-electron processes and the observed signal can only be explained by taking into account the full multiplet structure of the involved configurations and by inclusion of two-electron processes. The competing process of two-photon ionization from the ground state of Ar6 + is calculated to be orders of magnitude smaller.

  12. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

  13. Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research. Annual report for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

  14. Texas-louisiana shelf circulation and transport processes study: Year 1, annual report. Volume 2. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jochens, A.E.; Nowlin, W.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Louisiana-Texas Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX) is supported by the MMS of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior. The first field year of LATEX A was conducted from April 1992-March 1993. Data were collected from an array of current meter moorings, meteorological buoys, drifting buoys, and hydrographic and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) surveys deployed on the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Historical and concurrent data from other programs in this region also were collected. This Technical Report volume provides detail of the field operations, data processing, and preliminary data analysis for the first field year of the LATEX A program.

  15. Seasonal and Inter-annual Changes in Photosynthetic and Soil Respiratory Processes in a Cool-temperate Deciduous Forest on a Mountainous Landscape in Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, H.; Noh, N. J.; Saitoh, T. M.; Nagao, A.; Noda, H. M.; Kuribayashi, M.; Nagai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon budget of terrestrial ecosystems is one of the most crucial themes in ecosystem sciences under current and future climate changes as it would affect our Earth system. Remote sensing and modeling analysis studies from continental to global scales have been indicating that the recent climate change is influential to photosynthetic processes in terrestrial vegetation such as forests and grasslands, by altering phenology (seasonal change) and foliage biomass. In addition, increasing temperature and possibly changing photosynthetic activities of plants are influential to soil carbon dynamics. Our deeper and broader understandings on such photosynthetic and respiratory processes governing carbon cycle and hence budget of terrestrial ecosystems are critical to detect the changes of ecosystem processes and the functions in changing environments, as they would influence the biodiversity, ecosystem services and Earth system.In order to reveal the nature of temporal changes in photosynthetic and respiratory processes in forest ecosystems, we have been conducting multi-disciplinary observations of ecophysiological and optical properties for canopy photosynthesis in a cool-temperate deciduous forest since 2003 ("Takayama site", contributing to AsiaFlux and JaLTER). In addition, open-field warming experiments have been conducted since 2011 to examine the possible influence of near-future warming condition on forest canopy photosynthesis and soil respiration. (1) Our long-term measurements of leaf and canopy photosynthesis revealed that their phenology is influenced by inter-annual variation of micrometeorological conditions. (2) Combined analysis of leaf-canopy photosynthesis and optical properties enabled us to estimate the forest photosynthetic productivity at regional scale by satellite data. (3) Open-field warming experiments suggested that tree foliage and soil processes would acclimate to near-future warming conditions.

  16. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices: Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1995 -- January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R W; Phillips, J E; Buchanan, W A; Eser, E; Hegedus, S S; McCandless, B E; Meyers, P V; Shafarman, W N

    1996-08-01

    The overall mission of the Institute of Energy Conversion is the development of thin film photovoltaic cells, modules, and related manufacturing technology and the education of students and professionals in photovoltaic technology. The objectives of this four-year NREL subcontract are to advance the state of the art and the acceptance of thin film PV modules in the areas of improved technology for thin film deposition, device fabrication, and material and device characterization and modeling, relating to solar cells based on CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, on a-Si and its alloys, and on CdTe. In the area of CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, EEC researchers have produced CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} films by selenization of elemental and alloyed films with H{sub 2}Se and Se vapor and by a wide variety of process variations employing co-evaporation of the elements. Careful design, execution and analysis of these experiments has led to an improved understanding of the reaction chemistry involved, including estimations of the reaction rate constants. Investigation of device fabrication has also included studies of the processing of the Mo, US and ZnO deposition parameters and their influence on device properties. An indication of the success of these procedures was the fabrication of a 15% efficiency CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} solar cell.

  17. Development of the microstrip silicon detector for imaging of fast processes at a synchrotron radiation beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulchenko, V.; Pruuel, E.; Shekhtman, L.; Ten, K.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-02-01

    In situ imaging of explosions allows to study material properties under very high pressures and temperatures. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is a powerful tool for such studies because of its unique time structure. Flashes of X-rays from individual bunches in a storage ring are so short that an object under study does not move more than 1-10 μm during exposure. If a detector is able to store images synchronously with bunches of an SR source the time resolution of such method will be determined by the duration of SR flash from individual bunch. New beam line at the VEPP-4M storage ring will allow to get X-Ray flux from each bunch close to 106 photons/channel where channel area is 0.05×0.5 mm2 and average beam energy is about 30 keV. Bunches in the machine can be grouped into trains with 20 ns time gap. In order to meet these requirements a new detector development was started based on Si microstrip technology. The detector with a new dedicated front-end chip will be able to record images with maximum signal equivalent to 106 photons/channel, with signal to noise ratio of ∼103, spatial resolution of 50 μm and maximum frame rate of 50 MHz. The detector has to drive very high peak and average currents without affecting the front-end chip, therefore a specific design of Si sensor should be developed. The front-end chip has to provide signal measurements with the dynamic range of about 104 or more and recording of the signal to an analogue memory with the rate of 50 MHz. The concept of such detector is discussed in the paper. The results of the simulations of the main detector parameters and the results of the first measurements with the prototype sensors are presented.

  18. Radiation Protection in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N.

    1965-01-01

    The main emphasis of a provincial radiation protection program is on ionizing radiation produced by machines, although assistance is given to the Federal Radiation Protection Division in its program relating to radioactive substances. The basis for the Saskatchewan program of radiation protection is the Radiological Health Act 1961. An important provision of the Act is annual registration of radiation equipment. The design of the registration form encourages a “do-it-yourself” radiation and electrical safety inspection. Installations are inspected every two years by a radiation health officer. Two hundred and twenty-one deficiencies were found during inspection of 224 items of radiation equipment, the commonest being failure to use personal film badges. Insufficient filtration of the beam, inadequate limitation of the beam, and unnecessary exposure of operators were other common faults. Physicians have a responsibility to weigh the potential advantages against the hazards when requesting radiographic or fluoroscopic procedures. PMID:14282164

  19. Flow rate distribution and effect of convection and radiation heat transfer on the temperature profile during a coil annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haouam, A.; Bigerelle, M.

    2015-02-01

    Determining the temperature of several steel coils, heated in a furnace with a controlled hydrogen environment is important in an annealing process. Temperatures must be defined during heat treatment in order to guarantee metallurgical properties and acceptable reduced residual stresses. In this paper we approach hydrogen flow characteristics in the furnace and through a set of coils using an annealing non-differential model. Fluid flow is schematized as a pipe network solved by the Hardy Cross method to obtain pressure drops across the various gas flow segments. A comparison is made between measured and simulated results, confirming the adequacy of adopted assumptions and the validity of proposed model. Convective and radiative exchanges between the furnace and the coils are calculated by a discretization using the finite differences method. The convection coefficients are estimated and introduced into the boundary conditions around the coil to obtain the temperature distribution in the coils and in the covering bell. Finally, heat exchanges by convection and radiation are estimated by this model and the modeling errors are <8 °C.

  20. Radiation Tolerant Electronics and Digital Processing for the Phase-I Trigger Readout Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, A.

    2015-07-01

    The high luminosities of L > 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN produce an intense radiation environment that the detectors and their electronics must withstand. The ATLAS detector is a multi-purpose apparatus constructed to explore the new particle physics regime opened by the LHC. Of the many decay particles observed by the ATLAS detector, the energy of the created electrons and photons is measured by a sampling calorimeter technique that uses Liquid Argon (LAr) as its active medium. The front end (FE) electronic readout of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter located on the detector itself consists of a combined analog and digital processing system. In order to exploit the higher luminosity while keeping the same trigger bandwidth of 100 kHz, higher transverse granularity, higher resolution and longitudinal shower shape information will be provided from the LAr calorimeter to the Level-l trigger processors. New trigger readout electronics have been designed for this purpose, which will withstand the radiation dose levels expected for an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb{sup -1} during the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), which is well above the original LHC design qualifications. (authors)

  1. Effect of radiation processing on antinutrients, in-vitro protein digestibility and protein efficiency ratio bioassay of legume seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Niely, Hania F. G.

    2007-06-01

    The effects of irradiation (dose levels of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy) on nutritive characteristics of peas ( Pisum satinum L), cowpeas ( Vigna unguiculata L.Walp), lentils ( Lens culinaris Med), kidneybeans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L), and chickpeas ( Cicer arietinum L) were examined. Analyses included proximate composition, levels of anti-nutrients (phytic acid, tannins), available lysine (AL), in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD), and protein efficiency ratio (PER) in the growing rat. The results showed that moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and ash were unchanged by the irradiation. Radiation processing significantly ( p<0.05) reduced the levels of phytic acid (PA), tannins (TN), and AL. IVPD and PER were significantly enhanced in a dose-dependent manner, relative to unirradiated control samples, for all legumes. The data sets for each legume exhibited high correlation coefficients between radiation dose and PA, TN, AL, IVPD, and PER. These results demonstrate the benefits of irradiation on the nutritional properties of these legumes.

  2. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.

  3. Texas-louisiana shelf circulation and transport processes study: Year 2, annual report. Final report, April 1993-March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jochens, A.E.; Nowlin, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the Department of the Interior supports the Louisiana-Texas Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX). LATEX is divided into three study units: Study Unit A, Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Process (LATEX A or LATEX Shelf); Study Unit B, Mississippi River Plume Hydrography (LATEX B or LATEX Plume); and Study Unit C, Gulf of Mexico Eddy Circulation (LATEX C or LATEX Eddy). LATEX A, the largest of the three studies, covers the middle and outer Texas-Louisiana continental shelf from the Mississippi River to the Rio Grande. The report focuses on the work of LATEX A during the second field year, April 1993 through March 1994.

  4. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  5. Molecular-level processes governing the interaction of contaminants with iron and manganese oxides. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, S.A.; Brown, G.

    1997-06-01

    'The central tenet of this proposal is that a fundamental understanding of specific mineral surface-site reactivities will substantially improve reactive transport models of contaminants in geologic systems, and will allow more effective remediation schemes to be devised. Most large-scale, macroscopic models employ global chemical reaction kinetics and thermochemistry. However, such models do not incorporate molecular-level input critical to the detailed prediction of how contaminants interact with minerals in the subsurface. A first step leading to the incorporation of molecular-level processes in large-scale macroscopic models is the ability to understand which molecular-level processes will dominate the chemistry at the microscopic grain level of minerals. To this end, the research focuses on the fundamental mechanisms of redox chemistry at mineral surfaces. As much of this chemistry in sediments involves the Fe(III)/Fe(II) and Mn(IV)/Mn(II) couples, the authors focus on mineral phases containing these species. Of particular interest is the effect of the local coordination environment of Fe and Mn atoms on their reactivity toward contaminant species. Studies of the impact of local atomic structure on reactivity in combination with knowledge about the types and amounts of various surfaces on natural grain- size minerals provide the data for statistical models. These models in turn form the basis of the larger-scale macroscopic descriptions of reactivity that are needed for reactive transport models. A molecular-level understanding of these mechanisms will enhance the ability to design much greater performance efficiency, cost effectiveness, and remediation strategies that have minimal negative impact on the local environment. For instance, a comprehensive understanding of how minerals that contain Fe(II) reduce oxyanions and chlorinated organics should enable the design of other Fe(II)-containing remediation materials in a way that is synergistic with existing

  6. A Technical Approach to Expedited Processing of NTPR Radiation Dose Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    18 2.5.3 Variations in Screening Dose Values ......................................................18 2.5.4...development of the currently used processes for expediting RDAs. The variation of PC with dose, age of the individual at exposure and the time between...those cancers are established and are not part of the scope of this report. 2.5.3 Variations in Screening Dose Values The risk of cancer to

  7. Modeling of Cloud/Radiation Processes for Large-Scale Clouds and Tropical Anvils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    three-dimensional, large-scale cloud model has been developed for the prediction of cloud cover, cloud liquid /ice water content (LWC/IWC), precipitation...specific humidity and temperature. Partial cloudiness is allowed to form when large-scale relative humidity is less than 100%. Both liquid and ice...phases are included in the model. The liquid phase processes consist of evaporation, condensation, autoconversion and precipitation. The ice phase

  8. Multiphoton Process and Anomalous Potential of Cell Membrane by Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhar, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, by the use of quantum biology and quantum optics, the laser induced potential variation of cell membrane has been studied. Theoretically, we have found a method of calculating the monophoton and multiphoton processes in the formation of the anomalous potential of cell membrane. In contrast with the experimental results, our numerical result is in the same order. Therefore, we have found the possibility of cancer caused by the laser induced anomalous cell potential.

  9. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  10. Processing and characterization of edgeless radiation detectors for large area detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliopuska, J.; Wu, X.; Jakubek, J.; Eränen, S.; Virolainen, T.

    2013-12-01

    The edgeless or active edge silicon pixel detectors have been gaining a lot of interest due to improved silicon processing capabilities. At VTT, we have recently triggered a multi-project wafer process of edgeless silicon detectors. Totally 80 pieces of 150 mm wafers were processed to provide a given number of detector variations. Fabricated detector thicknesses were 100, 200, 300 and 500 μm. The polarities of the fabricated detectors on the given thicknesses were n-in-n, p-in-n, n-in-p and p-in-p. On the n-in-n and n-in-p wafers the pixel isolation was made either with a common p-stop grid or with a shallow p-spray doping. The wafer materials were high resistivity Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski silicon with crystal orientation of <100>. In this paper, the electric properties on various types of detectors are presented. The results from spectroscopic measurement show a good energy resolution of the edge pixels, indicating an excellent charge collection near the edge pixels of the edgeless detector.

  11. Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site. Annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    Construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) on the Savannah River Site (SRS) began during FY-1984. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 15 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Through the long-term census taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has been evaluating the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR 1022).

  12. Processing of high level waste: Spectroscopic characterization of redox reactions in supercritical water. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, C.A. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    'The author is engaged in a collaborative research effort with Los Alamos staff scientists Steven Buelow, Jeanne Robinson, and Bernie Foy all staff members in group CST-6. The work proposed by these LANL staff scientists is directed towards the destruction of complexants and oxidation of chromium and technetium by hydrothermal processing in near critical or supercritical aqueous solutions. The work addresses two areas of investigation related to ongoing efforts at LANL: (1) kinetic studies of oxidation-reduction reactions in supercritical water; (2) measurement of physical properties of ionic solutes in supercritical water. All of the work during this first year was carried out at Los Alamos National Lab. During the Summer program at LANL all equipment and supplies were provided through Dr. Buelow''s program at LANL. The author has now set up a Raman spectroscopy lab at Furman. Using departmental funds he purchased an optical bench, a laser, and a CCD detector, and a grant from the Dreyfus Foundation assisted in the purchase of a Raman spectrometer. He is now able to carry out experiments using the Raman system at Furman. The plan is to continue the Summer collaboration at LANL and carry out experiments at Furman during the academic year.'

  13. Annual variation in carbon budget using remote-sensing data and a process model in Borneo Island, Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, M.; Ito, A.; Takeuchi, W.; Yamagata, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD) is one of the most important carbon emission reduction efforts in the tropical region. Deforestation and land use changes are human activities with major impact on the regional carbon budged and the other greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) emissions. Forest carbon biomass in Southeast Asia is largest in Asia region; however, the area of primary forest had continuously decreased due to land-use conversion. The objective of the present study was to evaluate carbon budged and greenhouse gases induced by deforestation from Borneo Island. We used time-series satellite remote-sensing data to track deforestation history in Borneo Island, Southeast Asia, and estimated the resulting forest carbon budget using a process-based model (VISIT: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases). The forest/non-forest area was mapped by applying the ALOS/PALSAR-calibrated threshold value to MODIS, SPOT-VEGETATION, and NOAA-AVHRR images. The model allowed us to estimate changes in carbon budged and greenhouse gases by human disturbances, including land-use conversion from primary forest to cropland (e.g., oil-palm plantation). The estimated carbon stocks, budged, and greenhouse gases were verified using field observation of previous studies at some point of Borneo Island. Our results suggested that the southern part of Borneo Island was a large carbon source due to deforestation, although the VISIT model need be revised to account for tropical peatland.

  14. Study of temporal variations of seismoacoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation in boreholes exposed to natural deformation processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanov, Alexandr; Astrakhantsev, Yurie; Nachapkin, Nilolay; Beloglasova, Nadegda; Bagenova, Evgenija; Vdovin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    The investigation of the correlation between the deformation processes, seismoacoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation of the geo-environment is a timely problem due to many reasons. It is related to the discovery of the modulation effect of the high-frequency noise by the long-period deformation processes [1]. The possibility appeared to distinguish similar periods in the variations of the amplitude level of the seismic acoustic emission (SAE) and electromagnetic radiation (EMR) based on the known periodicities of the deformation processes. The investigation of the deformation processes is a complicated problem because the majority of currently applied methods give us information about deformations in the surface layer. In the conditions of the hierarchical block structure of the Earth's crust; such observations do not sufficiently reveal the distribution of deformations related to the accumulation and relaxation of stresses in the internal points of the medium. Therefore, the spatiotemporal distribution of the SAE and EMR in the boreholes carries significant information about the deformation processes in the Earth's crust directly reflecting the actual stresses and the structure of the investigated rock massive [2]. Geodynamical active zones along boreholes are characterized by anomalous (maximum) SAE and EMR values, moreover they change in time [3]. Simultaneous operational measurements of seismic acoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation were carried out in wells Kamchatskiy geodynamic testing ground and the Urals region. An analysis of amplitude-frequency spectra obtained by synchronous uninterrupted SAE and EMR measurements in boreholes allowed identifying latent periodicity of SAE and EMR signals and evaluating its connection with well-known deformation processes. As a result of realized investigations it was shown that simultaneous measurements of SAE and EMR in boreholes contain information on manifestation of deformation processes in fields

  15. Effect of radiation processing on in vitro protein digestibility and availability of calcium, phosphorus and iron of peanut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Amro B.; Diab, Eiman E.; Mahmoud, Nagat S.; Elagib, Randa A. A.; Rushdi, Mohamed A. H.; Osman, Gammaa A. M.

    2013-10-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation of two peanut cultivars (Sodari and Madani) on protein content, in vitro protein digestibility and availability of calcium, phosphorus and iron was determined. Seeds were treated with gamma irradiation at dose levels of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy. Total protein in seeds was not changed significantly by irradiation. However, the in vitro protein digestibility was decreased for both cultivars. In addition, the irradiation also caused an increment on the available calcium, phosphorus and iron for both cultivars. Moreover, radiation processing caused an increment on tannin content of the seeds especially at the dose 2 kGy for both cultivars. Regarding these results, irradiation treatment of peanut up to 2 kGy can be used as an effective alternative method to chemical treatments for insect disinfestation and microbial disinfection.

  16. Effect of laser radiation wavelength and reepithelization process on optical quality of eye cornea after laser correction of vision

    SciTech Connect

    Kitai, M S; Semchishen, A V; Semchishen, V A

    2015-10-31

    The optical quality of the eye cornea surface after performing the laser vision correction essentially depends on the characteristic roughness scale (CRS) of the ablated surface, which is mainly determined by the absorption coefficient of the cornea at the laser wavelength. Thus, in the case of using an excimer ArF laser (λ = 193 nm) the absorption coefficient is equal to 39000 cm{sup -1}, the darkening by the dissociation products takes place, and the depth of the roughness relief can be as large as 0.23 mm. Under irradiation with the Er : YAG laser (λ = 2940 nm) the clearing is observed due to the rupture of hydrogen bonds in water, and the relief depth exceeds 1 μm. It is shown that the process of reepithelization that occurs after performing the laser vision correction leads to the improvement of the optical quality of the cornea surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  17. Measurement of 226Ra, 232Th, 137Cs and 40K activities of Wheat and Corn Products in Ilam Province – Iran and Resultant Annual Ingestion Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    CHANGIZI, Vahid; SHAFIEI, Elham; ZAREH, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Background: Natural background radiation is the main source of human exposure to radioactive material. Soils naturally have radioactive mineral contents. The aim of this study is to determine natural (238 U, 232 Th, 40 K) and artificial (137 Cs) radioactivity levels in wheat and corn fields of Eilam province. Methods: HPGe detector was used to measure the concentration activity of 238 U and 232 Th series, 40 K and 137 Cs in wheat and corn samples taken from different regions of Eilam province, in Iran. Results: In wheat and corn samples, the average activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs were found to be 1, 67, 0.5, 91.73, 0.01 and 0.81, 0.85, 101.52, 0.07 Bq/kg (dry weight), respectively. H ex and H in in the present work are lower than 1. The average value of H ex was found to be 0.02 and 0.025 and average value of H in to be found 0.025 and 0.027 in wheat fields samples and corn samples in Eilam provinces, respectively. The obtained values of AGDE are 30.49 mSv/yr for wheat filed samples and 37.89 mSv/yr for corn samples; the AEDE rate values are 5.28 mSv/yr in wheat filed samples and this average value was found to be 6.13 mSv/yr in corn samples in Eilam. Transfer factors (TFs) of long lived radionuclide such as 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K from soils to corn and wheat plants have been studied by radiotracer experiments. Conclusion: The natural radioactivity levels in Eilam province are not at the range of high risk of morbidity and are under international standards. PMID:26056646

  18. Miniature nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer for in-situ and in-process analysis and monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.; Feinerman, A.D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this research project is to develop a miniature Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer. This analytical instrument would potentially be used for in-situ, in-field and in-process monitoring, characterization and identification of various chemical compounds. The intended spectral resolution of the NMR spectrometer is better than 0.1 ppm (parts per million). The development of the miniature NMR spectrometer will rely, in part, on the microfabrication technology that includes photolithography, chemical etching, thin film processing and other techniques originally developed in microelectronics. Miniaturization of the NMR spectrometer will involve the miniaturization of the inductive NMR probes used to pick-up the NMR signals. It will also involve integration of the probe, sample holder and magnetic field correction (shimming) coils into a single miniature system. Lastly, it will involve the development of a hand-held permanent magnet capable of creating magnetic field of over 1 Tesla with uniformity of about 1 part per million over the extent of the sample. The advantage of the developed instrument will not only be its portability, but also its ability to handle nono-liter quantities of fluids. As of today, the following tasks have been completed. (1) Scaled versions (800 micron diameter) of the NMR inductive probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for their radio frequency properties. The resulting probe design, which can be called a scroll coil, has been found to be suitable for further miniaturization and compatible with the existing microfabrication technology. In addition tests and analysis indicate and this design will also provide higher sensitivity to NMR signals per unit volume of the sample than other proposed miniature NMR probes. Analysis and tests of the scroll coil design revealed a surprising fact that the sensitivity of the scroll coil is much better when the conductor thickness is smaller than the conductor skin depth

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of metal retention/release in geochemical processes in soil. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    'The long-term fate of toxic metals in soils cannot be precisely predicted, and often remediation recommendations and techniques may be ineffective or unnecessary. This work will generate basic knowledge on the kinetics and mechanism(s) of heavy metal retention/release by soil mineral colloids. The information should assist in improving remediation strategies for toxic heavy metal contaminated soils. The objectives are: (1) To determine the effects of residence time on the mechanisms of Cr(VI), Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II) sorption/release on Fe and Al oxide and clay mineral surfaces using kinetic studies coupled to extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. (2) To study the effect of temperature, pH, and phosphate on metal sorption by oxides, and derive thermodynamic parameters to describe the sorption process. As of June, 16, 1997 several clay minerals were tested for their efficiency of removing Cr from aqueous systems. The materials tested--smectite, vermiculites, illites, and kaolinite--represent the natural clay minerals that are abundant in soils and sediments. The clays were used in either their original or reduced (reduced with sodium dithionite) forms. The experimental result indicate that the reduced clays acted as an efficient remover of Cr(VI) from an aqueous system. The XANES spectra of Cr-treated clays provided evidence that the clays reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and immobilized Cr in the clays at the same time. Sodium dithionite applied directly into aqueous systems reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III), but could not immobilize Cr even in the presence of the clays. The Cr(VI) removal capacity varied with the clay mineral type and the structural Fe content. For the clays used in this study, the removal capacity follows the orders of smectites > vermiculites and illites > kaolinite. Within the same type of clay minerals, reduction of Cr(VI) is highly related to the ferrous iron

  20. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1994--January 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results achieved during the second phase of a four year subcontract to develop and understand thin film solar cell technology related to a-Si and its alloys, CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, and CdTe. Accomplishments during this phase include, development of equations and reaction rates for the formation of CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} films by selenization, fabrication of a 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} cell, development of a reproducible, reliable Cu-diffused contact to CdTe, investigation of the role of CdTe-CdS interdiffusion on device operation, investigation of the substitution of HCl for CdCl{sub 2} in the post-deposition heat treatment of CdTe/CdS, demonstration of an improved reactor design for deposition of a-Si films, demonstration of improved process control in the fabrication of a ten set series of runs producing {approximately}8% efficient a-Si devices, demonstration of the utility of a simplified optical model for determining quantity and effect of current generation in each layer of a triple stacked a-Si cell, presentation of analytical and modeling procedures adapted to devices produced with each material system, presentation of baseline parameters for devices produced with each material system, and various investigations of the roles played by other layers in thin film devices including the Mo underlayer, CdS and ZnO in CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} devices, the CdS in CdTe devices, and the ZnO as window layer and as part of the back surface reflector in a-Si devices. In addition, collaborations with over ten research groups are briefly described. 73 refs., 54 figs., 34 tabs.