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Sample records for radiation resistance gene

  1. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  2. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  3. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  4. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  5. Pyrroloquinoline quinone and a quinoprotein kinase support γ-radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans and regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra Singh; Desai, Shruti Sumeet; Misra, Hari Sharan

    2013-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its extraordinary resistance to various DNA damaging agents including γ-radiation and desiccation. The pqqE:cat and Δdr2518 mutants making these cells devoid of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and a PQQ inducible Ser/Thr protein kinase, respectively, became sensitive to γ-radiation. Transcriptome analysis of these mutants showed differential expression of the genes including those play roles in oxidative stress tolerance and (DSB) repair in D. radiodurans and in genome maintenance and stress response in other bacteria. Escherichia coli cells expressing DR2518 and PQQ showed improved resistance to γ-radiation, which increased further when both DR2518 and PQQ were present together. Although, profiles of genes getting affected in these mutants were different, there were still a few common genes showing similar expression trends in both the mutants and some others as reported earlier in oxyR and pprI mutant of this bacterium. These results suggested that PQQ and DR2518 have independent roles in γ-radiation resistance of D. radiodurans but their co-existence improves radioresistance further, possibly by regulating differential expression of the genes important for bacterial response to oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  6. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    radiation resistance can be reversed with DNAPK inhibition. These findings suggest that DNA-PK inhibition should be explored as a clinical strategy for...PK inhibition should be explored as a clinical strategy for radiosensitizing prostate cancers. In addition, we have discovered that ERG interacts...DOD Annual Report review committee to consider allowing us to expand the aims of this grant to assess PARP1 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for

  7. Ozonation and UV254nm radiation for the removal of microorganisms and antibiotic resistance genes from urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sousa, José M; Macedo, Gonçalo; Pedrosa, Marta; Becerra-Castro, Cristina; Castro-Silva, Sérgio; Pereira, M Fernando R; Silva, Adrián M T; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2017-02-05

    Conventional wastewater treatment has a limited capacity to reduce antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes (ARB&ARG). Tertiary treatment processes are promising solutions, although the transitory inactivation of bacteria may select ARB&ARG. This study aimed at assessing the potential of ozonation and UV254nm radiation to inactivate cultivable fungal and bacterial populations, and the selected genes 16S rRNA (common to all bacteria), intI1 (common in Gram-negative bacteria) and the ARG vanA, blaTEM, sul1 and qnrS. The abundance of the different microbiological parameters per volume of wastewater was reduced by ∼2 log units for cultivable fungi and 16S rRNA and intI1 genes, by∼3-4 log units, for total heterotrophs, enterobacteria and enterococci, and to values close or below the limits of quantification for ARG, for both processes, after a contact time of 30min. Yet, most of the cultivable populations, the 16S rRNA and intI1 genes as well as the ARG, except qnrS after ozonation, reached pre-treatment levels after 3days storage, suggesting a transitory rather than permanent microbial inactivation. Noticeably, normalization per 16S rRNA gene evidenced an increase of the ARG and intI1 prevalence, mainly after UV254nm treatment. The results suggest that these tertiary treatments may be selecting for ARB&ARG populations.

  8. An interferon-related gene signature for DNA damage resistance is a predictive marker for chemotherapy and radiation for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Ishwaran, Hemant; Yoon, Taewon; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Baker, Samuel W.; Khodarev, Nikolai; Su, Andy W.; Shaikh, Arif Y.; Roach, Paul; Kreike, Bas; Roizman, Bernard; Bergh, Jonas; Pawitan, Yudi; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Minn, Andy J.

    2008-01-01

    Individualization of cancer management requires prognostic markers and therapy-predictive markers. Prognostic markers assess risk of disease progression independent of therapy, whereas therapy-predictive markers identify patients whose disease is sensitive or resistant to treatment. We show that an experimentally derived IFN-related DNA damage resistance signature (IRDS) is associated with resistance to chemotherapy and/or radiation across different cancer cell lines. The IRDS genes STAT1, ISG15, and IFIT1 all mediate experimental resistance. Clinical analyses reveal that IRDS(+) and IRDS(−) states exist among common human cancers. In breast cancer, a seven–gene-pair classifier predicts for efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy and for local-regional control after radiation. By providing information on treatment sensitivity or resistance, the IRDS improves outcome prediction when combined with standard markers, risk groups, or other genomic classifiers. PMID:19001271

  9. RelB regulates manganese superoxide dismutase gene and resistance to ionizing radiation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Xu, Yong; St. Clair, Daret K.; St. Clair, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the front line for treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, a significant percentage of patients have radiation-resistant disease. The NF-κB pathway is an important factor for radiation resistance, and the classical (canonical) pathway is thought to confer protection of prostate cancer cells from ionizing radiation. Recently, the alternative (non-canonical) pathway, which is involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness, has also been shown to be important for radiation resistance in prostate cancer. The alternative NF-κB pathway component RelB protects prostate cancer cells from the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation, in part, by stimulating expression of the mitochondria-localized antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Blocking RelB activation suppresses MnSOD expression and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation. These results suggest that RelB-mediated modulation of the antioxidant capacity of prostate cancer cells is an important mechanism of radiation resistance. Therefore, targeting RelB activation may prove to be a valuable weapon in the oncologist’s arsenal to defeat aggressive and radiation-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:20649549

  10. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    resistance  ERG is diffusely localized through the prostate cancer cell and does not redistribute upon genotoxic stress Reportable Outcomes: The past...JL, Schrecengost RS, Han S, Den RB, Dicker AP, Feng FY, and Knudsen KE. A hormone-DNA repair circuit governs the response to genotoxic insult

  11. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 REPORT DATE: August 2013 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual ummary PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical...2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 July 2012 to 14 July 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of...wild- type prostate cancer cells and human prostate cancer samples (data not shown). Unfortunately, this level of homogenous diffuse expression, as well

  12. Head Resistance Due to Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinschmidt, R V; Parsons, S R

    1920-01-01

    Part 1 deals with the head resistance of a number of common types of radiator cores at different speeds in free air, as measured in the wind tunnel at the bureau of standards. This work was undertaken to determine the characteristics of various types of radiator cores, and in particular to develop the best type of radiator for airplanes. Some 25 specimens of core were tested, including practically all the general types now in use, except the flat plate type. Part 2 gives the results of wind tunnel tests of resistance on a model fuselage with a nose radiator. Part 3 presents the results of preliminary tests of head resistance of a radiator enclosed in a streamlined casing. Special attention is given to the value of wing radiator and of the radiator located in the open, especially when it is provided with a properly designed streamlined casing.

  13. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  14. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  15. Radiation resistance of acinetobacter spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The radiation resistance of 78 different strains of Acinetobacter sp. 42 from clinical isolates and 36 from other sources were compared with 15 clinical isolates and 12 other strains from Denmark. None of the Canadian strains was as resistant as resistant-enhanced Danish strains. Four strains had D 10 values of 3.1-3.6 kGy. Irradiated and unirradiated cells from all strains grew well, when cultured in Trypticase-Soy Broth at 30°C. Most cultures grew after overnight incubation. It was concluded that there would be no difficulty in detecting these strains, using ISO methodology for establishing the radiation sterilization dose for devices.

  16. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  17. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  18. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-01-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. PMID:28188144

  19. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-03-01

    Application is made of two different generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalizations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance.

  20. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    DR. Howard B. Lieberman

    2001-05-11

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage.

  1. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  2. Escherichia coli radD (yejH) gene: a novel function involved in radiation resistance and double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stefanie H; Byrne, Rose T; Wood, Elizabeth A; Cox, Michael M

    2015-03-01

    A transposon insertion screen implicated the yejH gene in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage. The yejH gene, which exhibits significant homology to the human transcription-coupled DNA repair gene XPB, is involved in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Deletion of yejH significantly sensitized cells to agents that cause double-strand breaks (ionizing radiation, UV radiation, ciprofloxacin). In addition, deletion of both yejH and radA hypersensitized the cells to ionizing radiation, UV and ciprofloxacin damage, indicating that these two genes have complementary repair functions. The ΔyejH ΔradA double deletion also showed a substantial decline in viability following an induced double-strand DNA break, of a magnitude comparable with the defect measured when the recA, recB, recG or priA genes are deleted. The ATPase activity and C-terminal zinc finger motif of yejH play an important role in its repair function, as targeted mutant alleles of yejH did not rescue sensitivity. We propose that yejH be renamed radD, reflecting its role in the DNA repair of radiation damage.

  3. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  4. Resistance of Marine Bacterioneuston to Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Agogué, Hélène; Joux, Fabien; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Lebaron, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    A total of 90 bacterial strains were isolated from the sea surface microlayer (i.e., bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (i.e., bacterioplankton) from two sites of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The strains were identified by sequence analysis, and growth recovery was investigated after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates were subjected to six different exposure times, ranging from 0.5 to 7 h of simulated noontime solar radiation. Following exposure, the growth of each isolate was monitored, and different classes of resistance were determined according to the growth pattern. Large interspecific differences among the 90 marine isolates were observed. Medium and highly resistant strains accounted for 41% and 22% of the isolates, respectively, and only 16% were sensitive strains. Resistance to solar radiation was equally distributed within the bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton. Relative contributions to the highly resistant class were 43% for γ-proteobacteria and 14% and 8% for α-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB) group, respectively. Within the γ-proteobacteria, the Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas genera appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation. The majority of the CFB group (76%) had medium resistance. Our study further provides evidence that pigmented bacteria are not more resistant to solar radiation than nonpigmented bacteria. PMID:16151115

  5. Resistance of marine bacterioneuston to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Agogué, Hélène; Joux, Fabien; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Lebaron, Philippe

    2005-09-01

    A total of 90 bacterial strains were isolated from the sea surface microlayer (i.e., bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (i.e., bacterioplankton) from two sites of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The strains were identified by sequence analysis, and growth recovery was investigated after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates were subjected to six different exposure times, ranging from 0.5 to 7 h of simulated noontime solar radiation. Following exposure, the growth of each isolate was monitored, and different classes of resistance were determined according to the growth pattern. Large interspecific differences among the 90 marine isolates were observed. Medium and highly resistant strains accounted for 41% and 22% of the isolates, respectively, and only 16% were sensitive strains. Resistance to solar radiation was equally distributed within the bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton. Relative contributions to the highly resistant class were 43% for gamma-proteobacteria and 14% and 8% for alpha-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB) group, respectively. Within the gamma-proteobacteria, the Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas genera appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation. The majority of the CFB group (76%) had medium resistance. Our study further provides evidence that pigmented bacteria are not more resistant to solar radiation than nonpigmented bacteria.

  6. Collagen I confers gamma radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Azorin, E; González-Martínez, P R; Azorin, J

    2012-12-01

    The effect of collagen on the response of somatomammotroph tumor cells (GH3) to gamma, radiation therapy was studied in vitro. After incubating confluent GH3 cell monolayers in a serum-free, maintaining medium, either with or without collagen, the monolayers were irradiated with 137Cs, gamma radiation. Collagen reduces cell mortality via ERK1/2 activation, abolishing gamma radiation, cell death, and promotes cell invasion when acting in synergy with collagen and in association with the, MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation. The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors, confers resistance to radiation.

  7. Restoration of Chinese hamster cell radiation resistance by the human repair gene ERCC-5 and progress in molecular cloning of this gene

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; deBruin, D.; McCoy, L.S.; Luke, J.A.; Mudgett, J.S.; Nickols, J.W.; Okinaka, R.T.; Tesmer, J.G.; MacInnes, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The uv-sensitive Chinese hamster cell uv-135 is being used to identify and isolate the human gene, ERCC-5, which corrects nucleotide excision repair in this incision-defective mutant. A cosmid library, constructed from a 3/sup 0/ transformant of uv-135, has been screened for transfected gpt and human Alu family sequences. An ordered physical map of overlapping positives cosmids has been determined. Molecular evidence suggests a region of this map of <40 Kbp contains the ERCC-5 gene. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Does EMT Contribute to Radiation Resistance in Human Breast Cancer?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    to radiation. For this we will use a CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) expression vector from OriGene Technologies Inc. This vector has the cDNA for CDH1 ...control vector, we will excise out the CDH1 gene and use the re-ligated backbone vector to prepare cells stably expressing the control vector. The...MDA-MB-231 cells with the pTet- On-Advanced vector and select G418 resistant cells. We will insert the cDNA for CDH1 into the pTRE- Tight vector and

  9. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  10. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  11. Resistance and Cooling Power of Various Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R H

    1928-01-01

    This reports combines the wind tunnel results of radiator tests made at the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington during the summers of 1921, 1925, and 1926. In all, 13 radiators of various types and capacities were given complete tests for figure of merit. Twelve of these were tested for resistance to water flow and a fourteenth radiator was tested for air resistance alone, its heat dissipating capacity being known. All the tests were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel, or in its 4 by 8 foot restriction, by the writer and under conditions as nearly the same as possible. That is to say, as far as possible, the general arrangement and condition of the apparatus, the observation intervals, the ratio of water flow per unit of cooling surface, the differential temperatures, and the air speeds were the same for all.

  12. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sangyong; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-11-29

    The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans IMPORTANCE: Although there are no natural environments under intense radiation, some living organisms

  13. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  14. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  15. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing microorganisms. Eradification techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation- based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the non-spore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-spore-forming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/sq m), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  16. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing micro-organisms. Eradi cation techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation-based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the nonspore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-sporeforming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/m2), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  17. Resistance Gene Analogs in Cherries (Prunus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have shown that NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) tend to occur in clusters and often map to major resistances gene or QTL. The identification and use of specific RGAs as molecular markers among plant material displaying differential resistance phenotypes has the potential to di...

  18. Gamma radiation resistance of spin Seebeck devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmur, A.; Uchida, K.; Ihara, K.; Ioka, I.; Kikkawa, T.; Ono, M.; Endo, J.; Kashiwagi, K.; Nakashima, T.; Kirihara, A.; Ishida, M.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) were irradiated with gamma (γ) rays with the total dose of around 3 × 105 Gy in order to investigate the γ-radiation resistance of the devices. To demonstrate this, Pt/Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4/Glass and Pt/Bi0.1Y2.9Fe5O12/Gd3Ga5O12 SSE devices were used. We confirmed that the thermoelectric, magnetic, and structural properties of the SSE devices are not affected by the γ-ray irradiation. This result demonstrates that SSE devices are applicable to thermoelectric generation even in high radiation environments.

  19. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  20. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  1. Isolation of Radiation-Resistant Bacteria from Mars Analog Antarctic Dry Valleys by Preselection, and the Correlation between Radiation and Desiccation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gary; Ward, John M.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extreme radiation–resistant microorganisms can survive doses of ionizing radiation far greater than are present in the natural environment. Radiation resistance is believed to be an incidental adaptation to desiccation resistance, as both hazards cause similar cellular damage. Desert soils are, therefore, promising targets to prospect for new radiation-resistant strains. This is the first study to isolate radiation-resistant microbes by using gamma-ray exposure preselection from the extreme cold desert of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (a martian surface analogue). Halomonads, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were the most numerous survivors of the highest irradiation exposures. They were studied here for the first time for both their desiccation and irradiation survival characteristics. In addition, the association between desiccation and radiation resistance has not been investigated quantitatively before for a broad diversity of microorganisms. Thus, a meta-analysis of scientific literature was conducted to gather a larger data set. A strong correlation was found between desiccation and radiation resistance, indicating that an increase in the desiccation resistance of 5 days corresponds to an increase in the room-temperature irradiation survival of 1 kGy. Irradiation at −79°C (representative of average martian surface temperatures) increases the microbial radiation resistance 9-fold. Consequently, the survival of the cold-, desiccation-, and radiation-resistant organisms isolated here has implications for the potential habitability of dormant or cryopreserved life on Mars. Key Words: Extremophiles—Halomonas sp.—Antarctica—Mars—Ionizing radiation—Cosmic rays. Astrobiology 15, 1076–1090. PMID:26684506

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Gene Expression in Response to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Grynberg, Priscila; Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Mourão, Marina de Moraes; Hirata Jr, Roberto; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Franco, Glória Regina

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an organism highly resistant to ionizing radiation. Following a dose of 500 Gy of gamma radiation, the fragmented genomic DNA is gradually reconstructed and the pattern of chromosomal bands is restored in less than 48 hours. Cell growth arrests after irradiation but, while DNA is completely fragmented, RNA maintains its integrity. In this work we compared the transcriptional profiles of irradiated and non-irradiated epimastigotes at different time points after irradiation using microarray. In total, 273 genes were differentially expressed; from these, 160 were up-regulated and 113 down-regulated. We found that genes with predicted functions are the most prevalent in the down-regulated gene category. Translation and protein metabolic processes, as well as generation of precursor of metabolites and energy pathways were affected. In contrast, the up-regulated category was mainly composed of obsolete sequences (which included some genes of the kinetoplast DNA), genes coding for hypothetical proteins, and Retrotransposon Hot Spot genes. Finally, the tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, a gene involved in double-strand DNA break repair process, was up-regulated. Our study demonstrated the peculiar response to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism changes its gene expression to manage such a harmful stress. PMID:22247781

  3. Molecular Transfer of Nematode Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, V. M.; Ho, J.-Y.; Ma, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have been used to introduce agronomically valuable traits, including resistance to viruses, herbicides, and insects, into crop plants. Introduction of these genes into plants frequently involves Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. The potential exists for applying this technology to nematode control by introducing genes conferring resistance to nematodes. Transferred genes could include those encoding products detrimental to nematode development or reproduction as well as cloned host resistance genes. Host genes that confer resistance to cyst or root-knot nematode species have been identified in many plants. The best characterized is Mi, a gene that confers resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato. A map-based cloning approach is being used to isolate the gene. For development of a detailed map of the region of the genome surrounding Mi, DNA markers genetically linked to Mi have been identified and analyzed in tomato lines that have undergone a recombination event near Mi. The molecular map will be used to identify DNA corresponding to Mi. We estimate that a clone of Mi will be obtained in 2-5 years. An exciting prospect is that introduction of this gene will confer resistance in plant species without currently available sources of resistance. PMID:19282989

  4. Gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Mallory-Smith, Carol; Zapiola, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Gene flow from transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops can result in the adventitious presence of the transgene, which may negatively impact markets. Gene flow can also produce glyphosate-resistant plants that may interfere with weed management systems. The objective of this article is to review the gene flow literature as it pertains to glyphosate-resistant crops. Gene flow is a natural phenomenon not unique to transgenic crops and can occur via pollen, seed and, in some cases, vegetative propagules. Gene flow via pollen can occur in all crops, even those that are considered to be self-pollinated, because all have low levels of outcrossing. Gene flow via seed or vegetative propagules occurs when they are moved naturally or by humans during crop production and commercialization. There are many factors that influence gene flow; therefore, it is difficult to prevent or predict. Gene flow via pollen and seed from glyphosate-resistant canola and creeping bentgrass fields has been documented. The adventitious presence of the transgene responsible for glyphosate resistance has been found in commercial seed lots of canola, corn and soybeans. In general, the glyphosate-resistant trait is not considered to provide an ecological advantage. However, regulators should consider the examples of gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops when formulating rules for the release of crops with traits that could negatively impact the environment or human health.

  5. Targeting Notch to overcome radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Yahyanejad, Sanaz; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2016-02-16

    Radiotherapy represents an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer cells. However, it often fails to eliminate all tumor cells because of the intrinsic or acquired treatment resistance, which is the most common cause of tumor recurrence. Emerging evidences suggest that the Notch signaling pathway is an important pathway mediating radiation resistance in tumor cells. Successful targeting of Notch signaling requires a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to be safe and effective. Here we summarize the role of Notch in mediating resistance to radiotherapy, the different strategies to block Notch in cancer cells and how treatment scheduling can improve tumor response. Finally, we discuss a need for reliable Notch related biomarkers in specific tumors to measure pathway activity and to allow identification of a subset of patients who are likely to benefit from Notch targeted therapies.

  6. Targeting Notch to overcome radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yahyanejad, Sanaz; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy represents an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer cells. However, it often fails to eliminate all tumor cells because of the intrinsic or acquired treatment resistance, which is the most common cause of tumor recurrence. Emerging evidences suggest that the Notch signaling pathway is an important pathway mediating radiation resistance in tumor cells. Successful targeting of Notch signaling requires a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to be safe and effective. Here we summarize the role of Notch in mediating resistance to radiotherapy, the different strategies to block Notch in cancer cells and how treatment scheduling can improve tumor response. Finally, we discuss a need for reliable Notch related biomarkers in specific tumors to measure pathway activity and to allow identification of a subset of patients who are likely to benefit from Notch targeted therapies. PMID:26713603

  7. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  8. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1991-06-24

    We proposed an investigation of genetically-determined individual differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The model organism is Drosophila melanogaster. The gene coding for Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the target locus, but the effects of variation in other components of the genome that modulate SOD levels are also taken into account. SOD scavenges oxygen radicals generated during exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Two alleles, S and F, are commonly found in natural populations of D. melanogaster; in addition we have isolated from a natural population null'' (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide an ideal model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CA1. The roles of SOD level in radioresistance are being investigated in a series of experiments that measure the somatic and germ-line effects of increasing doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, we have pursued an unexpected genetic event-namely the nearly simultaneous transformation of several lines homozygous for the SOD null'' allele into predominately S lines. Using specifically designed probes and DNA amplification by means of the Tag polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have shown that (1) the null allele was still present in the transformed lines, but was being gradually replaced by the S allele as a consequence of natural selection; and (2) that the transformation was due to the spontaneous deletion of a 0.68 Kb truncated P-element, the insertion of which is characteristic of the CA1 null allele.

  9. Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.

    2012-01-01

    The environmental conditions of the Moon require mitigation if a long-term human presence is to be achieved for extended periods of time. Radiation, micrometeoroid impacts, high-velocity debris, and thermal cycling represent threats to crew, equipment, and facilities. For decades, local regolith has been suggested as a candidate material to use in the construction of protective barriers. A thickness of roughly 3m is sufficient protection from both direct and secondary radiation from cosmic rays and solar protons; this thickness is sufficient to reduce radiation exposure even during solar flares. NASA has previously identified a need for innovations that will support lunar habitats using lightweight structures because the reduction of structural mass translates directly into additional up and down mass capability that would facilitate additional logistics capacity and increased science return for all mission phases. The development of non-pressurized primary structures that have synergy with the development of pressurized structures is also of interest. The use of indigenous or in situ materials is also a well-known and active area of research that could drastically improve the practicality of human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. The Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance (ARMOR) concept is a new, multifunctional structure that acts as radiation shielding and micrometeorite impact shielding for long-duration lunar surface protection of humans and equipment. ARMOR uses a combination of native regolith and a deployed membrane jacket to yield a multifunctional structure. ARMOR is a robust and modular system that can be autonomously assembled on-site prior to the first human surface arrival. The system provides protection by holding a sufficiently thick (3 m) archshaped shell of local regolith around a central cavity. The regolith is held in shape by an arch-shaped jacket made of strong but deployable material. No regolith processing is

  10. Experiments on the resistance of airplane wheels and radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Experiments were made on the resistance of four airplane wheels of different sizes and coverings and two Lamblin radiators. The results show the important influence of the wheel coverings. The closing of a shutter, which was fitted to one of the radiators, considerably lessened the resistance.

  11. Radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szhogina, A. A.; Shilin, V. A.; Sedov, V. P.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2016-07-01

    The endohedral metallofullerenols Me@C2 n (OH)38-40 + C2 n (OH)38-40 ( Me = Tb, Sc, Gd, Fe, Pr, Mo) have been obtained and their radiation resistance under irradiation by a neutron flux of 8 × 1013 cm-2 s-1 has been studied. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols are discussed.

  12. ATCG nucleotide fluctuation of Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, C.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.

    2007-09-01

    The radiation resistance-repair genes in Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) and E-coli were analyzed in terms of the A, T, C, G nucleotide fluctuations. The studied genes were Rec-A, Rec-Q, and the unique DR PprA gene. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave a fractal dimension increase of the Deinococcus radiodurans genes as compared to E-coli, which is comparable to the enhancement observed in the human HAR1 region (HAR1F gene) over that of the chimpanzee. Near neighbor fluctuation was also studied via the Black-Scholes model where the increment sequence was treated as a random walk series. The Deinococcus radiodurans radiation gene standard deviations were consistently higher than that of the E-coli deviations, and agree with the fractal analysis results. The sequence stacking interaction was studied using the published nucleotide-pair melting free energy values and Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes were shown to possess larger negative free energies. The high sensitivity of the fractal dimension as a biomarker was tested with correlation analysis of the gamma ray dose versus fractal dimension, and the R square values were found to be above 0.9 (N=5). When compared with other nucleotide sequences such as the rRNA sequences, HAR1 and its chimpanzee counterpart, the higher fluctuation (correlated randomness) and larger negative free energy of a DR radiation gene suggested that a radiation resistance-repair sequence exhibited higher complexity. As the HAR1 nucleotide sequence complexity and its transcription activity of co-expressing cortex protein reelin supported a positive selection event in humans, a similar inference of positive selection of coding genes could be drawn for Deinococcus radiodurans when compared to E-coli. The origin of such a positive selection would be consistent with that of a

  13. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  14. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-30

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resistance, which is a major clinical problem. In clinical practice, hormonal therapy agents are commonly used in combination or sequence with radiation therapy. Tamoxifen treatment and radiotherapy improve both local tumor control and patient survival. However, tamoxifen treatment may render cancer cells less responsive to radiation therapy. Only a handful of data exist on the effects of radiation on cells resistant to hormonal therapy agents. These scarce data show that cells that were resistant to tamoxifen were also resistant to radiation. Yet, the existence and mechanisms of cross-resistance to endocrine therapy and radiation therapy need to be established. Here, we for the first time examined and compared radiation responses of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7/S0.5) and two antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from MCF-7/S0.5: the tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/TAMR-1 and ICI 182,780 resistant MCF-7/182R-6 cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the expression of genes involved in DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. We found that the tamoxifen-resistant cell line in contrast to the parental and ICI 182,780-resistant cell lines displayed a significantly less radiation-induced decrease in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we show that MCF-7/TAMR-1 and MCF-7/182R-6 cells were less susceptible to radiation-induced apoptosis as compared to the parental line. These data indicate that tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells have a reduced sensitivity to radiation treatment. The current study may therefore serve as a

  15. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  16. Radiation and Heat Resistance of Moraxella-Acinetobacter in Meats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-23

    growth 7 Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates .... 7 Effect of fat content of meat on radiation and heat resistance of...approximately 10 cells per ml. Storage for culture main- tenance after growth was at 3-5*C. Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates...sensitive to reduced oxygen occur- ring with vacuum packaging of foods (Maxcy et al., 1976). Furthermore, most of the radiation-resiscant M-A were

  17. Synthesis and radiation resistance of fullerenes and fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilin, V. A.; Lebedev, V. T.; Sedov, V. P.; Szhogina, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of an electric-arc facility for the synthesis of fullerenes and endohedral metallofullerenes are optimized. The resistance of C60 and C70 fullerenes and C60(OH)30 and C70(OH)30 fullerenols against neutron irradiation is studied. It is established that the radiation resistance of the fullerenes is higher than that of the fullerenols, but the radiation resistance of the Gd@C2 n endometallofullerenes is lower than that of the corresponding Gd@C2 n (OH)38 fullerenols. The radiation resistance of mixtures of Me@C2 n (OH)38 ( Me = Gd, Tb, Sc, Fe, and Pr) endometallofullerenes with C60(OH)30 is determined. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of the fullerenes and fullerenols are discussed.

  18. Functional genomics screening utilizing mutant mouse embryonic stem cells identifies novel radiation-response genes.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy.

  19. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans. PMID:27899501

  20. Biology of Extreme Radiation Resistance: The Way of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a champion of extreme radiation resistance that is accounted for by a highly efficient protection against proteome, but not genome, damage. A well-protected functional proteome ensures cell recovery from extensive radiation damage to other cellular constituents by molecular repair and turnover processes, including an efficient repair of disintegrated DNA. Therefore, cell death correlates with radiation-induced protein damage, rather than DNA damage, in both robust and standard species. From the reviewed biology of resistance to radiation and other sources of oxidative damage, we conclude that the impact of protein damage on the maintenance of life has been largely underestimated in biology and medicine. PMID:23818498

  1. Radiation resistivity of polyacenaphthylene-grafted polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Kawase, Kaoru; Yamakita, Hiromi

    Thin poly (ethylene-g-acenaphthylene) films prepared by the vapor-phase grafting method were subjected to the γ-irradiation in air, and various changes in tensile and structural properties of the film were investigated by comparing with those of the untreated or crosslinked polyethylene film. Polyethylene got to lose its inherent necking property by oxidative degradation and to be brittle-fractured by the irradiation dose less than 100 Mrad in air. The polyacenaphthylene-grafted polyethylenes (extent of grafting, ˜ 54 by {100( P-P°) }/{P°}), however, kept their ductility up to 200 Mrad or more, and the rate of increase in elastic modulus as well as yield strength with the increasing irradiation dose was considerably lower than that of untreated or crosslinked polyethylene. The effect of the grafting extent, and that of the irradiation dose-rate on the fracture energy were also examined. The weight increase of polyethylene due to the oxygen consumption and the resulting formation of carbonyl group which proceeded proportionally with the irradiation dose were remarkably suppressed by the grafting, whereas the double bond formation seemed to be unaffected by it. The grafted film held the original content of gel fraction unchanged during the irradiation in air, but the average molecular weight of the sol fraction decreased gradually. Meanwhile, the gel fraction of the crosslinked polyethylene was degenerated by a small dose of irradiation. The analysis of gaseous products revealed the formation of water, methanol, acetaldehyde and so forth from the irradiated grafted film. The grafting procedure and the subsequent irradiation of the grafted film did not affect the degree of crystallinity of the backbone polyethylene. The role played by the grafted polyacenaphthylene for endowing the radiation resistivity to polyethylene and its inherent limitation in effect were discussed from the structural point of view of the grafted film.

  2. Radiation Resistance and Injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Yehia A.; Rowley, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25°C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and −30°C, the D value of strain IP107 was 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at −20°C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at −20°C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at −20°C, nor did storage at −20°C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25°C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36°C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36°C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5°C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36°C for 1 day than at 5°C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation. PMID:570017

  3. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  4. Development of radiation resistant electrical cable insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, B. S.; Soo, P.; Mackenzie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Two new polyethylene cable insulations have been formulated for nuclear applications and have been tested under gamma radiation. Both insulations are based on low density polyethylene, one with PbO and the other with Sb2O3 as additives. The test results show that the concept of using inorganic antioxidants to retard radiation initiated oxidation (RIO) is viable. PbO is more effective than Sb2O3 in minimizing RIO.

  5. Towards understanding the extreme radiation resistance of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2007-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a phytopathogenic fungus exhibiting extreme resistance to UV and ionizing radiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance are as yet unknown. The recently determined genome sequence was examined for clues to the radiation resistance, focusing on proteins in homologous recombination, but there was little that was unusual about them. Furthermore, by comparison, its recombinational repair system seems to be only minimally related to the extended synthesis-dependent DNA strand-annealing system of Deinococcus radiodurans. Thus, consideration should be given to the possibility that incremental structural changes in repair proteins or their elevated expression are the basis for the extreme radiation resistance in U. maydis. Evolution of a system enabling the survival of U. maydis under such conditions could be a secondary consequence of adaptation to an environment of continual genotoxic stress encountered in its habitat.

  6. Escherichia coli Genes and Pathways Involved in Surviving Extreme Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Rose T.; Chen, Stefanie H.; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Cabot, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    To further an improved understanding of the mechanisms used by bacterial cells to survive extreme exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), we broadly screened nonessential Escherichia coli genes for those involved in IR resistance by using transposon-directed insertion sequencing (TraDIS). Forty-six genes were identified, most of which become essential upon heavy IR exposure. Most of these were subjected to direct validation. The results reinforced the notion that survival after high doses of ionizing radiation does not depend on a single mechanism or process, but instead is multifaceted. Many identified genes affect either DNA repair or the cellular response to oxidative damage. However, contributions by genes involved in cell wall structure/function, cell division, and intermediary metabolism were also evident. About half of the identified genes have not previously been associated with IR resistance or recovery from IR exposure, including eight genes of unknown function. PMID:25049088

  7. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  8. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen; Natarajan, Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  9. Gamma radiation induced resistivity changes in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tundwal, Ambika; Kumar, V.; Datta, A.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo Code JA-IPU is used for estimation of Frenkel pairs and their effect on change of resistivity of Iron on irradiation by gamma spectrum of Co60. The Code includes three cascade processes of incident gamma, produced electrons and recoiled atoms and simulation of the lattice structure of the target material. Change in experimentally measured resistivity of Iron is found to vary with number of Frenkel pairs as (x - 1) ln N d .

  10. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  11. RADIATION RESISTANT HTS QUADRUPOLES FOR RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; HARRISON,M.; ET AL.

    2004-10-03

    Extremely high radiation, levels with accumulated doses comparable to those in nuclear reactors than in accelerators, and very high heat loads ({approx}15 kw) make the quadrupole magnets in the fragment separator one of the most challenging elements of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Removing large heat loads, protecting the superconducting coils against quenching, the long term survivability of magnet components, and in particular, insulation that can retain its functionality in such a harsh environment, are the major challenges associated with such magnets. A magnet design based on commercially available high temperature superconductor (HTS) and stainless steel tape insulation has been developed. HTS will efficiently remove these large heat loads and stainless steel can tolerate these large radiation doses. Construction of a model magnet has been started with several coils already built and tested. This paper presents the basic magnet design, results of the coil tests, the status and the future plans. In addition, preliminary results of radiation calculations are also presented.

  12. Space radiation resistant transparent polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.

    1977-01-01

    A literature search in the field of ultraviolet and charged particle irradiation of polymers was utilized in an experimental program aimed at the development of radiation stable materials for space applications. The rationale utilized for material selection and the synthesis, characterization and testing performed on several selected materials is described. Among the materials tested for ultraviolet stability in vacuum were: polyethyleneoxide, polyvinylnaphthalene, and the amino resin synthesized by the condensation of o-hydroxybenzoguanamine with formaldehyde. Particularly interesting was the radiation behavior of poly(ethyleneoxide), irradiation did not cause degradation of optical properties but rather an improvement in transparency as indicated by a decrease in solar absorptance with increasing exposure time.

  13. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  14. Research of radiation resistant Er doped fiber for space detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian-ping; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Pu-pu; Li, Run-dong; Jiang, Cong; Xiao, Chun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, erbium doped fibers for space detection are researched for feature of radiation resistance. Fibers with different coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and too thick of carbon layer around fiber would not bring best radiation-resistant performance, since thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the high and low temperature respectively, and it's found that the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat after some days. Hydrogen is reloaded into the fibers which have been loaded once, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings. Loss and wave width changes are also researched under different radiation dose.

  15. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The very reactive superoxide anion O[sub 2] is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20[sub 2][sup [minus

  16. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  17. Molecular investigation of the radiation resistance of edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize in detail the response of Arthrospira to ionizing radiation, to better understand its radiation resistance capacity. Live cells of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays. This study is the first, showing that Arthrospira is highly tolerant to gamma rays, and can survive at least 6400 Gy (dose rate of 527 Gy h−1), which identified Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 as a radiation resistant bacterium. Biochemical, including proteomic and transcriptomic, analysis after irradiation with 3200 or 5000 Gy showed a decline in photosystem II quantum yield, reduced carbon fixation, and reduced pigment, lipid, and secondary metabolite synthesis. Transcription of photo-sensing and signaling pathways, and thiol-based antioxidant systems was induced. Transcriptomics did show significant activation of ssDNA repair systems and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) at the RNA level. Surprisingly, the cells did not induce the classical antioxidant or DNA repair systems, such superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme and the RecA protein. Arthrospira cells lack the catalase gene and the LexA repressor. Irradiated Arthrospira cells did induce strongly a group of conserved proteins, of which the function in radiation resistance remains to be elucidated, but which are a promising novel routes to be explored. This study revealed the radiation resistance of Arthrospira, and the molecular systems involved, paving the way for its further and better exploitation. PMID:25678338

  18. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  19. Radiation Resistant Vanadium-Graphene Nanolayered Composite

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youbin; Baek, Jinwook; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Sangmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jeon, Seokwoo; Han, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high strength V-graphene nanolayers were developed for the first time that was demonstrated to have an excellent radiation tolerance as revealed by the He+ irradiation study. Radiation induced hardening, evaluated via nanopillar compressions before and after He+ irradiation, is significantly reduced with the inclusion of graphene layers; the flow stresses of V-graphene nanolayers with 110 nm repeat layer spacing showed an increase of 25% while pure V showed an increase of 88% after He+ dosage of 13.5 dpa. The molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the graphene interface can spontaneously absorb the nearby crystalline defects that are produced from a collision cascade, thereby enhancing the lifetime of the V-graphene nanolayers via this self-healing effect. In addition, the impermeability of He gas through the graphene resulted in suppression of He bubble agglomerations that in turn reduced embrittlement. In-situ SEM compression also showed the ability of graphene to hinder crack propagation that suppressed the failure. PMID:27098407

  20. Radiation Resistant Vanadium-Graphene Nanolayered Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youbin; Baek, Jinwook; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Sangmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jeon, Seokwoo; Han, Seung Min

    2016-04-01

    Ultra high strength V-graphene nanolayers were developed for the first time that was demonstrated to have an excellent radiation tolerance as revealed by the He+ irradiation study. Radiation induced hardening, evaluated via nanopillar compressions before and after He+ irradiation, is significantly reduced with the inclusion of graphene layers; the flow stresses of V-graphene nanolayers with 110 nm repeat layer spacing showed an increase of 25% while pure V showed an increase of 88% after He+ dosage of 13.5 dpa. The molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the graphene interface can spontaneously absorb the nearby crystalline defects that are produced from a collision cascade, thereby enhancing the lifetime of the V-graphene nanolayers via this self-healing effect. In addition, the impermeability of He gas through the graphene resulted in suppression of He bubble agglomerations that in turn reduced embrittlement. In-situ SEM compression also showed the ability of graphene to hinder crack propagation that suppressed the failure.

  1. Modeling of secondary radiation damage in LIGA PMMA resist exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2003-01-01

    Secondary radiation during LIGA PMMA resist exposure adversely affects feature definition, sidewall taper and overall sidewall offset. Additionally, it can degrade the resist adjacent to the substrate, leading to the loss of free-standing features through undercutting during resist development or through mechanical failure of the degraded material. The source of this radiation includes photoelectrons, Auger electrons, fluorescence photons, etc. Sandia"s Integrated Tiger Series (ITS), a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code, was used to compute dose profiles within 1 to 2 microns of the absorber edge and near the interface of the resist with a metallized substrate. The difficulty of sub-micron resolution requirement was overcome by solving a few local problems having carefully designed micron-scale geometries. The results indicate a 2-μm dose transition region near the absorber edge resulting from PMMA"s photoelectrons. This region leads to sidewall offset and to tapered sidewalls following resist development. The results also show a dose boundary layer of around 1 μm near the substrate interface due to electrons emitted from the substrate metallization layer. The maximum dose at the resist bottom under the absorber can be very high and can lead to feature loss during development. This model was also used to investigate those resist doses resulting from multi-layer substrate.

  2. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  3. [Shielding ability of lead loaded radiation resistant gloves].

    PubMed

    Kawano, T; Ebihara, H

    1990-02-01

    The shielding ability of radiation resistant gloves was examined. The gloves are made of lead loaded (as PbO2) polyvinyl chloride resin and are about 0.4 mm in thickness (70 mg/cm2). Eleven test pieces were sampled from each of three gloves (total 33) and the transmission rates for radiations (X-ray or gamma-ray) through the test pieces were measured with radiation sources, 99mTc, 57Co, 133Ba, 133Xe and 241Am. The differences of the transmission rates for radiations by the positions of the gloves were smaller than 15%, and the differences by three gloves were smaller than 5% in the case of 60 keV and 141 keV radiations. The average transmission rates for radiations in the 33 test pieces were about 40% for 30 keV radiation, about 90% for 80 keV and 140 keV radiations. The shielding characteristic of the gloves is equivalent to about 0.026 mm thick lead plate.

  4. Three Cases of Levodopa-Resistant Parkinsonism After Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Raja; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Itin, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 77 • Female, 44 • Male, 9 Final Diagnosis: Radiation induced parkinsonism Symptoms: Slowness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Unequivocal brain radiation-induced parkinsonism has so far been reported in only in two pediatric patients. However, with the rising incidence rates for brain tumors in industrialized countries and the consequential increased exposure to cranial radiotherapy, clinicians might become more exposed to this entity. Case Report: Three patients were treated for intraparenchymal brain tumor with resection, chemotherapy, and whole brain radiation. One patient developed leukoencephalopathy and parkinsonism within one year of treatment, one developed it seven years after treatment completion, and one developed dementia, parkinsonism and cerebral infracts 40 years after whole brain radiation. Brain MRIs and a DaTscan were obtained. All patients failed a trial of carbidopa/levodopa. We suggest that the brain radiation exposure was responsible for levodopa resistant parkinsonism, cognitive decline, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Conclusions: Although rare, radiation therapy-induced parkinsonism might be responsible for levodopa-resistant parkinsonism. PMID:27909286

  5. Organization of a resistance gene cluster linked to rhizomania resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic resistance to rhizomania has been in use for over 40 years. Characterization of the molecular basis for susceptibility and resistance has proved challenging. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NB-LRR) genes have been implicated in numerous gene-for-gene resistance interaction...

  6. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO2 emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  7. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  8. Thin N-I-P radiation resistant solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several sets of N-I-P sola cells were fabricated from high resistivity silicon to test the effectiveness of various methods for hardening these devices against radiation. Different substrate materials were used to provide information on the effects of dopant concentration, silicon type, and the presence of oxygen. In some cells, P-type float-zone refined silicon of 800, 8000 and 15,000 omega-cm resistivity was used to provide a basis for studying resistivity and purity effects. In other cells, N-type silicon (approximately 800 omega-cm) was used to allow a comparison of dopant type. Oxygen-rich, crucible-grown, silicon (approximately 100 omega-cm, p-type) will provide information on purity effects and defect gettering. Lithium was introduced into different types of silicon to determine if mobile ions can reduce radiation induced defects in high resistivity material. Thin cells (2 mil) were fabricated to study the effects of cell thickness and carrier injection on radiation damage. The electrical characteristics of the different sets of cells were measured, analyzed, and compared prior to shipment of the cells to NASA/Lewis for irradiation.

  9. Development of resistant materials to beam impact and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Akira; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hara, Nobuyoshi; Akao, Noboru; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Materials that have strong resistance to both beam impact (or shock-wave) and radiation damage are required for the beam target of an intense accelerator and space applications. Recently, Futakawa et al. found in their experiments that Kolsterising specimens have a stronger resistance to pitting than SS316 CW. A similar effect can be expected for other hardening treatments, and new material development is hopeful. Accordingly, we have started the development of high-performance materials by organizing the project team from KEK, JAEA and universities. In this paper, the scope of the project is introduced. Recent topics involve the development of intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless-steel, AlN-TiN ceramics and cladding techniques of thin tantalum or CrN film on a tungsten target by means of a molten-salt method and ion-beam-enhanced deposition. New observations on corrosion resistance are presented.

  10. Low-Temperature Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Hunter, Stephanie J.; Lovell, Keith V.; Coates, Andrew J.; Ward, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 106 population reduction.

  11. Novel radiation response genes identified in gene-trapped MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jennifer; Ullrich, Robert

    2007-02-01

    We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyltransferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian; Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan

    2016-03-10

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation. PMID:26966202

  14. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  15. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y. M.; Hu, L. Q.; Mao, S. T.; Chen, K. Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Collaboration: EAST Diagnostics Team

    2012-09-15

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 {mu}m thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 {mu}m thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well.

  16. Radiation Resistance of Fluorite-Structured Nuclear Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido, Frederico; Moll, Sandra; Thome, Lionel; Vincent, Laetitia; Nowicki, Lech; Sattonnay, Gaeel

    2009-03-10

    Fluorite-structure oxides are radiation-resistant materials making them ideal candidates for uses as nuclear fuels or as inert matrices for actinide transmutation. The radiation tolerance of urania and cubic zirconia single crystals was investigated by external ion irradiation in predominating domains of electronic and nuclear stopping of bombarding particles. Damage kinetics show that the behavior of the two investigated fluorite-type oxides is almost the same: (i) at low-energy a two-stage disordering process is exhibited--first a ballistic step due to the formation of radiation-induced defects and second a crystal fragmentation induced by the formation of gas bubbles at large concentration-; (ii) at high energy a one-stage damage kinetics associated with the formation of ion tracks whose overlapping at high fluence results in the formation of nanometer-sized domains with a small disorientation.

  17. Exploring the diversity of arsenic resistance genes from acid mine drainage microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Verónica; Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; Postigo Cacho, Marina; González-Pastor, José E

    2015-06-01

    The microbial communities from the Tinto River, a natural acid mine drainage environment, were explored to search for novel genes involved in arsenic resistance using a functional metagenomic approach. Seven pentavalent arsenate resistance clones were selected and analysed to find the genes responsible for this phenotype. Insights about their possible mechanisms of resistance were obtained from sequence similarities and cellular arsenic concentration. A total of 19 individual open reading frames were analysed, and each one was individually cloned and assayed for its ability to confer arsenic resistance in Escherichia coli cells. A total of 13 functionally active genes involved in arsenic resistance were identified, and they could be classified into different global processes: transport, stress response, DNA damage repair, phospholipids biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and RNA-modifying enzymes. Most genes (11) encode proteins not previously related to heavy metal resistance or hypothetical or unknown proteins. On the other hand, two genes were previously related to heavy metal resistance in microorganisms. In addition, the ClpB chaperone and the RNA-modifying enzymes retrieved in this work were shown to increase the cell survival under different stress conditions (heat shock, acid pH and UV radiation). Thus, these results reveal novel insights about unidentified mechanisms of arsenic resistance.

  18. Dominant gene for rust resistance in pearl millet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, W.W.; Wells, H.D.; Burton, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Rust (Puccinia substriata var. indica) resistance was discovered in three Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke subspecies monodii (Maire) Brunken accessions from Senegal. Resistant plant were free of rust, although the bottom one or two leaves of some plants did develop a brown discoloration without pustules. Resistance was controlled by a dominant gene assigned the gene symbol Rr1. Backcrossing has been effective in transferring resistance from the wild grassy, monodii to cultivated pearl millet. The Rr1 gene should be useful in the production of rust resistant pearl millet hybrids and cultivars. 6 references, 1 table.

  19. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  20. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  1. What is a resistance gene? Ranking risk in resistomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Metagenomic studies have shown that antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment, which has led to the suggestion that there is a high risk that these genes will spread to bacteria that cause human infections. If this is true, estimating the real risk of dissemination of resistance genes from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens is therefore very difficult. In this Opinion article, we analyse the current definitions of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes, and we describe the bottlenecks that affect the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to human pathogens. We propose rules for estimating the risks associated with genes that are present in environmental resistomes by evaluating the likelihood of their introduction into human pathogens, and the consequences of such events for the treatment of infections.

  2. A New Perspective on Radiation Resistance Based on Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    scavenging enzymes51–53, and manganese supplementa‑ tion can restore the lifespan of short‑lived C . elegans mutants54. Mitochondria accumu‑ late high...1986). 48. Domain, F., Houot, L., Chauvat, F. & Cassier-Chauvat, C . Function and regulation of the cyanobacterial genes lexA, recA and ruvB: LexA is...damage. This damage is caused by reactive oxygen spe ‑ cies (ROS), the chemical agents that are principally responsible for cellular radiation damage11

  3. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato.

  4. Combined effects of ionizing radiation and cycloheximide on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-11-01

    Experiments were done to determine the effects of ionizing radiation exposure on expression of genes following exposure of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells to the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (including such genes as {beta}-actin, c-fos, H4-histone, c-myc, c-jun, Rb, and p53). Results revealed that when ionizing radiations (either fission-spectrum neutrons or {gamma}-rays) were administered 15 min following the cycloheximide treatment of SHE cells, the radiation exposure reduced cycloheximide-mediated gene induction for most of the induced genes studied (c-fos, H4-histone, c-jun) In addition, dose-rate differences were found when radiation exposure most significantly inhibited the cycloheximide response. Our results suggest (1) that ionizing radiation does not act as a general protein synthesis inhibitor and (2) that the presence of a labile (metastable) protein is required for the maintenance of transcription and mRNA accumulation following radiation exposure, especially for radiation administered at high dose-rates.

  5. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties.

  6. Radiation-resistant polymer-based photonics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Nichter, James E.; Nash, Fazio; Haas, Franz; Szep, Attila A.; Michalak, Richard J.; Flusche, B.; Repak, Paul L.; Brost, George A.; Pirich, Andrew R.; Craig, Douglas M.; Le, Dang T.; Cardimona, David A.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Tsap, Boris; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Barto, Richard R.; Zeng, Tingying; Wood, David; Claus, Richard O.

    2004-10-01

    Empirical data regarding the radiation induced responses of Mach Zehnder interferometric electro-optic polymer based modulators (PBMs) operating at 1310 and 1550 nm and broadband InP quantum dot (QD) polymer photodetectors (PPDs) operating into the near infrared (NIR) are reported. Modulators composed of spun-on materials and hybrid electostatically self assembled (ESA) and spun-on NLO materials are examined for changes to their half-wave voltage and insertion losses following a gamma-ray total dose of 163 krad(Si) and irradiation by 25.6 MeV protons at a fluence of ~1011 cm-2. Pre- and post- irradiation responses of ESA grown polymer detectors using InP QDs are examined for photovoltage degradation and aging effects. The data indicates and excellent potential for developing polymer based photonic (PBP) devices with increased radiation resistance suitable for transition to photonic space applications.

  7. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    cellular damge caused by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Deinococcus radiodurans; Lactobacillus plantarurn; cyanobacteria ; radiation...6 3. K. S. Makarova and MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria. Bacterial Stress Responses...In Press) Abstract | The prospect of comparative genomics resolving the seemingly paradoxical mechanism of extreme radiation resistance in

  8. Radiation resistance of electro-optic polymer-based modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Nichter, James E.; Nash, Fazio D.; Haas, Franz; Szep, Attila A.; Michalak, Richard J.; Flusche, Brian M.; Cook, Paul R.; McEwen, Tom A.; McKeon, Brian F.; Payson, Paul M.; Brost, George A.; Pirich, Andrew R.; Castaneda, Carlos; Tsap, Boris; Fetterman, Harold R.

    2005-05-01

    Mach-Zehnder interferometric electro-optic polymer modulators composed of highly nonlinear phenyltetraene bridge-type chromophores within an amorphous polycarbonate host matrix were investigated for their resistance to gamma rays and 25.6 MeV protons. No device failures were observed and the majority of irradiated modulators exhibited decreases in half-wave voltage and optical insertion losses compared to nonirradiated control samples undergoing aging processes. Irradiated device responses were attributed to scission, cross-linking, and free volume processes. The data suggests that strongly poled devices are less likely to de-pole under the influence of ionizing radiation.

  9. Thermal instability of a radiative and resistive coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal instability is believed to determine the evolution and formation of cool structures in the solar atmosphere such as the transition region and prominences (or filaments). The linear modes that arise in a sheared, force-free, magnetic field due to thermal instability are studied numerically. Previous studies have considered separately modes that arise due to the effects of radiation, compression, anisotropic thermal conduction, and ohmic heating. Here the results of such studies are integrated, first by presenting simple arguments that illustrate the essential physics of ideal, sheared-field, condensation modes, and second by showing numerically how finite resistivity affects the condensational instability in parameter regimes applicable to the solar corona.

  10. Gene-for-gene disease resistance: bridging insect pest and pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2004-12-01

    Active plant defense, also known as gene-for-gene resistance, is triggered when a plant resistance (R) gene recognizes the intrusion of a specific insect pest or pathogen. Activation of plant defense includes an array of physiological and transcriptional reprogramming. During the past decade, a large number of plant R genes that confer resistance to diverse group of pathogens have been cloned from a number of plant species. Based on predicted protein structures, these genes are classified into a small number of groups, indicating that structurally related R genes recognize phylogenetically distinct pathogens. An extreme example is the tomato Mi-1 gene, which confers resistance to potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). While Mi-1 remains the only cloned insect R gene, there is evidence that gene-for-gene type of plant defense against piercing-sucking insects exists in a number of plant species.

  11. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  12. Sponge Microbiota Are a Reservoir of Functional Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, Dennis; Rodriguez de Evgrafov, Mari; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Sipkema, Detmer; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional resistance genes in the sponges Aplysina aerophoba, Petrosia ficiformis, and Corticium candelabrum. We obtained 37 insert sequences facilitating resistance to D-cycloserine (n = 6), gentamicin (n = 1), amikacin (n = 7), trimethoprim (n = 17), chloramphenicol (n = 1), rifampicin (n = 2) and ampicillin (n = 3). Fifteen of 37 inserts harbored resistance genes that shared <90% amino acid identity with known gene products, whereas on 13 inserts no resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance-conferring β-lactamase was identified in the genus Pseudovibrio with 41% global amino acid identity to the closest β-lactamase with demonstrated functionality, and subsequently classified into a new family termed PSV. Taken together, our results show that sponge microbiota host diverse and novel resistance genes that may be harnessed by phylogenetically distinct bacteria. PMID:27909433

  13. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  14. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  15. Diverse antibiotic resistance genes in dairy cow manure.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-04-22

    Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. IMPORTANCE The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria is one of the most intractable challenges in 21st-century public health. The origins of resistance are complex, and a better understanding of the impacts of antibiotics used on farms would produce a more robust platform for public policy. Microbiomes of farm animals are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which may affect distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in human pathogens. Previous studies have focused on antibiotic resistance genes in manures of animals subjected

  16. Potential impact of environmental bacteriophages in spreading antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-06-01

    The idea that bacteriophage transduction plays a role in the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is gaining momentum. Such transduction might be vital in horizontal transfer from environmental to human body-associated biomes and here we review many lines of evidence supporting this notion. It is well accepted that bacteriophages are the most abundant entities in most environments, where they have been shown to be quite persistent. This fact, together with the ability of many phages to infect bacteria belonging to different taxa, makes them suitable vehicles for gene transfer. Metagenomic studies confirm that substantial percentages of the bacteriophage particles present in most environments contain bacterial genes, including mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistance genes. When specific genes of resistance to antibiotics are detected by real-time PCR in the bacteriophage populations of different environments, only tenfold lower numbers of these genes are observed, compared with those found in the corresponding bacterial populations. In addition, the antibiotic resistance genes from these bacteriophages are functional and generate resistance to the bacteria when these genes are transfected. Finally, reports about the transduction of antibiotic resistance genes are on the increase.

  17. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure is one of the unique physiological challenges of human spaceflight that is not encountered on earth. While radiation exposure is known to impart physiological stresses and alter normal function, it is unclear how it specifically affects drug metabolism. A major concern is that the actions of medications used in spaceflight may deviate from the expectations formed from terrestrial use. This concern was investigated at the molecular level by analyzing how gamma radiation exposure affected gene expression in the livers of mice. Three different doses of radiation were administered and after various intervals of recovery time, gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR screening arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair. After examining the results of 192 genes total from each of 72 mice, 65 genes were found to be significantly affected by at least one of the doses of radiation. In general, the genes affected are involved in the metabolism of drugs with lipid or steroid hormone-like structures, as well as the maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage.

  18. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance.

  19. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  20. Antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms along a whole river.

    PubMed

    Winkworth, Cynthia L

    2013-06-01

    A key problem challenging public health officials' efforts to stem the spread of antibiotic resistance is the potential increase of resistance in the environment. Yet, despite recent and significant changes to agricultural land in New Zealand, as well as the sector's high antibiotic use, the influence on antibiotic resistance in the environment remained uncharacterised. Spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater biofilms from NZ's fourth longest river as it transitioned between low and high intensity farming were examined for 1 year. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to gauge the level of resistance present. Biofilms were screened for 10 genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in humans only and both humans and agricultural animals. Three genes were detected, one which conferred resistance to the important human-only use antibiotic vancomycin. Detected at the two downstream sites only, and those subject to the highest combined land-use stressors, the three genes indicated an elevated presence of antibiotic resistance in relation to surrounding land use; 7.7% versus 2% across the whole river system. The detection of a gene conferring resistance to an important human-only use antibiotic was particularly concerning and highlighted human-based contamination sources along the river, in addition to those of agricultural origin.

  1. Exploiting natural variation to identify insect-resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Snoeren, Tjeerd A L; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2011-10-01

    Herbivorous insects are widespread and often serious constraints to crop production. The use of insect-resistant crops is a very effective way to control insect pests in agriculture, and the development of such crops can be greatly enhanced by knowledge on plant resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. Plants have evolved diverse ways to cope with insect attack that has resulted in natural variation for resistance towards herbivorous insects. Studying the molecular genetics and transcriptional background of this variation has facilitated the identification of resistance genes and processes that lead to resistance against insects. With the development of new technologies, molecular studies are not restricted to model plants anymore. This review addresses the need to exploit natural variation in resistance towards insects to increase our knowledge on resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. We will discuss how this knowledge can be exploited in breeding programmes to provide sustainable crop protection against insect pests. Additionally, we discuss the current status of genetic research on insect-resistance genes. We conclude that insect-resistance mechanisms are still unclear at the molecular level and that exploiting natural variation with novel technologies will contribute greatly to the development of insect-resistant crop varieties.

  2. Design of radiation resistant metallic multilayers for advanced nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Gill, Simerjeet E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Stanic, Vesna; DiMasi, Elaine; Kisslinger, Kim; Ecker, Lynne; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Misra, Amit; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-06-16

    Helium implantation from transmutation reactions is a major cause of embrittlement and dimensional instability of structural components in nuclear energy systems. Development of novel materials with improved radiation resistance, which is of the utmost importance for progress in nuclear energy, requires guidelines to arrive at favorable parameters more efficiently. Here, we present a methodology that can be used for the design of radiation tolerant materials. We used synchrotron X-ray reflectivity to nondestructively study radiation effects at buried interfaces and measure swelling induced by He implantation in Cu/Nb multilayers. The results, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show a direct correlation between reduced swelling in nanoscale multilayers and increased interface area per unit volume, consistent with helium storage in Cu/Nb interfaces in forms that minimize dimensional changes. In addition, for Cu/Nb layers, a linear relationship is demonstrated between the measured depth-dependent swelling and implanted He density from simulations, making the reflectivity technique a powerful tool for heuristic material design.

  3. Molecular exploration of the highly radiation resistant cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Hanène; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium able to use sunlight to release oxygen from water and remove carbon dioxide and nitrate from water. In addition, it is suited for human consumption (edible). For these traits, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the life support system MELiSSA for recycling oxygen, water, and food during future long-haul space missions. However, during such extended missions, Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 will be exposed to continuous artificial illumination and harmful cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate how Arthrospira will react and behave when exposed to such stress environment. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was exposed to high gamma rays doses in order to unravel in details the response of this bacterium following such stress. Test results showed that after acute exposure to high doses of 60Co gamma radiation upto 3200 Gy, Arthrospira filaments were still able to restart photosynthesis and proliferate normally. Doses above 3200 Gy, did have a detrimental effect on the cells, and delayed post-irradiation proliferation. The photosystem activity, measured as the PSII quantum yield immediately after irradiation, decreased significantly at radiation doses above 3200 Gy. Likewise through pigment content analysis a significant decrease in phycocyanin was observed following exposure to 3200 Gy. The high tolerance of this bacterium to 60Co gamma rays (i.e. ca. 1000x more resistant than human cells for example) raised our interest to investigate in details the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this amazing resistance. Optimised DNA, RNA and protein extraction methods and a new microarray chip specific for Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were developed to identify the global cellular and molecular response following exposure to 3200 Gy and 5000 Gy A total of 15,29 % and 30,18 % genes were found differentially expressed in RNA

  4. Diverse Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Dairy Cow Manure

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. PMID:24757214

  5. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  6. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  7. Mapping of the apple scab-resistance gene Vb.

    PubMed

    Erdin, N; Tartarini, S; Broggini, G A L; Gennari, F; Sansavini, S; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2006-10-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the major production constraint in temperate zones with humid springs. Normally, its control relies on frequent and regular fungicide applications. Because this control strategy has come under increasing criticism, major efforts are being directed toward the breeding of scab-resistant apple cultivars. Modern apple breeding programs include the use of molecular markers, making it possible to combine several different scab-resistance genes in 1 apple cultivar (pyramiding) and to speed up the breeding process. The apple scab-resistance gene Vb is derived from the Siberian crab apple 'Hansen's baccata #2', and is 1 of the 6 "historical" major apple scab-resistance genes (Vf, Va, Vr, Vbj, Vm, and Vb). Molecular markers have been published for all these genes, except Vr. In testcross experiments conducted in the 1960s, it was reported that Vb segregated independently from 3 other major resistance genes, including Vf. Recently, however, Vb and Vf have both been mapped on linkage group 1, a result that contrasts with the findings from former testcross experiments. In this study, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify the precise position of Vb in a cross of 'Golden Delicious' (vbvb) and 'Hansen's baccata #2' (Vbvb). A genome scanning approach, a fast method already used to map apple scab-resistance genes Vr2 and Vm, was used, and the Vb locus was identified on linkage group 12, between the SSR markers Hi02d05 and Hi07f01. This finding confirms the independent segregation of Vb from Vf. With the identification of SSR markers linked to Vb, another major apple scab-resistance gene has become available; breeders can use it to develop durable resistant cultivars with several different resistance genes.

  8. Low-temperature radiation-resistant material for ball-bearing retainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desau, P. O.; Emmons, W. F.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation resistant material, made of polyimide polymers and S-glass cloth, is used in ball bearing retainers for extreme environments. Material displays satisfactory wear resistance, lubricity, and stability. Results of comparative tests with fluorocarbon materials are given.

  9. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  10. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature. PMID:28296933

  11. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-07-20

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality.

  12. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well.

  13. Radiation Resistance Studies of Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys was investigated. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below lE14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  14. Novel metal resistance genes from microorganisms: a functional metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    González-Pastor, José E; Mirete, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Most of the known metal resistance mechanisms are based on studies of cultured microorganisms, and the abundant uncultured fraction could be an important source of genes responsible for uncharacterized resistance mechanisms. A functional metagenomic approach was selected to recover metal resistance genes from the rhizosphere microbial community of an acid-mine drainage (AMD)-adapted plant, Erica andevalensis, from Rio Tinto, Spain. A total of 13 nickel resistant clones were isolated and analyzed, encoding hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions, or well-characterized proteins, but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance. The resistance clones were classified into two groups according to their nickel accumulation properties: those preventing or those favoring metal accumulation. Two clones encoding putative ABC transporter components and a serine O-acetyltransferase were found as representatives of each group, respectively.

  15. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: management through gene monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an acknowledged crisis for humanity. Its genetic origins and dire potential outcomes are increasingly well understood. However, diagnostic techniques for monitoring the crisis are currently largely limited to enumerating the increasing incidence of resistant pathogens. Being the end-stage of the evolutionary process that produces antimicrobial resistant pathogens, these measurements, while diagnostic, are not prognostic, and so are not optimal in managing this crisis. A better test is required. Here, using insights from an understanding of evolutionary processes ruling the changing abundance of genes under selective pressure, we suggest a predictive framework for the AMR crisis. We then discuss the likely progression of resistance for both existing and prospective antimicrobial therapies. Finally, we suggest that by the environmental monitoring of resistance gene frequency, resistance may be detected and tracked presumptively, and how this tool may be used to guide decision-making in the local and global use of antimicrobials. PMID:27831476

  16. Apple contains receptor-like genes homologous to the Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene family of tomato with a cluster of genes cosegregating with Vf apple scab resistance.

    PubMed

    Vinatzer, B A; Patocchi, A; Gianfranceschi, L; Tartarini, S; Zhang, H B; Gessler, C; Sansavini, S

    2001-04-01

    Scab caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis is the most common disease of cultivated apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Monogenic resistance against scab is found in some small-fruited wild Malus species and has been used in apple breeding for scab resistance. Vf resistance of Malus floribunda 821 is the most widely used scab resistance source. Because breeding a high-quality cultivar in perennial fruit trees takes dozens of years, cloning disease resistance genes and using them in the transformation of high-quality apple varieties would be advantageous. We report the identification of a cluster of receptor-like genes with homology to the Cladosporium fulvum (Cf) resistance gene family of tomato on bacterial artificial chromosome clones derived from the Vf scab resistance locus. Three members of the cluster were sequenced completely. Similar to the Cf gene family of tomato, the deduced amino acid sequences coded by these genes contain an extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain and a transmembrane domain. The transcription of three members of the cluster was determined by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction to be constitutive, and the transcription and translation start of one member was verified by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. We discuss the parallels between Cf resistance of tomato and Vf resistance of apple and the possibility that one of the members of the gene cluster is the Vf gene. Cf homologs from other regions of the apple genome also were identified and are likely to present other scab resistance genes.

  17. Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance resistance to Sclerotinia head and stalk rot in cultivated sunflower, mining and introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower has been conducted using backcrossing method since 2004. During the last four years, numerous in...

  18. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  19. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight. While known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. Three different doses of gamma radiation (50 mGy - 6.05 Gy) and a sham were administered to groups of 6 mice each, and after various intervals of recovery time, liver gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair enzymes. Results indicated approx.65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post-treatment. With 6 Gy exposure, metallothionein expression was 132-fold more than control at the 4 hr time point, and fell at each later time point (11-fold at 24 hrs, and 8-fold at 7 days). In contrast, Cyp17a1 showed a 4-fold elevation at 4 hrs after exposure and remained constant for 7 days.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2011-02-01

    The potato gene RB, cloned from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to better characterize this partial resistance phenotype, we have compared host resistance responses mediated by RB with those mediated by the S. demissum-derived R gene R9, which confers immunity to P. infestans carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrR9. We found that both RB and R9 genes were capable of eliciting a hypersensitive cell death response (HR). However, in RB plants, the pathogen escaped HR lesions and continued to grow beyond the inoculation sites. We also found that callose deposition was negatively correlated with resistance levels in tested plants. Transcription patterns of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 basic, PR-2 acidic, and PR-5 indicated that P. infestans inoculation induced transcription of these defense-related genes regardless of the host genotype; however, transcription was reduced in both the susceptible and partially resistant plants later in the infection process but remained elevated in the immune host. Most interestingly, transcription of the HR-associated gene Hin1 was suppressed in both Katahdin and RB-transgenic Katahdin but not in R9 4 days after inoculation. Together, this suggests that suppression of certain defense-related genes may allow P. infestans to spread beyond the site of infection in the partially resistant host despite elicitation of hypersensitive cell death.

  1. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes.

  2. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general

  3. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  4. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Shi, Yujuan; Xiao, Yanhong; Guo, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression's controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy. PMID:26783511

  5. Impact of Solar Radiation on Gene Expression in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms often regulate their gene expression at the level of transcription and/or translation in response to solar radiation. In this review, we present the use of both transcriptomics and proteomics to advance knowledge in the field of bacterial response to damaging radiation. Those studies pertain to diverse application areas such as fundamental microbiology, water treatment, microbial ecology and astrobiology. Even though it has been demonstrated that mRNA abundance is not always consistent with the protein regulation, we present here an exhaustive review on how bacteria regulate their gene expression at both transcription and translation levels to enable biomarkers identification and comparison of gene regulation from one bacterial species to another. PMID:28250399

  6. Scab resistance in 'Geneva' apple is conditioned by a resistance gene cluster with complex genetic control.

    PubMed

    Bastiaanse, Héloïse; Bassett, Heather C M; Kirk, Christopher; Gardiner, Susan E; Deng, Cecilia; Groenworld, Remmelt; Chagné, David; Bus, Vincent G M

    2016-02-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis, is one of the most severe diseases of apple worldwide. It is the most studied plant-pathogen interaction involving a woody species using modern genetic, genomic, proteomic and bioinformatic approaches in both species. Although 'Geneva' apple was recognized long ago as a potential source of resistance to scab, this resistance has not been characterized previously. Differential interactions between various monoconidial isolates of V. inaequalis and six segregating F1 and F2 populations indicate the presence of at least five loci governing the resistance in 'Geneva'. The 17 chromosomes of apple were screened using genotyping-by-sequencing, as well as single marker mapping, to position loci controlling the V. inaequalis resistance on linkage group 4. Next, we fine mapped a 5-cM region containing five loci conferring both dominant and recessive scab resistance to the distal end of the linkage group. This region corresponds to 2.2 Mbp (from 20.3 to 22.5 Mbp) on the physical map of 'Golden Delicious' containing nine candidate nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance genes. This study increases our understanding of the complex genetic basis of apple scab resistance conferred by 'Geneva', as well as the gene-for-gene (GfG) relationships between the effector genes in the pathogen and resistance genes in the host.

  7. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2016-12-22

    The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad-spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in field-grown seedlings. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when grown under field conditions. This D genome-encoded bread wheat gene was transferred to tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum) cultivar Stewart by transformation. Transgenic durum lines were produced with elevated gene expression levels when compared with the endogenous hexaploid gene. Unlike nontransgenic hexaploid and durum control lines, these transgenic plants showed robust seedling resistance to pathogens causing wheat leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew disease. The effectiveness of seedling resistance against each pathogen correlated with the level of transgene expression. No evidence of accelerated leaf necrosis or up-regulation of senescence gene markers was apparent in these seedlings, suggesting senescence is not required for Lr34 resistance, although leaf tip necrosis occurred in mature plant flag leaves. Several abiotic stress-response genes were up-regulated in these seedlings in the absence of rust infection as previously observed in adult plant flag leaves of hexaploid wheat. Increasing day length significantly increased Lr34 seedling resistance. These data demonstrate that expression of a highly durable, broad-spectrum adult plant resistance gene can be modified to provide seedling resistance in durum wheat.

  8. Molecular characterizations of oxytetracycline resistant bacteria and their resistance genes from mariculture waters of China.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyue; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Song, Linsheng; Chang, Yaqing; Yang, Guanpin

    2006-11-01

    Oxytetracycline-resistant bacteria were isolated from a mariculture farm in China, and accounted for 32.23% and 5.63% of the total culturable microbes of the sea cucumber and the sea urchin rearing waters respectively. Marine vibrios, especially strains related to Vibrio splendidus or V. tasmaniensis, were the most abundant resistant isolates. For oxytetracycline resistance, tet(A), tet(B) and tet(D) genes were detected in both sea cucumber and sea urchin rearing ponds. The dominant resistance type for V. tasmaniensis-like strains was the combination of both tet(A) and tet(B) genes, while the major resistance type for V. splendidus-like strains was a single tet(D) gene. Most of the sea cucumber tet-positive isolates harbored a chloramphenicol-resistance gene, either cat IV or cat II, while only a few sea urchin tet-positive isolates harbored a cat gene, actually cat IV. The coexistence of tet and cat genes in the strains isolated from the mariculture farm studied was helpful in explaining some of the multi-resistance mechanisms.

  9. Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

  10. A Nomadic Subtelomeric Disease Resistance Gene Cluster in Common Bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The B4 resistance (R)-gene cluster, located in subtelomeric region of chromosome 4, is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Pv). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich...

  11. Identifying resistance gene analogs associated with resistances to different pathogens in common bean.

    PubMed

    López, Camilo E; Acosta, Iván F; Jara, Carlos; Pedraza, Fabio; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Gallego, Gerardo; Beebe, Steve; Tohme, Joe

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A polymerase chain reaction approach using degenerate primers that targeted the conserved domains of cloned plant disease resistance genes (R genes) was used to isolate a set of 15 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Eight different classes of RGAs were obtained from nucleotide binding site (NBS)-based primers and seven from not previously described Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor-like (TIR)-based primers. Putative amino acid sequences of RGAs were significantly similar to R genes and contained additional conserved motifs. The NBS-type RGAs were classified in two subgroups according to the expected final residue in the kinase-2 motif. Eleven RGAs were mapped at 19 loci on eight linkage groups of the common bean genetic map constructed at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical. Genetic linkage was shown for eight RGAs with partial resistance to anthracnose, angular leaf spot (ALS) and Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). RGA1 and RGA2 were associated with resistance loci to anthracnose and BGYMV and were part of two clusters of R genes previously described. A new major cluster was detected by RGA7 and explained up to 63.9% of resistance to ALS and has a putative contribution to anthracnose resistance. These results show the usefulness of RGAs as candidate genes to detect and eventually isolate numerous R genes in common bean.

  12. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  13. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; ...

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  14. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  15. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  16. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  17. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  18. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  19. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2016-09-29

    The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in seedlings under standard growth conditions. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when grown under field conditions. This D genome encoded bread wheat gene was transferred to tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum) cultivar Stewart by transformation. Transgenic durum lines were produced with elevated gene expression levels when compared with the endogenous hexaploid gene. Unlike nontransgenic hexaploid and durum control lines, these transgenic plants showed robust seedling resistance to pathogens causing wheat leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew disease. The effectiveness of seedling resistance against each pathogen correlated with the level of transgene expression. No evidence of accelerated leaf necrosis or upregulation of senescence gene markers was apparent in these seedlings suggesting senescence is not required for Lr34 resistance. Several abiotic stress response genes were upregulated in these seedling in the absence of rust infection as previously observed in adult plant flag leaves of hexaploid wheat. Photoperiod and light intensity had significant effects on Lr34 phenotypes. These data demonstrate that expression of a highly durable, broad spectrum adult plant resistance gene can be modified to provide seedling resistance in durum wheat. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in gene expression studies for space radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Stojicic, N.; Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Research on the effects of ionizing radiation exposure involves the use of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for measuring changes in gene expression. Several variables need to be controlled for gene expression analysis, such as different amounts of starting material between the samples, variations in enzymatic efficiencies of the reverse transcription step, and differences in RNA integrity. Normalization of the obtained data to an invariant endogenous control gene (reference gene) is the elementary step in relative quantification strategy. There is a strong correlation between the quality of the normalized data and the stability of the reference gene itself. This is especially relevant when the samples have been obtained after exposure to radiation qualities inducing different amounts and kinds of damage, leading to effects on cell cycle delays or even on cell cycle blocks. In order to determine suitable reference genes as internal controls in qRT-PCR assays after exposure to ionizing radiation, we studied the gene expression levels of nine commonly used reference genes which are constitutively expressed in A549 lung cancer cells. Expression levels obtained for ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, PBGD, 18S rRNA, G6PDH, HPRT, UBC, TFRC and SDHA were determined after exposure to 2 and 6 Gy X-radiation. Gene expression data for Growth arrest and damage-inducible gene 45 (GADD45α) and Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A/p21CIP1) were selected to elucidate the influence of normalization by using appropriate and inappropriate internal control genes. According to these results, we strongly recommend the use of a panel of reference genes instead of only one.

  1. Genetic analysis of resistance gene analogues from a sugarcane cultivar resistant to red rot disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the important approaches for disease control in sugarcane is to develop a disease resistant variety; this may be accomplished through identification of resistance genes in sugarcane. In this study, PCR primers targeting the conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) class and kinas...

  2. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  3. Gamma radiation resistant Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1998 completed a study of emerging technologies that could be applicable to measurement systems in nuclear power plants [H. M. Hashemian [et al.], "Advanced Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants," NUREG/CR-5501 (1998)]. This study concluded that advanced fiber optic sensing technology is an emerging technology that should be investigated. It also indicated that there had been very little research related to performance evaluation of fiber optic sensors in nuclear plant harsh environments, although substantial research has been performed on nuclear radiation effects on optical fibers in the last two decades. A type of Fabry-Perot fiber optic temperature sensor, which is manufactured by Fiso Technologies in Canada, is qualified to be a candidate for potential applications in nuclear radiation environment due to its unique signal processing technique and its resistance to power loss. The gamma irradiation effects on this type of sensors are investigated in this article. Two sensors were irradiated in a gamma irradiation field and one of them was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 133 Mrad. The sensor on-line performance was monitored during each gamma irradiation test. Furthermore, the sensor static and dynamic performance before and after each irradiation test were evaluated according to the Standard ISA-dS67.06.01 ("Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety-Related Instrument Channels in Nuclear Power Plants", Standard ISA-dS67.06.01, Draft 7, Instrument Society of America, 1999). Although several abnormal phenomena were observed, analysis shows that gamma irradiation is not accredited to the abnormal behavior, which implies that this type of sensor is suitable to a gamma irradiation environment with a high gamma dose.

  4. Gene expression and evolution of antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James B; Sirjusingh, Caroline; Syed, Nazia; Lafayette, Shantelle

    2009-05-01

    Permanent changes in gene expression result from certain forms of antifungal resistance. In this study, we asked whether any changes in gene expression are required for the evolution of a drug-resistant phenotype in populations. We examined the changes in gene expression resulting from the evolution of resistance in experimental populations of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with two antifungal drugs, fluconazole (FLC) in a previous study and amphotericin B (AmB) in this study, in which five populations were subjected to increasing concentrations of AmB, from 0.25 to 128 microg/ml in twofold increments. Six genes, YGR035C, YOR1, ICT1, GRE2, PDR16, and YPLO88W, were consistently overexpressed with resistance to AmB reported here and with resistance to FLC involving a mechanism of increased efflux reported previously. We then asked if the deletion of these genes impaired the ability of populations to evolve resistance to FLC over 108 generations of asexual reproduction in 32 and 128 microg/ml FLC, the same conditions under which FLC-resistant types evolved originally. For each of three deletion strains, YOR1, ICT1, and PDR16 strains, extinctions occurred in one of two replicate populations growing in 128 microg/ml FLC. Each of these three deletion strains was mixed 1:1 with a marked version of the wild type to measure the relative ability of the deletion strain to adapt over 108 generations. In these assays, only the PDR16 deletion strain consistently became extinct both at 32 and at 128 microg/ml FLC. The deletion of PDR16 reduces the capacity of a population to evolve to resistance to FLC.

  5. Extremely high UV-C radiation resistant microorganisms from desert environments with different manganese concentrations.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Glaucio; Fujishima, Kosuke; Navarrete, Jesica Urbina; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Azua-Bustos, Armando; Rothschild, Lynn Justine

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation resistance and a high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio contribute to ionizing radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. We hypothesized that this was a general phenomenon and thus developed a strategy to search for highly radiation-resistant organisms based on their natural environment. While desiccation is a typical feature of deserts, the correlation between radiation resistance and the intracellular Mn/Fe ratio of indigenous microorganisms or the Mn/Fe ratio of the environment, has not yet been described. UV-C radiation is highly damaging to biomolecules including DNA. It was used in this study as a selective tool because of its relevance to early life on earth, high altitude aerobiology and the search for life beyond Earth. Surface soil samples were collected from the Sonoran Desert, Arizona (USA), from the Atacama Desert in Chile and from a manganese mine in northern Argentina. Microbial isolates were selected after exposure to UV-C irradiation and growth. The isolates comprised 28 genera grouped within six phyla, which we ranked according to their resistance to UV-C irradiation. Survival curves were performed for the most resistant isolates and correlated with their intracellular Mn/Fe ratio, which was determined by ICP-MS. Five percent of the isolates were highly resistant, including one more resistant than D. radiodurans, a bacterium generally considered the most radiation-resistant organism, thus used as a model for radiation resistance studies. No correlation was observed between the occurrence of resistant microorganisms and the Mn/Fe ratio in the soil samples. However, all resistant isolates showed an intracellular Mn/Fe ratio much higher than the sensitive isolates. Our findings could represent a new front in efforts to harness mechanisms of UV-C radiation resistance from extreme environments.

  6. Modes and Modulations of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Depardieu, Florence; Podglajen, Isabelle; Leclercq, Roland; Collatz, Ekkehard; Courvalin, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    Since antibiotic resistance usually affords a gain of function, there is an associated biological cost resulting in a loss of fitness of the bacterial host. Considering that antibiotic resistance is most often only transiently advantageous to bacteria, an efficient and elegant way for them to escape the lethal action of drugs is the alteration of resistance gene expression. It appears that expression of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is frequently regulated, which indicates that modulation of gene expression probably reflects a good compromise between energy saving and adjustment to a rapidly evolving environment. Modulation of gene expression can occur at the transcriptional or translational level following mutations or the movement of mobile genetic elements and may involve induction by the antibiotic. In the latter case, the antibiotic can have a triple activity: as an antibacterial agent, as an inducer of resistance to itself, and as an inducer of the dissemination of resistance determinants. We will review certain mechanisms, all reversible, that bacteria have elaborated to achieve antibiotic resistance by the fine-tuning of the expression of genetic information. PMID:17223624

  7. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  8. Genetics of resistance to the African trypanosomes. IV. Resistance of radiation chimeras to Trypanosoma rhodesiense infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeGee, A.L.; Mansfield, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The cellular bases of resistance to the African trypanosomes were examined in inbred mice. As part of these studies, reciprocal bone marrow cell transplants were performed between H-2 compatible mice which differ in relative resistance to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection. Relatively resistant C57BL/10 mice, intermediate A.By mice, and least resistant C3H.SW mice that were reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow cells displayed resistance and immunity characteristic of the homologous donor strain. When C57BL/10 mice were reconstituted with C3H.SW mouse bone marrow cells they retained the ability to produce antibodies to trypanosome surface antigen but the antibody titers were significantly reduced. Control of parasitemia and mean survival time were reduced in these chimeras, but differed significantly from C3H.SW mice. A. By mice that received cells from C57BL/10 donors exhibited antibody responses and survival times similar to the C57BL/10 mice. Survival times of A.By mice given syngeneic cells or C3H.SW cells were the same, but the antibody responses of A.By mice given C3H.SW cells were lower than those of A.By mice given syngeneic cells. C3H.SW mice reconstituted with C57BL/10 bone marrow cells were capable of making antibodies and controlling parasitemia, in marked contrast to the absence of such responses in C3H.SW mice reconstituted with syngeneic cells. Survival times, however, were indistinguishable from those of C3H.SW mice given syngeneic cells. Thus, resistance to T.B. rhodesiense was shown for the first time to depend on donor bone marrow derived cells as well as upon radiation-resistant cells/factors associated with host genetic background. Also, parasite-specific IgM antibody responses seem to be regulated by a mechanism which does not depend on bone marrow derived cells alone, and the presence of such immune responses is not linked to survival time.

  9. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  10. Resistance of the nucleosomal organization of eucaryotic chromatin to ionizing radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1982-09-01

    The structural organization and radiation sensitivity of Tetrahymena chromatin under several conditions of modified transcriptional activity were investigated using the structure-specific nucleases, micrococcal nuclease and DNase I. Digestion of unirradiated nuclei by those nucleases proceeded with very similar kinetics and to a similar extent irrespective of the stages of growth of the cultures, except for the cultures in stationary phase, which became more resistant to DNase I digestion. Neither for suppression of total cellular RNA synthesis by actinomycin D nor the transient inhibition of only rRNA synthesis by 40 krad of ..gamma.. radiation affected the sensitivity of the chromatin of the nucleases. These results confirm that activity transcribing chromatin remains in an active conformation even when its function is temporarily inhibited, while more permanent repression of some genes during stationary phase appears to alter the chromatin and hence its susceptibility to DNase I. Actively transcribing ribosomal chromatin was found to be very sensitive to DNase I degradation compared to bulk chromatin; its sensitivity to DNase I was also not altered by 40 krad of ..gamma.. radiation, but was reduced in stationary phase. It is concluded that damage to DNA and/or chromatin resulting from ..gamma.. irradiation does not produce alterations in the nucleosome-level organization of chromatin which can be measured by micrococcal nuclease and DNase I.

  11. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  12. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  13. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l−1 and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1R allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1R and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1V or the duplicated ace-1D allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects. PMID:26463842

  14. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l(-1) and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1(R) allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1(R) and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1(V) or the duplicated ace-1(D) allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects.

  15. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species. PMID:27833593

  16. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant's resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  17. Dissemination of metal resistance genes among animal methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Butaye, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of metals as feed supplement has been recognized as a potential driver for co-selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs. However, the prevalence of these determinants in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) is largely unknown. In this study, a collection of 130 MRCoNS from pigs and veal calves were investigated for the presence of metal-resistance genes (czrC, copB, cadD, arsA) associated to SCCmec. Near half of the isolates carried metal resistance genes (czrC 5.4%, copB 38.5%, cadD 7.7%, arsA 26.2%) regardless of their SCCmec type. The increased use of metals in livestock animals, especially zinc in pigs in several European countries may co-select for methicillin-resistance in several staphylococcal species.

  18. Gene expression and proliferation biomarkers for antidepressant treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Laje, G; Stingl, J C

    2017-03-14

    The neurotrophic hypothesis of depression suggests an association between effects on neuroplasticity and clinical response to antidepressant drug therapy. We studied individual variability in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from n=25 therapy-resistant patients versus n=25 first-line therapy responders from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Furthermore, the variability in gene expression of genes associated with cell proliferation was analyzed for tentative candidate genes for prediction of individual LCL donor's treatment response. Cell proliferation was quantified by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) assays after 21-day incubation of LCLs with fluoxetine (0.5 ng μl(-1)) and citalopram (0.3 ng μl(-1)) as developed and described earlier. Gene expression of a panel of candidate genes derived from genome-wide expression analyses of antidepressant effects on cell proliferation of LCLs from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) study was analyzed by real-time PCR. Significant differences in in vitro cell proliferation effects were detected between the group of LCLs from first-line therapy responders and LCLs from treatment-resistant patients. Gene expression analysis of the candidate gene panel revealed and confirmed influence of the candidate genes ABCB1, FZD7 and WNT2B on antidepressant drug resistance. The potential of these genes as tentative biomarkers for antidepressant drug resistance was confirmed. In vitro cell proliferation testing may serve as functional biomarker for individual neuroplasticity effects of antidepressants.

  19. Hypertension genes are genetic markers for insulin sensitivity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuqing; Cheng, Suzanne; Taylor, Kent D; Cui, Jinrui; Hughes, Randall; Quiñones, Manuel J; Bulnes-Enriquez, Isabel; De la Rosa, Roxana; Aurea, George; Yang, Huiying; Hsueh, Willa; Rotter, Jerome I

    2005-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a determinant of blood pressure variation and risk factor for hypertension. Because insulin resistance and blood pressure cosegregate in Mexican American families, we thus investigated the association between variations in 9 previously reported hypertension genes (ACE, AGT, AGTRI, ADDI, NPPA, ADDRB2, SCNN1A, GNB3, and NOS3) and insulin resistance. Families were ascertained via a coronary artery disease proband in the Mexican American Coronary Artery Disease Project. Individuals from 100 Mexican American families (n=656) were genotyped for 14 polymorphisms in the 9 genes and all adult offspring and offspring spouses were phenotyped for insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (n=449). AGT M235T and NOS3 A(-922)G and E298D polymorphisms were significantly associated with insulin sensitivity (P=0.018, 0.036, 0.039) but were not significant after adjusting for body mass index. ADD1 G460W was associated with insulin sensitivity only after adjusting for body mass index. The NPPA T2238C and SCNN1A A663T were associated with decreased fasting insulin levels after adjusting for body mass index (P=0.015 and 0.028). In conclusion, AGT, NOS3, NPPA, ADRB2, ADD1, and SCNN1A may well be genetic markers for insulin resistance, and adiposity was a potential modifier for only some gene/trait combinations. Our data support the hypothesis that genes in the blood pressure pathway may play a role in insulin resistance in Mexican Americans.

  20. Cyanobacteria: photosynthetic factories combining biodiversity, radiation resistance, and genetics to facilitate drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Dive, Vincent; Chauvat, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are ancient, abundant, and widely diverse photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are viewed as promising cell factories for the ecologically responsible production of chemicals. Natural cyanobacteria synthesize a vast array of biologically active (secondary) metabolites with great potential for human health, while a few genetic models can be engineered for the (low level) production of biofuels. Recently, genome sequencing and mining has revealed that natural cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The corresponding panoply of enzymes (polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases) of interest for synthetic biology can still be increased through gene manipulations with the tools available for the few genetically manipulable strains. In this review, we propose to exploit the metabolic diversity and radiation resistance of cyanobacteria, and when required the genetics of model strains, for the production and radioactive ((14)C) labeling of bioactive products, in order to facilitate the screening for new drugs.

  1. Candidate Genes That May Be Responsible for the Unusual Resistances Exhibited by Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Spores

    PubMed Central

    Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Rastogi, Rajat; Zamani, Nader; O’Bryant Williams, Elisha; Allen, Shamail; Diouf, Fatma; Kwende, Sharon; Weinstock, George M.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Fox, George E.

    2013-01-01

    The spores of several Bacillus species, including Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 and B. safensis FO-36b, which were isolated from the spacecraft assembly facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, are unusually resistant to UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide. In order to identify candidate genes that might be associated with these resistances, the whole genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032, and the draft genome of B. safensis FO-36b were compared in detail with the very closely related type strain B. pumilus ATCC7061T. 170 genes are considered characteristic of SAFR-032, because they are absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061T. Forty of these SAFR-032 characteristic genes are entirely unique open reading frames. In addition, four genes are unique to the genomes of the resistant SAFR-032 and FO-36b. Fifty three genes involved in spore coat formation, regulation and germination, DNA repair, and peroxide resistance, are missing from all three genomes. The vast majority of these are cleanly deleted from their usual genomic context without any obvious replacement. Several DNA repair and peroxide resistance genes earlier reported to be unique to SAFR-032 are in fact shared with ATCC7061T and no longer considered to be promising candidates for association with the elevated resistances. Instead, several SAFR-032 characteristic genes were identified, which along with one or more of the unique SAFR-032 genes may be responsible for the elevated resistances. These new candidates include five genes associated with DNA repair, namely, BPUM_0608 a helicase, BPUM_0652 an ATP binding protein, BPUM_0653 an endonuclease, BPUM_0656 a DNA cytosine-5- methyltransferase, and BPUM_3674 a DNA helicase. Three of these candidate genes are in immediate proximity of two conserved hypothetical proteins, BPUM_0654 and BPUM_0655 that are also absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061T. This cluster of five genes is considered to be an especially promising target for future experimental work. PMID:23799069

  2. Candidate genes that may be responsible for the unusual resistances exhibited by Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores.

    PubMed

    Tirumalai, Madhan R; Rastogi, Rajat; Zamani, Nader; O'Bryant Williams, Elisha; Allen, Shamail; Diouf, Fatma; Kwende, Sharon; Weinstock, George M; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J; Fox, George E

    2013-01-01

    The spores of several Bacillus species, including Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 and B. safensis FO-36b, which were isolated from the spacecraft assembly facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, are unusually resistant to UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide. In order to identify candidate genes that might be associated with these resistances, the whole genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032, and the draft genome of B. safensis FO-36b were compared in detail with the very closely related type strain B. pumilus ATCC7061(T). 170 genes are considered characteristic of SAFR-032, because they are absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061(T). Forty of these SAFR-032 characteristic genes are entirely unique open reading frames. In addition, four genes are unique to the genomes of the resistant SAFR-032 and FO-36b. Fifty three genes involved in spore coat formation, regulation and germination, DNA repair, and peroxide resistance, are missing from all three genomes. The vast majority of these are cleanly deleted from their usual genomic context without any obvious replacement. Several DNA repair and peroxide resistance genes earlier reported to be unique to SAFR-032 are in fact shared with ATCC7061(T) and no longer considered to be promising candidates for association with the elevated resistances. Instead, several SAFR-032 characteristic genes were identified, which along with one or more of the unique SAFR-032 genes may be responsible for the elevated resistances. These new candidates include five genes associated with DNA repair, namely, BPUM_0608 a helicase, BPUM_0652 an ATP binding protein, BPUM_0653 an endonuclease, BPUM_0656 a DNA cytosine-5- methyltransferase, and BPUM_3674 a DNA helicase. Three of these candidate genes are in immediate proximity of two conserved hypothetical proteins, BPUM_0654 and BPUM_0655 that are also absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061(T). This cluster of five genes is considered to be an especially promising target for future experimental work.

  3. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    PubMed Central

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1–2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1–2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a “core TC-resistome” of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID

  4. Quantification of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and corresponding resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Hashimoto, Reina; Mekata, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and their resistance genes, vanA and vanB, to examine their presence in sewage treatment systems. Water samples were collected from primary sedimentation tank inlet, aeration tank, final sedimentation tank overflow outlet, and disinfection tank. Enterococcal strains were determined their vancomycin susceptibility by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. Vancomycin-resistance genes (vanA and vanB) were quantified by real-time PCR. The sewage treatment process indeed decreased the number of most enterococci contained in the entering sewage, with a removal rate of ≥ 5 log. The MIC test showed that two enterococcal strains resistant to a high concentration of vancomycin (>128 μg mL(-1)). However, most of the enterococcal strains exhibited sensitivity to vancomycin, indicating that VRE were virtually absent in the sewage treatment systems. On the other hand, vancomycin-resistance genes were detected in all the sewage samples, including those collected from the chlorination disinfection tank. The highest copy numbers of vanA (1.5 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) and vanB (1.0 × 10(3) copies mL(-1)) were detected from the water sample of effluent water and chlorinated water, respectively. Therefore, antibiotic resistance genes remain in the sewage treatment plant and might discharged into water environments such as rivers and coastal areas.

  5. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  6. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  7. Genes Involved in Bacitracin Resistance in Streptococcus mutans†

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Shibata, Yukie; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is resistant to bacitracin, which is a peptide antibiotic produced by certain species of Bacillus. The purpose of this study was to clarify the bacitracin resistance mechanism of S. mutans. We cloned and sequenced two S. mutans loci that are involved in bacitracin resistance. The rgp locus, which is located downstream from rmlD, contains six rgp genes (rgpA to rgpF) that are involved in rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP) synthesis in S. mutans. The inactivation of RGP synthesis in S. mutans resulted in an approximately fivefold-higher sensitivity to bacitracin relative to that observed for the wild-type strain Xc. The second bacitracin resistance locus comprised four mbr genes (mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, and mbrD) and was located immediately downstream from gtfC, which encodes the water-insoluble glucan-synthesizing enzyme. Although the bacitracin sensitivities of mutants that had defects in flanking genes were similar to that of the parental strain Xc, mutants that were defective in mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, or mbrD were about 100 to 120 times more sensitive to bacitracin than strain Xc. In addition, a mutant that was defective in all of the mbrABCD genes and rgpA was more sensitive to bacitracin than either the RGP or Mbr mutants. We conclude that RGP synthesis is related to bacitracin resistance in S. mutans and that the mbr genes modulate resistance to bacitracin via an unknown mechanism that is independent of RGP synthesis. PMID:12435673

  8. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  9. Paleo-evolutionary plasticity of plant disease resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent access to a large set of genome sequences, combined with a robust evolutionary scenario of modern monocot (i.e. grasses) and eudicot (i.e. rosids) species from their founder ancestors, offered the opportunity to gain insights into disease resistance genes (R-genes) evolutionary plasticity. Results We unravel in the current article (i) a R-genes repertoire consisting in 7883 for monocots and 15758 for eudicots, (ii) a contrasted R-genes conservation with 23.8% for monocots and 6.6% for dicots, (iii) a minimal ancestral founder pool of 384 R-genes for the monocots and 150 R-genes for the eudicots, (iv) a general pattern of organization in clusters accounting for more than 60% of mapped R-genes, (v) a biased deletion of ancestral duplicated R-genes between paralogous blocks possibly compensated by clusterization, (vi) a bias in R-genes clusterization where Leucine-Rich Repeats act as a ‘glue’ for domain association, (vii) a R-genes/miRNAs interome enriched toward duplicated R-genes. Conclusions Together, our data may suggest that R-genes family plasticity operated during plant evolution (i) at the structural level through massive duplicates loss counterbalanced by massive clusterization following polyploidization; as well as at (ii) the regulation level through microRNA/R-gene interactions acting as a possible source of functional diploidization of structurally retained R-genes duplicates. Such evolutionary shuffling events leaded to CNVs (i.e. Copy Number Variation) and PAVs (i.e. Presence Absence Variation) between related species operating in the decay of R-genes colinearity between plant species. PMID:24617999

  10. Relationship between Psidium species (Myrtaceae) by resistance gene analog markers: focus on nematode resistance.

    PubMed

    Noia, L R; Tuler, A C; Ferreira, A; Ferreira, M F S

    2017-03-16

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) crop is severely affected by the nematode Meloidogyne enterolobii. Native Psidium species have been reported as sources of resistance against this nematode. Knowledge on the molecular relationship between Psidium species based on plant resistance gene analogs (RGA) can be useful in the genetic breeding of guava for resistance to M. enterolobii. In this study, RGA markers from conserved domains, and structural features of plant R genes, were employed to characterize Psidium species and establish genetic proximity, with a focus on nematode resistance. SSR markers were also applied owing to their neutral nature, thus differing from RGA markers. For this, species reported as sources of resistance to M. enterolobii, such as P. cattleianum and P. friedrichsthalianum, as well as species occurring in the Atlantic Rainforest and susceptible genotypes, were investigated. In 10 evaluated Psidium species, high interspecific genetic variability was verified through RGA and SSR markers, with intraspecific variation in P. guajava higher with SSR, as was expected. Resistant species were clustered by RGA markers, and differential amplicons among genotypes resistant and susceptible to M. enterolobii were identified. Knowledge on the molecular relationships between Psidium species constitutes useful information for breeding of the guava tree, providing direction for hybridization and material for rootstocks. Additionally, the genetic relationship between native species, which have been little studied, and P. guajava were estimated by RGAs, which were confirmed as important markers for genetic diversity related to pathogen resistance.

  11. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  12. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  13. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  14. Association mapping and gene-gene interaction for stem rust resistance in CIMMYT spring wheat germplasm.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Lorenz, Aaron; Rutkoski, Jessica; Singh, Ravi P; Bhavani, Sridhar; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Sorrells, Mark E

    2011-12-01

    The recent emergence of wheat stem rust Ug99 and evolution of new races within the lineage threatens global wheat production because they overcome widely deployed stem rust resistance (Sr) genes that had been effective for many years. To identify loci conferring adult plant resistance to races of Ug99 in wheat, we employed an association mapping approach for 276 current spring wheat breeding lines from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). Breeding lines were genotyped with Diversity Array Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. Phenotypic data was collected on these lines for stem rust race Ug99 resistance at the adult plant stage in the stem rust resistance screening nursery in Njoro, Kenya in seasons 2008, 2009 and 2010. Fifteen marker loci were found to be significantly associated with stem rust resistance. Several markers appeared to be linked to known Sr genes, while other significant markers were located in chromosome regions where no Sr genes have been previously reported. Most of these new loci colocalized with QTLs identified recently in different biparental populations. Using the same data and Q + K covariate matrices, we investigated the interactions among marker loci using linear regression models to calculate P values for pairwise marker interactions. Resistance marker loci including the Sr2 locus on 3BS and the wPt1859 locus on 7DL had significant interaction effects with other loci in the same chromosome arm and with markers on chromosome 6B. Other resistance marker loci had significant pairwise interactions with markers on different chromosomes. Based on these results, we propose that a complex network of gene-gene interactions is, in part, responsible for resistance to Ug99. Further investigation may provide insight for understanding mechanisms that contribute to this resistance gene network.

  15. Accumulation of Mn(II) in Deinococcus radiodurans Facilitates Gamma-Radiation Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E; Matrosova, V; Vasilenko, A; Zhai, M; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Hess, M; Omelchenko, M V.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Makarova, S; Wackett, L. P.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ghosal, D

    2004-11-05

    Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation. How this bacterium can grow under chronic gamma-radiation (50 Gy/hour) or recover from acute doses greater than 10 kGy is unknown. We show that D. radiodurans accumulates very high intracellular manganese and low iron levels compared to radiation sensitive bacteria, and resistance exhibits a concentration-dependent response to Mn(II). Among the most radiation-resistant bacterial groups reported, Deinococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and cyanobacteria spp. accumulate Mn(II). In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida have high Fe but low intracellular Mn concentrations and are very sensitive. We propose that Mn(II) accumulation facilitates recovery from radiation injury.

  16. Resistance gene identification from Larimichthys crocea with machine learning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yinyin; Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Liu, Juan; Mao, Yong; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    The research on resistance genes (R-gene) plays a vital role in bioinformatics as it has the capability of coping with adverse changes in the external environment, which can form the corresponding resistance protein by transcription and translation. It is meaningful to identify and predict R-gene of Larimichthys crocea (L.Crocea). It is friendly for breeding and the marine environment as well. Large amounts of L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms have been explored by biological methods. However, much about them is still unclear. In order to break the limited understanding of the L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms and to detect new R-gene and R-gene-like genes, this paper came up with a more useful combination prediction method, which is to extract and classify the feature of available genomic data by machine learning. The effectiveness of feature extraction and classification methods to identify potential novel R-gene was evaluated, and different statistical analyzes were utilized to explore the reliability of prediction method, which can help us further understand the immune mechanisms of L.Crocea against pathogens. In this paper, a webserver called LCRG-Pred is available at http://server.malab.cn/rg_lc/. PMID:27922074

  17. Resistance gene identification from Larimichthys crocea with machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yinyin; Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Liu, Juan; Mao, Yong; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-12-01

    The research on resistance genes (R-gene) plays a vital role in bioinformatics as it has the capability of coping with adverse changes in the external environment, which can form the corresponding resistance protein by transcription and translation. It is meaningful to identify and predict R-gene of Larimichthys crocea (L.Crocea). It is friendly for breeding and the marine environment as well. Large amounts of L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms have been explored by biological methods. However, much about them is still unclear. In order to break the limited understanding of the L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms and to detect new R-gene and R-gene-like genes, this paper came up with a more useful combination prediction method, which is to extract and classify the feature of available genomic data by machine learning. The effectiveness of feature extraction and classification methods to identify potential novel R-gene was evaluated, and different statistical analyzes were utilized to explore the reliability of prediction method, which can help us further understand the immune mechanisms of L.Crocea against pathogens. In this paper, a webserver called LCRG-Pred is available at http://server.malab.cn/rg_lc/.

  18. Unbiased analysis of pancreatic cancer radiation resistance reveals cholesterol biosynthesis as a novel target for radiosensitisation

    PubMed Central

    Souchek, J J; Baine, M J; Lin, C; Rachagani, S; Gupta, S; Kaur, S; Lester, K; Zheng, D; Chen, S; Smith, L; Lazenby, A; Johansson, S L; Jain, M; Batra, S K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite its promise as a highly useful therapy for pancreatic cancer (PC), the addition of external beam radiation therapy to PC treatment has shown varying success in clinical trials. Understanding PC radioresistance and discovery of methods to sensitise PC to radiation will increase patient survival and improve quality of life. In this study, we identified PC radioresistance-associated pathways using global, unbiased techniques. Methods: Radioresistant cells were generated by sequential irradiation and recovery, and global genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to discover cellular pathways and functions associated with differential radioresponse and identify potential small-molecule inhibitors for radiosensitisation. The expression of FDPS, one of the most differentially expressed genes, was determined in human PC tissues by IHC and the impact of its pharmacological inhibition with zoledronic acid (ZOL, Zometa) on radiosensitivity was determined by colony-forming assays. The radiosensitising effect of Zol in vivo was determined using allograft transplantation mouse model. Results: Microarray analysis indicated that 11 genes (FDPS, ACAT2, AG2, CLDN7, DHCR7, ELFN2, FASN, SC4MOL, SIX6, SLC12A2, and SQLE) were consistently associated with radioresistance in the cell lines, a majority of which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. We demonstrated that knockdown of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS), a branchpoint enzyme of the cholesterol synthesis pathway, radiosensitised PC cells. FDPS was significantly overexpressed in human PC tumour tissues compared with healthy pancreas samples. Also, pharmacologic inhibition of FDPS by ZOL radiosensitised PC cell lines, with a radiation enhancement ratio between 1.26 and 1.5. Further, ZOL treatment resulted in radiosensitisation of PC tumours in an allograft mouse model

  19. Systemic acquired resistance delays race shifts to major resistance genes in bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Romero, A M; Ritchie, D F

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of durability of host plant disease resistance is a major problem in disease control. Genotype-specific resistance that involves major resistance (R) genes is especially prone to failure. The compatible (i.e., disease) host-pathogen interaction with systemic acquired resistance (SAR) has been studied extensively, but the incompatible (i.e., resistant) interaction less so. Using the pepper-bacterial spot (causal agent, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria) pathosystem, we examined the effect of SAR in reducing the occurrence of race-change mutants that defeat R genes in laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments. Pepper plants carrying one or more R genes were sprayed with the plant defense activator acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and challenged with incompatible strains of the pathogen. In the greenhouse, disease lesions first were observed 3 weeks after inoculation. ASM-treated plants carrying a major R gene had significantly fewer lesions caused by both the incompatible (i.e., hypersensitive) and compatible (i.e., disease) responses than occurred on nonsprayed plants. Bacteria isolated from the disease lesions were confirmed to be race-change mutants. In field experiments, there was a delay in the detection of race-change mutants and a reduction in disease severity. Decreased disease severity was associated with a reduction in the number of race-change mutants and the suppression of disease caused by the race-change mutants. This suggests a possible mechanism related to a decrease in the pathogen population size, which subsequently reduces the number of race-change mutants for the selection pressure of R genes. Thus, inducers of SAR are potentially useful for increasing the durability of genotype-specific resistance conferred by major R genes.

  20. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  1. Detection of glycopeptide resistance genes in enterococci by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Puneet; Sahni, A.K.; Praharaj, A.K.; Grover, Naveen; Kumar, Mahadevan; Chaudhari, C.N.; Khajuria, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) are a major cause of nosocomial infections. There are various phenotypic and genotypic methods of detection of glycopeptide resistance in enterococci. This study utilizes multiplex PCR for reliable detection of various glycopeptides resistance genes in VRE. Method This study was conducted to detect and to assess the prevalence of vancomycin resistance among enterococci isolates. From October 2011 to June 2013, a total of 96 non-repetitive isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. VRE were identified by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all isolates for vancomycin and teicoplanin was determined by E-test. Multiplex PCR was carried out for all enterococci isolates using six sets of primers. Results Out of 96 isolates, 14 (14.6%) were found to be resistant to vancomycin by vancomycin E-test method (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Out of these 14 isolates, 13 were also resistant to teicoplanin (MIC ≥16 μg/ml). VanA gene was detected in all the 14 isolates by Multiplex PCR. One of the PCR amplicons was sent for sequencing and the sequence received was submitted in the GenBank (GenBank accession no. KF181100). Conclusion Prevalence of VRE in this study was 14.6%. Multiplex PCR is a robust, sensitive and specific technique, which can be used for rapid detection of various glycopeptide resistance genes. Rapid identification of patients infected or colonized with VRE is essential for implementation of appropriate control measures to prevent their spread. PMID:25609863

  2. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions. PMID:27938628

  3. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from human gut microbiota reveals a novel gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hu, Yongfei; Yin, Yeshi; Yang, Xi; Xiang, Chunsheng; Wang, Baohong; Chen, Yanfei; Yang, Fengling; Lei, Fang; Wu, Na; Lu, Na; Li, Jing; Chen, Quanze; Li, Lanjuan; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-11-01

    The human gut microbiota has a high density of bacteria that are considered a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, one fosmid metagenomic library generated from the gut microbiota of four healthy humans was used to screen for ARGs against seven antibiotics. Eight new ARGs were obtained: one against amoxicillin, six against d-cycloserine, and one against kanamycin. The new amoxicillin resistance gene encodes a protein with 53% identity to a class D β-lactamase from Riemerella anatipestifer RA-GD. The six new d-cycloserine resistance genes encode proteins with 73-81% identity to known d-alanine-d-alanine ligases. The new kanamycin resistance gene encodes a protein of 274 amino acids with an N-terminus (amino acids 1-189) that has 42% identity to the 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] from Enterococcus hirae and a C-terminus (amino acids 190-274) with 35% identity to a hypothetical protein from Clostridiales sp. SSC/2. A functional study on the novel kanamycin resistance gene showed that only the N-terminus conferred kanamycin resistance. Our results showed that functional metagenomics is a useful tool for the identification of new ARGs.

  4. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA.

  5. Identification of wheat chromosomal regions containing expressed resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and physically localize expressed resistance (R) genes on wheat chromosomes. Irrespective of the host or pest type, most of the 46 cloned R genes from 12 plant species share a strong sequence similarity, especially for protein domains and motifs. By utilizing this structural similarity to perform modified RNA fingerprinting and data mining, we identified 184 putative expressed R genes of wheat. These include 87 NB/LRR types, 16 receptor-like kinases, and 13 Pto-like kinases. The remaining were seven Hm1 and two Hs1(pro-1) homologs, 17 pathogenicity related, and 42 unique NB/kinases. About 76% of the expressed R-gene candidates were rare transcripts, including 42 novel sequences. Physical mapping of 121 candidate R-gene sequences using 339 deletion lines localized 310 loci to 26 chromosomal regions encompassing approximately 16% of the wheat genome. Five major R-gene clusters that spanned only approximately 3% of the wheat genome but contained approximately 47% of the candidate R genes were observed. Comparative mapping localized 91% (82 of 90) of the phenotypically characterized R genes to 18 regions where 118 of the R-gene sequences mapped. PMID:15020436

  6. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  7. Human pigmentation genes and their response to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Sturm, R A

    1998-11-09

    Identification and characterisation of the genes involved in melanin pigment formation, together with the study of how their action is influenced by exposure to UV radiation, is providing a molecular understanding of the process of skin photoprotection through tanning. The mechanisms underlying this change in epidermal melanin involve both a transcriptional response of the pigmentation genes and post-translational control of the melanin biosynthetic pathway. UV rays are known to interact with numerous molecules within cells, and among these the photochemical reactions involving lipids and DNA are implicated in modulating melanogenesis. The combination of DNA damage, the formation of diacylglycerol, and the action of the melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor are all likely to be involved in UV-induced tanning.

  8. A Numerical Treatment of Anisotropic Radiation Fields Coupled with Relativistic Resistive Magnetofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 × 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 × 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  9. A NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF ANISOTROPIC RADIATION FIELDS COUPLED WITH RELATIVISTIC RESISTIVE MAGNETOFLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  10. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  11. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  12. Resistance Gene Transfer during Treatments for Experimental Avian Colibacillosis

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Mourand, Gwenaëlle; Bouder, Axelle; Jouy, Eric

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in animal facilities to compare the impacts of four avian colibacillosis treatments—oxytetracycline (OTC), trimethoprim-sulfadimethoxine (SXT), amoxicillin (AMX), or enrofloxacin (ENR)—on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli in broiler intestinal tracts. Birds were first orally inoculated with rifampin-resistant E. coli strains bearing plasmid genes conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones (qnr), cephalosporins (blaCTX-M or blaFOX), trimethoprim-sulfonamides, aminoglycosides, or tetracyclines. Feces samples were collected before, during, and after antimicrobial treatments. The susceptibilities of E. coli strains were studied, and resistance gene transfer was analyzed. An increase in the tetracycline-resistant E. coli population was observed only in OTC-treated birds, whereas multiresistant E. coli was detected in the dominant E. coli populations of SXT-, AMX-, or ENR-treated birds. Most multiresistant E. coli strains were susceptible to rifampin and exhibited various pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting the transfer of one of the multiresistance plasmids from the inoculated strains to other E. coli strains in the intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study clearly illustrates how, in E. coli, “old” antimicrobials may coselect antimicrobial resistance to recent and critical molecules. PMID:21986830

  13. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  14. Continental-scale pollution of estuaries with antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Zhao, Yi; Li, Bing; Huang, Chu-Long; Zhang, Si-Yu; Yu, Shen; Chen, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Tong; Gillings, Michael R; Su, Jian-Qiang

    2017-01-30

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have moved from the environmental resistome into human commensals and pathogens, driven by human selection with antimicrobial agents. These genes have increased in abundance in humans and domestic animals, to become common components of waste streams. Estuarine habitats lie between terrestrial/freshwater and marine ecosystems, acting as natural filtering points for pollutants. Here, we have profiled ARGs in sediments from 18 estuaries over 4,000 km of coastal China using high-throughput quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and investigated their relationship with bacterial communities, antibiotic residues and socio-economic factors. ARGs in estuarine sediments were diverse and abundant, with over 200 different resistance genes being detected, 18 of which were found in all 90 sediment samples. The strong correlations of identified resistance genes with known mobile elements, network analyses and partial redundancy analysis all led to the conclusion that human activity is responsible for the abundance and dissemination of these ARGs. Such widespread pollution with xenogenetic elements has environmental, agricultural and medical consequences.

  15. A study on measurement of radiation resistance of Pyronema domesticum sclerotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoshuang, Y. Y.; Ailian, W. W.; Ying, Z. Z.

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of radiation resistance have been carried out using two strains of Pyronema domesticum which were isolated from Chinese cotton swab gauze. A "sand-washing" technique was developed to overcome the difficulties when harvesting sclerotia spores from cultured plates and preparing spore suspensions for further use. Three types of microbial preparations, spore suspension, inoculated cotton and spore dot, were exposed to gamma radiation. A dose-survival curve method and a fraction positive method were employed to determine radiation resistance. D 10 values derived from this study are within the range of 2.0-3.0 kGy. Concerns associated with the current study indicate that further work is needed.

  16. Evolution of Resistance Against CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Drive.

    PubMed

    Unckless, Robert L; Clark, Andrew G; Messer, Philipp W

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 gene drive (CGD) promises to be a highly adaptable approach for spreading genetically engineered alleles throughout a species, even if those alleles impair reproductive success. CGD has been shown to be effective in laboratory crosses of insects, yet it remains unclear to what extent potential resistance mechanisms will affect the dynamics of this process in large natural populations. Here we develop a comprehensive population genetic framework for modeling CGD dynamics, which incorporates potential resistance mechanisms as well as random genetic drift. Using this framework, we calculate the probability that resistance against CGD evolves from standing genetic variation, de novo mutation of wild-type alleles, or cleavage repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-a likely by-product of CGD itself. We show that resistance to standard CGD approaches should evolve almost inevitably in most natural populations, unless repair of CGD-induced cleavage via NHEJ can be effectively suppressed, or resistance costs are on par with those of the driver. The key factor determining the probability that resistance evolves is the overall rate at which resistance alleles arise at the population level by mutation or NHEJ. By contrast, the conversion efficiency of the driver, its fitness cost, and its introduction frequency have only minor impact. Our results shed light on strategies that could facilitate the engineering of drivers with lower resistance potential, and motivate the possibility to embrace resistance as a possible mechanism for controlling a CGD approach. This study highlights the need for careful modeling of the population dynamics of CGD prior to the actual release of a driver construct into the wild.

  17. Evaluating the mobility potential of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes without metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Hultman, Jenni; Paulin, Lars; Virta, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are ubiquitous in the environment. However, only a fraction of them are mobile and able to spread to pathogenic bacteria. Until now, studying the mobility of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental resistomes has been challenging due to inadequate sensitivity and difficulties in contig assembly of metagenome based methods. We developed a new cost and labor efficient method based on Inverse PCR and long read sequencing for studying mobility potential of environmental resistance genes. We applied Inverse PCR on sediment samples and identified 79 different MGE clusters associated with the studied resistance genes, including novel mobile genetic elements, co-selected resistance genes and a new putative antibiotic resistance gene. The results show that the method can be used in antibiotic resistance early warning systems. In comparison to metagenomics, Inverse PCR was markedly more sensitive and provided more data on resistance gene mobility and co-selected resistances. PMID:27767072

  18. Divergence with gene flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J; Demboski, J R; Bell, K C; Hird, S; Sarver, B; Reid, N; Good, J M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years on DGF in the chipmunk (Tamias) radiation with new data that quantify very high rates of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression among para- and sympatric species in the T. quadrivittatus group in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. These new data (188 cytochrome b sequences) bring the total number of sequences up to 1871; roughly 16% (298) of the chipmunks we have sequenced exhibit introgressed mtDNA. This includes ongoing introgression between subspecies and between both closely related and distantly related taxa. In addition, we have identified several taxa that are apparently fixed for ancient introgressions and in which there is no evidence of ongoing introgression. A recurrent observation is that these introgressions occur between ecologically and morphologically diverged, sometimes non-sister taxa that engage in well-documented niche partitioning. Thus, the chipmunk radiation in western North America represents an excellent mammalian example of speciation in the face of recurrent gene flow among lineages and where biogeography, habitat differentiation and mating systems suggest important roles for both ecological and sexual selection.

  19. Divergence with gene flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J; Demboski, J R; Bell, K C; Hird, S; Sarver, B; Reid, N; Good, J M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years on DGF in the chipmunk (Tamias) radiation with new data that quantify very high rates of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression among para- and sympatric species in the T. quadrivittatus group in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. These new data (188 cytochrome b sequences) bring the total number of sequences up to 1871; roughly 16% (298) of the chipmunks we have sequenced exhibit introgressed mtDNA. This includes ongoing introgression between subspecies and between both closely related and distantly related taxa. In addition, we have identified several taxa that are apparently fixed for ancient introgressions and in which there is no evidence of ongoing introgression. A recurrent observation is that these introgressions occur between ecologically and morphologically diverged, sometimes non-sister taxa that engage in well-documented niche partitioning. Thus, the chipmunk radiation in western North America represents an excellent mammalian example of speciation in the face of recurrent gene flow among lineages and where biogeography, habitat differentiation and mating systems suggest important roles for both ecological and sexual selection. PMID:24781803

  20. Electrical resistivity of radiation disordered oxide BaNb sub 4 O sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S.A.; Goshchitskii, B.N.; Karkin, A.E.; Mirmelstein, A.V.; Voronin, V.I.; Parkhomenko, V.D. ); Zubkov, V.G.; Perelyaev, V.N.; Berger, I.F.; Kontzevaya, I.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of radiation disorder on the electrical resistivity of the metallic non-superconducting BaNb{sub 4}O{sub 6} oxide has been investigated. It is shown that variation of electrical resistivity {rho} of this compound under disorder is typical of metallic systems, i.e. residual resistivity increases linearly with defect concentration while the temperature dependence of {rho} changes slightly. Such a behavior qualitatively differs from the previously observed unusual behavior of HTSC with similar crystal structure.

  1. Using SNP genetic markers to elucidate the linkage of the Co-34/Phg-3 anthracnose and angular leaf spot resistance gene cluster with the Ur-14 resistance gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Ouro Negro common bean cultivar contains the Co-34/Phg-3 gene cluster that confers resistance to the anthracnose (ANT) and angular leaf spot (ALS) pathogens. These genes are tightly linked on chromosome 4. Ouro Negro also has the Ur-14 rust resistance gene, reportedly in the vicinity of Co- 34; ...

  2. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance and characterization of resistant genes and integrons in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are still widely applied in animal husbandry to prevent diseases and used as feed additives to promote animal growth. This could result in antibiotic resistance to bacteria and antibiotic residues in animals. In this paper, Enterobacteriaceae isolated from four integrated fish farms in Zhongshan, South China were tested for antibiotic resistance, tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and class 1 integrons. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were carried out to test antibiotic susceptibility and resistance genes, respectively. Relatively high antibiotic resistance frequencies were found, especially for ampicillin (80%), tetracycline (52%), and trimethoprim (50%). Out of 203 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 98.5% were resistant to one or more antibiotics tested. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) was found highest in animal manures with a MAR index of 0.56. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(C)) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul2) were detected in more than 50% of the isolates. The intI1 gene was found in 170 isolates (83.7%). Both classic and non-classic class 1 integrons were found. Four genes, aadA5, aadA22, dfr2, and dfrA17, were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms in China and the first time that gene cassette array dfrA17-aadA5 has been detected in such fish farms. Results of this study indicated that fish farms may be a reservoir of highly diverse and abundant antibiotic resistant genes and gene cassettes. Integrons may play a key role in multiple antibiotic resistances posing potential health risks to the general public and aquaculture.

  3. Longevity, oxygen toxicity and radiation-enhanced resistance to oxygen in tribolium confusum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Sublethal doses of ionizing radiation increase longevity in a variety of insects suggesting that irradiation may retard the age-dependent decline of physiological functions. There have been no systematic investigations of the response of irradiated populations to stress, however. The authors have demonstrated that resistance of adult flour beetles, Tribolium confusum, to oxygen poisoning declines progressively with age. They have examined oxygen resistance of irradiated populations of T. confusum as a function of age at irradiation, of time after irradiation, and of radiation dose and of dose-modifying factors. Shortly after gamma-irradiation, flour beetles exhibited a decline in resistance to oxygen toxicity. Then, about two weeks after irradiation, the LD/sub 50/ exposure time in pure oxygen was much greater than that of nonirradiated beetles, and this enhanced resistance persisted for about 6 months. The magnitude of the enhancement was a function of dose, decreased with increasing age at irradiation, and was modified by radiation factors. Sublethal irradiation under anoxia, at low dose rate, or with dose fractionation reduced the development of oxygen resistance to approximately the same degree that it reduced acute radiation lethality . Radiation-enhanced resistance to stress may be an important factor in the increased longevity of irradiated insects.

  4. Multiple drug resistance genes in malaria -- from epistasis to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Refour, Philippe

    2005-08-01

    A decline in our ability to successfully treat patients with malaria infections of the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum with cheap quinoline drugs has led to a huge escalation in morbidity and mortality in recent years. Many approaches have been taken, including classical genetics, reverse genetics and molecular epidemiology, to identify the molecular determinants underlying this resistance. The contribution of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene, pfmdr1, to antimalarial resistance has been a source of controversy for over a decade since it was first identified. In the current issue of Molecular Microbiology, Sidhu and colleagues use powerful reverse genetics to demonstrate the importance of commonly occurring alleles of pfmdr1 in conferring resistance to the second-line drugs quinine and sensitivity to the new alternatives mefloquine and artemisinin. They also elegantly highlight the importance of genetic background and epistasis between pfmdr1 and other potential modulators of drug resistance. Such molecular knowledge will facilitate surveillance/monitoring and aid the development of strategies for the reversal of resistance.

  5. Improved antibiotic resistance gene cassette for marker exchange mutagenesis in Ralstonia solanacearum and Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Um, Hae Young; Chung, Eunsook; Lee, Jai-Heon; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-04-01

    Marker exchange mutagenesis is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function at a molecular level in bacteria. New plasmids carrying a kanamycin resistance gene or a trimethoprim resistance gene were constructed to provide antibiotic resistance cassettes for marker exchange mutagenesis in Ralstonia solanacearum and many antibiotic-resistant Burkholderia spp. Insertion sequences present in the flanking sequences of the antibiotic resistance cassette were removed to prevent aberrant gene replacement and polar mutation during mutagenesis in wild-type bacteria. Plasmids provided in this study would be convenient for use in gene cassettes for gene replacement in other Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Metabolo-proteomics to discover plant biotic stress resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Kushalappa, Ajjamada C; Gunnaiah, Raghavendra

    2013-09-01

    Plants continuously encounter various environmental stresses and use qualitative and quantitative measures to resist pathogen attack. Qualitative stress responses, based on monogenic inheritance, have been elucidated and successfully used in plant improvement. By contrast, quantitative stress responses remain largely unexplored in plant breeding, due to complex polygenic inheritance, although hundreds of quantitative trait loci for resistance have been identified. Recent advances in metabolomic and proteomic technologies now offer opportunities to overcome the hurdle of polygenic inheritance and identify candidate genes for use in plant breeding, thus improving the global food security. In this review, we describe a conceptual background to the plant-pathogen relationship and propose ten heuristic steps streamlining the application of metabolo-proteomics to improve plant resistance to biotic stress.

  7. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  8. Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rpp4 (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi 4) confers resistance to P. pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). By combining expression profiling and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), we are developing a genetic framework for Rpp4-mediated resistance. We measured gene expression i...

  9. Radiation resistance of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Uckun, F.M. Childrens Cancer Group, Arcadia, CA ); Aeppli, D.; Song, C.W. )

    1993-11-15

    Detailed comparative analyses of the radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed to achieve a better understanding of clinical radiation resistance in ALL. The radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from 74 children with newly diagnosed ALL was analyzed using leukemic progenitor cell (LPC) assays. Primary bone marrow blasts from all 74 patients were exposed to ionizing radiation and subsequently assayed for LPC-derived blast colony formation. Radiation survival curves of LPC were constructed for each of the newly diagnosed patients using computer programs for the single-hit multitarget as well as the linear quadratic models of cell survival. A marked interpatient variation in intrinsic radiation sensitivity was observed between LPC populations. The SF[sub 2] values ranged from 0.01 to 1.00. Patients were divided into groups according to their sex, age, WBC at diagnosis, cell cycle distribution of leukemic blasts, and immunophenotype. Only immunophenotype provided a significant correlation with the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of LPC. Patients with B-lineage ALL had higher SF[sub 2] and smaller [alpha] values than T-lineage ALL patients, consistent with greater intrinsic radiation resistance at the level of LPC. Notably, 43% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 27% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with SF[sub 2] [ge] 0.5. Similarly, 66% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 37% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with [alpha] values [le] 0.4 Gy[sup [minus]1]. Combining the two indicators of radiation resistance, they found that only 34% of the B-lineage ALL patients had none of the two parameters in the respective critical regions, while 63% of the T-lineage patients had none. In multivariate analyses, the immunophenotypic B-lineage affiliation was the only significant predictor of radiation resistance at the level of LPC. 42 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Gene expression profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer reveals key genes and pathways associated with chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Luo, S C

    2016-01-22

    The aim of this study is to analyze gene expression data to identify key genes and pathways associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to improve clinical treatment strategies. The gene expression data set was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included 12 chemotherapy-resistant EOC samples and 16 chemotherapy-sensitive EOC samples. A differential analysis was performed to screen out differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the database for annotation, visualization, and integration discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed with information from the human protein reference database. Pathway-pathway interactions were determined with a test based on the hypergeometric distribution. A total of 1564 DEGs were identified in chemotherapy-sensitive EOC, including 654 upregulated genes and 910 downregulated genes. The top three upregulated genes were HIST1H3G, AKT3, and RTN3, while the top three downregulated genes were NBLA00301, TRIM62, and EPHA5. A Gene Ontology enrichment analysis showed that cell adhesion, biological adhesion, and intracellular signaling cascades were significantly enriched in the DEGs. A KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the calcium, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and B cell receptor signaling pathways were significantly over-represented in the DEGs. A PPI network containing 101 interactions was acquired. The top three hub genes were RAC1, CAV1, and BCL2. Five modules were identified from the PPI network. Taken together, these findings could advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying intrinsic chemotherapy resistance in EOC.

  11. A large scale analysis of resistance gene homologues in Arachis.

    PubMed

    Bertioli, D J; Leal-Bertioli, S C M; Lion, M B; Santos, V L; Pappas, G; Cannon, S B; Guimarães, P M

    2003-10-01

    Arachis hypogaea L., commonly known as the peanut or groundnut, is an important and widespread food legume. Because the crop has a narrow genetic base, genetic diversity in A. hypogaea is low and it lacks sources of resistance to many pests and diseases. In contrast, wild diploid Arachis species are genetically diverse and are rich sources of disease resistance genes. The majority of known plant disease resistance genes encode proteins with a nucleotide binding site domain (NBS). In this study, degenerate PCR primers designed to bind to DNA regions encoding conserved motifs within this domain were used to amplify NBS-encoding regions from Arachis spp. The Arachis spp. used were A. hypogaea var. Tatu and wild species that are known to be sources of disease resistance: A. cardenasii, A. duranensis, A. stenosperma and A. simpsonii. A total of 78 complete NBS-encoding regions were isolated, of which 63 had uninterrupted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arachis NBS sequences derived in this study and other NBS sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago trunculata, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and Phaseolus vulgaris that are available in public databases This analysis indicates that most Arachis NBS sequences fall within legume-specific clades, some of which appear to have undergone extensive copy number expansions in the legumes. In addition, NBS motifs from A. thaliana and legumes were characterized. Differences in the TIR and non-TIR motifs were identified. The likely effect of these differences on the amplification of NBS-encoding sequences by PCR is discussed.

  12. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or multiple copies of the SASP-C gene, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha/beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  13. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and uv (ultraviolet) radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Setlow, P.

    1987-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of (i) one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; (ii) multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or (iii) multiple copies of the SASP-C genes, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha-beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores.

  14. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Related to Resistance in Spinosad- and Neonicotinoid-Resistant Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Højland, Dorte H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The housefly is a global pest that has developed resistance to most insecticides applied against it. Resistance of the spinosad-resistant strain 791spin and the neonicotinoid-resistant 766b strain is believed to be due to metabolism. We investigate differentially expressed genes in these two resistant strains related to metabolism in comparison with an insecticide-susceptible reference strain. Results Genes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics were primarily up-regulated in resistant flies with some differences between resistant strains. The cyp4g98 and cyp6g4 genes proved interesting in terms of neonicotinoid resistance, while cyp4d9 was overexpressed in 791spin compared to spinosad-susceptible strains. GSTs, ESTs and UGTs were mostly overexpressed, but not to the same degree as P450s. We present a comprehensive and comparative picture of gene expression in three housefly strains differing significantly in their response to insecticides. High differential expression of P450s and genes coding for cuticle protein indicates a combination of factors involved in metabolic neonicotinoid and spinosad resistance. Conclusion Resistance in these strains is apparently not linked to the alteration of a single gene but is composed of several changes including differential expression of genes encoding metabolic detoxification enzymes. PMID:28125739

  15. Genome of the Extremely Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans Viewed from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Aravind, L.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Tatusov, Roman L.; Minton, Kenneth W.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans shows remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, desiccation, UV radiation, oxidizing agents, and electrophilic mutagens. D. radiodurans is best known for its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation; not only can it grow continuously in the presence of chronic radiation (6 kilorads/h), but also it can survive acute exposures to gamma radiation exceeding 1,500 kilorads without dying or undergoing induced mutation. These characteristics were the impetus for sequencing the genome of D. radiodurans and the ongoing development of its use for bioremediation of radioactive wastes. Although it is known that these multiple resistance phenotypes stem from efficient DNA repair processes, the mechanisms underlying these extraordinary repair capabilities remain poorly understood. In this work we present an extensive comparative sequence analysis of the Deinococcus genome. Deinococcus is the first representative with a completely sequenced genome from a distinct bacterial lineage of extremophiles, the Thermus-Deinococcus group. Phylogenetic tree analysis, combined with the identification of several synapomorphies between Thermus and Deinococcus, supports the hypothesis that it is an ancient group with no clear affinities to any of the other known bacterial lineages. Distinctive features of the Deinococcus genome as well as features shared with other free-living bacteria were revealed by comparison of its proteome to the collection of clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. Analysis of paralogs in Deinococcus has revealed several unique protein families. In addition, specific expansions of several other families including phosphatases, proteases, acyltransferases, and Nudix family pyrophosphohydrolases were detected. Genes that potentially affect DNA repair and recombination and stress responses were investigated in detail. Some proteins appear to have been horizontally transferred from eukaryotes and are

  16. Novel Streptomycin and Spectinomycin Resistance Gene as a Gene Cassette within a Class 1 Integron Isolated from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sandvang, Dorthe

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim resistance gene dfr7 in a class 1 integron. The integron was located on a plasmid and was identified in a pathogenic porcine Escherichia coli isolate. PMID:10582907

  17. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  18. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  19. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Kimberly M.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell. PMID:23209374

  20. Molecular characterizations of chloramphenicol- and oxytetracycline-resistant bacteria and resistance genes in mariculture waters of China.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jingyi; Song, Linsheng; Chen, Mingna; Chang, Yaqing

    2009-07-01

    In order to gain an understanding of the diversity and distribution of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes in maricultural environments, multidrug-resistant bacteria were screened for the rearing waters from a mariculture farm of China. Both abalone Haliotis discushannai and turbot Scophthalmus maximus rearing waters were populated with abundant chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria. These bacteria were also multidrug resistant, with Vibriosplendidus and Vibriotasmaniensis being the most predominant species. The chloramphenicol-resistance gene cat II, cat IV or floR could be detected in most of the multidrug-resistant isolates, and the oxytetracycline-resistance gene tet(B), tet(D), tet(E) or tet(M) could also be detected for most of the isolates. Coexistence of chloramphenicol- and oxytetracycline-resistance genes partially explains the molecular mechanism of multidrug resistance in the studied maricultural environments. Comparative studies with different antimicrobial agents as the starting isolation reagents may help detect a wider diversity of the antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes.

  1. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA+ cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a

  2. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA (+) cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a novel

  3. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice.

  4. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  5. Diverse and abundant antibiotic resistance genes in Chinese swine farms.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Johnson, Timothy A; Su, Jian-Qiang; Qiao, Min; Guo, Guang-Xia; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Hashsham, Syed A; Tiedje, James M

    2013-02-26

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants posing a potential worldwide human health risk. Intensive animal husbandry is believed to be a major contributor to the increased environmental burden of ARGs. Despite the volume of antibiotics used in China, little information is available regarding the corresponding ARGs associated with animal farms. We assessed type and concentrations of ARGs at three stages of manure processing to land disposal at three large-scale (10,000 animals per year) commercial swine farms in China. In-feed or therapeutic antibiotics used on these farms include all major classes of antibiotics except vancomycins. High-capacity quantitative PCR arrays detected 149 unique resistance genes among all of the farm samples, the top 63 ARGs being enriched 192-fold (median) up to 28,000-fold (maximum) compared with their respective antibiotic-free manure or soil controls. Antibiotics and heavy metals used as feed supplements were elevated in the manures, suggesting the potential for coselection of resistance traits. The potential for horizontal transfer of ARGs because of transposon-specific ARGs is implicated by the enrichment of transposases--the top six alleles being enriched 189-fold (median) up to 90,000-fold in manure--as well as the high correlation (r(2) = 0.96) between ARG and transposase abundance. In addition, abundance of ARGs correlated directly with antibiotic and metal concentrations, indicating their importance in selection of resistance genes. Diverse, abundant, and potentially mobile ARGs in farm samples suggest that unmonitored use of antibiotics and metals is causing the emergence and release of ARGs to the environment.

  6. Development of high temperature, high radiation resistant silicon semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorl, C. A.; Evans, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a hardened silicon power transistor for operation in severe nuclear radiation environments at high temperature was studied. Device hardness and diffusion techniques are discussed along with the geometries of hardened power transistor chips. Engineering drawings of 100 amp and 5 amp silicon devices are included.

  7. Alternatively spliced transcripts of Pi-ta blast resistance gene in Oryza sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) confers resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae containing its cognate avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta is a single-copy gene belonging to the nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) genes. In the present study, w...

  8. The radiation resistance of thermoset plastics—V. Epoxy plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfrich, H.-P.; Wilski, H.

    Flexural strength, impact strength and dielectric properties of an epoxy plastic (bispherol A-based epoxy resin cured with aromatic diamines) with inorganic fillers remained unchanged after irradiation at high dose rate up to 10 MGy. Measurements of heat deflection temperature and sol fraction indicated, however, a deterioration of the resin. The same results were obtained after irradiation in the presence of air at extremely low dose rate (irradiation time: 10 years). Electrical surface resistance and tracking resistance worsened after irradiation. In addition, both of these surface-dependent properties were markedly influenced by the dose rate.

  9. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zijian; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation in penA (A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutated penA gene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutated ftsX increased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, while pilM, pilN, and pilQ were downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  10. Genetic resistance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. I. Analysis of the mechanism of LeR resistance using radiation chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Pelfrey, C.M.; Waxman, F.J.; Whitacre, C.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that has been extensively studied in the rat. The Lewis rat is highly susceptible to the induction of EAE, while the Lewis resistant (LeR) rat is known to be resistant. In this paper, we demonstrate that the LeR rat, which was derived from the Lewis strain by inbreeding of fully resistant animals, is histocompatible with the Lewis strain. Radiation chimeras, a tool for distinguishing between immunologic and nonimmunologic resistance mechanisms, were utilized to analyze the cellular mechanisms involved in genetic resistance to EAE. By transplanting bone marrow cells from LeR rats into irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to EAE induction. Likewise, transplanting Lewis bone marrow cells into irradiated LeR recipients rendered LeR rats susceptible. Mixed lymphoid cell chimeras using bone marrow, spleen, and thymus cells in Lewis recipient rats revealed individual lymphoid cell types and cell interactions that significantly affected the incidence and severity of EAE. Our results suggest that LeR resistance is mediated by hematopoietic/immune cells, and that cells located in the spleen appear to play a critical role in the resistance/susceptibility to EAE induction. Depletion of splenic adherent cells did not change the patterns of EAE resistance. In vivo cell mixing studies suggested the presence of a suppressor cell population in the LeR spleen preparations which exerted an inhibitory effect on Lewis autoimmune responses. Thus, the mechanism of LeR resistance appears to be different from that in other EAE-resistant animals.

  11. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance.

  12. Molecular detection of antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Hindiyeh, Musa Y; Smollan, Gill; Gefen-Halevi, Shiraz; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection of the bacterial causative agent causing sepsis must be coupled with rapid identification of the antibiotic resistant mechanism that the pathogen might possess. Real-time PCR (qPCR)-based assays have been extensively utilized in the clinical microbiology field as diagnostic tools for the rapid detection of specific nucleic acid (NA) targets. In this chapter, we will discuss the technical aspects of using an internally controlled qPCR assay for the rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase gene (bla KPC) in positive Bactec blood culture bottles. The multiplex qPCR (bla KPC/RNase P) utilizes specific primers and probes for the detection of the bacterial carbapenem resistance mechanism, bla KPC gene, and the internal control RNase P. The internal control of the qPCR assay is vital for detecting any inhibitors that are well known to be present in the blood culture bottles. Rapid detection of the antibiotic resistant mechanism present in the bacterial pathogen causing sepsis can help in better managing patients' infection.

  13. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Robertson, Alison E.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance. PMID:28081566

  14. Monitoring and Comparison of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Their Resistance Genes in Municipal and Hospital Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Aali, Rahim; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmad, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) is a public health concern which could occur in a number of ways. Wastewaters seem to play an important role in the dissemination of bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) in our environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of three groups of ARB and their resistance genes in hospital and municipal wastewaters (MWs) as possible sources. Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected from raw MWs and hospital wastewaters (HWs) and final effluents of related wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Samples were analyzed for the detection of three groups of ARB including gentamicin (GM), chloramphenicol (CHL) and ceftazidime resistant bacteria and their ARGs (aac (3)-1, cmlA1 and ctx-m-32, respectively). Results: The mean concentration of GM, CHL and ceftazidime resistant bacteria in raw wastewater samples was 1.24 × 107, 3.29 × 107 and 5.54 × 107 colony forming unit/100 ml, respectively. There is a variation in prevalence of different groups of ARB in MWs and HWs. All WWTPs decreased the concentration of ARB. However, high concentration of ARB was found in the final effluent of WWTPs. Similar to ARB, different groups of ARGs were found frequently in both MWs and HWs. All genes also detected with a relative high frequency in effluent samples of MWs WWTPs. Conclusions: Discharge of final effluent from conventional WWTPs is a potential route for dissemination of ARB and ARGs into the natural environment and poses a hazard to environmental and public health. PMID:25105001

  15. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-03-15

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations.

  16. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations. PMID:26976674

  17. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    PubMed

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  18. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  19. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized.

  20. A Bacteroides tetracycline resistance gene represents a new class of ribosome protection tetracycline resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Nikolich, M P; Shoemaker, N B; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    The ribosome protection type of tetracycline resistance (Tcr) has been found in a variety of bacterial species, but the only two classes described previously, Tet(M) and Tet(O), shared a high degree of amino acid sequence identity (greater than 75%). Thus, it appeared that this type of resistance emerged recently in evolution and spread among different species of bacteria by horizontal transmission. We obtained the DNA sequence of a Tcr gene from Bacteroides, a genus of gram-negative, obligately anaerobic bacteria that is phylogenetically distant from the diverse species in which tet(M) and tet(O) have been found. The Bacteroides Tcr gene defines a new class of ribosome protection resistance genes, Tet(Q), and has a deduced amino acid sequence that was only 40% identical to Tet(M) or Tet(O). Like tet(M) and tet(O), tet(Q) appears to have spread by horizontal transmission, but only within the Bacteroides group. Images PMID:1339256

  1. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  2. On the radiation resistance of planar Gunn diodes with δ-doped layers

    SciTech Connect

    Obolenskaya, E. S. Churin, A. Yu.; Obolensky, S. V.; Murel, A. V.; Shashkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    The radiation resistance of planar Gunn diodes is investigated. Based on the results of measurements of the pulsed current–voltage characteristics and computer simulations it is shown that the use of δ layers of doping impurities contributes to the higher radiation resistance of planar diodes by an order of magnitude compared to conventional Gunn diodes. The results of this study make it possible to formulate methodical guidelines to reduce the amount of computational and experimental studies without a considerable decrease in their informativity.

  3. Effect of Ni content on thermal and radiation resistance of VVER RPV steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Fedotova, S. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper thermal stability and radiation resistance of VVER-type RPV steels for pressure vessels of advanced reactors with different nickel content were studied. A complex of microstructural studies and mechanical tests of the steels in different states (after long thermal exposures, provoking embrittling heat treatment and accelerated neutron irradiation) was carried out. It is shown that nickel content (other things being equal) determines the extent of materials degradation under influence of operational factors: steels with a lower nickel concentration demonstrate a higher thermal stability and radiation resistance.

  4. Impact of dairy manure pre-application treatment on manure composition, soil dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes, and abundance of antibiotic-resistance genes on vegetables at harvest.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yuan-Ching; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Scott, Andrew; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Marti, Romain; Topp, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Manuring ground used for crop production is an important agricultural practice. Should antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria carried in the manure be transferred to crops that are consumed raw, their consumption by humans or animals will represent a route of exposure to antibiotic resistance genes. Treatment of manures prior to land application is a potential management option to reduce the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes entrained with manure application. In this study, dairy manure that was untreated, anaerobically digested, mechanically dewatered or composted was applied to field plots that were then cropped to lettuce, carrots and radishes. The impact of treatment on manure composition, persistence of antibiotic resistance gene targets in soil following application, and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria on vegetables at harvest was determined. Composted manure had the lowest abundance of antibiotic resistance gene targets compared to the other manures. There was no significant difference in the persistence characteristics of antibiotic resistance genes following land application of the various manures. Compared to unmanured soil, antibiotic resistance genes were detected more frequently in soil receiving raw or digested manure, whereas they were not in soil receiving composted manure. The present study suggests that vegetables grown in ground receiving raw or digested manure are at risk of contamination with manure-borne antibiotic resistant bacteria, whereas vegetables grown in ground receiving composted manure are less so.

  5. Flame-retardant EPDM compounds containing phenanthrene to enhance radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Shu-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; An, You; Li, Chuang; Gao, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Hong-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) compounds with good flame-retardant and γ-ray radiation resistant properties were prepared by adding complex flame retardants and phenathrene. The resultant EPDM formulations have a long time to ignition (TTI >46 s), a low peak heat release rate (PHRR 341 kW/m2) and a high limited oxygen index (LOI >30). Effects of γ-ray radiation on the resultant flame-retardant EPDM was investigated. The formulated EPDM is a crosslinking dominated polymer under γ-ray radiation. The γ-ray radiation resistant property of EPDM was enhanced by adding phenanthrene. Elongation at break of EPDM formulated with phenanthrene could retain 91% after being irradiated to 0.3 MGy and still retains 40% elongation even after being irradiated to 0.9 MGy, which is much better the control. It is expected that the formulated flame-retardant and radiation resistant EPDM materials could meet the requirements for use in radiation environments.

  6. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 mRad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  7. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 Mrad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  8. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in Normal Lung Epithelial Cells Confers Resistance to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M. . E-mail: mmahmed@geisinger.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To address the functional role of radiation-induced transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) signaling in a normal epithelial background, we selected a spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of a dominant-negative mutant of the TGF-{beta} RII ({delta}RII) transgenic mouse that conditionally expressed {delta}RII under the control of the metallothionein promoter (MT-1), and assessed this cell line's response to radiation. Methods and Materials: A spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and terminal transferase dUPT nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to assess clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis, respectively. Western-blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax, and RII proteins. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results: Exposure to ZnSO{sub 4} inhibited TGF-{beta} signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-{beta}1 or ionizing radiation. The SILECC, treated with either ZnSO{sub 4} or neutralizing antibody against TGF-{beta}, showed a significant increase in radio-resistance compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of {delta}RII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-{beta} effector gene p21{sup waf1/cip1}. Conclusions: Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-{beta} signaling via abrogation of the RII function enhances the radio-resistance of normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-{beta} signaling function.

  9. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  10. Radiation-hard ceramic Resistive Plate Chambers for forward TOF and T0 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinov, A.; Dreyer, J.; Fan, X.; Kämpfer, B.; Kiselev, S.; Kotte, R.; Garcia, A. Laso; Malkevich, D.; Naumann, L.; Nedosekin, A.; Plotnikov, V.; Stach, D.; Sultanov, R.; Voloshin, K.

    2017-02-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers with ceramic electrodes are the main candidates for a use in precise multi-channel timing systems operating in high-radiation conditions. We report the latest R&D results on these detectors aimed to meet the requirements of the forward T0 counter at the CBM experiment. RPC design, gas mixture, limits on the bulk resistivity of ceramic electrodes, efficiency, time resolution, counting rate capabilities and ageing test results are presented.

  11. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  12. Radiation sensitivity of Salmonella isolates relative to resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol or gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Lonczynski, Kelly A.; Sommers, Christopher H.

    2006-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance of inoculated bacteria is a commonly used selective marker. Bacteria resistant to the antibiotic nalidixic acid have been shown to have an increased sensitivity to irradiation. The purpose of this research was to screen a collection of Salmonella isolates for antibiotic resistance and determine the association, if any, of antibiotic resistance with radiation sensitivity. Twenty-four clinical isolates of Salmonella were screened for native resistance to multiple concentrations of ampicillin (Amp), chloramphenicol (Chl), or gentamicin (Gm). Test concentrations were chosen based on established clinical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels, and isolates were classified as either sensitive or resistant based on their ability to grow at or above the MIC. Salmonella cultures were grown overnight at (37 °C) in antibiotic-amended tryptic soy broth (TSB). Native resistance to Gm was observed with each of the 24 isolates (100%). Eight isolates (33%) were shown to be resistant to Amp, while seven isolates (29%) were shown to be resistant to Chl. In separate experiments, Salmonella cultures were grown overnight (37 °C) in TSB, centrifuged, and the cell pellets were re-suspended in phosphate buffer. The samples were then gamma irradiated at doses up to 1.0 kGy. The D10 values (the ionizing radiation dose required to reduce the viable number of microorganisms by 90%) were determined for the 24 isolates and they ranged from 0.181 to 0.359 kGy. No correlation was found between the D10 value of the isolate and its sensitivity or resistance to each of the three antibiotics. Resistance to Amp or Chl is suggested as appropriate resistance marker for Salmonella test strains to be used in studies of irradiation.

  13. Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistant Genes and Bacteria across Agricultural and Non-Agricultural Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Miller, Daniel N.; Wienhold, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described. Few details are known about the ecology of antibiotic resistant genes and bacteria in food production systems, or how antibiotic resistance genes in food animals compare to antibiotic resistance genes in other ecosystems. Here we report the distribution of antibiotic resistant genes in publicly available agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomic samples and identify which bacteria are likely to be carrying those genes. Antibiotic resistance, as coded for in the genes used in this study, is a process that was associated with all natural, agricultural, and human-impacted ecosystems examined, with between 0.7 to 4.4% of all classified genes in each habitat coding for resistance to antibiotic and toxic compounds (RATC). Agricultural, human, and coastal-marine metagenomes have characteristic distributions of antibiotic resistance genes, and different bacteria that carry the genes. There is a larger percentage of the total genome associated with antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal-associated and agricultural metagenomes compared to marine and Antarctic samples. Since antibiotic resistance genes are a natural part of both human-impacted and pristine habitats, presence of these resistance genes in any specific habitat is therefore not sufficient to indicate or determine impact of anthropogenic antibiotic use. We recommend that baseline studies and control samples be taken in order to determine natural background levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or antibiotic resistance genes when investigating the impacts of veterinary use of antibiotics on human health. We raise questions regarding whether the underlying biology of each type of bacteria contributes to the likelihood of transfer via the food chain. PMID:23133629

  14. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  15. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  16. A possible radiation-resistant solar cell geometry using superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Clark, R.; Brinker, D.

    1985-01-01

    A solar cell structure is proposed which uses a GaAs nipi doping superlattice. An important feature of this structure is that photogenerated minority carriers are very quickly collected in a time shorter than bulk lifetime in the fairly heavily doped n and p layers and these carriers are then transported parallel to the superlattice layers to selective ohmic contacts. Assuming that these already-separated carriers have very long recombination lifetimes, due to their across an indirect bandgap in real space, it is argued that the proposed structure may exhibit superior radiation tolerance along with reasonably high beginning-of-life efficiency.

  17. Luminescence and radiation resistance of undoped NaI crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiran, N. Boiaryntseva, I.; Gektin, A.; Gridin, S.; Shlyakhturov, V.; Vasuykov, S.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The performance of NaI scintillators depends on luminescence properties. • A criterion of crystals’ purity level is radiation colorability at room temperature. • The traces of the most dangerous impurities were detected. • Crucial role in efficiency of pure NaI scintillator play the crystal perfection. - Abstract: Undoped NaI single crystal is an excellent scintillator at low temperature. However, scintillation parameters of different quality crystals vary in a wide range, significantly exceeding measurement error. Experimental data demonstrate the features of luminescence, radiation induced coloration, and afterglow dependence on the quality of nominally pure crystals. It is found that defects level that allows to elucidate artefacts introduced by traces of harmful impurities corresponds to 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} that significantly overhead accuracy of chemical and absorption analysis. It is shown that special raw material treatment before and during the single crystal growth allows to reach NaI purity level that avoids impurities influence to the basic luminescence data.

  18. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  19. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  20. Distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria across agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described and few details are known about how antibiotic resistance genes i...

  1. Differential gene expression and bioinformatics analysis of copper resistance gene afe_1073 in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Wu, Xueling; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Yuandong; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan; Yin, Huaqun; Baba, Ngom

    2013-04-01

    Copper resistance of acidophilic bacteria is very significant in bioleaching of copper ore since high concentration of copper are harmful to the growth of organisms. Copper resistance gene afe_1073 was putatively considered to be involved in copper homeostasis in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC23270. In the present study, differential expression of afe_1073 in A. ferrooxidans strain DY26 and DC was assessed with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed the expression of afe_1073 in two strains increased with the increment of copper concentrations. The expression of DY26 was lower than that of DC at the same copper concentration although A. ferrooxidans strain DY26 possessed higher copper resistance than strain DC. In addition, bioinformatics analysis showed AFE_1073 was a typical transmembrane protein P1b1-ATPase, which could reduce the harm of Cu(+) by pumping it out from the cell. There were two mutation sites in AFE_1073 between DY26 and DC and one may change the hydrophobicity of AFE_1073, which could enhance the ability of DY26 to pump out Cu(+). Therefore, DY26 needed less gene expression of afe_1073 for resisting copper toxicity than that of DC at the same copper stress. Our study will be beneficial to understanding the copper resistance mechanism of A. ferrooxidans.

  2. Antibiotic resistance, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and ampC gene in two typical municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; He, Liang-Ying; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Tao, Ran

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and ampC gene were investigated for Escherichia coli isolates from two typical municipal wastewater treatment plants in both dry and wet seasons by using the antibiotic susceptibility test and PCR assay, respectively. The results showed that 98.4% of the isolates (1056) were found resistant to antibiotic(s) tested and 90.6% showed multiple resistances to at least three antibiotics. Tetracycline was found to have the highest resistance frequency (70.8%), followed by ampicillin (65.1%), whereas ceftazidime had the lowest resistance frequency of 9.0%. Moreover, 39.2% of the E. coli isolates were carrying plasmids. intI1 had the highest detection rate in the plasmids (38.1%), followed by qnrS, ampC, qnrB, intI2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr. The disinfection process (UV and chlorination) could significantly reduce the number of bacteria, but percentage of the resistant bacteria, resistance frequency for each antibiotic, MAR index and detection rate of the plasmid-mediated resistance genes were all found increasing in the effluents of biological units. The results of this study showed that a more frequent horizontal gene transfer occurred in the biological units. Wastewater treatment plants were an important medium for the recombination and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment.

  3. Isolation and Diversity Analysis of Resistance Gene Homologues from Switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qihui; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Smith, Shavannor M.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance gene homologs (RGHs) were isolated from the switchgrass variety Alamo by a combination of polymerase chain reaction and expressed sequence tag (EST) database mining. Fifty-eight RGHs were isolated by polymerase chain reaction and 295 RGHs were identified in 424,545 switchgrass ESTs. Four nucleotide binding site−leucine-rich repeat RGHs were selected to investigate RGH haplotypic diversity in seven switchgrass varieties chosen for their representation of a broad range of the switchgrass germplasm. Lowland and upland ecotypes were found to be less similar, even from nearby populations, than were more distant populations with similar growth environments. Most (83.5%) of the variability in these four RGHs was found to be attributable to the within-population component. The difference in nucleotide diversity between and within populations was observed to be small, whereas this diversity is maintained to similar degrees at both population and ecotype levels. The results also revealed that the analyzed RGHs were under positive selection in the studied switchgrass accessions. Intragenic recombination was detected in switchgrass RGHs, thereby demonstrating an active genetic process that has the potential to generate new resistance genes with new specificities that might act against newly-arising pathogen races. PMID:23589518

  4. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  5. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  6. Apramycin resistance as a selective marker for gene transfer in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Paget, E; Davies, J

    1996-01-01

    We have explored the potential of using the apramycin resistance gene as a marker in mycobacterial gene transfer studies. Shuttle plasmids available for both electroporation and conjugation studies have been constructed, and we have successfully validated the use of the apramycin resistance gene as a component of cloning vectors for Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG, and M. tuberculosis. PMID:8892841

  7. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  8. Complete genome sequence of Frondihabitans sp. strain PAMC28766, a novel carotenoid-producing and radiation-resistant strain isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Han, So-Ra; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Seunghyun; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of Frondihabitans sp. strain PAMC28766, which was found to consist of three plasmids, one chromosome (4,345,897bp), and a series of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and nucleotide excision repair. An analysis of the Frondihabitans sp. PAMC28766 genome will improve our understanding of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, the sequence data will provide novel insight into UV radiation-resistance in extremely cold environments.

  9. Ras Labs.-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle: resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Sandberg, Eric; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles A.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nordarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher; Froio, Danielle; Furlong, Cosme; Razavi, Payam; Valenza, Logan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Generation 3 Synthetic Muscle was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials may also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment is to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant or radiation hardened. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness Durometry, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. Gforce testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April

  10. Prostate cancer immunotherapy, particularly in combination with androgen deprivation or radiation treatment. Customized pharmacogenomic approaches to overcome immunotherapy cancer resistance

    PubMed Central

    ALBERTI, C.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches for advanced prostate cancer - such as androgen deprivation, chemotherapy, radiation - come up often against lack of effectiveness because of possible arising of correlative cancer cell resistance and/or inadequate anti-tumor immune conditions. Whence the timeliness of resorting to immune-based treatment strategies including either therapeutic vaccination-based active immunotherapy or anti-tumor monoclonal antibody-mediated passive immunotherapy. Particularly attractive, as for research studies and clinical applications, results to be the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte check point blockade by the use of anti-CTLA-4 and PD-1 monoclonal antibodies, particularly when combined with androgen deprivation therapy or radiation. Unlike afore said immune check point inhibitors, both cell-based (by the use of prostate specific antigen carriers autologous dendritic cells or even whole cancer cells) and recombinant viral vector vaccines are able to induce immune-mediated focused killing of specific antigen-presenting prostate cancer cells. Such vaccines, either used alone or concurrently/sequentially combined with above-mentioned conventional therapies, led to generally reach, in the field of various clinical trials, reasonable results particularly as regards the patient’s overall survival. Adoptive trasferred T-cells, as adoptive T-cell passive immunotherapy, and monoclonal antibodies against specific antigen-endowed prostate cancer cells can improve immune micro-environmental conditions. On the basis of a preliminary survey about various immunotherapy strategies, are here also outlined their effects when combined with androgen deprivation therapy or radiation. What’s more, as regard the immune-based treatment effectiveness, it has to be pointed out that suitable personalized epigenetic/gene profile-achieved pharmacogenomic approaches to target identified gene aberrations, may lead to overcome – as well as for conventional therapies

  11. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  12. Radiation resistance of lactobacilli isolated from radurized meat relative to growth and environment.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, J W; Holzapfel, W H; Niemand, J G

    1986-01-01

    Of 113 lactobacilli isolated from radurized (5 kGy) minced meat, 7 Lactobacillus sake strains, 1 L. curvatus strain, and 1 L. farciminis strain were used for radiation resistance studies in a semisynthetic substrate (i.e., modified MRS broth). Five reference Lactobacillus spp., one Staphylococcus aureus strain, and one Salmonella typhimurium strain were used for comparative purposes. All L. sake isolates exhibited the phenomenon of being more resistant to gamma-irradiation in the exponential (log) phase than in the stationary phase of their growth cycles by a factor of 28%. Four references strains also exhibited this phenomenon, with L. sake (DSM 20017) showing a 68% increase in resistance in the log phase over the stationary phase. This phenomenon was not common to all bacteria tested and is not common to all strains with high radiation resistance. Four L. sake isolates and three reference strains were used in radiation sensitivity testing in a natural food system (i.e., meat). The bacteria were irradiated in minced meat and packaged under four different conditions (air, vacuum, CO2, and N2). Organisms exhibited the highest death rate (lowest D10 values [doses required to reduce the logarithm of the bacterial population by 1] ) under CO2 packaging conditions, but resistance to irradiation was increased under N2. The D10 values of the isolates were generally greater than those of the reference strains. The D10 values were also higher (approximately two times) in meat than in semisynthetic growth medium. PMID:3096207

  13. Clusters of antibiotic resistance genes enriched together stay together in swine agriculture

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Timothy A.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Wang, Qiong; ...

    2016-04-12

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundancemore » of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk.Agricultural antibiotic use results in clusters of cooccurring resistance genes that together confer resistance to multiple antibiotics. The use of a single antibiotic could select for an entire suite of resistance

  14. Clusters of antibiotic resistance genes enriched together stay together in swine agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy A.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Wang, Qiong; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Looft, Torey; Zhu, Yong -Guan; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-04-12

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundance of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk.Agricultural antibiotic use results in clusters of cooccurring resistance genes that together confer resistance to multiple antibiotics. The use of a single antibiotic could select for an entire suite of

  15. Resistance of colorectal cancer cells to radiation and 5-FU is associated with MELK expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seungho; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} MELK expression significantly increased when the cells are exposed to radiation or 5-FU. {yields} Suppression of MELK caused cell cycle changes and decrease in proliferation. {yields} Radiation or 5-FU treatment after MELK suppression by siRNA induced growth inhibition. -- Abstract: It was reported that the local recurrence would be caused by cancer stem cells acquiring chemo- and radio-resistance. Recently, one of the potential therapeutic targets for colorectal and other cancers has been identified, which is maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). MELK is known as an embryonic and neural stem cell marker, and associated with the cell survival, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, SNU-503, which is a rectal cancer cell line, was treated with radiation or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and elevation of the MELK expression level was observed. Furthermore, the cell line was pre-treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MELK mRNA before treatment of radiation or 5-FU and its effects on cell cycle and proliferation were observed. We demonstrated that knockdown of MELK reduced the proliferation of cells with radiation or 5-FU treatment. In addition, MELK suppression caused changes in cell cycle. In conclusion, MELK could be associated with increased resistance of colorectal cancer cells against radiation and 5-FU.

  16. Close linkage of a blast resistance gene, Pias(t), with a bacterial leaf blight resistance gene, Xa1-as(t), in a rice cultivar 'Asominori'.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Kaji, Ryota; Nakagomi, Koji; Kataoka, Tomomori; Yokogami, Narifumi; Nakamura, Toshiki; Ishikawa, Goro; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    It has long been known that a bacterial leaf blight-resistant line in rice obtained from a crossing using 'Asominori' as a resistant parent also has resistance to blast, but a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori' has not been investigated in detail. In the present study, a blast resistance gene in 'Asominori', tentatively named Pias(t), was revealed to be located within 162-kb region between DNA markers YX4-3 and NX4-1 on chromosome 4 and to be linked with an 'Asominori' allele of the bacterial leaf blight resistance gene Xa1, tentatively named Xa1-as(t). An 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) was found to be dominant and difference of disease severity between lines having the 'Asominori' allele of Pias(t) and those without it was 1.2 in disease index from 0 to 10. Pias(t) was also closely linked with the Ph gene controlling phenol reaction, suggesting the possibility of successful selection of blast resistance using the phenol reaction. Since blast-resistant commercial cultivars have been developed using 'Asominori' as a parent, Pias(t) is considered to be a useful gene in rice breeding for blast resistance.

  17. Identification of Two Genes Required in Tomato for Full Cf-9-Dependent Resistance to Cladosporium fulvum.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond-Kosack, K. E.; Jones, D. A.; Jones, JDG.

    1994-01-01

    Mutagenesis was used to identify and characterize plant genes required for fungal disease resistance gene function in tomato. Seed of a stock homozygous for the Cf-9 gene for resistance to Cladosporium fulvum were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate, and 568 M2 families were screened for mutations to C. fulvum sensitivity. Eight mutants with reduced resistance were isolated. Four mutations, all of which mapped to the Cf-9 gene, lost both resistance and response to the race-specific AVR9 elicitor. The other four mutations partially lost resistance and response to the AVR9 elicitor. Cytological analysis revealed that a unique host cell staining pattern accompanied the reduced-resistance phenotype in three mutants. Two of the mutants with reduced resistance mapped to Cf-9, and two mapped to two distinct loci designated Rcr-1 and Rcr-2 (Required for Cladosporium resistance) that are unlinked to Cf-9. PMID:12244240

  18. Radiation resistance of biological reagents for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Vafadari, Cyrus; Lui, Clarissa S; Cascio, Ethan; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Life on Mars, if it exists, may share a common ancestry with life on Earth derived from meteoritic transfer of microbes between the planets. One means to test this hypothesis is to isolate, detect, and sequence nucleic acids in situ on Mars, then search for similarities to known common features of life on Earth. Such an instrument would require biological and chemical components, such as polymerase and fluorescent dye molecules. We show that reagents necessary for detection and sequencing of DNA survive several analogues of the radiation expected during a 2-year mission to Mars, including proton (H-1), heavy ion (Fe-56, O-18), and neutron bombardment. Some reagents have reduced performance or fail at higher doses. Overall, our findings suggest it is feasible to utilize space instruments with biological components, particularly for mission durations of up to several years in environments without large accumulations of charged particles, such as the surface of Mars, and have implications for the meteoritic transfer of microbes between planets.

  19. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis.

  20. Silicon space solar cells: progression and radiation-resistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Atteq ur; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the solar cell technology based on silicon for applications in space is presented. First, the space environment and its effects on the basis of satellite orbits, such as geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO), are described. The space solar cell technology based on silicon-based materials, including thin-film silicon solar cells, for use in space was appraised. The evolution of the design for silicon solar cell for use in space, such as a backsurface field (BSF), selective doping, and both-side passivation, etc., is illustrated. This paper also describes the nature of radiation-induced defects and the models proposed for understanding the output power degradation in silicon space solar cells. The phenomenon of an anomalous increase in the short-circuit current ( I sc) in the fluence irradiation range from 2 × 1016 cm-2 to 5 × 1016 cm-2 is also described explicitly from the view point of the various presented models.

  1. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  2. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  3. MicroRNA-21 modulates radiation resistance through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-promoted glycolysis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Renben; Yan, Hongjiang; Jin, Linzhi; Dou, Xue; Chen, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer affects the transcription of target genes, and profoundly influences cancer‑associated signaling pathways. Radiation resistance is a major problem encountered in the treatment of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miRNA (miR)‑21 in the development of radiation resistance in non‑small cell lung cancer cells. A radiation‑resistant cell line was generated from A549 cells. Significant upregulation of miR‑21 was detected in the radioresistant cancer cells, as compared with the radiosensitive cells, and overexpression of miR‑21 rendered A549 parental cells resistant to radiation. In addition, glycolysis was increased in the radioresistant cells, as compared with the sensitive cells. Furthermore, hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF1α) was upregulated by miR‑21 in radioresistant cells, resulting in promotion of the key enzymes of glycolysis. Inhibition of HIF1α by small interfering RNA suppressed glycolysis and resensitized the cancer cells to radiation, whereas the recovery of HIF1α in miR‑21‑inhibited radioresistant cells resulted in recovery of radioresistance. In conclusion, the present study suggested that miR‑21 may modulate radioresistance through the upregulation of HIF1α. These results may provide a novel perspective on miRNA for the development of anti-radioresistance drugs.

  4. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  5. The anthracycline resistance-associated (ara) gene, a novel gene associated with multidrug resistance in a human leukaemia cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, T. J.; O'Neill, G. M.; Harvie, R. M.; Davey, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is a major contributor to the failure of chemotherapy treatment. This paper describes a novel protein named the anthracycline resistance associated (ARA) protein. The ara gene is amplified in the MDR leukaemia line CCRF-CEM/E1000 and its mRNA is overexpressed. ARA belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) family of proteins. Another ABC protein, the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), has previously been reported to be overexpressed in the CEM/E1000 subline. The primary amino acid sequence of ARA indicates that it is 49.5 kDa without glycosylation, and that it has one potential glycosylation site. ARA has one ATP binding site and associated transmembrane regions. This is in contrast to MRP (190 kDa, 172 kDa deglycosylated) and most other higher eukaryote ABC proteins, which consist of two similar halves, each having one ATP binding site. In addition to ARA being coexpressed with MRP, comparison of amino acid sequences showed that, among known proteins, ARA is most similar to the C-terminal half of MRP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8912525

  6. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  7. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  8. Radiation resistance of (Ni,Fe)Cr2O4 spinels by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Brutzel, Laurent; Alvarez, Pierre; Chartier, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study primary radiation damage in NiCr2O4 and FeCr2O4 spinels, which are part of the corrosion layer of the vapour generators used in nuclear reactors. The radiation resistance of both spinels is evaluated by studying point defect recombination processes, threshold displacement energies, and 20 keV displacement cascades initiated with different PKA masses. Results are mainly in agreement with previous studies involving MgAl2O4 showing that radiation facilitates the transition to inverse spinel structure or NaCl structure. However, we find some differences between the two studied spinels indicating that NiCr2O4 is more sensitive to radiation.

  9. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, P K; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N K; Singh, U S

    2015-03-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1-24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes.

  10. Assessment of Resistance of Bacillus Horneckiae Endospores to UV Radiation and Function of Their Extraneous Layer in Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. The spore's resistance might be due to their metabolically dormant state, and/or by the presence of a series of protective structures that encase the interior-most compartment, the core, which houses the spore chromosome. These spores have multiple layers surrounding the cell that are not found in vegetative cells, and some species have an outer layer of proteins and glycoproteins termed the "exosporium" or a fibrous "extraneous layer" (EL). Bacillus horneckiae is an EL-producing novel sporeformer isolated from a Phoenix spacecraft assembly clean room, and it has previously demonstrated resistance to UV radiation up to 1000 J/m(sup 2). The EL appears to bind B. horneckiae spores into large aggregations, or biofilms, and may confer some UV resistance to the spores. Multiple culturing and purification schemes were tried to achieve high purity spores because vegetative cells would skew UV resistance results. An ethanol-based purification scheme produced high purity spores. Selective removal of the EL from spores was attempted with two schemes: a chemical extraction method and physical extraction (sonication). Results from survival rates in the presence and absence of the external layer will provide a new understanding of the role of biofilms and passive resistance that may favor survival of biological systems in aggressive extra-terrestrial environments. The chemical extraction method decreased viable counts of spores and lead to an inconclusive change UV resistance relative to non-extracted spores. The physical extraction method lead to non-aggregated spores and did not alter viability; however, it produced UV resistance profiles similar to non-extracted spores. In addition to the EL-removal study, samples of B. horneckiae spores dried on

  11. [Classification and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in China--A review].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Xu, Hai

    2016-02-04

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs, developing from the treatment of urinary tract infection in early time and now from the treatment of intestinal infection and respiratory infection, have been widely used in clinical, animal husbandry and aquaculture. Bacteria gradually become resistant to them and resistance mechanism is more and more complicated. Quinolone resistance mechanism is mainly divided into chromosome mediated resistance and plasmid mediated resistance, the latter plays an important role in spreading of antibiotic resistance. In 1998, plasmid mediated quinolone resistance mechanism was reported for the first time, namely the qnr gene mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism. qnr genes can spread rapidly in different bacteria, which causes the infection difficult to control, makes the nosocomial infection popular in a wide range. In addition, qnr genes are usually associated with β-lactamase resistance gene. They exist in complex integron and integrate with the other varieties of resistance genes, which narrows the space of clinical medicine choose or drug combinations use to treat related bacterial infection and brings us a serious challenge. In this review, we provide a detailed overview for the historical discovery, classification, the resistance mechanisms of qnr genes, and the prevalence of those genes in China.

  12. Microarray-Based Detection of 90 Antibiotic Resistance Genes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perreten, Vincent; Vorlet-Fawer, Lorianne; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    A disposable microarray was developed for detection of up to 90 antibiotic resistance genes in gram-positive bacteria by hybridization. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by two specific oligonucleotides chosen from consensus sequences of gene families, except for nine genes for which only one specific oligonucleotide could be developed. A total of 137 oligonucleotides (26 to 33 nucleotides in length with similar physicochemical parameters) were spotted onto the microarray. The microarrays (ArrayTubes) were hybridized with 36 strains carrying specific antibiotic resistance genes that allowed testing of the sensitivity and specificity of 125 oligonucleotides. Among these were well-characterized multidrug-resistant strains of Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, and Lactococcus lactis and an avirulent strain of Bacillus anthracis harboring the broad-host-range resistance plasmid pRE25. Analysis of two multidrug-resistant field strains allowed the detection of 12 different antibiotic resistance genes in a Staphylococcus haemolyticus strain isolated from mastitis milk and 6 resistance genes in a Clostridium perfringens strain isolated from a calf. In both cases, the microarray genotyping corresponded to the phenotype of the strains. The ArrayTube platform presents the advantage of rapidly screening bacteria for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes known in gram-positive bacteria. This technology has a large potential for applications in basic research, food safety, and surveillance programs for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:15872258

  13. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  14. Combining Selective Pressures to Enhance the Durability of Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bourguet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of disease resistance genes in plants decreases over time because of the selection of virulent pathogen genotypes. A key goal of crop protection programs is to increase the durability of the resistance conferred by these genes. The spatial and temporal deployment of plant disease resistance genes is considered to be a major factor determining their durability. In the literature, four principal strategies combining resistance genes over time and space have been considered to delay the evolution of virulent pathogen genotypes. We reviewed this literature with the aim of determining which deployment strategy results in the greatest durability of resistance genes. Although theoretical and empirical studies comparing deployment strategies of more than one resistance gene are very scarce, they suggest that the overall durability of disease resistance genes can be increased by combining their presence in the same plant (pyramiding). Retrospective analyses of field monitoring data also suggest that the pyramiding of disease resistance genes within a plant is the most durable strategy. By extension, we suggest that the combination of disease resistance genes with other practices for pathogen control (pesticides, farming practices) may be a relevant management strategy to slow down the evolution of virulent pathogen genotypes. PMID:28066472

  15. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-17

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human's health in the 21(st) century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6')-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought.

  16. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  17. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; van Schaik, Willem; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W J

    2015-07-08

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  18. Gene quantification by the NanoGene assay is resistant to inhibition by humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gha-Young; Wang, Xiaofang; Ahn, Hosang; Son, Ahjeong

    2011-10-15

    NanoGene assay is a magnetic bead and quantum dot nanoparticles based gene quantification assay. It relies on a set of probe and signaling probe DNAs to capture the target DNA via hybridization. We have demonstrated the inhibition resistance of the NanoGene assay using humic acids laden genomic DNA (gDNA). At 1 μg of humic acid per mL, quantitiative PCR (qPCR) was inhibited to 0% of its quantification capability whereas NanoGene assay was able to maintain more than 60% of its quantification capability. To further increase the inhibition resistance of NanoGene assay at high concentration of humic acids, we have identified the specific mechanisms that are responsible for the inhibition. We examined five potential mechanisms with which the humic acids can partially inhibit our NanoGene assay. The mechanisms examined were (1) adsorption of humic acids on the particle surface; (2) particle aggregation induced by humic acids; (3) fluorescence quenching of quantum dots by humic acids during hybridization; (4) humic acids mimicking of target DNA; and (5) nonspecific binding between humic acids and target gDNA. The investigation showed that no adsorption of humic acids onto the particles' surface was observed for the humic acids' concentration. Particle aggregation and fluorescence quenching were also negligible. Humic acids also did not mimic the target gDNA except 1000 μg of humic acids per mL and hence should not contribute to the partial inhibition. Four of the above mechanisms were not related to the inhibition effect of humic acids particularly at the environmentally relevant concentrations (<100 μg/mL). However, a substantial amount of nonspecific binding was observed between the humic acids and target gDNA. This possibly results in lesser amount of target gDNA being captured by the probe and signaling DNA.

  19. DNA repair and resistance to UV-B radiation in western spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, A.R.; Hays, J.B.; Hoffman, P.D.; Chivers, D.P.; Kiesecker, J.M.; Leonard, W.P.; Marco, A.; Olson, D.H.; Reaser, J.K.; Anthony, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed DNA repair and resistance to solar radiation in eggs of members of the western spotted frog complex (Rana pretiosa and R. luteiventris), species whose populations are suffering severe range reductions and declines. Specifically, we measured the activity of photoreactivating enzyme (photolyase) in oocytes of spotted frogs. In some species, photoreactivation is the most important mechanism for repair of UV-damaged DNA. Using field experiments, we also compared the hatching success of spotted frog embryos at natural oviposition sites at three elevations, where some embryos were subjected to ambient levels of UV-B radiation and others were shielded from UV-B radiation. Compared with other amphibians, photolyase activities in spotted frogs were relatively high. At all sites, hatching success was unaffected by UV-B. Our data support the interpretation that amphibian embryos with relatively high levels of photolyase are more resistant to UV-B radiation than those with lower levels of photolyase. At the embryonic stage, UV-B radiation does not presently seem to be contributing to the population declines of spotted frogs.

  20. Radiation resistance: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their enigmatic pro-survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, Ira; Debbage, Paul; Kumar, Vinod; Skvortsov, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that radiation therapy is a highly effective therapeutic approach, a small intratumoral cell subpopulation known as "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) is radiation-resistant and possesses specific molecular properties protecting it against radiation-induced damage. The exact mechanisms of this radioresistance are still not fully elucidated, but they relate to these cells' enhanced DNA repair capacities and their low intracellular ROS concentrations, resulting from their up-regulation of ROS scavengers. The low ROS content is accompanied by disturbances in cell cycle regulation, so it can be assumed that either CSCs are quiescent or dormant themselves, or that this cell population consists of at least two cell subpopulations: the normally and the slowly proliferating cells (quiescent or dormant cells). Slowly dividing CSCs show concomitant dysregulation of the signaling molecules mediating both cell cycle progression and maintenance of cell stemness. Despite a massive accumulation of data concerning the mechanisms underlying DNA damage response in CSCs, it represents a challenge to researchers in the era of personalized medicine to elucidate the role of intracellular ROS and of signaling pathways associated with the radiation resistance of these cells; there is a clear need to understand the molecular mechanisms helping CSCs to survive radiation exposure.

  1. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  2. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar 'Morex'. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar 'Morex' or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes.

  3. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  4. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Cristian; Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Bortolomasi, Marco; Segala, Matilde; Sartori, Riccardo; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2010-08-16

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is a serious mental illness that is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. In addition, approximately 15% of depression patients are defined treatment-resistant (TRD). Preclinical and genetic studies show that serotonin modulation dysfunction exists in patients with TRD. Some polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis/treatment of MDD; however, no data are available concerning TRD. Therefore, in order to investigate the possible influence of SLC6A4 polymorphisms on the risk of TRD, we genotyped 310 DSM-IV MDD treatment-resistant patients and 284 healthy volunteers. We analysed the most studied polymorphism 5-HTTLPR (L/S) and a single nucleotide substitution, rs25531 (A/G), in relation to different functional haplotype combinations. However the correct mapping of rs25531 is still debated whether it is within or outside the insertion. Our sequencing analysis showed that rs25531 is immediately outside of the 5-HTTLPR segment. Differences in 5-HTTLPR allele (p=0.04) and in L allele carriers (p<0.05) were observed between the two groups. Concerning the estimated haplotype analyses, L(A)L(A) homozygote haplotype was more represented among the control subjects (p=0.01, OR=0.64 95%CI: 0.45-0.91). In conclusion, this study reports a protective effect of the L(A)L(A) haplotype on TRD, supporting the hypothesis that lower serotonin transporter transcription alleles are correlated to a common resistant depression mechanism.

  5. In silico analysis of gene content in tomato genomic regions mapped to the Ty-2 resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Wan, H J; Wei, Y P; Wang, R Q; Ruan, M Y; Ye, Q J; Li, Z M; Zhou, G Z; Yao, Z P; Yang, Y J

    2015-07-17

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus is one of the main diseases affecting tomato production worldwide. Previous studies have shown that Ty-2 is an important resistance gene located between molecular markers C2_At2g28250 (82.3 cM) and T0302 (89.0 cM), and exhibits strong resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Asia. In this study, Ty-2 candidate genes were subjected to bioinformatic analysis for the sequenced tomato genome. We identified 69 genes between molecular markers C2_At2g28250 and T0302, 22 of which were disease-related resistant genes, including nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat disease resistance genes, protease genes (protein kinase, kinase receptor, and protein isomerase), cytochromes, and transcription factors. Expressed sequence tag analysis revealed that 77.3% (17/22) of candidate disease-resistance genes were expressed, involving 143 expressed sequence tags. Based on full-length cDNA sequence analysis, 7 candidate genes were found, 4 of which were involved in tomato responses to pathogens. Microarray expression analysis also showed that most candidate genes were involved in the tomato responses to multiple pathogens, including fungi, viruses, and bacteria. RNA-seq expression analysis revealed that all candidate genes participated in tomato growth and development.

  6. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  7. Gene flow from herbicide-resistant crops: it's not just for transgenes.

    PubMed

    Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Sanchez Olguin, Elena

    2011-06-08

    Gene flow was raised as one of the first issues related to the development and release of genetically engineered (GE) crops. Gene flow has remained a topic of discussion for more than 20 years and is still used as an argument against the release of transgenic crops. With respect to herbicide-resistant crops, gene flow does not differ whether the herbicide resistance trait is introduced via genetic engineering or via conventional breeding techniques. Conventional breeding and genetic engineering techniques have been used to produce herbicide resistance in many of the same crop species. In addition, conventional breeding has been used to produce a broader range of herbicide-resistant crops than have been genetically engineered for herbicide resistance. Economic, political, and social concerns center on the breeding technique, but the results of gene flow for weed management are the same irrespective of breeding technique. This paper will focus on gene flow from nonGE herbicide-resistant crops in North America.

  8. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N. Sarita; Kempker, Russell R.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:28221108

  9. Spirosoma montaniterrae sp. nov., an ultraviolet and gamma radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Kang, Myung-Suk; Joo, Eun Sun; Kim, Myung Kyum; Im, Wan-Taek; Jung, Hee-Young; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-negative, yellow-pigmented, long-rod shaped bacterial strain designated DY10(T) was isolated from a soil sample collected at Mt. Deogyusan, Jeonbuk province, South Korea. Optimum growth observed at 30°C and pH 7. No growth was observed above 1% (w/v) NaCl. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain DY10(T) belonged to the genus Spirosoma and was distantly related to Spirosoma arcticum R2-35(T) (91.0%), Spirosoma lingual DSM 74(T) (90.8%), Spirosoma endophyticum EX36(T) (90.7%), Spirosoma panaciterrae DSM 21099(T) (90.5%), Spirosoma rigui WPCB118(T) (90.2%), Spirosoma spitsbergense DSM 19989(T) (89.8%), Spirosoma luteum DSM 19990(T) (89.6%), Spirosoma oryzae RHs22(T) (89.6%), and Spirosoma radiotolerans DG5A(T) (89.1%). Strain DY10(T) showed resistance to gamma and ultraviolet radiation. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain DY10(T) were consistent with those of the genus Spirosoma, with the quinone system with MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone, iso-C15:0, C16:1 ω5c, and summed feature3 (C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c), and phosphatidylethanolamine as the major polar lipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 53.0 mol%. Differential phenotypic properties with the closely related type strains clearly distinguished strain DY10(T) from previously described members of the genus Spirosoma and represents a novel species in this genus, for which the name Spirosoma montaniterrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DY10(T) (=KCTC 23999(T) =KEMB 9004-162(T) =JCM 18492(T)).

  10. Gene silencing using the recessive rice bacterial blight resistance gene xa13 as a new paradigm in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyan; Wei, Jing; Lin, Yongjun; Chen, Hao

    2012-05-01

    Resistant germplasm resources are valuable for developing resistant varieties in agricultural production. However, recessive resistance genes are usually overlooked in hybrid breeding. Compared with dominant traits, however, they may confer resistance to different pathogenic races or pest biotypes with different mechanisms of action. The recessive rice bacterial blight resistance gene xa13, also involved in pollen development, has been cloned and its resistance mechanism has been recently characterized. This report describes the conversion of bacterial blight resistance mediated by the recessive xa13 gene into a dominant trait to facilitate its use in a breeding program. This was achieved by knockdown of the corresponding dominant allele Xa13 in transgenic rice using recently developed artificial microRNA technology. Tissue-specific promoters were used to exclude most of the expression of artificial microRNA in the anther to ensure that Xa13 functioned normally during pollen development. A battery of highly bacterial blight resistant transgenic plants with normal seed setting rates were acquired, indicating that highly specific gene silencing had been achieved. Our success with xa13 provides a paradigm that can be adapted to other recessive resistance genes.

  11. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Baker, Barbara; Mcgrath, Des J; Jones, David A

    2016-04-01

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 has been identified previously on chromosome 7 and encodes an S-receptor-like kinase, but little is known about I-7. Molecular markers have been developed for the marker-assisted breeding of I-3, but none are available for I-7. We used an RNA-seq and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis approach to map I-7 to a small introgression of S. pennellii DNA (c. 210 kb) on chromosome 8, and identified I-7 as a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP), thereby expanding the repertoire of resistance protein classes conferring resistance to Fol. Using an eds1 mutant of tomato, we showed that I-7, like many other LRR-RLPs conferring pathogen resistance in tomato, is EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1) dependent. Using transgenic tomato plants carrying only the I-7 gene for Fol resistance, we found that I-7 also confers resistance to Fol races 1 and 2. Given that Fol race 1 carries Avr1, resistance to Fol race 1 indicates that I-7-mediated resistance, unlike I-2- or I-3-mediated resistance, is not suppressed by Avr1. This suggests that Avr1 is not a general suppressor of Fol resistance in tomato, leading us to hypothesize that Avr1 may be acting against an EDS1-independent pathway for resistance activation. The identification of I-7 has allowed us to develop molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding of both genes currently known to confer Fol race 3 resistance (I-3 and I-7). Given that I-7-mediated resistance is not suppressed by Avr1, I-7 may be a useful addition to I-3 in the tomato breeder's toolbox.

  12. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-12-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals.

  13. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  14. Functional metagenomic analysis reveals rivers are a reservoir for diverse antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Amos, G C A; Zhang, L; Hawkey, P M; Gaze, W H; Wellington, E M

    2014-07-16

    The environment harbours a significant diversity of uncultured bacteria and a potential source of novel and extant resistance genes which may recombine with clinically important bacteria disseminated into environmental reservoirs. There is evidence that pollution can select for resistance due to the aggregation of adaptive genes on mobile elements. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent disposal to a river by using culture independent methods to study diversity of resistance genes downstream of the WWTP in comparison to upstream. Metagenomic libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli and screened for phenotypic resistance to amikacin, gentamicin, neomycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Resistance genes were identified by using transposon mutagenesis. A significant increase downstream of the WWTP was observed in the number of phenotypic resistant clones recovered in metagenomic libraries. Common β-lactamases such as blaTEM were recovered as well as a diverse range of acetyltransferases and unusual transporter genes, with evidence for newly emerging resistance mechanisms. The similarities of the predicted proteins to known sequences suggested origins of genes from a very diverse range of bacteria. The study suggests that waste water disposal increases the reservoir of resistance mechanisms in the environment either by addition of resistance genes or by input of agents selective for resistant phenotypes.

  15. A novel approach to locate Phytophthora infestans resistance genes on the potato genetic map.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Mirjam M J; Vosman, Ben; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Visser, Richard G F; Henken, Betty; van den Berg, Ronald G

    2010-02-01

    Mapping resistance genes is usually accomplished by phenotyping a segregating population for the resistance trait and genotyping it using a large number of markers. Most resistance genes are of the NBS-LRR type, of which an increasing number is sequenced. These genes and their analogs (RGAs) are often organized in clusters. Clusters tend to be rather homogenous, viz. containing genes that show high sequence similarity with each other. From many of these clusters the map position is known. In this study we present and test a novel method to quickly identify to which cluster a new resistance gene belongs and to produce markers that can be used for introgression breeding. We used NBS profiling to identify markers in bulked DNA samples prepared from resistant and susceptible genotypes of small segregating populations. Markers co-segregating with resistance can be tested on individual plants and directly used for breeding. To identify the resistance gene cluster a gene belongs to, the fragments were sequenced and the sequences analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Putative map positions arising from this analysis were validated using markers mapped in the segregating population. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated with a number of populations derived from wild Solanum species segregating for P. infestans resistance. Newly identified P. infestans resistance genes originating from S. verrucosum, S. schenckii, and S. capsicibaccatum could be mapped to potato chromosomes 6, 4, and 11, respectively.

  16. A loss of function screen identifies nine new radiation susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B. Sugyo, Aya; Imai, Takashi; Saga, Tsuneo; Harada, Yoshi-nobu

    2007-12-21

    Genomic instability is considered a hallmark of carcinogenesis, and dysfunction of DNA repair and cell cycle regulation in response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation are thought to be important factors in the early stages of genomic instability. We performed cell-based functional screening using an RNA interference library targeting 200 genes in human cells. We identified three known and nine new radiation susceptibility genes, eight of which are linked directly or potentially with cell cycle progression. Cell cycle analysis on four of the genes not previously linked to cell cycle progression demonstrated that one, ZDHHC8, was associated with the G{sub 2}/M checkpoint in response to DNA damage. Further study of the 12 radiation susceptibility genes identified in this screen may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle progression, DNA repair, cell death, cell growth and genomic instability, and to develop new radiation sensitizing agents for radiotherapy.

  17. Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis Is Conferred by a Novel erm Gene, erm(38)

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.

    2003-01-01

    High-level, acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria is conferred by mutation within the 23S rRNA gene. However, several mycobacteria are naturally resistant to macrolides, including the Mycobacterium smegmatis group and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize this resistance. Intrinsic macrolide resistance in M. smegmatis was inducible and showed cross-resistance to lincosamides but not to streptogramin B (i.e., ML resistance). A similar phenotype was found with Mycobacterium microti and macrolide-resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum. A search of the DNA sequence data for M. smegmatis strain mc2155 identified a novel erm gene, erm(38), and expression analysis showed that erm(38) RNA levels increased >10-fold after a 2-h incubation with macrolide. Inducible ML resistance was not expressed by an erm(38) knockout mutant, and complementation of this mutant with intact erm(38) in trans resulted in high-level ML resistance (e.g., clarithromycin MIC of >512 μg/ml). Thus, the results indicate that erm(38) confers the intrinsic ML resistance of M. smegmatis. Southern blot analysis with an erm(38)-specific probe indicated that a similar gene may be present in macrolide-resistant M. fortuitum. This finding, with the presence of the erm(37) gene (Rv1988) in the M. tuberculosis complex, suggests that such genes are widespread in mycobacteria with intrinsic macrolide resistance. PMID:14506008

  18. Resistance of radiation-induced tropical wood-polymer composites to fungal degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, L. H. L.; Lim, V. S. L.; Yap, M. G. S.

    The resistance of six tropical hardwoods to fungal degradation by two wild-type strains of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall was investigated using vermiculite burial and wood-block weight loss techniques. Radiation-induced wood-polymer composites (WPC), based on two hardwoods Ramin and Rubber-wood with methyl methacrylate, were prepared, and samples were also exposed to the wood-rotting fungus. A significant improvement in resistance to fungal decay was observed in the WPC. Scanning-electron micrographs of the two woods and their composites after fungal degradation are presented and discussed.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment.

  20. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Valdez, James A.; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation resistance of Fe-14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700-1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150-700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5-4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  1. Radiation-resistant erbium-doped-nanoparticles optical fiber for space applications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jérémie; Myara, Mikhaël; Troussellier, Laurent; Burov, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; Boivin, David; Mélin, Gilles; Gilard, Olivier; Sotom, Michel; Signoret, Philippe

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate for the first time a radiation-resistant Erbium-Doped Fiber exhibiting performances that can fill the requirements of Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers for space applications. This is based on an Aluminum co-doping atom reduction enabled by Nanoparticules Doping-Process. For this purpose, we developed several fibers containing very different erbium and aluminum concentrations, and tested them in the same optical amplifier configuration. This work allows to bring to the fore a highly radiation resistant Erbium-doped pure silica optical fiber exhibiting a low quenching level. This result is an important step as the EDFA is increasingly recognized as an enabling technology for the extensive use of photonic sub-systems in future satellites.

  2. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential.

  3. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  4. Influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs and tet genes in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Dongfang; Li, Kexun

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations of tetracycline-intermediate resistant, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria, and total heterotrophic bacteria were examined to assess the influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs by the R2A agar cultivation method in the tetracycline fortified activated sludge process and in the natural background. Results showed that the percentages of both tetracycline-intermediate resistant and tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in total heterotrophic bacteria were significantly increased, after tetracycline was fed to activated sludge for a 3 months period under four different operating conditions, as compared with the background. In order to investigate the mechanism of activated sludge resistance to tetracycline, polymerase chain reaction experiments were carried out to analyze the existence and evolution of tet genes in the presence of tetracycline. Results revealed that only tet A and tet B genes out of the 11 target tet genes were observed in tetracycline treated activated sludge while no tet gene was detected in background. This indicated that tet A gene could accumulate in activated sludge with slower and continuous influent, while the accumulation of tet B gene could be attributed to shorter hydraulic retention time. Therefore, it was proposed in this study that tetracycline-resistant genes created by efflux pumps spread earlier and quicker to encode resistance to tetracycline, which facilitated the increase in tetracycline-resistance.

  5. In Silico Assigned Resistance Genes Confer Bifidobacterium with Partial Resistance to Aminoglycosides but Not to Β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Fouhy, Fiona; O’Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; van Sinderen, Douwe; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have received significant attention due to their contribution to human gut health and the use of specific strains as probiotics. It is thus not surprising that there has also been significant interest with respect to their antibiotic resistance profile. Numerous culture-based studies have demonstrated that bifidobacteria are resistant to the majority of aminoglycosides, but are sensitive to β-lactams. However, limited research exists with respect to the genetic basis for the resistance of bifidobacteria to aminoglycosides. Here we performed an in-depth in silico analysis of putative Bifidobacterium-encoded aminoglycoside resistance proteins and β-lactamases and assess the contribution of these proteins to antibiotic resistance. The in silico-based screen detected putative aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance proteins across the Bifidobacterium genus. Laboratory-based investigations of a number of representative bifidobacteria strains confirmed that despite containing putative β-lactamases, these strains were sensitive to β-lactams. In contrast, all strains were resistant to the aminoglycosides tested. To assess the contribution of genes encoding putative aminoglycoside resistance proteins in Bifidobacterium sp. two genes, namely Bbr_0651 and Bbr_1586, were targeted for insertional inactivation in B. breve UCC2003. As compared to the wild-type, the UCC2003 insertion mutant strains exhibited decreased resistance to gentamycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. This study highlights the associated risks of relying on the in silico assignment of gene function. Although several putative β-lactam resistance proteins are located in bifidobacteria, their presence does not coincide with resistance to these antibiotics. In contrast however, this approach has resulted in the identification of two loci that contribute to the aminoglycoside resistance of B. breve UCC2003 and, potentially, many other bifidobacteria. PMID:24324818

  6. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  7. Natural variation of rice blast resistance gene Pi-d2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studying natural variation of rice resistance (R) genes in cultivated and wild rice relatives can predict resistance stability to rice blast fungus. In the present study, the protein coding regions of rice R gene Pi-d2 in 35 rice accessions of subgroups, aus (AUS), indica (IND), temperate japonica (...

  8. Worldwide distribution and origin of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pi-ta is a single resistance (R) gene encoding a putative NBS type receptor with single amino acid alanine at position 918 (G at 6640) determining the resistance specificity. The distribution and origin of the Pi-ta gene were investigated in a germplasm core collection consisting of 1790 accessions ...

  9. A New Anthracnose Resistance Gene in Andean Common Bean Cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracnose is one of the most widespread and economically important diseases of common bean worldwide. Most anthracnose resistance genes in common bean are from beans of the Mesoamerican gene pool. The resistant reaction of the Andean common bean cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas to races 9, 64, 65 and ...

  10. mmr, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Gene Conferring Resistance to Small Cationic Dyes and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Branzoni, Manuela; Cantoni, Rita; Milano, Anna; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ciferri, Orio

    1998-01-01

    The mmr gene, cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was shown to confer to Mycobacterium smegmatis resistance to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), erythromycin, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, safranin O, and pyronin Y. The gene appears to code for a protein containing four transmembrane domains. Studies of [3H]TPP intracellular accumulation strongly suggest that the resistance mediated by the Mmr protein involves active extrusion of TPP. PMID:9811672

  11. Identification of disease resistance genes for enhancement of existing potato cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant’s ability to defend itself against host-specific microbes is specified by disease resistance (R) genes. Upon recognition of an invading pathogen, R proteins are responsible for the activation of a multitude of responses ultimately leading to resistance. The majority of R genes are dominant a...

  12. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kristine T; Caprio, Michael A; Allen, K Clint; Musser, Fred R

    2013-02-01

    Recent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decisions regarding resistance management in Bt-cropping systems have prompted concern in some experts that dual-gene Bt-corn (CrylA.105 and Cry2Ab2 toxins) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than single-gene Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-corn (CrylAb toxin). The concern is that Bt-toxin longevity could be significantly reduced with recent adoption of a natural refuge for dual-gene Bt-cotton (CrylAc and Cry2Ab2 toxins) and concurrent reduction in dual-gene corn refuge from 50 to 20%. A population genetics framework that simulates complex landscapes was applied to risk assessment. Expert opinions on effectiveness of several transgenic corn and cotton varieties were captured and used to assign probabilities to different scenarios in the assessment. At least 350 replicate simulations with randomly drawn parameters were completed for each of four risk assessments. Resistance evolved within 30 yr in 22.5% of simulations with single-gene corn and cotton with no volunteer corn. When volunteer corn was added to this assessment, risk of resistance evolving within 30 yr declined to 13.8%. When dual-gene Bt-cotton planted with a natural refuge and single-gene corn planted with a 50% structured refuge was simulated, simultaneous resistance to both toxins never occurred within 30 yr, but in 38.5% of simulations, resistance evolved to toxin present in single-gene Bt-corn (CrylAb). When both corn and cotton were simulated as dual-gene products, cotton with a natural refuge and corn with a 20% refuge, 3% of simulations evolved resistance to both toxins simultaneously within 30 yr, while 10.4% of simulations evolved resistance to CrylAb/c toxin.

  13. Novel ISCR1-linked resistance genes found in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengping; Wu, Kuihai; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Qian; Chen, Qing; Yu, Shouyi; Rui, Yongyu

    2012-11-01

    Non-duplicate multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (n=1329) isolated from southern China between January 2008 and December 2009 were investigated for the presence of ISCR1 as well as characterisation of ISCR1-linked resistance genes. Of 433 ISCR1-positive strains, 151 appeared to carry ISCR1-linked resistance genes. Seven different ISCR1-linked resistance gene arrays were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing analysis. Many of these arrays are reported in some species for the first time. A total of 12 genes, including a novel ABC transporter (GenBank accession no. GU944725), qnrA1, qnrB2, qnrB6, bla(DHA-1), ampR, bla(CTX-M-9), bla(PER-1), insB, sapA-like peptide transport periplasmic protein, putative glutathione S-transferase and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, were detected. This study was the first to employ PCR-RFLP using HinfI and RsaI to analyse ISCR1-linked genes. ISCR1 was widely disseminated among MDR Gram-negative bacteria and was in close association with quinolone resistance and β-lactamase genes (class A and class C) in southern China.

  14. Radiation Effects of n-type, Low Resistivity, Spiral Silicon Drift Detector Hybrid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen W.; De Geronimo G.; Carini, G.A.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.C.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new thin-window, n-type, low-resistivity, spiral silicon drift detector (SDD) array - to be used as an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer (in varying environments) for NASA. To achieve low-energy response, a thin SDD entrance window was produced using a previously developed method. These thin-window devices were also produced on lower resistivity, thinner, n-type, silicon material, effectively ensuring their radiation hardness in anticipation of operation in potentially harsh radiation environments (such as found around the Jupiter system). Using the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility beam line RERS1, we irradiated a set of suitable diodes up to 5 Mrad and the latest iteration of our ASICs up to 12 Mrad. Then we irradiated two hybrid detectors consisting of newly, such-produced in-house (BNL) SDD chips bonded with ASICs with doses of 0.25 Mrad and 1 Mrad. Also we irradiated another hybrid detector consisting of previously produced (by KETEK) on n-type, high-resistivity SDD chip bonded with BNL's ASICs with a dose of 1 Mrad. The measurement results of radiated diodes (up to 5 Mrad), ASICs (up to 12 Mrad) and hybrid detectors (up to 1 Mrad) are presented here.

  15. Radiation-Resistant Hybrid Lotus Effect for Achieving Photoelectrocatalytic Self-Cleaning Anticontamination Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Pirich, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment involving radiation-resistant hydrophobic coatings is planned for space exposure and experimental testing on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. The Lotus biocide coatings are designed for supporting space exploration missions. This innovation is an antibacterial, anti-contamination, and self-cleaning coating that uses nano-sized semiconductor semimetal oxides to neutralize biological pathogens and toxic chemicals, as well as to mitigate dust accumulation (see figure). The Lotus biocide coating is thin (approximately microns thick), lightweight, and the biocide properties will not degrade with time or exposure to biological or chemical agents. The biocide is stimulated chemically (stoichiometric reaction) through exposure to light (photocatalysis), or by an applied electric field (electrocatalysis). The hydrophobic coating samples underwent preliminary high-energy proton and alpha-ray (helium ion) irradiations at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88" cyclotron and demonstrated excellent radiation resistance for a portion of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GRC) and Solar Proton spectrum. The samples will undergo additional post-flight studies when returned to Earth to affirm further the radiation resistance properties of the space exposed coatings.

  16. Development of High-Fiber-Volume, Radiation-Resistant, Hig-Pressure Laminates for Cryogenic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Reed

    2001-04-15

    Three new composite laminates have been developed for use as structural supports, thermal insulation in cryogenic and radiation environments. Boron-free, woven glass cloth has been preimpregnated with three types of resin systems. The organic resin systems are multifunctional and are much less sensitive to radiation than the epoxy systems used in G-10CR and G-11CR. The laminates are fabricated by curing the preimpregnated glass cloth under high pressure to produce higher glass content (70-74 vol. %). Higher glass content is beneficial because (1) it increases the laminate strength and stiffness; (2) it leads to more isotropic composite properties; and (3) it increases the overall radiation resistance because half and the amount of organic resin content is used. The cost of at least one of the laminates is comparable to that of G-10CR. Elastic, short-beam shear, thermal contraction, and flexural properties have been measured.

  17. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  18. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  19. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes derived from the omega interposon for use in E. coli and Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Weiser, J; Lebrihi, A; Branny, P; Pernodet, J L

    1997-05-06

    Three antibiotic resistance gene cassettes, derived from the omega interposon (Prentki and Krisch (1984) Gene 29, 303-313) were constructed. These cassettes carry different antibiotic resistance genes, conferring resistance to geneticin, hygromycin or viomycin, flanked by short inverted repeats containing transcription and translation termination signals and synthetic polylinkers. These cassettes were designated omega aac, omega hyg and omega vph. Resistance phenotypes conferred by these constructions are selectable in E. coli and Streptomyces. These cassettes can be used for insertional mutagenesis or for vector construction.

  20. Detection of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene in Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae from Different Hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Qu, Fen; Shan, Bin; Huang, Bin; Jia, Wei; Chen, Cha; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Zhang, Xin; Bao, Chunmei; Xu, Yunmin; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, into carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) clinical isolates poses a significant threat to global health. Here we report the identification of three mcr-1-harboring carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strains, collected from three patients in two provinces in China. Our results show that mcr-1-harboring CRE strains have started to spread in different hospitals in China. In addition, this report presents the first description of chromosomal integration of mcr-1 into a carbapenem-resistant E. coli strain. PMID:27216058

  1. Identification and molecular tagging of two complementary dominant resistance genes to maize dwarf mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Yu; Ding, Jun-Qiang; Du, Yan-Xiu; Chen, Wei-Cheng

    2002-12-01

    Maize dwarf mosaic is one of the devastating and widespread viral diseases in the world. So far, only a few genes were identified and mapped in the resistant materials. A new resistant elite inbred line Siyi was identified with resistance to maize dwarf mosaic virus strain B at early and adult stage. Two complementary dominant genes conditioned the resistance, with a new genetic model, of the maize inbred line were found at adult stage by the genetic analysis based on parents, F1, F2 and backcrosses in two years. The microsatellite analysis of a F2 population from the cross between Siyi and Mo17 was used to identify the two resistance genes on chromosome 3 and 6 respectively by 87 pairs of microsatellite markers. The linkage distance between phi029 and the one resistance gene on chromosome 3 is 14.5 cM, and phi126 to the other on chromosome 6 is 7.2 cM.

  2. A New SNP Haplotype associated with blue disease resistance gene in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to cotton blue disease (CBD) was evaluated in 364 F2.3 families of 3 populations derived from resistant variety ‘Delta Opal’. The CBD resistance in ‘Delta Opal’ was controlled by one single dominant gene designated Cbd. Two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were identified as linked t...

  3. Prevalence of ColE1-like plasmids and kanamycinr resistance genes in Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes are increasing in prevalence and concern in human and animal health. Many strains carry resistance determinants on plasmids; current practices focus heavily on large plasmids, and the role that small plasmids play in resistance gene transfer ...

  4. Identification of the tetracycline resistance gene, tet(M), in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Noguchi, N; Sasatsu, M; Takahashi, T

    2001-05-01

    This is the first report to demonstrate the presence of tet(M) in naturally occurring isolates of tetracycline-resistant Erysipelothrix rbusiopathiae, which causes swine erysipelas. The tet(M) gene was isolated from E. rhusiopathiae strain KY5-42. The nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequence were 99% identical to the tet(M) gene from Enterococcus faecalis. The gene was necessary and sufficient for the expression of tetracycline resistance in Escherichia coli. The presence of the tet(M) gene in the 114 tetracycline-resistant E. rhusiopathiae isolates from diseased pigs was detected by the polymerase chain reaction assay. The specific amplified DNA fragment was obtained from all 114 tetracycline-resistant strains. It was suggested that the tet(M) gene was widely present in the field isolates of E. rhusiopathiae resistant to tetracycline.

  5. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and both genes were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 was identified previously and encodes a S-receptor-like kinase, but li...

  6. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Laport, Marinella Silva; Pontes, Paula Veronesi Marinho; Dos Santos, Daniela Silva; Santos-Gandelman, Juliana de Fátima; Muricy, Guilherme; Bauwens, Mathieu; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; George, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL) to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria.

  7. Presence of antibiotic resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant in Thibodaux, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Naquin, Anthony; Shrestha, Arsen; Sherpa, Mingma; Nathaniel, Rajkumar; Boopathy, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Increasing uses and disposals of antibiotics to the environment have increased emergence of various antibiotic resistance. One of the sources for the spread of antibiotic resistance is wastewater treatment plant, where bacteria and antibiotics can come in contact and can acquire antibiotics resistance. There are very few studies on this subject from a small town sewage treatment plant. Therefore, this study was conducted using raw sewage as well as treated sewage from a sewage treatment plant in Thibodaux in rural southeast Louisiana in USA. Samples were collected monthly from the Thibodaux sewage treatment plant and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes was monitored. The study showed the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in both raw and treated sewage in every month of the study period. The genetic transformation assay showed the successful transformation of methicillin resistant gene, mecA to an antibiotic sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, which became antibiotic resistant within 24h.

  8. Elimination of Listeria monocytogenes in sausage meat by combination treatment: Radiation and radiation-resistant bacteriocins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Stotz, Viviane; Dupont, Claude; Salmieri, Stéphane; Khan, Ruhul A.; Lacroix, Monique

    2012-08-01

    Two new bacteria were isolated from human feces and were designated MT 104 and MT 162. They were able to produce bacteriocins that are active against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes. Bacteriocins produced by these isolated strains had 100% and 82.35% residual activity when they were treated by gamma radiation at doses of 4 and 40 kGy, respectively. A reduction of 1.0, 1.5 and 3 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes was observed in sausage meat when treated with bacteriocins from MT 104, MT 162, and nisin, respectively. For synergic effect, the D10 value in presence of the bacteriocins produced by MT 104 showed a 1.08 fold increased relative sensitivity of L. monocytogenes as compared to control after 5 days. The highest synergic effect was observed in presence of nisin which led to 1.61 fold increased relative sensitivity. Combined treatments with nisin and γ-irradiation showed a synergic antimicrobial effect in meat after 24 h and 5 days of storage. A synergic effect was observed only after 5 days at 4 °C for the bacteriocin from MT 104, as compared to the bacteriocin produced by MT 162 that had only an additive antimicrobial effect in all conditions.

  9. Resistance to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus vulgaris: a case study for mapping two independent genes.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, Valérie; Sévignac, Mireille; Billant, Paul; Dron, Michel; Langin, Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a devastating disease of common bean. Resistant cultivars are economical means for defense against this pathogen. In the present study, we mapped resistance specificities against 7 C. lindemuthianum strains of various geographical origins revealing differential reactions on BAT93 and JaloEEP558, two parents of a recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population, of Meso-american and Andean origin, respectively. Six strains revealed the segregation of two independent resistance genes. A specific numerical code calculating the LOD score in the case of two independent segregating genes (i.e. genes with duplicate effects) in a RILs population was developed in order to provide a recombination value (r) between each of the two resistance genes and the tested marker. We mapped two closely linked Andean resistance genes (Co-x, Co-w) at the end of linkage group (LG) B1 and mapped one Meso-american resistance genes (Co-u) at the end of LG B2. We also confirmed the complexity of the previously identified B4 resistance gene cluster, because four of the seven tested strains revealed a resistance specificity near Co-y from JaloEEP558 and two strains identified a resistance specificity near Co-9 from BAT93. Resistance genes found within the same cluster confer resistance to different strains of a single pathogen such as the two anthracnose specificities Co-x and Co-w clustered at the end of LG B1. Clustering of resistance specificities to multiple pathogens such as fungi (Co-u) and viruses (I) was also observed at the end of LG B2.

  10. The allelic relationship of genes giving resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus in blackgram.

    PubMed

    Verma, R P; Singh, D P

    1986-09-01

    The allelic relationship of resistance genes for MYMV was studied in blackgram (V. mungo (L.) Hepper). The resistant donors to MYMV - 'Pant U84' and 'UPU 2', and their F1, F2 and F3 generations - were inoculated artificially using an insect vector, whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.). The two recessive genes previously reported for resistance were found to be the same in both donors.

  11. Genetic engineering of crop plants for fungal resistance: role of antifungal genes.

    PubMed

    Ceasar, S Antony; Ignacimuthu, S

    2012-06-01

    Fungal diseases damage crop plants and affect agricultural production. Transgenic plants have been produced by inserting antifungal genes to confer resistance against fungal pathogens. Genes of fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes, such as chitinase and glucanase, are frequently used to produce fungal-resistant transgenic crop plants. In this review, we summarize the details of various transformation studies to develop fungal resistance in crop plants.

  12. Resistance to Sulfonamides and Dissemination of sul Genes Among Salmonella spp. Isolated from Food in Poland.

    PubMed

    Mąka, Łukasz; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Ścieżyńska, Halina; Modzelewska, Magdalena; Popowska, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella spp., is an emerging problem of food safety. Antimicrobial use can result in selection of resistant organisms. The food chain is considered a route of transmission of resistant pathogens to humans. In many European countries, sulfonamides are one of the most commonly used antimicrobials. The aim of our investigation was to assess the prevalence of sul genes and plasmid occurrence among sulfonamide-resistant Salmonella spp. Eighty-four sulfonamide-resistant isolates were collected in 2008 and 2013 from retail products in Poland. Minimal inhibitory concentration of all of these isolates was ≥1024 μg/mL. Resistant isolates were tested for the presence of sul1, sul2, sul3, and int1 genes by using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In total, 44.0% (37/84) isolates carried the sul1 gene, 46.4% (39/84) were sul2 positive, while the sul3 gene was not detected in any of the sulfonamide-resistant isolates tested. It was found that 3.6% (3/84) of resistant Salmonella spp. contained sul1, sul2, and intI genes. All 33 intI-positive isolates carried the sul1 gene. Eleven of the sulfonamide-resistant isolates were negative for all the sul genes. Most of the sulfonamide-resistant Salmonella spp. harbored plasmids; only in eight isolates were no plasmids detected. Generally, the size of the plasmids ranged from approximately 2 kb to ≥90 kb. Our results revealed a relatively a high prevalence of sulfonamides-resistant Salmonella spp. isolated from retail food. Additionally, we have detected a high dissemination of plasmids and class 1 integrons that may enhance the spread of resistance genes in the food chain.

  13. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  14. Bioinformatic prediction of ultraviolet light mutagenesis sensitivity of human genes and a method for genetically engineering UVB resistance.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Papageorgio, Chris

    2011-04-18

    Living on earth, we are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light as part of the solar radiation. UVB spectrum light exposure contributes to the development of skin cancer by interacting with pyrimidine pairs to create lesions called cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. If these lesions are not removed by nucleotide excision repair, they often give rise to C to T transition mutations. Based on these observations, a bioinformatics approach was used to predict the vulnerability of human protein coding genes to UVB induced loss of function mutations. This data was used to evaluate in depth those genes associated with malignant melanoma. In addition, we demonstrate a method of genetically engineering genes that significantly improves resistance to UVB loss of function mutations.

  15. Isolation and characterization of NBS-LRR- resistance gene candidates in turmeric (Curcuma longa cv. surama).

    PubMed

    Joshi, R K; Mohanty, S; Subudhi, E; Nayak, S

    2010-09-08

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), an important asexually reproducing spice crop of the family Zingiberaceae is highly susceptible to bacterial and fungal pathogens. The identification of resistance gene analogs holds great promise for development of resistant turmeric cultivars. Degenerate primers designed based on known resistance genes (R-genes) were used in combinations to elucidate resistance gene analogs from Curcuma longa cultivar surama. The three primers resulted in amplicons with expected sizes of 450-600 bp. The nucleotide sequence of these amplicons was obtained through sequencing; their predicted amino acid sequences compared to each other and to the amino acid sequences of known R-genes revealed significant sequence similarity. The finding of conserved domains, viz., kinase-1a, kinase-2 and hydrophobic motif, provided evidence that the sequences belong to the NBS-LRR class gene family. The presence of tryptophan as the last residue of kinase-2 motif further qualified them to be in the non-TIR-NBS-LRR subfamily of resistance genes. A cluster analysis based on the neighbor-joining method was carried out using Curcuma NBS analogs together with several resistance gene analogs and known R-genes, which classified them into two distinct subclasses, corresponding to clades N3 and N4 of non-TIR-NBS sequences described in plants. The NBS analogs that we isolated can be used as guidelines to eventually isolate numerous R-genes in turmeric.

  16. Study of fatigue resistance of chemical and radiation crosslinked medical grade ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Baker, D A; Hastings, R S; Pruitt, L

    1999-09-15

    The aim of this work is to understand the role of chemical and radiation induced crosslinking on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of medical grade ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In recent years, the need to improve the tribological performance of UHMWPE used in total joint replacements has resulted in the widespread utilization of crosslinking as a method to improve wear resistance. Although crosslinking has been shown to drastically improve the wear resistance of the polymer, the potential trade-off in fatigue properties has yet to be addressed. Fatigue crack propagation resistance is a concern in tibial inserts where large cyclic stresses are sufficient to drive the growth of subsurface cracks that potentially contribute to delamination wear mechanisms. For clinical relevance, the combined effects of sterilization and aging are examined in two commercially available crosslinked resins. Nonsterile and unaged resins serve as a control. To evaluate the effect of crosslinking, a comparison is made to uncrosslinked resins. Scanning electron microscopy is used to provide an understanding of fatigue fracture mechanisms in the crosslinked polymers. The results of this study show that the current level of crosslinking used in orthopedic resins for enhanced wear resistance is not beneficial for fatigue crack propagation resistance.

  17. RNAi validation of resistance genes and their interactions in the highly DDT-resistant 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Doherty, Jeffery J; Sun, Weilin; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been re-recommended by the World Health Organization for malaria mosquito control. Previous DDT use has resulted in resistance, and with continued use resistance will increase in terms of level and extent. Drosophila melanogaster is a model dipteran that has many available genetic tools, numerous studies done on insecticide resistance mechanisms, and is related to malaria mosquitoes allowing for extrapolation. The 91-R strain of D. melanogaster is highly resistant to DDT (>1500-fold), however, there is no mechanistic scheme that accounts for this level of resistance. Recently, reduced penetration, increased detoxification, and direct excretion have been identified as resistance mechanisms in the 91-R strain. Their interactions, however, remain unclear. Use of UAS-RNAi transgenic lines of D. melanogaster allowed for the targeted knockdown of genes putatively involved in DDT resistance and has validated the role of several cuticular proteins (Cyp4g1 and Lcp1), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1), and ATP binding cassette transporters (Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1) involved in DDT resistance. Further, increased sensitivity to DDT in the 91-R strain after intra-abdominal dsRNA injection for Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1 was determined by a DDT contact bioassay, directly implicating these genes in DDT efflux and resistance.

  18. Identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster and an additional gene for resistance to the antituberculosis drug capreomycin.

    PubMed

    Felnagle, Elizabeth A; Rondon, Michelle R; Berti, Andrew D; Crosby, Heidi A; Thomas, Michael G

    2007-07-01

    Capreomycin (CMN) belongs to the tuberactinomycin family of nonribosomal peptide antibiotics that are essential components of the drug arsenal for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Members of this antibiotic family target the ribosomes of sensitive bacteria and disrupt the function of both subunits of the ribosome. Resistance to these antibiotics in Mycobacterium species arises due to mutations in the genes coding for the 16S or 23S rRNA but can also arise due to mutations in a gene coding for an rRNA-modifying enzyme, TlyA. While Mycobacterium species develop resistance due to alterations in the drug target, it has been proposed that the CMN-producing bacterium, Saccharothrix mutabilis subsp. capreolus, uses CMN modification as a mechanism for resistance rather than ribosome modification. To better understand CMN biosynthesis and resistance in S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus, we focused on the identification of the CMN biosynthetic gene cluster in this bacterium. Here, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of the CMN biosynthetic gene cluster from S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus ATCC 23892. We provide evidence for the heterologous production of CMN in the genetically tractable bacterium Streptomyces lividans 1326. Finally, we present data supporting the existence of an additional CMN resistance gene. Initial work suggests that this resistance gene codes for an rRNA-modifying enzyme that results in the formation of CMN-resistant ribosomes that are also resistant to the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin. Thus, S. mutabilis subsp. capreolus may also use ribosome modification as a mechanism for CMN resistance.

  19. Distribution of radiation resistances of microbiological contaminants of a cotton-based medical product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan Aoshuang; Tallentire, Alan

    1995-02-01

    A distribution of radiation resistances of microorganisms has been compiled from the results of D 10 determinations of isolates recovered from a cotton-based medical product. In all, 250 organisms were isolated from a total microbial population of around 21,000 organisms present on about 170 g of product. D 10 values of the isolates fall within the range of 0.5 to 3.6 kGy. The findings indicate that organisms having a D 10 value greater than 3.6 kGy occur amongst contaminants on this cotton product at a probability of less than 1 in 5000. The overall resistance of the population of organisms found in the present study is somewhat less than that of the 'Standard Distribution of Resistances' used in 'AAMI dose setting methods'.

  20. Top-surface imaging resists for lithography with strongly attenuated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Kubiak, G.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.; Pollagi, T.

    1997-09-01

    Strong resist photoabsorption at wavelengths below 248 nm necessitates the use of a thin layer imaging (TLI) scheme for microlithography using 193 nm, 157 nm, or 13.4 nm radiation. Previous to this work, a TLI process commonly known as silylated top surface imaging (TSI) was developed by a Sandia/AT and T team for use in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) at 13.4 nm. Using this bilayer process, 0.13 {micro}m resolution with 87{degree} sidewalls in 0.7 {micro}m of resist was achieved for EUV exposures. New imaging layer polymers, silylation reagents and crosslinkers, and process conditions were screened for improvement in this TSI process with the ultimate goal of demonstrating a resist technology capable of 0.10 {micro}m critical dimension (CD). The results of these attempted improvements to the TSI process are described in this report.

  1. An ICEBs1-like element may be associated with the extreme radiation and desiccation resistance of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores.

    PubMed

    Tirumalai, Madhan R; Fox, George E

    2013-09-01

    Comparisons of the genomes of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 and the closely related type strain, B. pumilus ATCC7061(T), exposed an extended region of non-homologous genes. A detailed examination of this region revealed the presence of an ICEBs1-like integrative conjugative element in SAFR-032. A similar element was subsequently located elsewhere in the ATCC7061(T) genome. A detailed comparison of these elements and the ICEBs1 of B. subtilis revealed extremely rapid flux in gene content, genome organization and sequence similarity. It is not clear if the B. pumilus elements as they are currently structured are functional. However, it is clear that the past involvement of these elements has brought multiple genes of unknown function to the SAFR-032 genome and these genes may be responsible for the rapid evolution that led to the extreme radiation and desiccation resistance of this organism's spores.

  2. Integrating Biological Covariates into Gene Expression-Based Predictors of Radiation Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Vidya P.; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene expression-based classifiers has resulted in a number of promising potential signatures of patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy. However, these approaches have also created difficulties in trying to use gene expression alone to predict a complex trait. A practical approach to this problem is to integrate existing biological knowledge with gene expression to build a composite predictor. We studied the problem of predicting radiation sensitivity within human cancer cell lines from gene expression. First, we present evidence for the need to integrate known biological conditions (tissue of origin, RAS, and p53 mutational status) into a gene expression prediction problem involving radiation sensitivity. Next, we demonstrate using linear regression, a technique for incorporating this knowledge. The resulting correlations between gene expression and radiation sensitivity improved through the use of this technique (best-fit adjusted R2 increased from 0.3 to 0.84). Overfitting of data was examined through the use of simulation. The results reinforce the concept that radiation sensitivity is not driven solely by gene expression, but rather by a combination of distinct parameters. We show that accounting for biological heterogeneity significantly improves the ability of the model to identify genes that are associated with radiosensitivity.

  3. Cerium clustering and radiation damage resistance in aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygel, Jennifer Lynn

    Cerium oxide is a well-known additive for increasing resistance to radiation damage in glass by preventing electrons and holes freed by irradiation from becoming trapped at defect sites and inducing optical absorption bands which can severely darken the glass. Phosphate glasses provide a unique opportunity for studying radiation damage resistance due to their high rare-earth solubility, ˜25 mol%. Two series of glasses, nominally AlP3O9-CeP 3O9 and CeP3O9-SiP2O 7, were synthesized to investigate structure-property relationships in a range of compositions near the metaphosphate. The presence of cerium clustering, or sharing of oxygen between cerium cations, was predicted using the chain fragment cluster model, an extension of earlier models for rare-earth phosphate glasses. Using the atom% composition determined by XPS from vacuum fracture surfaces, and cation coordination measured by Ce K-edge EXAFS, 29Si CPMG NMR, and 27Al MAS NMR, it was determined that clustering occurs for glasses containing ≥ 14 mol% Ce2O3 in the aluminophosphate glass series and ≥ 18 mol% Ce2O3 in the silicophosphate glass series. Many measured properties have been observed to correlate with the presence or absence of cerium clustering, cluster size, or other concomitant structural changes, including: visible coloration, density, refractive index, Ce3+ photoluminescence, and Ce3+ paramagnetic resonance. Additionally, radiation damage resistance was identified in the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses which were predicted to have clustered cerium cations through the absence of radiation-induced phosphorus-related paramagnetic defects. This resistance is attributed to a structural implication of clustering. Specifically, cerium cations will be in close proximity to defect precursor sites at the concentrations required for clustering and are thus able to prevent localization of electrons and holes on those sites. Finally, irradiation-induced optical absorption was measured in all

  4. Pollen-mediated gene flow from glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer): consequences for the dispersal of resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Debalin; Tyre, Andrew J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Gaines, Todd A.; Irmak, Suat; Knezevic, Stevan Z.; Lindquist, John L.; Jhala, Amit J.

    2017-01-01

    Gene flow is an important component in evolutionary biology; however, the role of gene flow in dispersal of herbicide-resistant alleles among weed populations is poorly understood. Field experiments were conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) from glyphosate-resistant (GR) to -susceptible (GS) common waterhemp using a concentric donor-receptor design. More than 130,000 common waterhemp plants were screened and 26,199 plants were confirmed resistant to glyphosate. Frequency of gene flow from all distances, directions, and years was estimated with a double exponential decay model using Generalized Nonlinear Model (package gnm) in R. PMGF declined by 50% at <3 m distance from the pollen source, whereas 90% reduction was found at 88 m (maximum) depending on the direction of the pollen-receptor blocks. Amplification of the target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), was identified as the mechanism of glyphosate resistance in parent biotype. The EPSPS gene amplification was heritable in common waterhemp and can be transferred via PMGF, and also correlated with glyphosate resistance in pseudo-F2 progeny. This is the first report of PMGF in GR common waterhemp and the results are critical in explaining the rapid dispersal of GR common waterhemp in Midwestern United States. PMID:28327669

  5. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwood, J. S.; Shahnazari, M.; Chicana, B.; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, A.; Bartolini, A.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically-active, cancellous-bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total-body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16wk), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50-1.1Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is =10Gy) or accumulates over long-duration, interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4hrs-7d later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4hrs) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1d) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB-ligand (Rankl) within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3d of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (e.g., monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased 11.9-fold, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased 1.7- fold over controls). Marrow expression of the RANKL decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (Opg), also rose after irradiation (11.3-fold). The ratio Rankl/Opg in marrow was increased 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. As expected, radiation increased a serum marker of resorption (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrease in bone volume/total volume) through reduced trabecular struts. We conclude that total-body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal, concerted regulation of gene expression within marrow and mineralized tissue for

  6. Ionizing radiation stimulates expression of pro-osteoclastogenic genes in marrow and skeletal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Chicana, Betsabel; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, Akhilesh; Bartolini, Alana; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-03-03

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically active, cancellous bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16 week), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2 Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8 Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50–1.1 Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is ≥10 Gy) or accumulates over long-duration interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4 h—7 days later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4 h) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1 day) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (Rankl), within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3 days of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (eg, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased by 11.9-fold, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased by 1.7-fold over controls). The ratio, Rankl/Opg, in marrow increased by 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. In the marrow, expression of the antioxidant transcription factor, Nfe2l2, strongly correlated with expression levels of Nfatc1, Csf1, Tnf, and Rankl. Radiation exposure increased a serum marker of bone resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrement after 1 week). Finally, we conclude that total body irradiation (gamma

  7. Ionizing radiation stimulates expression of pro-osteoclastogenic genes in marrow and skeletal tissue

    DOE PAGES

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Chicana, Betsabel; ...

    2015-03-03

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically active, cancellous bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16 week), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2 Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8 Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50–1.1 Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is ≥10 Gy) or accumulates overmore » long-duration interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4 h—7 days later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4 h) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1 day) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (Rankl), within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3 days of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (eg, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased by 11.9-fold, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased by 1.7-fold over controls). The ratio, Rankl/Opg, in marrow increased by 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. In the marrow, expression of the antioxidant transcription factor, Nfe2l2, strongly correlated with expression levels of Nfatc1, Csf1, Tnf, and Rankl. Radiation exposure increased a serum marker of bone resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrement after 1 week). Finally, we conclude that total body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal elevations in the concentrations of specific

  8. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Chicana, Betsabel; Schreurs, A.S.; Kumar, Akhilesh; Bartolini, Alana; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically active, cancellous bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16 week), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2 Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8 Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50–1.1 Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is ≥10 Gy) or accumulates over long-duration interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4 h—7 days later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4 h) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1 day) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (Rankl), within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3 days of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (eg, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased by 11.9-fold, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased by 1.7-fold over controls). The ratio, Rankl/Opg, in marrow increased by 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. In the marrow, expression of the antioxidant transcription factor, Nfe2l2, strongly correlated with expression levels of Nfatc1, Csf1, Tnf, and Rankl. Radiation exposure increased a serum marker of bone resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrement after 1 week). We conclude that total body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal elevations in the concentrations of specific genes

  9. Incorporation of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes Into Lowland Rice Cultivar Through Marker-Assisted Backcross Breeding.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sharat Kumar; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Pandit, Elssa; Behera, Lambodar; Anandan, Annamalai; Mukherjee, Arup Kumar; Lenka, Srikanta; Barik, Durga Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a major disease of rice in many rice growing countries. Pyramided lines carrying two BB resistance gene combinations (Xa21+xa13 and Xa21+xa5) were developed in a lowland cultivar Jalmagna background through backcross breeding by integrating molecular markers. In each backcross generation, markers closely linked to the disease resistance genes were used to select plants possessing the target genes. Background selection was continued in those plants carrying resistant genes until BC(3) generation. Plants having the maximum contribution from the recurrent parent genome were selected in each generation and hybridized with the recipient parent. The BB-pyramided line having the maximum recipient parent genome recovery of 95% was selected among BC3F1 plants and selfed to isolate homozygous BC(3)F(2) plants with different combinations of BB resistance genes. Twenty pyramided lines with two resistance gene combinations exhibited high levels of tolerance against the BB pathogen. In order to confirm the resistance, the pyramided lines were inoculated with different X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains of Odisha for bioassay. The genotypes with combination of two BB resistance genes conferred high levels of resistance to the predominant X. oryzae pv. oryzae isolates prevalent in the region. The pyramided lines showed similarity with the recipient parent with respect to major agro-morphologic traits.

  10. Molecular Identification and Quantification of Tetracycline and Erythromycin Resistance Genes in Spanish and Italian Retail Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Large antibiotic resistance gene pools in the microbiota of foods may ultimately pose a risk for human health. This study reports the identification and quantification of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant populations, resistance genes, and gene diversity in traditional Spanish and Italian cheeses, via culturing, conventional PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The numbers of resistant bacteria varied widely among the antibiotics and the different cheese varieties; in some cheeses, all the bacterial populations seemed to be resistant. Up to eight antibiotic resistance genes were sought by gene-specific PCR, six with respect to tetracycline, that is, tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), and tet(W), and two with respect to erythromycin, that is, erm(B) and erm(F). The most common resistance genes in the analysed cheeses were tet(S), tet(W), tet(M), and erm(B). The copy numbers of these genes, as quantified by qPCR, ranged widely between cheeses (from 4.94 to 10.18log⁡10/g). DGGE analysis revealed distinct banding profiles and two polymorphic nucleotide positions for tet(W)-carrying cheeses, though the similarity of the sequences suggests this tet(W) to have a monophyletic origin. Traditional cheeses would therefore appear to act as reservoirs for large numbers of many types of antibiotic resistance determinants. PMID:25302306

  11. Clusters of Antibiotic Resistance Genes Enriched Together Stay Together in Swine Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy A.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Wang, Qiong; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Looft, Torey; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundance of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk. PMID:27073098

  12. Radiation Dose-Rate Effects on Gene Expression in a Mouse Biodosimetry Model

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Elliston, Carl D.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological terrorist attack, there will be a pressing need for biodosimetry to triage a large, potentially exposed population and to assign individuals to appropriate treatment. Exposures from fallout are likely, resulting in protracted dose delivery that would, in turn, impact the extent of injury. Biodosimetry approaches that can distinguish such low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures from acute exposures have not yet been developed. In this study, we used the C57BL/6 mouse model in an initial investigation of the impact of low-dose-rate delivery on the transcriptomic response in blood. While a large number of the same genes responded to LDR and acute radiation exposures, for many genes the magnitude of response was lower after LDR exposures. Some genes, however, were differentially expressed (P < 0.001, false discovery rate < 5%) in mice exposed to LDR compared with mice exposed to acute radiation. We identified a set of 164 genes that correctly classified 97% of the samples in this experiment as exposed to acute or LDR radiation using a support vector machine algorithm. Gene expression is a promising approach to radiation biodosimetry, enhanced greatly by this first demonstration of its potential for distinguishing between acute and LDR exposures. Further development of this aspect of radiation biodosimetry, either as part of a complete gene expression biodosimetry test or as an adjunct to other methods, could provide vital triage information in a mass radiological casualty event. PMID:26114327

  13. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control.

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Pigeons from Public Parks in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Peña, K; Esperón, F; Torres-Mejía, A M; de la Torre, A; de la Cruz, E; Jiménez-Soto, M

    2017-02-24

    Antimicrobial resistance is known to be an emerging problem, but the extent of the issue remains incomplete. The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of nine resistance genes (blaTEM , catI, mecA, qnrS, sulI, sulII, tet(A), tet(Q), vanA) in the faeces of 141 pigeons from four urban parks in Alajuela, Guadalupe, Tres Ríos and San José in Costa Rica. The genes were identified by real-time PCR directly from enema samples. About 30% of the samples were positive for genes catI and sulI; between 13% and 17% were positive for qnrS, sulII, tet(A) and tet(Q); and 4% were positive for blaTEM . The mecA and vanA genes were not detected. The average of antimicrobial resistance genes detected per pigeon was 2. Eight different patterns of resistance were identified, without differences in the sampling areas, being the most common pattern 2 (sulII positive samples). During rainy season, the genes more frequently found were sulI and tet(A). In conclusion, the urban inhabiting pigeons tested are currently carrying antimicrobial resistance genes, potentially acting as reservoirs of resistant bacteria and vectors to humans. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study carried out on direct detection of resistance genes in the digestive metagenomes of pigeons.

  15. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  16. Radiation Resistance of XLPE Nano-dielectrics for Advanced Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Polyzos, Georgios; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Leonard, Keith J; Sauers, Isidor

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in nuclear reactor safety, particularly as commercial reactors are approaching 40 years service and lifetime extensions are considered, as well as for new reactor building projects around the world. The materials that are currently used in cabling for instrumentation, reactor control, and communications include cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), ethylene propylene rubber (EPR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), neoprene, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene. While these materials show suitable radiation tolerance in laboratory tests, failures before their useful lifetime occur due to the combined environmental effects of radiation, temperature and moisture, or operation under abnormal conditions. In addition, the extended use of commercial reactors beyond their original service life places a greater demand on insulating materials to perform beyond their current ratings in these nuclear environments. Nanocomposite materials that are based on XLPE and other epoxy resins incorporating TiO2, MgO, SiO2, and Al2O3 nanoparticles are being fabricated using a novel in-situ method established at ORNL to demonstrate materials with increased resistance to radiation. As novel nanocomposite dielectric materials are developed, characterization of the non-irradiated and irradiated nanodielectrics will lead to a knowledge base that allow for dielectric materials to be engineered with specific nanoparticle additions for maximum benefit to wide-variety of radiation environments found in nuclear reactors. This paper presents the initial findings on the development of XLPE-based SiO2 nano-composite dielectrics in the context of electrical performance and radiation degradation.

  17. Organization, expression and evolution of a disease resistance gene cluster in soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michelle A; Marek, Laura Fredrick; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-01-01

    PCR amplification was previously used to identify a cluster of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) on soybean linkage group J. Resistance to powdery mildew (Rmd-c), Phytophthora stem and root rot (Rps2), and an ineffective nodulation gene (Rj2) map within this cluster. BAC fingerprinting and RGA-specific primers were used to develop a contig of BAC clones spanning this region in cultivar "Williams 82" [rps2, Rmd (adult onset), rj2]. Two cDNAs with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of R-genes have also been mapped to opposite ends of a BAC in the contig Gm_Isb001_091F11 (BAC 91F11). Sequence analyses of BAC 91F11 identified 16 different resistance-like gene (RLG) sequences with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of disease resistance genes. Four of these RLGs represent two potentially novel classes of disease resistance genes: TIR/NBD domains fused inframe to a putative defense-related protein (NtPRp27-like) and TIR domains fused inframe to soybean calmodulin Ca(2+)-binding domains. RT-PCR analyses using gene-specific primers allowed us to monitor the expression of individual genes in different tissues and developmental stages. Three genes appeared to be constitutively expressed, while three were differentially expressed. Analyses of the R-genes within this BAC suggest that R-gene evolution in soybean is a complex and dynamic process. PMID:12524363

  18. Characterization of integrons and resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-10-17

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of illness and death, especially in developing countries. The problem is exacerbated if bacteria attain multidrug resistance. Little is currently known about the extent of antibiotic resistance in foodborne pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in Africa. Therefore, the current study was carried out to characterize, at the molecular level, the mechanism of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Forty-seven out of 69 isolates (68.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates was higher in meat products (37, 69.8%) than in dairy products (10, 62.5%). The multidrug-resistant serovars included, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (24 isolates, 34.8%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, (15 isolates, 21.8%), S. enterica serovar Infantis (7 isolates, 10.1%) and S. enterica non-typable serovar (1 isolate, 1.4%). The highest resistance was to ampicillin (95.7%), then to kanamycin (93.6%), spectinomycin (93.6%), streptomycin (91.5%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (91.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes and 39.1% and 8.7% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. β-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 75.4% of isolates and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 27.5% of isolates. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in 18.8% of isolates. PCR screening identified S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in both meat and dairy products. This is the first study to report many of these resistance genes in dairy products. This study highlights the high incidence of multidrug-resistant S. enterica in

  19. Fluoroquinolone resistance in atypical pneumococci and oral streptococci: evidence of horizontal gene transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance determinants from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ip, Margaret; Chau, Shirley S L; Chi, Fang; Tang, Julian; Chan, Paul K

    2007-08-01

    Atypical strains, presumed to be pneumococcus, with ciprofloxacin MICs of > or =4.0 microg/ml and unique sequence variations within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes in comparison with the Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 strain, were examined. These strains were reidentified using phenotypic methods, including detection of optochin susceptibility, bile solubility, and agglutination by serotype-specific antisera, and genotypic methods, including detection of pneumolysin and autolysin genes by PCR, 16S rRNA sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The analysis based on concatenated sequences of the six MLST loci distinguished the "atypical" strains from pneumococci, and these strains clustered closely with S. mitis. However, all these strains and five of nine strains from the viridans streptococcal group possessed one to three gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes whose QRDR sequences clustered with those of S. pneumoniae, providing evidence of horizontal transfer of the QRDRs of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes from pneumococci into viridans streptococci. These genes also conferred fluoroquinolone resistance to viridans streptococci. In addition, the fluoroquinolone resistance determinants of 32 well-characterized Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains from bacteremic patients were also compared. These strains have unique amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC that were distinguishable from those in fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci and the "atypical" isolates. Both recombinational events and de novo mutations play an important role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  20. Application of genomic and quantitative genetic tools to identify candidate resistance genes for brown rot resistance in peach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Pedro J; Parfitt, Dan E; Bostock, Richard M; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A; Gradziel, Thomas M; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a brown rot resistant introgression line, 'F8,1-42', derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot.

  1. Detection and Characterizations of Genes Resistant to Tetracycline and Sulfa among the Bacteria in Mariculture Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, L.; Li, Y.; Zhu, P.

    2013-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-five bacteria from maricultural environments were tested for sensitivity to tetracycline and sulfa. Result show that 72% of the bacteria were sulfa-resistant, 36% of the bacteria were tetracycline-resistant, and 16.5% of bacteria showed resistance to both tetracyclines and sulfa ,indicating that the proportion of sulfa and tetracycline resistance bacteria isvery large in the maricultural environments. PCR methods were used to detect if these resistant bacteria carry tetracycline and sulfa resistance genes. Out of the 33 tetracycline-resistant bacteria screened, 3 were positive for tetA, 6 were positive for tetB and no isolate wasboth positive for tetA and tetB. Of the 97 sulfa-resistant bacteria screened, 9 were positive for sul2, 6 were positive for sul1, 1 isolate was positive for bothsul1 and sul2. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tetracycline for tetA-carrying isolates were higher than those tetB-carrying isolates.while The MIC of sulfa for sul2-carrying isolates were higher than those sul1-carrying isolates. Indicating that tetA and sul2 gene may play ubknown roles in resisting tetracycline and sulfa than tetB and sul1 genes. The results showed the 4 kinds of genes (tetA,tetB,sul1,sul2) has no host specificity. All these 16S sequence are from the isolates which are positive for the above genes, it indicated the above antibiotic resistance genes are widespread in the environment regardless of the host. While the DNA sequence of these four genes showed tetA, sul1, sul2 genes are conservative in different bacteria , etB gene conserved poorly. The research aim is to get a preliminary understanding of resistance mechanism related to the resistant bacteria and the resistance genes in marine aquaculture environment through the analysis of resistant genes, providing research base for the prevention and treatment of drug-resistant bacteria so as to reduce the threat to the ecological environment, aquaculture and human health.

  2. Coordinate regulation of proteins associated with radiation resistance in cultured insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, A.; Koval, T.M.

    1994-04-01

    Cultured TN-368 lepidopteran insect cells exhibit a pronounced resistance to the lethal effects of a variety of physical agents, including X rays and 254 nm UV light, as well as a large number of chemicals. The resistance to ionizing radiation has previously been associated with an inducible process which is not expressed in unirradiated cells or cells receiving less than some minimal amount of radiation necessary for activating the process. The studies in this paper were initiated in an attempt to identify and characterize the inducible proteins associated with the marked radiation resistance of the TN-368 cells. Cells were exposed to doses of 0, 25, 64 or 350 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays and incubated either for 3 h in medium containing [{sup 35}S]methionine or for 2 h without labeling. Labeled cells were separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions and proteins were analyzed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Unlabeled cells were used to isolate total RNA which was translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with {sup 35}S label. These translation products were also analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Gamma irradiation of the TN-368 cells resulted in the de novo synthesis of several proteins as well as the complete inhibition of others. The number of such proteins identified was 19. These proteins ranged in size from 18-73 kDa, with a pI distribution of 4.7 to 6.1. In addition to the unique proteins, a large number of other proteins were also either up- or down-regulated. These observations were made in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions as well as in the translation products of RNA produced after irradiation. These studies indicate that RNA and protein synthesis in lepidopteran cells are coordinately regulated in response to ionizing radiation and may participate in the pronounced radioresistance of the TN-368 cells. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhances human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian-Shu; Li, Yi; Yu, Hongliang; Xiong, Wei; Yu, Hao; Wang, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Teng, Yingqi; Zhou, Demin

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3(AKR1C3) is an enzyme involved in prostaglandins metabolism. Studies suggest that AKR1C3 has a pivotal role in the radioresistance of esophageal cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, yet the role of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer cells radiation resistance has not yet been clarified. In our study, we established a stable overexpressing AKR1C3 cell line (AKR1C3-over) derived from the prostate cell line DU145 and its control cell line (Control). We conducted colony formation assay to determine the role of AKR1C3 in radioresistance and we used its chemical inhibitor to detect whether it can restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. Flow cytometry assay was carried out to detect IR-induced ROS accumulation. Elisa was adopted to dedect the concentration of PGF2α in the suspension of the cells after 6GY radiation. Western blotting was used to dedect the MAPK and PPAR γ. The results demonstrated that overexpression of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer can result in radioresistance and suppression of AKR1C3 via its chemical inhibitor indocin restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. According to the flow cytometry assay, ROS was decreased by 80% in DU145-over cells. Also overexpression of AKR1C3 could result in the accumulation of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), which can not only promote prostate cancer cell 's proliferation but also could enhance prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation and activated the MAPK pathway and inhibited the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, we found that overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhanced human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation through activation of MAPK pathway. PMID:27385003

  4. Impact of pre-application treatment on municipal sludge composition, soil dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes, and abundance of antibiotic-resistance genes on vegetables at harvest.

    PubMed

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Scott, Andrew; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Lapen, David R; Duenk, Peter; Topp, Edward

    2017-06-01

    In many jurisdictions sludge recovered from the sewage treatment process is a valued fertilizer for crop production. Pre-treatment of sewage sludge prior to land application offers the potential to abate enteric microorganisms that carry genes conferring resistance to antibiotics. Pre-treatment practices that accomplish this should have the desirable effect of reducing the risk of contamination of crops or adjacent water with antibiotic resistance genes carried in these materials. In the present study, we obtained municipal sludge that had been subjected to one of five treatments. There were, anaerobic-digestion or aerobic-digestion, in both instances with and without dewatering; and heat-treatment and pelletization. Each of the five types of biosolids was applied to an agricultural field at commercial rates, following which lettuce, carrots and radishes were planted. Based on qPCR, the estimated antibiotic gene loading rates were comparable with each of the five biosolids. However, the gene abundance in soil following application of the pelletized biosolids was anomalously lower than expected. Following application, the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes decreased in a generally coherent fashion, except sul1 which increased in abundance during the growing season in the soil fertilized with pelletized biosolids. Based on qPCR and high throughput sequencing evidence for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from the biosolids to the vegetables at harvest was weak. Clostridia were more abundant in soils receiving any of the biosolids except the pelletized. Overall, the behavior of antibiotic resistance genes in soils receiving aerobically or anaerobically-digested biosolids was consistent and coherent with previous studies. However, dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in soils receiving the heat treated pelletized biosolids were very different, and the underlying mechanisms merit investigation.

  5. Arsenic resistance genes of As-resistant purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from As-contaminated sites for bioremediation application.

    PubMed

    Nookongbut, Phitthaya; Kantachote, Duangporn; Krishnan, Kannan; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to identify arsenic resistant mechanisms in As-resistant purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB) by screening them for presence of As-resistance genes and related enzymes. Resistance to As(III) and As(V) of four As-resistant PNSB determined in terms of median inhibition concentration (IC50 values) were in the order of strains Rhodopseudomonas palustris C1 > R. palustris AB3 > Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus C31 > R. palustris L28 which corresponded to the presence of As-resistance genes in these bacteria. The strain C1 showed all As-marker genes; arsC, arsM, aioA, and acr3, while aioA was not detected in strain AB3. Strains C31 and L28 had only Arsenite-transporter gene, acr3. Translation of all these detected gene sequences of strain C1 to amino acid sequences showed that these proteins have vicinal cysteine; Cys126, Cys105, and Cys178 of Acr3, ArsC, AioA, respectively. Tertiary structure of proteins Acr3, ArsC, AioA, and ArsM showed strain C1 exhibits the high activities of arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase enzymes that are encoded by aioA and arsC genes, respectively. Moreover, strain C1 with arsM gene produced volatile-methylated As-compounds; monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsenic acid (DMA), and arsenobetaine (AsB) in the presence of either As(III) or As(V). In conclusion, the strain C1 has great potential for its application in bioremediation of As-contaminated sites.

  6. Phylogeny Estimation of the Radiation of Western North American Chipmunks (Tamias) in the Face of Introgression Using Reproductive Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Noah; Demboski, John R.; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The causes and consequences of rapid radiations are major unresolved issues in evolutionary biology. This is in part because phylogeny estimation is confounded by processes such as stochastic lineage sorting and hybridization. Because these processes are expected to be heterogeneous across the genome, comparison among marker classes may provide a means of disentangling these elements. Here we use introns from nuclear-encoded reproductive protein genes expected to be resistant to introgression to estimate the phylogeny of the western chipmunks (Tamias: subgenus: Neotamias), a rapid radiation that has experienced introgressive hybridization of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We analyze the nuclear loci using coalescent-based species-tree estimation methods and concatenation to estimate a species tree and we use parametric bootstraps and coalescent simulations to differentiate between phylogenetic error, coalescent stochasticity and introgressive hybridization. Results indicate that the mtDNA gene tree reflects several introgression events that have occurred between taxa of varying levels of divergence and at different time points in the tree. T. panamintinus and T. speciosus appear to be fixed for ancient mitochondrial introgressions from T. minimus. A southern Rocky Mountains clade appears well sorted (i.e., species are largely monophyletic) at multiple nuclear loci, while five of six taxa are nonmonophyletic based on cytochrome b. Our simulations reject phylogenetic error and coalescent stochasticity as causes. The results represent an advance in our understanding of the processes at work during the radiation of Tamias and suggest that sampling reproductive-protein genes may be a viable strategy for phylogeny estimation of rapid radiations in which reproductive isolation is incomplete. However, a genome-scale survey that can statistically compare heterogeneity of genealogical process at many more loci will be necessary to test this conclusion. PMID:21878471

  7. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi Yue, Wu

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  8. Extracting Gene Networks for Low-Dose Radiation Using Graph Theoretical Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Voy, Brynn H; Scharff, Jon A; Perkins, Andy D; Saxton, Arnold M; Borate, Bhavesh; Chesler, Elissa J; Branstetter, Lisa K; Langston, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Genes with common functions often exhibit correlated expression levels, which can be used to identify sets of interacting genes from microarray data. Microarrays typically measure expression across genomic space, creating a massive matrix of co-expression that must be mined to extract only the most relevant gene interactions. We describe a graph theoretical approach to extracting co-expressed sets of genes, based on the computation of cliques. Unlike the results of traditional clustering algorithms, cliques are not disjoint and allow genes to be assigned to multiple sets of interacting partners, consistent with biological reality. A graph is created by thresholding the correlation matrix to include only the correlations most likely to signify functional relationships. Cliques computed from the graph correspond to sets of genes for which significant edges are present between all members of the set, representing potential members of common or interacting pathways. Clique membership can be used to infer function about poorly annotated genes, based on the known functions of better-annotated genes with which they share clique membership (i.e., “guilt-by-association”). We illustrate our method by applying it to microarray data collected from the spleens of mice exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation. Differential analysis is used to identify sets of genes whose interactions are impacted by radiation exposure. The correlation graph is also queried independently of clique to extract edges that are impacted by radiation. We present several examples of multiple gene interactions that are altered by radiation exposure and thus represent potential molecular pathways that mediate the radiation response. PMID:16854212

  9. Extracting gene networks for low-dose radiation using graph theoretical algorithms.

    PubMed

    Voy, Brynn H; Scharff, Jon A; Perkins, Andy D; Saxton, Arnold M; Borate, Bhavesh; Chesler, Elissa J; Branstetter, Lisa K; Langston, Michael A

    2006-07-21

    Genes with common functions often exhibit correlated expression levels, which can be used to identify sets of interacting genes from microarray data. Microarrays typically measure expression across genomic space, creating a massive matrix of co-expression that must be mined to extract only the most relevant gene interactions. We describe a graph theoretical approach to extracting co-expressed sets of genes, based on the computation of cliques. Unlike the results of traditional clustering algorithms, cliques are not disjoint and allow genes to be assigned to multiple sets of interacting partners, consistent with biological reality. A graph is created by thresholding the correlation matrix to include only the correlations most likely to signify functional relationships. Cliques computed from the graph correspond to sets of genes for which significant edges are present between all members of the set, representing potential members of common or interacting pathways. Clique membership can be used to infer function about poorly annotated genes, based on the known functions of better-annotated genes with which they share clique membership (i.e., "guilt-by-association"). We illustrate our method by applying it to microarray data collected from the spleens of mice exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation. Differential analysis is used to identify sets of genes whose interactions are impacted by radiation exposure. The correlation graph is also queried independently of clique to extract edges that are impacted by radiation. We present several examples of multiple gene interactions that are altered by radiation exposure and thus represent potential molecular pathways that mediate the radiation response.

  10. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  11. De Novo Characterization of Genes That Contribute to High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thu; Ran, Qinghong; Ostrer, Lev

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization of resistant bacteria to existing antibiotics depends on the identification of candidate targets whose activities contribute to resistance. Using a transposon insertion library in an Escherichia coli mutant that was 2,000 times less susceptible to ciprofloxacin than its parent and the relative fitness scores, we identified 19 genes that contributed to the acquired ciprofloxacin resistance and mapped the shortest genetic path that increased the antibiotic susceptibility of the resistant bacteria back to a near wild-type level. PMID:27431218

  12. Tetracycline and Phenicol Resistance Genes and Mechanisms: Importance for Agriculture, the Environment, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Recent reports have speculated on the future impact that antibiotic-resistant bacteria will have on food production, human health, and global economics. This review examines microbial resistance to tetracyclines and phenicols, antibiotics that are widely used in global food production. The mechanisms of resistance, mode of spread between agriculturally and human-impacted environments and ecosystems, distribution among bacteria, and the genes most likely to be associated with agricultural and environmental settings are included. Forty-six different tetracycline resistance () genes have been identified in 126 genera, with (M) having the broadest taxonomic distribution among all bacteria and (B) having the broadest coverage among the Gram-negative genera. Phenicol resistance genes are organized into 37 groups and have been identified in 70 bacterial genera. The review provides the latest information on tetracycline and phenicol resistance genes, including their association with mobile genetic elements in bacteria of environmental, medical, and veterinary relevance. Knowing what specific antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) are found in specific bacterial species and/or genera is critical when using a selective suite of ARGs for detection or surveillance studies. As detection methods move to molecular techniques, our knowledge about which type of bacteria carry which resistance gene(s) will become more important to ensure that the whole spectrum of bacteria are included in future surveillance studies. This review provides information needed to integrate the biology, taxonomy, and ecology of tetracycline- and phenicol-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes so that informative surveillance strategies can be developed and the correct genes selected.

  13. Theory of the high base resistivity n(+)pp(+) silicon solar cell and its application to radiation damage effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Weinberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    Particulate radiation in space is a principal source of silicon solar cell degradation, and an investigation of cell radiation damage at higher base resistivities appears to have implication toward increasing solar cell and, therefore, useful satellite lifetimes in the space environment. However, contrary to expectations, it has been found that for cells with resistivities of 84 and 1250 ohm cm, the radiation resistance decreases as cell base resistivity increases. An analytical solar-cell computer model was developed with the objective to determine the reasons for this unexpected behavior. The present paper has the aim to describe the analytical model and its use in interpreting the behavior, under irradiation, of high-resistivity solar cells. Attention is given to boundary conditions at the space-charge region edges, cell currents, cell voltages, the generation of the theoretical I-V characteristic, experimental results, and computer calculations.

  14. Natural variation of rice blast resistant gene Pi-ta in Oryza species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice is a putative NBS type cytoplasmic receptor conferring resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene-for-gene manner. A Functional Nucleotide Polymorphism (FNP) change resulting in an amino acid substitution of Alanine to Serine at position 918 (nucleotide G to T at posi...

  15. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in EPA regulations have prompted concern in some experts that transgenic corn expressing two lepidopteran-active genes from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (dual-gene) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than corn expressing a s...

  16. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Todd A; Barker, Abigail L; Patterson, Eric L; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P; Wilson, Robert G; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan; Kniss, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number.

  17. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  18. EPSPS Gene Copy Number and Whole-Plant Glyphosate Resistance Level in Kochia scoparia

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Barker, Abigail L.; Patterson, Eric L.; Westra, Philip; Westra, Eric P.; Wilson, Robert G.; Jha, Prashant; Kumar, Vipan

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Kochia scoparia has evolved in dryland chemical fallow systems throughout North America and the mechanism of resistance involves 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene duplication. Agricultural fields in four states were surveyed for K. scoparia in 2013 and tested for glyphosate-resistance level and EPSPS gene copy number. Glyphosate resistance was confirmed in K. scoparia populations collected from sugarbeet fields in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and Montana. Glyphosate resistance was also confirmed in K. scoparia accessions collected from wheat-fallow fields in Montana. All GR samples had increased EPSPS gene copy number, with median population values up to 11 from sugarbeet fields and up to 13 in Montana wheat-fallow fields. The results indicate that glyphosate susceptibility can be accurately diagnosed using EPSPS gene copy number. PMID:27992501

  19. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  20. The LBP gene and its association with resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Gui Hong; Liu, Feng; Xia, Jun Hong; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-12-01

    Resistance to pathogens is important for the sustainability and profitability of food fish production. In immune-related genes, the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) gene is an important mediator of the inflammatory reaction. We analyzed the cDNA and genomic structure of the LBP gene in tilapia. The full-length cDNA (1901 bp) of the gene contained a 1416 bp open reading frame, encoding 471 amino acid residues. Its genomic sequence was 5577 bp, comprising 15 exons and 14 introns. Under normal conditions, the gene was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues. The highest expression was detected in intestine and kidney. We examined the responses of the gene to challenges with two bacterial pathogens Streptcoccus agalactiae and Aeromonas hydrophila. The gene was significantly upregulated in kidney and spleen post-infection with S. agalactiae and A. hydrophila, respectively. However, the expression profiles of the gene after the challenge with the two pathogens were different. Furthermore, we identified three SNPs in the gene. There were significant associations (p < 0.05) of two of the three SNPs with the resistance to A. hydrophila, but not with the resistance to S. agalactiae or growth performance. These results suggest that the LBP gene is involved in the acute-phase immunologic response to the bacterial infections, and the responses to the two bacterial pathogens are different. The two SNPs associated with the resistance to A. hydrophila may be useful in the selection of tilapia resistant to A. hydrophila.

  1. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  2. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  3. Effectiveness of Genes for Hessian Fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) Resistance in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Shukle, Richard H; Cambron, Sue E; Moniem, Hossam Abdel; Schemerhorn, Brandon J; Redding, Julie; David Buntin, G; Flanders, Kathy L; Reisig, Dominic D; Mohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is the most important insect pest of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. subsp. aestivum) in the southeastern United States, and the deployment of genetically resistant wheat is the most effective control. However, the use of resistant wheat results in the selection of pest genotypes that can overcome formerly resistant wheat. We have evaluated the effectiveness of 16 resistance genes for protection of wheat from Hessian fly infestation in the southeastern United States. Results documented that while 10 of the genes evaluated could provide protection of wheat, the most highly effective genes were H12, H18, H24, H25, H26, and H33. However, H12 and H18 have been reported to be only partially effective in field evaluations, and H24, H25, and H26 may be associated with undesirable effects on agronomic traits when introgressed into elite wheat lines. Thus, the most promising new gene for Hessian fly resistance appears to be H33. These results indicate that identified highly effective resistance in wheat to the Hessian fly is a limited resource and emphasize the need to identify novel sources of resistance. Also, we recommend that the deployment of resistance in gene pyramids and the development of novel strategies for engineered resistance be considered.

  4. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  5. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  6. A Low-Power, Radiation-Resistant, Silicon-Drift-Detector Array for Extraterrestrial Element Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey B. D.; De Geronimo G.; Gaskin, J.A.; Elsner, R.F.; Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; Keister, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.

    2012-02-08

    We are developing a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C to Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on remote airless bodies. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is demonstrated by its inclusion on three recent lunar missions and by exciting new data that have recently been announced from the Messenger Mission to Mercury. The SDD-XRS instrument that we have been developing offers excellent energy resolution and an order of magnitude lower power requirement than conventional CCDs, making much higher sensitivities possible with modest spacecraft resources. In addition, it is significantly more radiation resistant than x-ray CCDs and therefore will not be subject to the degradation that befell recent lunar instruments. In fact, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it applicable even to the harsh environment of the Jovian system where it can be used to map the light surface elements of Europa. In this paper, we first discuss our element-mapping science-measurement goals. We then derive the necessary instrument requirements to meet these goals and discuss our current instrument development status with respect to these requirements.

  7. Risk assessment for the harmful effects of UVB radiation on the immunological resistance to infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, W; Garssen, J; Slob, W; de Gruijl, F R; Van Loveren, H

    1998-01-01

    Risk assessment comprises four steps: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. In this study, the effects of increased ultraviolet B(UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation on immune functions and the immunological resistance to infectious diseases in rats were analyzed according to this strategy. In a parallelogram approach, nonthreshold mathematical methods were used to estimate the risk for the human population after increased exposure to UVB radiation. These data demonstrate, using a worst-case strategy (sensitive individuals, no adaptation), that exposure for approximately 90 min (local noon) at 40 degrees N in July might lead to 50% suppression of specific T-cell mediated responses to Listeria monocytogenes in humans who were not preexposed to UVB (i.e., not adapted). Additionally, a 5% decrease in the thickness of the ozone layer might shorten this exposure time by approximately 2.5%. These data demonstrate that UVB radiation, at doses relevant to outdoor exposure, may affect the specific cellular immune response to Listeria bacteria in humans. Whether this will also lead to a lowered resistance (i.e.,increased pathogenic load) in humans is not known, although it was demonstrated that UVB-induced immunosuppression in rats was sufficient to increase the pathogenic load. Epidemiology studies are needed to validate and improve estimates for the potential effects of increased UVB exposure on infectious diseases in humans. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9435148

  8. eIF4E Resistance: Natural Variation Should Guide Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Bastet, Anna; Robaglia, Christophe; Gallois, Jean-Luc

    2017-02-28

    eIF4E translation initiation factors have emerged as major susceptibility factors for RNA viruses. Natural eIF4E-based resistance alleles are found in many species and are mostly variants that maintain the translation function of the protein. eIF4E genes represent major targets for engineering viral resistance, and gene-editing technologies can be used to make up for the lack of natural resistance alleles in some crops, often by knocking out eIF4E susceptibility factors. However, we report here how redundancy among eIF4E genes can restrict the efficient use of knockout alleles in breeding. We therefore discuss how gene-editing technologies can be used to design de novo functional alleles, using knowledge about the natural evolution of eIF4E genes in different species, to drive resistance to viruses without affecting plant physiology.

  9. Expression of the yeast cpd1 gene in tobacco confers resistance to the fungal toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Panagiotis, Madesis; Kritonas, Kalantidis; Irini, Nianiou Obeidat; Kiriaki, Chatzidimitriou; Nicolaos, Panopoulos; Athanasios, Tsaftaris

    2007-06-01

    Many phytopathogenic species of the fungus Cercospora produce cercosporin, a photoactivated perylenequinone toxin that belongs to a family of photosensitizers, which absorb light energy and produce extremely cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species. The cpd1 (cercosporin photosensitizer detoxification) gene of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which encodes for a novel protein with significant similarity to the FAD-dependent pyridine nucleotide reductases, confers resistance to cercosporin when over-expressed in yeast. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential ability of cpd1 gene to confer resistance to cercosporin when expressed in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). Transgenic tobacco plants were produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens, with cpd1 integrated as the gene of interest. We report here that expression of cpd1 gene in tobacco can mediate resistance to cercosporin. The involvement of cpd1 gene in the detoxification of the cercosporin reinforces previous observations, which suggested that resistance to cercosporin is mediated by a mechanism involving toxin reduction.

  10. [Cloning and analysis of the resistance gene fragments from silverleaf sunflower Helianthus agrophyllus].

    PubMed

    Danilova, T V; Kuklev, M Iu; Andeeva, G N; Shevelukha, V S; Karlov, G I

    2007-04-01

    Using a combination of degenerate primers designed from the NBS domains of the resistance genes, amplification and subsequent cloning of the resistance gene fragments from sunflower (Helianthus agrophyllus) was conducted. Sequences of cloned PCR products differed from one another and displayed homology to NBS domain fragments of the already known plant resistance genes, as well as to the analogous genes from different classes. The highest homology was shown to the NBS domain regions of cultivated sunflower and the other members of the family Compositae. Two cloned fragments had open reading frames, while the other sequences carried stop codons and seemed to belong to pseudogenes. Amino acid sequences of Helianthus agrophyllus analyzed contained conservative regions typical of NBS domains of the resistance gene products.

  11. Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from Lactobacillus Isolated from Traditional Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiling; Pan, Lin; Li, Lina; Lu, Jie; Kwok, Laiyu; Menghe, Bilige; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2017-03-01

    Lactobacilli are widely used as starter cultures or probiotics in yoghurt, cheese, beer, wine, pickles, preserved food, and silage. They are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). However, recent studies have shown that some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains carry antibiotic resistance genes and are resistant to antibiotics. Some of them may even transfer their intrinsic antibiotic resistance genes to other LAB or pathogens via horizontal gene transfer, thus threatening human health. A total of 33 Lactobacillus strains was isolated from fermented milk collected from different areas of China. We analyzed (1) their levels of antibiotic resistance using a standardized dilution method, (2) their antibiotic resistance gene profiles by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using gene-specific primers, and (3) the transferability of some of the detected resistance markers by a filter mating assay. All Lactobacillus strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin, but susceptible to gentamicin, linezolid, neomycin, erythromycin, and clindamycin. Their susceptibilities to tetracycline, kanamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, rifampicin, and chloramphenicol was different. Results from our PCR analysis revealed 19 vancomycin, 10 ciprofloxacin, and 1 tetracycline-resistant bacteria that carried the van(X), van(E), gyr(A), and tet(M) genes, respectively. Finally, no transferal of the monitored antibiotic resistance genes was observed in the filter mating assay. Taken together, our study generated the antibiotic resistance profiles of some milk-originated lactobacilli isolates and preliminarily assessed their risk of transferring antibiotic gene to other bacteria. The study may provide important data concerning the safe use of LAB.

  12. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure.

    PubMed

    Luby, Elizabeth M; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water, which may contribute to the increase in antibiotic resistance in non-agricultural settings. We compared losses of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and macrolide-resistance (erm and msrA) genes in water draining from plots with or without swine manure application under chisel plow and no till conditions. Concentrations of ermB, ermC and ermF were all >10(9)copies g(-1) in manure from tylosin-treated swine, and application of this manure resulted in short-term increases in the abundance of these genes in soil. Abundances of ermB, ermC and ermF in manured soil returned to levels identified in non-manured control plots by the spring following manure application. Tillage practices yielded no significant differences (p>0.10) in enterococci or erm gene concentrations in drainage water and were therefore combined for further analysis. While enterococci and tylosin-resistant enterococci concentrations in drainage water showed no effects of manure application, ermB and ermF concentrations in drainage water from manured plots were significantly higher (p<0.01) than concentrations coming from non-manured plots. ErmB and ermF were detected in 78% and 44%, respectively, of water samples draining from plots receiving manure. Although ermC had the highest concentrations of the three genes in drainage water, there was no effect of manure application on ermC abundance. MsrA was not detected in manure, soil or water. This study is the first to report significant increases in abundance of resistance genes in waters draining from agricultural land due to manure application.

  13. Modulation of DNA methylation levels sensitizes doxorubicin-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-02-05

    Chemoresistant tumors often fail to respond to other cytotoxic treatments such as radiation therapy. The mechanisms of chemo- and radiotherapy cross resistance are not fully understood and are believed to be epigenetic in nature. We hypothesize that MCF-7 cells and their doxorubicin-resistant variant MCF-7/DOX cells may exhibit different responses to ionizing radiation due to their dissimilar epigenetic status. Similar to previous studies, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells harbor much lower levels of global DNA methylation than MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells had lower background apoptosis levels and were less responsive to radiation than MCF-7 cells. Decreased radiation responsiveness correlated to significant global DNA hypomethylation in MCF-7/DOX cells. Here, for the first time, we show that the radiation resistance of MCF-7/DOX cells can be reversed by an epigenetic treatment - the application of methyl-donor SAM. SAM-mediated reversal of DNA methylation led to elevated radiation sensitivity in MCF-7/DOX cells. Contrarily, application of SAM on the radiation sensitive and higher methylated MCF-7 cells resulted in a decrease in their radiation responsiveness. This data suggests that a fine balance of DNA methylation is needed to insure proper radiation and drug responsiveness.

  14. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Ontogenic Resistance in Malus-Venturia Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gusberti, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible) and old (ontogenic resistant) leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not) should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen) shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. In this work, five candidate genes putatively involved in the ontogenic resistance of apple were identified: a gene encoding an “enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein” was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3) were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result of the

  15. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.513 Section 174.513... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  16. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.513 Section 174.513... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  17. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.513 Section 174.513... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  18. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats.

  19. Molecular insights of co-trimoxazole resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zain, Z; Kamsani, N H; Ahmad, N

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades, co-trimoxazole (SXT), an antibacterial combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, has been used for treatment of upper respiratory tract infection due to Haemophilus influenzae. The usage of this antibiotic has become less important due to emergence of SXT-resistant strains worldwide. Most reports associate SXT resistance to the presence of variants of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) dfrA genes which are responsible for trimethoprim resistance; while the sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance are due to sulfonamide (SUL) genes sul1 and sul2 and/or mutation in the chromosomal (folP) gene encoding dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS). This study aims to detect and analyse the genes that are involved in SXT resistance in H. influenzae strains that were isolated in Malaysia. Primers targeting for variants of dfrA, fol and sul genes were used to amplify the genes in nine SXT-resistant strains. The products of amplification were sequenced and multiple alignments of the assembled sequences of the local strains were compared to the sequences of other H. influenzae strains in the Genbank. Of the five variants of the dhfA genes, dfrA1 was detected in three out of the nine strains. In contrast to intermediate strains, at least one variant of folP genes was detected in the resistant strains. Multiple nucleotide alignment of this gene revealed that strain H152 was genetically different from the others due to a 15-bp nucleotide insert in folP gene. The sequence of the insert was similar to the insert in folP of H. influenzae strain A12, a strain isolated in United Kingdom. None of the strains had sul1 gene but sul2 gene was detected in four strains. Preliminary study on the limited number of samples shows that the TMP resistance was attributed to mainly to dfrA1 and the SMX was due to folP genes. Presence of sul2 in addition to folP in seven strains apparently had increased their level of resistance. A strain that lacked sul1 or sul2 gene, its resistance

  20. Quantitative Resistance to Bean dwarf mosaic virus in Common Bean is Associated with the Bct gene for Resistance to Beet curly top virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dominant resistance gene, Bct, confers qualitative resistance to Beet curly top virus, a leafhopper-transmitted geminivirus in the genus Curtovirus. To determine whether this gene confers resistance to other geminiviruses, plants of a recombinant inbred population were sap-inoculated with BDMV, ...

  1. A synteny map and disease resistance gene comparison between barley and the model monocot Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Drader, Tom; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2010-05-01

    Grass species have coevolved with current economically important crop pathogens over millions of years. During this time, speciation of current domestic crops has occurred, resulting in related yet divergent genomes. Here, we present a synteny map between the crop species Hordeum vulgare and the recently sequenced Brachypodium distachyon genome, focusing on regions known to harbor important barley disease resistance genes. The resistance genes have orthologous genes in Brachypodium that show conservation of the form and likely the function of the genes. The level of colinearity between the genomes is highly dependent on the region of interest and, at the DNA level or protein level, the gene of interest. The stem rust resistance gene Rpg1 has an ortholog with a high level of identity at the amino acid level, while the stem rust resistance gene Rpg5 has two orthologs with a high level of identity, one corresponding to the NBS-LRR domain and the other to the serine/threonine protein kinase domain, on different contigs. Interestingly, the predicted product of the Brachypodium Rpg1 ortholog contained a WD40 domain at the C-terminal end. The stem rust resistance gene rpg4 (actin depolymerizing factor 2) also has an ortholog with a high level of identity, in which one of the three residues indicated by allele sequencing in barley cultivars to be important in disease resistance is conserved. The syntenous region of the seedling spot blotch resistance locus, Rcs5, has a high level of colinearity that may prove useful in efforts to identify and clone this gene. A synteny map and orthologous resistance gene comparisons are presented.

  2. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  3. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, “Rojo Pasión” and “Z506-7”, resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance. PMID:26658051

  4. Transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via phage-related mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern for society because it threatens the effective prevention of infectious diseases. While some bacterial strains display intrinsic resistance, others achieve antibiotic resistance by mutation, by the recombination of foreign DNA into the chromosome or by horizontal gene acquisition. In many cases, these three mechanisms operate together. Several mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been reported to mobilize different types of resistance genes and despite sharing common features, they are often considered and studied separately. Bacteriophages and phage-related particles have recently been highlighted as MGEs that transfer antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on phages, phage-related elements and on composite MGEs (phages-MGEs) involved in antibiotic resistance mobility. We review common features of these elements, rather than differences, and provide a broad overview of the antibiotic resistance transfer mechanisms observed in nature, which is a necessary first step to controlling them.

  5. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  6. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  7. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J. M.; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P.; Humphrey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health. PMID:25934615

  8. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J M; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P; Humphrey, Tom; Hilbert, Friederike

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health.

  9. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  10. Plasmodium falciparum: effect of radiation on levels of gene transcripts in sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Benjamin U; Chattopadhyay, Rana

    2008-02-01

    Humans immunized by the bites of irradiated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoite-infected mosquitoes are protected against malaria. Radiation attenuates the sporozoites preventing them from fully developing and replicating in hepatocytes, but the effects of radiation on gene expression in sporozoites are unknown. We used RT-PCR (35 cycles of PCR followed by densitometry) to assess the expression of ten genes in Pf sporozoites, and in sporozoites irradiated with 15,000cGy. Irradiation reduced expression substantially (>60%) of two DNA repair genes; moderately (30-60%) of PfUIS3, the Pf orthologue of PbUIS3, a gene up-regulated in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites and of a third DNA repair gene; and minimally (<30%) of the Pf18S ribosomal RNA, PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, and PfCELTOS genes. Irradiation increased expression of PfSPATR minimally. PfLSA1 RNA was not detectable in sporozoites. These results establish that radiation of sporozoites affects gene expression levels and provide the foundation for studies to identify specific genes involved in attenuation and protective immunity.

  11. Genetic engineering of a radiation-resistant bacterium for biodegradation of ixed wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    'Because of their tolerance to very high levels of ionizing radiation, members of the genus Deinococcus have received considerable attention over the past years. The type species of the genus, Deinococcus radiodurans, has been studied extensively in several labs. Although researchers are only beginning to understand the mechanisms by which this Gram-positive bacterium is able to repair massive DNA damage after radiation dosages as high as 5 Mrad, it has become evident that its recombination machinery has several unique characteristics (1--4). The aim of the present studies is to engineer D. radiodurans into a detoxifier for bioremediation of complex waste mixtures, containing heavy metals, halo-organics and radionuclides, making use of its ability to be biologically active in environments where they will be exposed to high levels of radiation. For that purpose, the authors aim to clone and express several broad spectrum oxygenases and heavy metal resistance determinants, and test survival and activities of these strains in artificial mixtures of contaminants, designed to simulate DOE mixed waste streams. This report summarizes work after 0.5 year of a 3-year project. The initial studies have focused on the development of an insertional expression system for D. radiodurans R1. This effort has involved two parts, namely: (1) promoter analysis, and (2) development of insertion systems. Several studies have shown that the expression signals used by D. radiodurans differ considerably from those found in other bacteria. Although D. radiodurans contains a typical eubacterial RNA polymerase core enzyme (based on TBLASTN searches on the genome sequence), Escherichia coli promoters are not recognized in D. radiodurans and vice versa (5). To expand the basic understanding of the requirements for transcription, and to optimize expression of (heterologous) genes, they will follow two strategies. First, a promoter-probe vector is being developed for the selection of promoter

  12. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  13. Modulation of mgrB gene expression as a source of colistin resistance in Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Jayol, Aurélie; Poirel, Laurent; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-07-01

    Gene modifications in the PmrAB and PhoPQ two-component regulatory systems, as well as inactivation of the mgrB gene, are known to be causes of colistin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae. The objective of this study was to characterise the mechanism involved in colistin resistance in a Klebsiella oxytoca isolate. A K. oxytoca clinical isolate showing resistance to colistin was recovered in Cali, Colombia. The pmrA, pmrB, phoP, phoQ and mgrB genes were amplified and sequenced. Wild-type mgrB genes from K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca were cloned, and corresponding recombinant plasmids were used for complementation assays. By analysing the mgrB gene of the K. oxytoca isolate and its flanking sequences, an insertion sequence (IS) of 1196bp was identified in its promoter region. The insertion was located between nucleotides -39 and -38 when referring to the start codon of the mgrB gene, thus negatively interfering with expression of the mgrB gene by modifying its promoter structure. This IS was very similar to ISKpn26 (99% nucleotide identity) belonging to the IS5 family. Complementation assays with mgrB genes from wild-type K. pneumoniae or K. oxytoca restored full susceptibility to colistin. In conclusion, here we identified the mechanism involved in colistin resistance in a K. oxytoca isolate. Modulation of mgrB gene expression was the key factor for this acquired resistance to colistin.

  14. The durable wheat disease resistance gene Lr34 confers common rust and northern corn leaf blight resistance in maize.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Justine; Boni, Rainer; Yang, Ping; Rogowsky, Peter; Büchner, Heike; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Krattinger, Simon G; Keller, Beat

    2017-04-01

    Maize (corn) is one of the most widely grown cereal crops globally. Fungal diseases of maize cause significant economic damage by reducing maize yields and by increasing input costs for disease management. The most sustainable control of maize diseases is through the release and planting of maize cultivars with durable disease resistance. The wheat gene Lr34 provides durable and partial field resistance against multiple fungal diseases of wheat, including three wheat rust pathogens and wheat powdery mildew. Because of its unique qualities, Lr34 became a cornerstone in many wheat disease resistance programmes. The Lr34 resistance is encoded by a rare variant of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that evolved after wheat domestication. An Lr34-like disease resistance phenotype has not been reported in other cereal species, including maize. Here, we transformed the Lr34 resistance gene into the maize hybrid Hi-II. Lr34-expressing maize plants showed increased resistance against the biotrophic fungal disease common rust and the hemi-biotrophic disease northern corn leaf blight. Furthermore, the Lr34-expressing maize plants developed a late leaf tip necrosis phenotype, without negative impact on plant growth. With this and previous reports, it could be shown that Lr34 is effective against various biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic diseases that collectively parasitize all major cereal crop species.

  15. Prevalence of antibiotics resistance and OXA carbapenemases genes in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, S-C; Chang, W-J; Chang, Y-H; Tsai, Y-S; Yang, T-P; Juan, C-W; Shiau, M-Y

    2010-05-01

    This study analyzed the prevalence of antibiotics resistance and the distribution of genes responsible for carbapenems resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Clinical A. baumannii isolates were cultured, identified, and collected during the period from May 2007 to February 2009. Antibiotics resistance rates of the clinical isolates were analyzed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The distribution of carbapenemase alleles were investigated in the multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii isolates by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. A total of 1,265 independent A. baumannii isolates were identified. Approximately 70% of the clinical isolates were resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, followed by imipenem, meropenem, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, and cefoperazone. Overall, 15.18% (192/1,265) of the isolates were characterized as MDR strains. All of the MDR A. baumannii isolates carried the bla (OXA51-like) allele. The detection rate of the bla (OXA23-like) and bla (OXA24-like) alleles was 96.35% (185/192) and 0.52% (1/192), respectively. Most of the isolates (185/192, 96.35%) carried genes which encode more than one carbapenemase. This report demonstrated that approximately 15% of A. baumannii clinical isolates in central Taiwan are MDR strains, with most of them harboring multiple carbapenemases. This study provides updated data regarding the prevalence of beta-lactam resistance and genotyping information of carbapenems resistance of A. baumannii in central Taiwan.

  16. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikestikova, M.; Allport, P. P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Wilson, J. A.; Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Ullan, M.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Tackmann, K.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Clark, A.; Ferrere, D.; Sevilla, S. Gonzalez; Ashby, J.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Doherty, F.; McMullen, T.; McEwan, F.; O'Shea, V.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Chilingarov, A.; Fox, H.; Affolder, A. A.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Wonsak, S.; Wormald, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Palni, P.; Seidel, S.; Taylor, A.; Toms, K.; Wang, R.; Hessey, N. P.; Valencic, N.; Hanagaki, K.; Dolezal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Bohm, J.; Stastny, J.; Bevan, A.; Beck, G.; Milke, C.; Domingo, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Hibbard-Lubow, D.; Liang, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; To, K.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.; Jinnouchi, O.; Hara, K.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, M.; Iwabuchi, S.; Bernabeu, J.; Civera, J. V.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.

    2016-09-01

    A radiation hard n+-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the "ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration" and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in "punch-through protection" (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×1016 neq/cm2, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 and by gamma rays from 60Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07.

  17. Identification and mapping of two powdery mildew resistance genes in Triticum boeoticum L.

    PubMed

    Chhuneja, Parveen; Kumar, Krishan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Hurni, Severine; Keller, Beat; Dhaliwal, Harcharan S; Singh, Kuldeep

    2012-04-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is one of the important foliar diseases of wheat that can cause serious yield losses. Breeding for cultivars with diverse resources of resistance is the most promising approach for combating this disease. The diploid A genome progenitor species of wheat are an important resource for new variability for disease resistance genes. An accession of Triticum boeoticum (A(b)A(b)) showed resistance against a number of Bgt isolates, when tested using detached leaf segments. Inheritance studies in a recombinant inbred line population (RIL), developed from crosses of PM resistant T. boeoticum acc. pau5088 with a PM susceptible T. monococcum acc. pau14087, indicated the presence of two powdery mildew resistance genes in T. boeoticum acc. pau5088. Analysis of powdery mildew infection and molecular marker data of the RIL population revealed that both powdery mildew resistance genes are located on the long arm of chromosome 7A. Mapping was conducted using an integrated linkage map of 7A consisting of SSR, RFLP, STS, and DA