Science.gov

Sample records for radiation sensitivity estimation

  1. Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain.

    PubMed

    Arino, Yosuke; Akimoto, Keigo; Sano, Fuminori; Homma, Takashi; Oda, Junichiro; Tomoda, Toshimasa

    2016-05-24

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) might play a role as an emergency geoengineering measure, its potential risks remain uncertain, and hence there are ethical and governance issues in the face of SRM's actual deployment. By using an integrated assessment model, we first present one possible methodology for evaluating the value arising from retaining an SRM option given the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, and also examine sensitivities of the option value to SRM's side effects (damages). Reflecting the governance challenges on immediate SRM deployment, we assume scenarios in which SRM could only be deployed with a limited degree of cooling (0.5 °C) only after 2050, when climate sensitivity uncertainty is assumed to be resolved and only when the sensitivity is found to be high (T2x = 4 °C). We conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis with constraining temperature rise as the objective. The SRM option value is originated from its rapid cooling capability that would alleviate the mitigation requirement under climate sensitivity uncertainty and thereby reduce mitigation costs. According to our estimates, the option value during 1990-2049 for a +2.4 °C target (the lowest temperature target level for which there were feasible solutions in this model study) relative to preindustrial levels were in the range between $2.5 and $5.9 trillion, taking into account the maximum level of side effects shown in the existing literature. The result indicates that lower limits of the option values for temperature targets below +2.4 °C would be greater than $2.5 trillion.

  2. Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain

    PubMed Central

    Arino, Yosuke; Akimoto, Keigo; Sano, Fuminori; Homma, Takashi; Oda, Junichiro; Tomoda, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) might play a role as an emergency geoengineering measure, its potential risks remain uncertain, and hence there are ethical and governance issues in the face of SRM’s actual deployment. By using an integrated assessment model, we first present one possible methodology for evaluating the value arising from retaining an SRM option given the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, and also examine sensitivities of the option value to SRM’s side effects (damages). Reflecting the governance challenges on immediate SRM deployment, we assume scenarios in which SRM could only be deployed with a limited degree of cooling (0.5 °C) only after 2050, when climate sensitivity uncertainty is assumed to be resolved and only when the sensitivity is found to be high (T2x = 4 °C). We conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis with constraining temperature rise as the objective. The SRM option value is originated from its rapid cooling capability that would alleviate the mitigation requirement under climate sensitivity uncertainty and thereby reduce mitigation costs. According to our estimates, the option value during 1990–2049 for a +2.4 °C target (the lowest temperature target level for which there were feasible solutions in this model study) relative to preindustrial levels were in the range between $2.5 and $5.9 trillion, taking into account the maximum level of side effects shown in the existing literature. The result indicates that lower limits of the option values for temperature targets below +2.4 °C would be greater than $2.5 trillion. PMID:27162346

  3. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Median Lifetime on Radiation Risks Estimates for Cancer and Circulatory Disease amongst Never-Smokers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation risks are estimated in a competing risk formalism where age or time after exposure estimates of increased risks for cancer and circulatory diseases are folded with a probability to survive to a given age. The survival function, also called the life-table, changes with calendar year, gender, smoking status and other demographic variables. An outstanding problem in risk estimation is the method of risk transfer between exposed populations and a second population where risks are to be estimated. Approaches used to transfer risks are based on: 1) Multiplicative risk transfer models -proportional to background disease rates. 2) Additive risk transfer model -risks independent of background rates. In addition, a Mixture model is often considered where the multiplicative and additive transfer assumptions are given weighted contributions. We studied the influence of the survival probability on the risk of exposure induced cancer and circulatory disease morbidity and mortality in the Multiplicative transfer model and the Mixture model. Risks for never-smokers (NS) compared to the average U.S. population are estimated to be reduced between 30% and 60% dependent on model assumptions. Lung cancer is the major contributor to the reduction for NS, with additional contributions from circulatory diseases and cancers of the stomach, liver, bladder, oral cavity, esophagus, colon, a portion of the solid cancer remainder, and leukemia. Greater improvements in risk estimates for NS s are possible, and would be dependent on improved understanding of risk transfer models, and elucidating the role of space radiation on the various stages of disease formation (e.g. initiation, promotion, and progression).

  5. Radiation sensitization in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    One possible benefit of stimulated oxygen consumption rendering aerobic cancer cells hypoxic, and the reductive sensitizer drug metabolism which has been found to be selective for hypoxic tissue, is that the resulting reductive metabolites are selectively toxic and may be useful in chemotherapy to kill sensitive hypoxic tumor cells. Radiation chemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies are continuing to provide additional information on drug delivery, metabolism and cytotoxicity, in order to select and evaluate clinically acceptable sensitizer drugs. Radiation chemical studies over the past decade have led to the development and selection of the nitroimidazoles, metronidazole and misonidazole for clinical evaluation in terms of improved cancer treatments. The results of ongoing clinical trials will, within the next few years, indicate how successful this application of basic radiation chemical research has been. 39 references are included. (JMT)

  6. Predicting radiation sensitivity of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Price, P. B.; Kinoshita, K.; Willson, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Recently two independent applications have emerged for highly radiation-sensitive polymers: as resists for production of microelectronic circuitry and as materials to record the tracks of energetic nuclear particles. The relief images used for masking in resist materials are generated by radiation-induced differential dissolution rates, whereas the techniques used in recording nuclear particle tracks employ differential etching processes, that is, development by a chemical etchant that actually degrades the polymer. It is found that the sensitivity of materials to these very different processes is related to their gamma-ray scission efficiency. This correlation provides a predictive capability.

  7. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  8. Estimating potential evapotranspiration with improved radiation estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is of great importance to estimation of surface energy budget and water balance calculation. The accurate estimation of PET will facilitate efficient irrigation scheduling, drainage design, and other agricultural and meteorological applications. However, accuracy o...

  9. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  10. Estimating shortwave solar radiation using net radiation and meteorological measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shortwave radiation has a wide variety of uses in land-atmosphere interactions research. Actual evapotranspiration estimation that involves stomatal conductance models like Jarvis and Ball-Berry require shortwave radiation to estimate photon flux density. However, in most weather stations, shortwave...

  11. Estimating solar radiation for plant simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, T.; French, V.; Leduc, S.

    1985-01-01

    Five algorithms producing daily solar radiation surrogates using daily temperatures and rainfall were evaluated using measured solar radiation data for seven U.S. locations. The algorithms were compared both in terms of accuracy of daily solar radiation estimates and terms of response when used in a plant growth simulation model (CERES-wheat). Requirements for accuracy of solar radiation for plant growth simulation models are discussed. One algorithm is recommended as being best suited for use in these models when neither measured nor satellite estimated solar radiation values are available.

  12. Simulation of the global contrail radiative forcing: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Minnis, Patrick; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-12-01

    The contrail radiative forcing induced by human aviation activity is one of the most uncertain contributions to climate forcing. An accurate estimation of global contrail radiative forcing is imperative, and the modeling approach is an effective and prominent method to investigate the sensitivity of contrail forcing to various potential factors. We use a simple offline model framework that is particularly useful for sensitivity studies. The most-up-to-date Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is employed to simulate the atmosphere and cloud conditions during the year 2006. With updated natural cirrus and additional contrail optical property parameterizations, the RRTMG Model (RRTM-GCM application) is used to simulate the global contrail radiative forcing. Global contrail coverage and optical depth derived from the literature for the year 2002 is used. The 2006 global annual averaged contrail net (shortwave + longwave) radiative forcing is estimated to be 11.3 mW m-2. Regional contrail radiative forcing over dense air traffic areas can be more than ten times stronger than the global average. A series of sensitivity tests are implemented and show that contrail particle effective size, contrail layer height, the model cloud overlap assumption, and contrail optical properties are among the most important factors. The difference between the contrail forcing under all and clear skies is also shown.

  13. Bacterial inactivation by solar ultraviolet radiation compared with sensitivity to 254 nm radiation.

    PubMed

    Coohill, Thomas P; Sagripanti, Jose-Luis

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to derive a quantitative factor that would allow us to predict the solar sensitivity of vegetative bacterial cells to natural solar radiation from the wealth of data collected for cells exposed to UVC (254 nm) radiation. We constructed a solar effectiveness spectrum for inactivation of vegetative bacterial cells by combining the available action spectra for vegetative cell killing in the solar range with the natural sunlight spectrum that reaches the ground. We then analyzed previous studies reporting the effects of solar radiation on vegetative bacterial cells and on bacterial spores. Although UVC-sensitive cells were also more sensitive to solar radiation, we found no absolute numerical correlation between the relative solar sensitivity of vegetative cells and their sensitivity to 254 nm radiation. The sensitivity of bacterial spores to solar exposure during both summer and winter correlated closely to their UVC sensitivity. The estimates presented here should make it possible to reasonably predict the time it would take for natural solar UV to kill bacterial spores or with a lesser degree of accuracy, vegetative bacterial cells after dispersion from an infected host or after an accidental or intentional release.

  14. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  15. Global average net radiation sensitivity to cloud amount variations

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, O.

    1993-12-01

    Time series analysis performed using an autoregressive model is carried out to study monthly oscillations in the earth radiation budget (ERB) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and cloud amount estimates on a global basis. Two independent cloud amount datasets, produced elsewhere by different authors, and the ERB record based on the Nimbus-7 wide field-of-view 8-year (1978-86) observations are used. Autoregressive models are used to eliminate the effects of the earth`s orbit eccentricity on the radiation budget and cloud amount series. Nonzero cross correlation between the residual series provides a way of estimating the contribution of the cloudiness variations to the variance in the net radiation. As a result, a new parameter to estimate the net radiation sensitivity at the TOA to changes in cloud amount is introduced. This parameter has a more general character than other estimates because it contains time-lag terms of different length responsible for different cloud-radiation feedback mechanisms in the earth climate system. Time lags of 0, 1, 12, and 13 months are involved. Inclusion of the zero-lag term only shows that the albedo effect of clouds dominates, as is known from other research. Inclusion of all four terms leads to an average quasi-annual insensitivity. Approximately 96% of the ERB variance at the TOA can be explained by the eccentricity factor and 1% by cloudiness variations, provided that the data used are without error. Although the latter assumption is not fully correct, the results presented allow one to estimate the contribution of current cloudiness changes to the net radiation variability. Two independent cloud amount datasets have very similar temporal variability and also approximately equal impact on the net radiation at the TOA.

  16. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  17. Radiation sensitive area detection device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Hecht, Diana L. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A radiation sensitive area detection device for use in conjunction with an X ray, ultraviolet or other radiation source is provided which comprises a phosphor containing film which releases a stored diffraction pattern image in response to incoming light or other electromagnetic wave. A light source such as a helium-neon laser, an optical fiber capable of directing light from the laser source onto the phosphor film and also capable of channelling the fluoresced light from the phosphor film to an integrating sphere which directs the light to a signal processing means including a light receiving means such as a photomultiplier tube. The signal processing means allows translation of the fluoresced light in order to detect the original pattern caused by the diffraction of the radiation by the original sample. The optical fiber is retained directly in front of the phosphor screen by a thin metal holder which moves up and down across the phosphor screen and which features a replaceable pinhole which allows easy adjustment of the resolution of the light projected onto the phosphor film. The device produces near real time images with high spatial resolution and without the distortion that accompanies prior art devices employing photomultiplier tubes. A method is also provided for carrying out radiation area detection using the device of the invention.

  18. Sensitivity of erythemal UV/global irradiance ratios to atmospheric parameters: application for estimating erythemal radiation at four sites in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntoung, Sumaman; Janjai, Serm; Nunez, Manuel; Choosri, Pranomkorn; Pratummasoot, Noppamas; Chiwpreecha, Kulanist

    2014-11-01

    Factors affecting the ratio of erythemal UV (UVER) to broadband (G) irradiance were investigated in this study. Data from four solar monitoring sites in Thailand, namely Chiang Mai, Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Pathom and Songkhla were used to investigate the UVER/G ratio in response to geometric and atmospheric parameters. These comprised solar zenith angle, aerosol load, total ozone column, precipitable water and clearness index. A modeling scheme was developed to isolate and examine the effect of each individual environmental parameter on the ratio. Results showed that all parameters with the exception of solar zenith angle and clearness index influenced the ratios in a linear manner. These results were also used to develop a semi-empirical model for estimating hourly erythemal UV irradiance. Data from 2009 to 2010 were used to construct the ratio model while validation was performed using erythemal UV irradiance at the above four sites in 2011. The validation results showed reasonable agreement with a root mean square difference of 13.5% and mean bias difference of - 0.5%, under all sky conditions and 10.9% and - 0.3%, respectively, under cloudless conditions.

  19. Sensitivity of erythemal UV/global irradiance ratios to atmospheric parameters: application for estimating erythemal radiation at four sites in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntoung, Sumaman; Janjai, Serm; Nunez, Manuel; Choosri, Pranomkorn; Pratummasoot, Noppamas; Chiwpreecha, Kulanist

    2014-10-01

    Factors affecting the ratio of erythemal UV (UVER) to broadband (G) irradiance were investigated in this study. Data from four solar monitoring sites in Thailand, namely Chiang Mai, Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Pathom and Songkhla were used to investigate the UVER/G ratio in response to geometric and atmospheric parameters. These comprised solar zenith angle, aerosol load, total ozone column, precipitable water and clearness index. A modeling scheme was developed to isolate and examine the effect of each individual environmental parameter on the ratio. Results showed that all parameters with the exception of solar zenith angle and clearness index influenced the ratios in a linear manner. These results were also used to develop a semi-empirical model for estimating hourly erythemal UV irradiance. Data from 2009 to 2010 were used to construct the ratio model while validation was performed using erythemal UV irradiance at the above four sites in 2011. The validation results showed reasonable agreement with a root mean square difference of 13.5% and mean bias difference of - 0.5%, under all sky conditions and 10.9% and - 0.3%, respectively, under cloudless conditions.

  20. Gamma radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens on meat and poultry

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1994-12-31

    Several factors have been identified that may affect the responses of foodborne pathogens to ionizing radiation. Among these are the temperature and atmosphere during the process of irradiation; the medium in which the pathogen is suspended; and the genus, species, serovar, and physiological state of the organism. In addition to these factors, variations in {open_quotes}apparent{close_quotes} radiation sensitivity of bacteria may occur because of the incubation conditions and media used to estimate the number of surviving colony-forming units. Both incubation temperature and culture media frequently affect the ability of injured bacteria to recover. Because there are so many possible variables, it is often difficult to compare data on the radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens from different studies. The objectives of the studies reported here were to compare the radiation sensitivities of Bacillus cereus on beef, beef gravy, chicken, pork, and turkey; and of Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus on beef, pork, lamb, turkey breast, and turkey leg meats. Examples of the effects of serovar, irradiation temperature, growth phase, and atmosphere during irradiation were also examined.

  1. Regional estimates of radiated seismic energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Choy, G.L.; Seekins, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    We revise the spectral technique for estimating radiated energy from recordings of large earthquakes at regional distances (?? 27.5 km from the source, we model the geometrical spreading of the regional wavefield as r-?? where???? = 0.5 for f ??? 0.2 Hz and ?? = 0.7 for f ??? 0.25 Hz. We fit the spectral falloff with distance using a frequency-dependent attenuation Q = 400(f/1.5)0.6, where Q = 400 for f ??? 1.5 Hz. There is little directivity apparent in the corrected velocity spectra: the velocity spectra observed to the northwest along strike are amplified by a factor of 2.5 from 0.3 to 1.0 Hz and those to the southeast are amplified by a factor of 1.6 from 0.3 to 0.7 Hz. We group the stations in NEHRP site classes, using average 1-D velocity structures to estimate site amplification as a function of frequency and assuming 0.40 ??? ?? ??? 0.55 sec for the near-surface attenuation. We increase the amplification of the soft-soil sites from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz by a factor that reaches 1.7 at 0.3 Hz because they are more strongly amplified than the NEHRP-D velocity structure predicts. We combine the 65 single-station estimates of radiated energy using an equal-azimuth weighting scheme that compensates for station distribution and incorporates the observed directivity, yielding a regional estimate of Es = 3.4 ?? 0.7 ?? 1022 dyne cm. This regional estimate of radiated energy corresponds closely to the teleseismic estimate of Es = 3.2 ?? 1022 dyne cm.

  2. Development of a radiation-sensitive indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A. A.; El-Kelany, M.; Abdel-Rehim, F.

    1996-10-01

    A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film containing acid-sensitive dye (bromophenol red, BPR) and water soluble chlorine-containing substance [CCl 3COONa or chloral hydrate (CCl 3CH(OH) 2, 2,2,2-trichloroethan-1,1-diol)] may be useful as a radiation-sensitive indicator. The acid-sensitive dye in the film changes its color from violet to pale yellow by irradiation due to the consequent lowering of the pH of the film caused by the HCl generated from the radiolysis of the Cl-containing substance. This film can be used as a dosimeter in a relatively low dose range up to 5 kGy. This response range makes this film useful in some food irradiation, pasteurization and water purification applications. The effects of temperature and relative humidity during irradiation and post-irradiation storage on the response of the film are discussed. It is inexpensive, does not require toxic solvents in preparation and easy to prepare in a laboratory.

  3. Estimated radiation dose from timepieces containing tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell-Boyer, L M

    1980-01-01

    Luminescent timepieces containing radioactive tritium, either in elemental form or incorporated into paint, are available to the general public. The purpose of this study was to estimate potential radiation dose commitments received by the public annually as a result of exposure to tritium which may escape from the timepieces during their distribution, use, repair, and disposal. Much uncertainty is associated with final dose estimates due to limitations of empirical data from which exposure parameters were derived. Maximum individual dose estimates were generally less than 3 ..mu..Sv/yr, but ranged up to 2 mSv under worst-case conditions postulated. Estimated annual collective (population) doses were less than 5 person/Sv per million timepieces distributed.

  4. A Direct Estimate of Climate Sensitivity from Atmospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nominal equilibrium climate sensitivity of about 3°C for doubled CO2 is obtained from direct climate model calculations and from simulations of the historical surface temperature record. A similar value of equilibrium climate sensitivity has been inferred from the geological ice core record. A further independent estimate of climate sensitivity can be derived directly from the atmospheric temperature, cloud, and absorbing gas structure. Attribution of individual contributions to the terrestrial greenhouse effect by individual atmospheric constituents shows that water vapor and clouds account for about 75% of the total greenhouse effect, while CO2 and the other minor non-condensing green house gases account for the remaining 25%. It is generally understood that water vapor and cloud contributions to the greenhouse effect arise as feedback effects, and that the non-condensing greenhouse gas contribution can be identified as the radiative forcing component. From this alone, a climate feedback sensitivity of f = 4, or about 5°C for doubled CO2 can be inferred. Accounting further for the negative temperature lapse rate feedback that is not directly included in the attribution analysis, and allowing for a residual non-condensing component of the water vapor feedback, brings the equilibrium climate sensitivity that is inferred from atmospheric structural analysis to the 3°C range for doubled CO2, in good agreement with the equilibrium climate sensitivity that is obtained from comparisons to historical and geological global temperature changes.

  5. Estimating radiated energy for complex volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Ristau, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The August 6th, 2012 Te Maari eruption in the Tongariro National Park included a complex sequence of activity including a pre-eruption debris avalanche and at least three distinct eruptive pulses. In such a scenario, classic seismic methods such as moment tensor inversion struggle to characterize the whole event due to overlapping coda of the disparate bursts. To understand the entire eruption in terms of energy budget, we determine the trace energy density according to the more general formulations of Kanamori (1977) and Vassiliou and Kanamori (1982). By calculating the broad-band integral of the energy spectrum, we quantify radiated energy from the eruption cycle for each component at 3-component seismic monitoring sites surrounding the volcano and compare these results to observations at mid- and far-field distances. We correct for anelastic attenuation, noting that the solution is relatively insensitive to this correction as the records are essentially within the near-field. This suggests that even near to the source, most of the radiated energy is contained in relatively low frequencies which are less attenuated at short propagation distances. In the double-couple case of earthquakes (for which the method was originally developed), difficulties arise in situations with poor azimuthal data coverage. This is because the energy recorded at a single station is largely influenced by heterogeneous radiation patterns. For the volcano case, volumetric excitations of unknown source geometries may produce similar heterogeneities, which can be averaged by incorporation of well-distributed data. Our results provide estimates of radiated energy (Es) from the sequence ranging from 2.96 x 10^9 to 2.58 X 10^10 N*m, corresponding to an average energy magnitude of Me=3.72. This estimate is significantly lower than the predicted energy release based on an independently calculated moment tensor inversion. Preliminary results suggest that routine full-waveform energy calculations

  6. Metal-containing radiation-sensitive polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The copolymers of methyl methacrylate with alkali metal salts (Na, K, and Cs) of methacrylic acid have been prepared by saponification K, and Cs) of methylacrylic acid have been prepared by saponification of the homopolymer poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA. Low degrees of hydrolysis have been achieved by a heterogeneous system, and from the infrared spectra it has been confirmed that the ester groups of the methyl methacrylates are directly converted to the metal salts of methacrylic acid. These ionomers exhibit pseudo high molecular weights in gel permeation chromatogram, but no appreciable increase in intrinsic viscosities is observed in comparison to PMMA. The coordinated inorganic polymers poly((dithio-2,2'-diacetato)bis(dimethylsulfoxide)dioxouranium(VI)) and poly()methylenebis(thio)-2,2'-bis(acetato))bis(dimethylsulfoxide)dioxouranium(VI))have been synthesized in dimethyl sulfoxide solution with about 90% yield. The degree of polymerization and the number of average molecular weights of these polymers have been assessed by high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, with which the acetato end group to the bridging ligand group ratios have been determined. The polymers bridging ligand group ratios have been determined. The polymers have been characterized by employing various techniques: infrared spectra, thermal gravimetric analysis, /sup 13/C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and gel permeation chromatography. The prepared polymer samples have been subjected to various doses of /sup 137/Cs gamma radiation under which the polymers predominantly undergo chain scission. The radiation sensitivities of the polymers are assessed by G values which are obtained from gel permeation chromatograms. These uranyl polymers exhibit unusually high G values.

  7. Radiation sensitivity of hyperthermal composting microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Jae-Hun; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kim, Geun Joong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    In the space station and vehicles designed for long human mission, high-temperature compost is a promising technology for decomposing organic waste and producing the fertilizers. In space, the microorganisms could have the changed biological activities or even be mutated by ionizing irradiation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of gamma irradiation on the sensitivity of bacteria in hyperthermal composting was investigated. The sequence analysis of the amplified 16s rDNA genes and amoA gene were used for the identification of composting microorganisms. Viability of microorganisms in compost soil after gamma irradiation was directly visualized with LIVE/DEAD Baclight viability kit. The dominant bacterial genera are Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc sp. and fungus genera are Metschnikowia bicuspidate and Pichia guilliermondii, respectively. By the gamma irradiation up to the dose of 1 kGy, the microbial population was not changed. Also, the enzyme activities of amylase and cellulose were sustained by the gamma irradiation. These results show that these hyperthermia microorganisms might have the high resistance to gamma radiation and could be used for agriculture in the Space Station.

  8. Impact of Genomic Methylation on Radiation Sensitivity of Colorectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Barbara; Niemierko, Andrzej; Forrer, Christian; Benhattar, Jean; Albertini, Veronica; Pruschy, Martn; Bosman, Fred T.; Catapano, Carlo V.; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of demethylation with 5-aza-cytidine (AZA) on radiation sensitivity and to define the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of methylation deficient colorectal carcinoma cells. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitizing effects of AZA were investigated in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines (HCT116, SW480, L174 T, Co115), defining influence of AZA on proliferation, clonogenic survival, and cell cycling with or without ionizing radiation. The methylation status for cancer or DNA damage response-related genes silenced by promoter methylation was determined. The effect of deletion of the potential target genes (DNMT1, DNMT3b, and double mutants) on radiation sensitivity was analyzed. Results: AZA showed radiation sensitizing properties at >=1 {mu}mol/l, a concentration that does not interfere with the cell cycle by itself, in all four tested cell lines with a sensitivity-enhancing ratio (SER) of 1.6 to 2.1 (confidence interval [CI] 0.9-3.3). AZA successfully demethylated promoters of p16 and hMLH1, genes associated with ionizing radiation response. Prolonged exposure to low-dose AZA resulted in sustained radiosensitivity if associated with persistent genomic hypomethylation after recovery from AZA. Compared with maternal HCT116 cells, DNMT3b-defcient deficient cells were more sensitive to radiation with a SER of 2.0 (CI 0.9-2.1; p = 0.03), and DNMT3b/DNMT1-/- double-deficient cells showed a SER of 1.6 (CI 0.5-2.7; p = 0.09). Conclusions: AZA-induced genomic hypomethylation results in enhanced radiation sensitivity in colorectal carcinoma. The mediators leading to sensitization remain unknown. Defining the specific factors associated with radiation sensitization after genomic demethylation may open the way to better targeting for the purpose of radiation sensitization.

  9. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes may constitute a radiation-sensitive subpopulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R G.; Morris, James E. ); Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-12-01

    A primary mechanism of radiation-induced DNA damage is by generation of free radicals. Chronically increased oxidative stress from elevated body iron may increase radiation sensitivity by decreasing cellular oxygen radical scavenging capability. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes have elevated body iron. Low-level radiation sensitization by iron may be particularly pertinent for risk of breast cancer. Since ten percent of the population appears to be heterozygous for the hemochromatosis gene, a radiosensitizing effect would have pervasive implications.

  10. Broadband radiation modes: estimation and active control.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  11. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  12. Estimating Sobol Sensitivity Indices Using Correlations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensitivity analysis is a crucial tool in the development and evaluation of complex mathematical models. Sobol's method is a variance-based global sensitivity analysis technique that has been applied to computational models to assess the relative importance of input parameters on...

  13. Estimation of health risks from radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, M.L.

    1983-08-01

    An informal presentation is given of the cancer and genetic risks from exposures to ionizing radiations. The risks from plausible radiation exposures are shown to be comparable to other commonly encountered risks.

  14. Superoxide dismutase amplifies organismal sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.D.; Meshnick, S.R.; Eaton, J.W.

    1989-02-15

    Although increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity is often associated with enhanced resistance of cells and organisms to oxidant challenges, few direct tests of the antioxidant importance of this enzyme have been carried out. To assess the importance of SOD in defending against gamma-radiation, we employed Escherichia coli with deficient, normal, and super-normal enzyme activities. Surprisingly, the radiation sensitivity of E. coli actually increases as bacterial SOD activity increases. Elevated intracellular SOD activity sensitizes E. coli to radiation-induced mortality, whereas SOD-deficient bacteria show normal or decreased radiosensitivity. Toxic effects of activated oxygen species are involved in this phenomenon; bacterial SOD activity has no effect on radiation sensitivity under anaerobic conditions or on the lethality of other, non-oxygen-dependent, toxins such as ultraviolet radiation.

  15. Whispering gallery mode resonators based on radiation-sensitive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Handley, Timothy A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators formed of radiation-sensitive materials to allow for permanent tuning of their resonance frequencies in a controlled manner. Two WGM resonators may be cascaded to form a composite filter to produce a second order filter function where at least one WGM resonator is formed a radiation-sensitive material to allow for proper control in the overlap of the two filter functions.

  16. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  17. Methanogen Sensitivity to Ultraviolet Radiation: Implications for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, N.; Kral, T. A.

    2013-09-01

    If an organism is to exist near the surface of Mars, it must be able to deal with UV radiation. The sensitivity of four species of methanogens to UV radiation was determined. They survived from 1 to 12 hours, depending on the organism tested.

  18. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon Fd

    2015-09-28

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net.

  19. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon FD

    2015-01-01

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net. PMID:26435777

  20. An investigation of new methods for estimating parameter sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltracchi, Todd J.; Gabriele, Gary A.

    1989-01-01

    The method proposed for estimating sensitivity derivatives is based on the Recursive Quadratic Programming (RQP) method and in conjunction a differencing formula to produce estimates of the sensitivities. This method is compared to existing methods and is shown to be very competitive in terms of the number of function evaluations required. In terms of accuracy, the method is shown to be equivalent to a modified version of the Kuhn-Tucker method, where the Hessian of the Lagrangian is estimated using the BFS method employed by the RQP algorithm. Initial testing on a test set with known sensitivities demonstrates that the method can accurately calculate the parameter sensitivity.

  1. Physical determinants of radiation sensitivity in bacterial spores

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Several factors modifying radiation sensitivity in dry bacterial spores are described and discussed. Vacuum inducing the loss of critical structural water, very low dose rates of radiation from which the cell may recover, radiations of high linear energy transfer, and the action of temperature over long periods of time on previously irradiated cells are recognized from extensive laboratory work as important in determining survival of spores exposed to low radiation doses at low temperatures for long periods of time. Some extensions of laboratory work are proposed.

  2. Sensitiveness of the colorimetric estimation of titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.

    1911-01-01

    The accuracy of the colorimetric estimation of titanium is practically constant over concentrations ranging from the strongest down to those containing about 1.5 mg. TiO2 in 100 cc. The change in concentration required to produce a perceptible difference in intensity between two solutions, at favorable concentrations, was found to be about 6.5 per cent, which does not differ much from the results of others with chromium and copper solutions. With suitable precautions, such as comparing by substitution and taking the mean of several settings or of the two perceptibly different extremes, the accuracy of the colorimetric comparisons appears to be about 2 per cent.

  3. Radiation sensitive devices and systems for detection of radioactive materials and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K

    2014-12-02

    Radiation sensitive devices include a substrate comprising a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to resonate responsive to non-ionizing incident radiation. Systems for detecting radiation from a special nuclear material include a radiation sensitive device and a sensor located remotely from the radiation sensitive device and configured to measure an output signal from the radiation sensitive device. In such systems, the radiation sensitive device includes a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements positioned on the radiation sensitive material. Methods for detecting a presence of a special nuclear material include positioning a radiation sensitive device in a location where special nuclear materials are to be detected and remotely interrogating the radiation sensitive device with a sensor.

  4. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of Afterbody Radiative Heating Predictions for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Thomas K., IV; Johnston, Christopher O.; Hosder, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to perform sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification for afterbody radiative heating predictions of Stardust capsule during Earth entry at peak afterbody radiation conditions. The radiation environment in the afterbody region poses significant challenges for accurate uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis due to the complexity of the flow physics, computational cost, and large number of un-certain variables. In this study, first a sparse collocation non-intrusive polynomial chaos approach along with global non-linear sensitivity analysis was used to identify the most significant uncertain variables and reduce the dimensions of the stochastic problem. Then, a total order stochastic expansion was constructed over only the important parameters for an efficient and accurate estimate of the uncertainty in radiation. Based on previous work, 388 uncertain parameters were considered in the radiation model, which came from the thermodynamics, flow field chemistry, and radiation modeling. The sensitivity analysis showed that only four of these variables contributed significantly to afterbody radiation uncertainty, accounting for almost 95% of the uncertainty. These included the electronic- impact excitation rate for N between level 2 and level 5 and rates of three chemical reactions in uencing N, N(+), O, and O(+) number densities in the flow field.

  5. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  6. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  7. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  8. Multipurpose High Sensitivity Radiation Detector: Terradex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpat, Behcet; Aisa, Damiano; Bizzarri, Marco; Blasko, Sandor; Esposito, Gennaro; Farnesini, Lucio; Fiori, Emmanuel; Papi, Andrea; Postolache, Vasile; Renzi, Francesca; Ionica, Romeo; Manolescu, Florentina; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Denizli, Haluk; Tapan, Ilhan; Pilicer, Ercan; Egidi, Felice; Moretti, Cesare; Dicola, Luca

    2007-05-01

    Terradex project aims to realise an accurate and programmable multiparametric tool which will measure relevant physical quantities such as observation time, energy and type of all decay products of three naturally occurring decay chains of uranium and thorium series present in nature as well as the decay products of man-made radioactivity. The measurements described in this work are based on the performance tests of the first version of an instrument that is designed to provide high counting accuracy, by introducing self-triggering, delayed time-coincidence technique, of products of a given decay chain. In order to qualify the technique and to calibrate the Terradex, a 222Rn source is used. The continuous and accurate monitoring of radon concentration in air is realised by observing the alpha and beta particles produced by the decay of 222Rn and its daughters and tag each of them with a precise occurrence time. The validity of delayed coincident technique by using the state of the art electronics with application of novel data sampling and analysis methods are discussed. The flexibility of sampling protocols and the advantages of online calibration capability to achieve the highest level of precision in natural and man-made radiation measurements are also described.

  9. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  10. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  11. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.H.; Ramsay, J.R.; Birrell, G.W.

    1995-07-30

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Sensitive Detection of Radiation Trapping in Cold Atom Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Matt; Feeney, Laura; Stites, Ron; Kim, Soo; Bali, Samir

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effect of radiation trapping on the photon statistics of the light scattered from optical molasses. We propose that the intensity correlation function may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at optical depths up to two orders of magnitude lower than where effects of multiple scattering in cold atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990)].

  13. Genetics of human sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaver, James E.

    1994-07-01

    the major human health effects of solar and artificial UV light occur from the UVB and UVC wavelength ranges and involve a variety of short-term and long-term deleterious changes to the skin and eyes. the more important initial damage to cellular macromolecules involves dimerization of adjacent pyrimidines in DNA to produce cyclobutane pyrimidine dimes, (6-4) pyrimidine- pyrimidone, and (6-4) dewar photoproducts. these photoproducts can be repaired by a genetically regulated enzyme system (nucleotide excision repair) which removes oligonucleotides 29-30 nucleotides long that contain the photoproducts, and synthesizes replacement patches. At least a dozen gene products are involved in the process of recognizing photoproducts in DNA, altering local DNA helicity and cleaving the polynucleotide chain at defined positions either side of a photoproduct. Hereditary mutations in many of these genes are recognized in the human genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). Several of the gene products have other functions involving the regulation of gene transcription which accounts for the complex clinical presentation of repair deficient diseases that involve sensitivity of the skin and eyes to UV light, increased solar carcinogenesis (in XP), demyelination, and ganglial calcification (in CS), hair abnormalities (in TTD), and developmental and neurological abnormalities

  14. Radiation noise in a high sensitivity star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J. B.; Gordon, E.

    1972-01-01

    An extremely accurate attitude determination was developed for space applications. This system uses a high sensitivity star sensor in which the photomultiplier tube is subject to noise generated by space radiations. The space radiation induced noise arises from trapped electrons, solar protons and other ionizing radiations, as well as from dim star background. The solar activity and hence the electron and proton environments are predicted through the end of the twentieth century. The available data for the response of the phototube to proton, electron, gamma ray, and bremsstrahlung radiations are reviewed and new experimental data is presented. A simulation was developed which represents the characteristics of the effect of radiations on the star sensor, including the non-stationarity of the backgrounds.

  15. Radiation dose estimates for copper-64 citrate in man

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, J.E.; Carlton, J.E.; Stabin, M.; Watson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Tumor imaging agents suitable for use with positron emission tomographs are constantly sought. We have performed studies with animal-tumor-bearing models that have demonstrated the rapid uptake of copper-64. The radiation dose estimates for man indicate that the intravenous administration of 7.0 mCi would result in radiation doses to the kidney of 9.8 to 10.5 rads with other organs receiving substantially less radiation. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Familial melanoma associated with dominant ultraviolet radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, R.G.; Chen, P.; Imray, F.P.; Kidson, C.; Lavin, M.F.; Hockey, A.

    1982-07-01

    Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation was studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 32 members of two families with histories of multiple primary melanomas in several generations. As assayed by colony formation in agar or by trypan blue exclusion following irradiation, cellular sensitivity showed a bimodal distribution. All persons with melanoma or multiple moles were in the sensitive group, while some family members exhibited responses similar to those of controls. Cells from four cases of sporadic melanoma showed normal levels of sensitivity. The data are consistent with a dominantly inherited ultraviolet light sensitivity associated with these examples of familial melanoma. Spontaneous and ultraviolet light-induced sister chromatid exchange frequencies were similar to those in control cell lines. No defect in excision repair was detected in any of the above cell lines, but the sensitive group showed postirradiation inhibition of DNA replication intermediate between controls and an excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cell line.

  17. Evaluation of novel radiation sensitizers in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.E.; Sheldon, P.W.; Stratford, I.J.

    1982-03-01

    In principle, radiation sensitizers with therapeutic ratios greater than that of misonidazole can be obtained either by increasing sensitizing efficiency, decreasing toxicity or preferably both. This paper illustrates, firstly that a 5-nitroimidazole (S73-0662) with an electron affinity close to that of metronidazole shows sensitizing efficiency similar to misonidazole both in vitro and in vivo. The suggestion is made that the compound should receive a detailed toxicological study to acertain if its toxicity is lower than misonidazole. Secondly, Imuran, a 5-substituted 4-nitroimidazole and one of a series of compounds which show sensitizing efficiencies in vitro much greater then would be predicted from electron affinity considerations, also shows good sensitization in vivo. Compounds in this series are generally metabolically unstable and the positive results with Imuran in vivo provide a direction for future synthesis of novel sensitizers.

  18. Quality control and estimation of global solar radiation in China

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenjun; He, Jie; Yang, Kun; Qin, Jun

    2010-03-15

    Measurements of surface radiation in China are too sparse to meet demand for scientific research and engineering applications. Moreover, the radiation data often include erroneous and questionable values though preliminary quality-check has been done before the data release. Therefore, quality control of radiation data is often a prerequisite for using these data. In this study, a set of quality-check procedures were implemented to control the quality of the solar radiation measurements at 97 stations in China. A hybrid model for estimating global solar radiation was then evaluated against the controlled data. The results show that the model can estimate the global radiation with accuracy of MBE less than 1.5 MJ m{sup -2} and RMSE less than 2.8 MJ m{sup -2} for daily radiation and RMSE less than 2.0 MJ m{sup -2} for monthly-mean daily radiation at individual stations over most of China except at a few stations where unsatisfactory estimates were possibly caused by severe air pollution or too dense clouds. The MBE averaged over all stations are about 0.7 MJ m{sup -2} and RMSE about 2.0 MJ m{sup -2} for daily radiation and RMSE about 1.3 MJ m{sup -2} for monthly-mean daily radiation. Finally, this model was used to fill data gaps and to expand solar radiation data set using routine meteorological station data in China. This data set would substantially contribute to some radiation-related scientific studies and engineering applications in China. (author)

  19. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1991-10-01

    This lecture will provide a bridge from the physical energy or LET spectra as might be calculated in an organ to the risk of carcinogenesis, a particular concern for extended missions to the moon or beyond to Mars. Topics covered will include (1) LET spectra expected from galactic cosmic rays, (2) probabilities that individual cell nuclei in the body will be hit by heavy galactic cosmic ray particles, (3) the conventional methods of calculating risks from a mixed environment of high and low LET radiation, (4) an alternate method which provides certain advantages using fluence-related risk coefficients (risk cross sections), and (5) directions for future research and development of these ideas.

  20. Simultaneously Constraining Climate Sensitivity and Aerosol Radiative Forcing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, L. D. Danny; Kaufmann, Robert K.

    2002-10-01

    conclusions, it was found that the simulated change of ocean heat content (over the 0-3000-m depth interval, during the period 1948-98) agrees well with the observed change in ocean heat content for climate sensitivity and aerosol forcing combinations that produce a good simulation of the observed temperature change during this time period, thereby validating the model uptake of heat by the oceans.Although the preferred T2× is 2°C in this study, it is possible to choose fossil and biomass aerosol forcing combinations (within the ranges given above) that produce comparable simulations of global mean and NH SH temperature variation after the 1880s for any T2× in the range 1.0°-5.0°C. However, and in common with other models, this model simulates much too large a drop in temperature during the 1880s (in response to the eruption of Mount Krakatau in 1883). As T2× ranges from 1.0° to 5.0°C, the simulated drop ranges from about 0.3° to about 0.7°C, compared to an observed change of about 0.2°C. On this basis, a lower T2× is preferred.Inasmuch as the model response to the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo accords well with observations, especially for intermediate and high sensitivities, it may be that the estimated radiative forcing due to the eruption of Krakatau is too large or that there was a short-term negative feedback, dependent on conditions just before this eruption, which reduced the effective radiative forcing. If half the base case forcing is assumed for Krakatau only, the temperature decrease during the 1880s ranges from 0.2°C for T2× = 1°C (matching observations) to 0.3°C for T2× = 5°C (modestly in excess of observations). Thus, the volcanic radiative forcing during the 1880s, and the quality of the historical and proxy temperature records around this time, are critical data in discriminating between different climate sensitivities, inasmuch as a smaller volcanic forcing might permit

  1. Improved fire radiative energy estimation in high latitude ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchiorre, A.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, land managers, and policy makers are facing new challenges as fire regimes are evolving as a result of climate change (Westerling et al. 2006). In high latitudes fires are increasing in number and size as temperatures increase and precipitation decreases (Kasischke and Turetsky 2006). Peatlands, like the large complexes in the Alaskan tundra, are burning more frequently and severely as a result of these changes, releasing large amounts of greenhouse gases. Remotely sensed data are routinely used to monitor the location of active fires and the extent of burned areas, but they are not sensitive to the depth of the organic soil layer combusted, resulting in underestimation of peatland greenhouse gas emissions when employing the conventional 'bottom up' approach (Seiler and Crutzen 1980). An alternative approach would be the direct estimation of the biomass burned from the energy released by the fire (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE) (Wooster et al. 2003). Previous works (Boschetti and Roy 2009; Kumar et al. 2011) showed that the sampling interval of polar orbiting satellite systems severely limits the accuracy of the FRE in tropical ecosystems (up to four overpasses a day with MODIS), but because of the convergence of the orbits, more observations are available at higher latitudes. In this work, we used a combination of MODIS thermal data and Landsat optical data for the estimation of biomass burned in peatland ecosystems. First, the global MODIS active fire detection algorithm (Giglio et al. 2003) was modified, adapting the temperature thresholds to maximize the number of detections in boreal regions. Then, following the approach proposed by Boschetti and Roy (2009), the FRP point estimations were interpolated in time and space to cover the full temporal and spatial extent of the burned area, mapped with Landsat5 TM data. The methodology was tested on a large burned area in Alaska, and the results compared to published field measurements (Turetsky et al. 2011).

  2. An investigation of new methods for estimating parameter sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltracchi, Todd J.; Gabriele, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Parameter sensitivity is defined as the estimation of changes in the modeling functions and the design variables due to small changes in the fixed parameters of the formulation. There are currently several methods for estimating parameter sensitivities requiring either difficult to obtain second order information, or do not return reliable estimates for the derivatives. Additionally, all the methods assume that the set of active constraints does not change in a neighborhood of the estimation point. If the active set does in fact change, than any extrapolations based on these derivatives may be in error. The objective here is to investigate more efficient new methods for estimating parameter sensitivities when the active set changes. The new method is based on the recursive quadratic programming (RQP) method and in conjunction a differencing formula to produce estimates of the sensitivities. This is compared to existing methods and is shown to be very competitive in terms of the number of function evaluations required. In terms of accuracy, the method is shown to be equivalent to a modified version of the Kuhn-Tucker method, where the Hessian of the Lagrangian is estimated using the BFS method employed by the RPQ algorithm. Inital testing on a test set with known sensitivities demonstrates that the method can accurately calculate the parameter sensitivity. To handle changes in the active set, a deflection algorithm is proposed for those cases where the new set of active constraints remains linearly independent. For those cases where dependencies occur, a directional derivative is proposed. A few simple examples are included for the algorithm, but extensive testing has not yet been performed.

  3. Radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Langebach; Christoph, Haberstroh

    2017-02-01

    Radiative heat transfer is usually of substantial importance in cryogenics when systems are designed and thermal budgeting is carried out. However, the contribution of pipes is commonly assumed to be comparably low since the warm and cold ends as well as their cross section are fairly small. Nevertheless, for a first assessment of each pipe rough estimates are always appreciated. In order to estimate the radiative heat transfer with traditional “paper and pencil“ methods there is only one analytical case available in literature – the case of plane-parallel plates. This case can only be used to calculate the theoretical lower and the upper asymptotic values of the radiative heat transfer, since pipe wall radiation properties are not taken into account. For this paper we investigated the radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities with the help of numerical simulations. Out of a number of calculation series we could gain an empirical extension for the used approach of plane-parallel plates. The model equation can be used to carry out enhanced paper and pencil estimations for the radiative heat transfer through pipes without demanding numerical simulations.

  4. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chul E; Ramanathan, V; Decremer, Damien

    2012-07-17

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm(-2), to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm(-2). This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm(-2) (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm(-2), thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon.

  5. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chul E.; Ramanathan, V.; Decremer, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm-2, to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm-2. This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm-2 (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm-2, thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon. PMID:22753522

  6. Sensitivity to Radiation-Induced Cancer in Hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bull. Richard J.; Anderson, Larry E.

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this pilot project using HFE-knockout homozygotes and heterozygotes are to (1) determine whether the knock-out mice have greater sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer of the colon, liver and breast, (2) establish the dependence of this sensitivity on the accumulation of iron, (3) determine the extent to which cell replication and apoptosis occur in these target tissues with varying iron load, and (4) correlate the increases in sensitivity with changes in insulin-related signaling in tumors and normal tissue from each target organ. Three experimental designs will be used in the pilot project. The sequence of experiments is designed to first explore the influence of iron load on the response and demonstrate that HFE knockout mice are more sensitive than the wild type to radiation-induced cancer in one or more of three target tissues (liver, colon and breast). The dose response relationships with a broader set of radiation doses will be explored in the second experiment. The final experiment is designed to explore the extent to which heterozygotes display the increased susceptibility to cancer induction and to independently assess the importance of iron load to the initiation versus promotion of tumors.

  7. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. ); Vaughan, A.T.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the organization of the DNA in chromosomes plays an important role in radiation responses. In this paper, a model is proposed which suggests that these DNA unwinding alterations reflect differences in the attachment of DNA to the nuclear matrix. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure might exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and influencing the rate and nature of DNA double-strand break rejoining.

  8. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Vaughan, A.T.M. . Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  9. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-03-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  10. Sensitive detection of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Matthew; Stites, Ronald; Kim, Soo; Feeney, Laura; Bali, Samir

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effect of radiation trapping on the photon statistics of the light scattered from optical molasses. We propose that an intensity correlation function measurement may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at an on-resonance optical depth as low as 0.1, more than an order of magnitude less than where effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990); D. Sesko, T. Walker, and C. Wieman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B. 8, 946 (1991)].

  11. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Kumar, A. Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  12. Sensitivity of polymer blends to synchrotron radiation. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Jubinsky, J.A.; Groele, R.J.; Rodriquez, F.; Namaste, Y.M.; Obendorf, S.K.

    1986-09-26

    The sensitivity of poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, to x rays is enhanced by the addition of poly(epichlorohydrin), CO rubber. The two polymers appear to be miscible over a wide concentration range. Films with 20 to 50% CO in PMMA require only 1/2 to 1/4 the exposure dose of synchrotron radiation to produce an equivalent pattern in PMMA alone. The sensitivity is confirmed by measurements of molecular weight of blends irradiated by gamma rays or electrons, a well as x rays. Dissolution behavior of the blends also is similar to that for PMMA.

  13. Spectral estimates of solar radiation intercepted by corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Daughtry, C. S. T.; Gallo, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat band radiometer throughout two growing seasons for corn (Zea mays L.) canopies differing in planting dates, populations, and soil types. Agronomic data collected included leaf area index (LAI), biomass, development stage, and final grain yields. The spectral variable, greenness, was associated with 78 percent of the variation in LAI over all treatments. Single observations of LAI or greenness have limited value in predicting corn yields. The proportions of solar radiation intercepted (SRI) by these canopies were estimated using either measured LAI or greenness. Both SRI estimates, when accumulated over the growing season, accounted for approximately 65 percent of the variation in yields. Models which simulated the daily effects of weather and intercepted solar radiation on growth had the highest correlations to grain yields. This concept of estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data represents a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data for crop yield models.

  14. Sensitivity of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyck, P.J.; Tobback, P.; Feys, M.; Van De Voorde, H.

    1982-06-01

    Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ in a 5-..mu..g/ml water solution was sensitive to ionizing radiation. Inactivation was assayed by the Ames microsome mutagenicity test and confirmed by thin-layer chromatography. Destruction of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ had already begun at 2.5 kilograys (kGy; 1 kGy = 0.1 Mrad), but a dose exceeding 10 kGy was necessary for total destruction.

  15. Estimating sound power radiated from rectangular baffled panels using a radiation factor.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Dan

    2009-10-01

    A method is introduced which is shown to predict radiated sound power from rectangular baffled panels. The method employs a filtered wavenumber transform to extract the power in the supersonic wavenumbers on the panel and a radiation factor to scale the supersonic power to match the actual radiated sound power. Although empirically derived, the radiation factor is shown to be related to the radiation efficiency of an infinite panel. The radiation factor is simple, depending only on the ratio of the wavenumbers of the panel to the radiation medium, and the method is straightforward to use, requiring only the panel normal velocities. The computation is efficient, as much as two orders of magnitude faster than a Rayleigh integration, thus providing a means of combining sound power predictions with finite element optimizations. A formula is derived which predicts the lowest frequency for which the method is valid as a function of the bin width of the wavenumber transform. The radiation factor method is shown to produce radiated sound power estimates which favorably compare to estimates derived from intensity measurements of physical test specimens and to Rayleigh integral estimates computed using both simulated and measured velocities.

  16. Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio Leandro; Costa, Alexandre Araújo; Ramalho, Fernando Pinto; de Maria, Paulo Henrique Santiago

    2009-03-01

    The use of renewable energy sources, like solar, wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years, with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil, serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil, using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS), calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos- FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors, overestimating surface radiation, but that, after the proper statistical corrections, using a relationship between the model-predicted cloud fraction, the ground-level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere, a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5 W/m2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology, we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215 W/m2 (maximum in October: 260 W/m2).

  17. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and heavy charged-particle radiations.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. D.; Urtasun, R. C.; Blakely, E. A.; Smith, K. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Stationary-phase populations of Chinese hamster V-79 cells were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays and the Bragg peaks (spread to a width of 4 cm) of energetic He-, C-, Ne-, and A-ion beams produced at the 184-inch cyclotron and BEVALAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Survival curves were generated with each radiation for cells suspended in air-saturated and nitrogen-saturated medium with and without sensitizer present. The oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) measured for X-rays with 1mM metronidazole and 0.5 mM misonidazole were 2.0 and 1.6 respectively. The OERs without sensitizer for He-, C-, Ne-, and A-ion Bragg peaks were 2.4, 1.7, 1.6 and 1.4 respectively. For each type of radiation tested the presence of hypoxic-cell sensitizers resulted in an additional reduction in the measured OERs, indicating that these drugs should be of benefit in the radiotherapy planned with these and other high LET radiations. PMID:277223

  18. Observation-based Estimate of Climate Sensitivity with a Scaling Climate Response Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Raphael; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    To properly adress the anthropogenic impacts upon the earth system, an estimate of the climate sensitivity to radiative forcing is essential. Observation-based estimates of climate sensitivity are often limited by their ability to take into account the slower response of the climate system imparted mainly by the large thermal inertia of oceans, they are nevertheless essential to provide an alternative to estimates from global circulation models and increase our confidence in estimates of climate sensitivity by the multiplicity of approaches. It is straightforward to calculate the Effective Climate Sensitivity(EffCS) as the ratio of temperature change to the change in radiative forcing; the result is almost identical to the Transient Climate Response(TCR), but it underestimates the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity(ECS). A study of global mean temperature is thus presented assuming a Scaling Climate Response Function to deterministic radiative forcing. This general form is justified as there exists a scaling symmetry respected by the dynamics, and boundary conditions, over a wide range of scales and it allows for long-range dependencies while retaining only 3 parameter which are estimated empirically. The range of memory is modulated by the scaling exponent H. We can calculate, analytically, a one-to-one relation between the scaling exponent H and the ratio of EffCS to TCR and EffCS to ECS. The scaling exponent of the power law is estimated by a regression of temperature as a function of forcing. We consider for the analysis 4 different datasets of historical global mean temperature and 100 scenario runs of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 distributed among the 4 Representative Concentration Pathways(RCP) scenarios. We find that the error function for the estimate on historical temperature is very wide and thus, many scaling exponent can be used without meaningful changes in the fit residuals of historical temperatures; their response in the year 2100

  19. Assessment of in silico methods to estimate aquatic species sensitivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the sensitivity of a diversity of species to environmental contaminants continues to be a significant challenge in ecological risk assessment because toxicity data are generally limited to a few standard species. In many cases, QSAR models are used to estimate toxici...

  20. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  1. Image-based spectral transmission estimation using "sensitivity comparison".

    PubMed

    Nahavandi, Alireza Mahmoudi; Tehran, Mohammad Amani

    2017-01-20

    Although digital cameras have been used for spectral reflectance estimation, transmission measurement has rarely been considered in studies. This study presents a method named sensitivity comparison (SC) for spectral transmission estimation. The method needs neither a priori knowledge from the samples nor statistical information of a given reflectance dataset. As with spectrophotometers, the SC method needs one shot for calibration and another shot for measurement. The method exploits the sensitivity of the camera in the absence and presence of transparent colored objects for transmission estimation. 138 Kodak Wratten Gelatin filter transmissions were used for controlling the proposed method. Using modeling of the imaging system in different levels of noise, the performance of the proposed method was compared with a training-based Matrix R method. For checking the performance of the SC method in practice, 33 manmade colored transparent films were used in a conventional three-channel camera. The method generated promising results using different error metrics.

  2. Sensitivity of two salamander (Ambystoma) species to ultraviolet radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Bridges, C.M.; Little, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the Earth's surface has been implicated in amphibian declines. Recent studies have shown that many amphibian species have differences in sensitivity depending on developmental stage. Embryos and larvae of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander) and larvae of Ambystoma talpoideum (Mole Salamander) were exposed to five simulated UV-B treatments in controlled laboratory experiments to determine the relative sensitivity of different lifestages. Hatching success of the embryos exceeded 95% in all treatments; however, the larvae of both species exhibited greater sensitivity to UV-B exposure. Older larvae of A. maculatum that were not exposed to UV-B as embryos were more sensitive than larvae that had hatched during exposure to UV-B. Growth of surviving larvae of A. maculatum was significantly reduced as UV-B intensity increased, whereas growth of A. talpoideum was unaffected. These results were compared to ambient UV-B conditions in natural environments. It appears that the embryo stage is relatively unaffected by UV-B levels observed in natural habitats, probably because of protection from vegetation, organic matter in the water column, oviposition depth, and egg jelly. The larval stage of these species may be at greater risk, particularly if there is an increase in UV-B radiation exposure caused by increases in water clarity and/or decreases in dissolved organic carbon.

  3. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the In Vitro Sensitivity of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Radiation of Different LET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, Ekaterina M.; Deperas-Kaminska, Marta; Govorun, Raisa D.; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if the sensitivity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) to high LET radiation is individually variable and whether it correlates with the sensitivity to low LET radiation.

  5. [Factors of individual radiation sensitivity in caries prevalence in population of radiation polluted regions].

    PubMed

    Sevbitov, A V; Skatova, E A

    2005-01-01

    Analysing dental diseases prevalence in population of radiation polluted regions after the Chernobyl accident, one should take into account not only the level of the soil contamination with radionuclides but also factors of individual sensitivity to radioactivity, main of which is the age of the exposed person.

  6. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m-3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m-3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the soil

  7. Targeting Nucleophosmin 1 Represents a Rational Strategy for Radiation Sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Benamar, Mouadh; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Sasi, Soumya; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Hann, Stephen R.; Geng, Ling; Balusu, Ramesh; Abbas, Tarek; Freeman, Michael L.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that small molecule targeting of nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) represents a rational approach for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Wilde-type and NPM1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were used to determine whether radiosensitization produced by the small molecule YTR107 was NPM1 dependent. The stress response to ionizing radiation was assessed by quantifying pNPM1, γH2AX, and Rad51 foci, neutral comet tail moment, and colony formation. NPM1 levels in a human-derived non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue microarray (TMA) were determined by immunohistochemistry. YTR107-mediated radiosensitization was assessed in NSCLC cell lines and xenografts. Results: Use of NPM1-null MEFs demonstrated that NPM1 is critical for DNA double- strand break (DSB) repair, that loss of NPM1 increases radiation sensitivity, and that YTR107-mediated radiosensitization is NPM1 dependent. YTR107 was shown to inhibit NPM1 oligomerization and impair formation of pNPM1 irradiation-induced foci that colocalized with γH2AX foci. Analysis of the TMA demonstrated that NPM1 is overexpressed in subsets of NSCLC. YTR107 inhibited DNA DSB repair and radiosensitized NSCLC lines and xenografts. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that YTR107-mediated targeting of NPM1 impairs DNA DSB repair, an event that increases radiation sensitivity.

  8. Estimated Radiation on Mars, Hits per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows estimates for amounts of high-energy-particle cosmic radiation reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

    The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements made on the way to Mars by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have least radiation are where elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth does.

    Colors in the map refer to the estimated average number of times per year each cell nucleus in a human there would be hit by a high-energy cosmic ray particle. The range is generally from two hits (color-coded green), a moderate risk level, to eight hits (coded red), a high risk level.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Space Radiation Heart Disease Risk Estimates for Lunar and Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Program performs research on the risks of late effects from space radiation for cancer, neurological disorders, cataracts, and heart disease. For mortality risks, an aggregate over all risks should be considered as well as projection of the life loss per radiation induced death. We report on a triple detriment life-table approach to combine cancer and heart disease risks. Epidemiology results show extensive heterogeneity between populations for distinct components of the overall heart disease risks including hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular diseases. We report on an update to our previous heart disease estimates for Heart disease (ICD9 390-429) and Stroke (ICD9 430-438), and other sub-groups using recent meta-analysis results for various exposed radiation cohorts to low LET radiation. Results for multiplicative and additive risk transfer models are considered using baseline rates for US males and female. Uncertainty analysis indicated heart mortality risks as low as zero, assuming a threshold dose for deterministic effects, and projections approaching one-third of the overall cancer risk. Medan life-loss per death estimates were significantly less than that of solid cancer and leukemias. Critical research questions to improve risks estimates for heart disease are distinctions in mechanisms at high doses (>2 Gy) and low to moderate doses (<2 Gy), and data and basic understanding of radiation doserate and quality effects, and individual sensitivity.

  10. Radiative Energy Budget Estimates for the 1979 Southwest Summer Monsoon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1987-10-01

    Obsemations of temperature moisture, cloud amount, cloud height and soil-derived aerosols are incorporated into radiative transfer models to yield estimates of the tropospheric and surface radiative energy budgets for the summer Monsoon of 1979. Results are presented for six phases of the monsoon for the region 30°S to 40°N latitude and 30°E to 100°E longitude. The derived radiative fields are significantly different from climatological estimates. The evolution of the radiative energy budgets are discussed in relation to monsoon activity. Total tropospheric convergence (TTC) for the January and February phases exhibits a minimum cooling over the southern Indian Ocean and a maximum tropospheric radiative energy loss over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The early May, pre-onset, onset and post-onset periods exhibit cellular patterns in TTC, with maximum cooling over the cloud-free oceanic regions, and minimum cooling associated with continental regions and areas with large amounts of cloud. This cellular structure is still evident when TTC is averaged over 10° regions. Large seasonal variations in TTC are observed over the deserts, due to the presence of dust in the summer. Regions with large seasonal variations in cloud cover (e.g., the Arabian Sea) also display large variations in TTC. Regionally averaged radiative heating profiles also change significantly with period. These variations result primarily from changes in the cloud distribution associated with the evolution of the monsoon.The net surface radiative flux varies markedly from period to period, and within the same period. As expected, all six periods have a maximum surface radiative energy gain for the cloud-free oceanic regions, while cloudy and continental regions tend to have relative minimae. Large spatial and temporal variations exist in the net surface flux.

  11. Global sensitivity analysis of the radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Maheshwari; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2015-04-01

    With the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, it is very important to have a complete understanding of the radiative transfer model for better soil moisture retrievals and to direct future research and field campaigns in areas of necessity. Because natural systems show great variability and complexity with respect to soil, land cover, topography, precipitation, there exist large uncertainties and heterogeneities in model input factors. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using global sensitivity analysis (GSA) technique to study the influence of heterogeneity and uncertainties in model inputs on zero order radiative transfer (ZRT) model and to quantify interactions between parameters. GSA technique is based on decomposition of variance and can handle nonlinear and nonmonotonic functions. We direct our analyses toward growing agricultural fields of corn and soybean in two different regions, Iowa, USA (SMEX02) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). We noticed that, there exists a spatio-temporal variation in parameter interactions under different soil moisture and vegetation conditions. Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) behaves more non-linearly in SMEX02 and linearly in SMAPVEX12, with average parameter interactions of 14% in SMEX02 and 5% in SMAPVEX12. Also, parameter interactions increased with vegetation water content (VWC) and roughness conditions. Interestingly, soil moisture shows an exponentially decreasing sensitivity function whereas parameters such as root mean square height (RMS height) and vegetation water content show increasing sensitivity with 0.05 v/v increase in soil moisture range. Overall, considering the SMAPVEX12 fields to be water rich environment (due to higher observed SM) and SMEX02 fields to be energy rich environment (due to lower SM and wide ranges of TSURF), our results indicate that first order as well as interactions between the parameters change with water and energy rich environments.

  12. Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Hykes, Joshua M

    2008-01-01

    The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

  13. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1990-01-01

    A future goal of the U.S. space program is a commitment to the manned exploration and habitation of Mars. An important consideration of such missions is the exposure of crew members to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation from high-energy galactic cosmic ray fluxes and solar proton flares. The crew will encounter the most harmful radiation environment in transit to Mars from which they must be adequately protected. However, once on the planet's surface, the Martian environment should provide a significant amount of protection from free-space radiative fluxes. In current Mars scenario descriptions, the crew flight time to Mars is estimated to be anywhere from 7 months to over a year each way, with stay times on the surface ranging from 20 days to 2 years. To maintain dose levels below established astronaut limits, dose estimates need to be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations on the surface anticipated, the characterization of the Mars radiation environment is important in assessing all radiation protection requirements. This synopsis focuses on the probable doses incurred by surface inhabitants from the transport of galactic cosmic rays and solar protons through the Mars atmosphere.

  14. Sensitivity of probabilistic MCO water content estimates to key assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-02-25

    Sensitivity of probabilistic multi-canister overpack (MCO) water content estimates to key assumptions is evaluated with emphasis on the largest non-cladding film-contributors, water borne by particulates adhering to damage sites, and water borne by canister particulate. Calculations considered different choices of damage state degree of independence, different choices of percentile for reference high inputs, three types of input probability density function (pdfs): triangular, log-normal, and Weibull, and the number of scrap baskets in an MCO.

  15. Sensitivity estimate of the MACE gamma ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mradul; Chinmay, B.; Bhatt, Nilay; Bhattacharyya, Subir; Bose, S.; Mitra, Abhas; Koul, R.; Tickoo, A. K.; Rannot, Ramesh C.

    2017-04-01

    The MACE (Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Experiment) is a 21 m diameter γ-ray telescope which is presently being installed at Hanle in Ladakh, India (32° 46 ‧ 46″ N, 78° 58 ‧ 35″ E) at an altitude of 4270 m a.s.l. Once operational, it will become the highest altitude very high energy (VHE) γ-ray telescope in the world based on Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT). In the present work, we discuss the sensitivity estimate of the MACE telescope by using a substantially large Monte Carlo simulation database at 5° zenith angle. The sensitivity of MACE telescope is estimated by carrying out the γ-hadron segregation using the Random Forest method. It is estimated that the MACE telescope will have an analysis energy threshold of 38 GeV for image intensities above 50 photoelectrons. The integral sensitivity for point like sources with Crab Nebula-like spectrum above 38 GeV is ∼ 2.7 % of Crab Nebula flux at 5 σ statistical significance level in 50 h of observation.

  16. Precipitation sensitivity to warming estimated from long island records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, D.; Hegerl, G. C.; Solomon, S.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most damaging impacts of climate change are a consequence of changes to the global water cycle. Atmospheric warming causes the water cycle to intensify, increasing both atmospheric water vapor concentrations and global precipitation and enhancing existing patterns of precipitation minus evaporation (P - E). This relationship between temperature and precipitation therefore makes understanding how precipitation has changed with global temperatures in the past crucial for projecting changes with future warming. In situ observations cannot readily estimate global precipitation sensitivity to temperature (dP/dT), as land precipitation changes are affected by water limitation. Satellite observations of precipitation over ocean are only available after 1979, but studies based on them suggest a precipitation sensitivity over wet tropical (30N-30S) oceans that exceeds the Clausius-Clapeyron value. Here, we determine for the first time precipitation sensitivity using longer (1930-2005), island-based in situ observations to estimate dP/dT over islands. The records show a robust pattern of increasing precipitation in the tropics and decreasing precipitation in the subtropics, as predicted from physical arguments, and heavy precipitation shows a stronger sensitivity than mean precipitation over many islands. The pattern and magnitude of island-based dP/dT agree with climate models if masked to island locations, supporting model predictions of future changes.

  17. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam T.; Storm, Tyler L.; Gee, Lind S.; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution (R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  18. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  19. Optimizing spectral wave estimates with adjoint-based sensitivity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Flampouris, Stylianos

    2014-04-01

    A discrete numerical adjoint has recently been developed for the stochastic wave model SWAN. In the present study, this adjoint code is used to construct spectral sensitivity maps for two nearshore domains. The maps display the correlations of spectral energy levels throughout the domain with the observed energy levels at a selected location or region of interest (LOI/ROI), providing a full spectrum of values at all locations in the domain. We investigate the effectiveness of sensitivity maps based on significant wave height ( H s ) in determining alternate offshore instrument deployment sites when a chosen nearshore location or region is inaccessible. Wave and bathymetry datasets are employed from one shallower, small-scale domain (Duck, NC) and one deeper, larger-scale domain (San Diego, CA). The effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and multiple assimilation points on sensitivity map shapes and model performance are investigated. Model accuracy is evaluated by comparing spectral statistics as well as with an RMS skill score, which estimates a mean model-data error across all spectral bins. Results indicate that data assimilation from identified high-sensitivity alternate locations consistently improves model performance at nearshore LOIs, while assimilation from low-sensitivity locations results in lesser or no improvement. Use of sub-sampled or alongshore-averaged bathymetry has a domain-specific effect on model performance when assimilating from a high-sensitivity alternate location. When multiple alternate assimilation locations are used from areas of lower sensitivity, model performance may be worse than with a single, high-sensitivity assimilation point.

  20. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  1. Assessing the sensitivity of methods for estimating principal causal effects.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth A; Jo, Booil

    2015-12-01

    The framework of principal stratification provides a way to think about treatment effects conditional on post-randomization variables, such as level of compliance. In particular, the complier average causal effect (CACE) - the effect of the treatment for those individuals who would comply with their treatment assignment under either treatment condition - is often of substantive interest. However, estimation of the CACE is not always straightforward, with a variety of estimation procedures and underlying assumptions, but little advice to help researchers select between methods. In this article, we discuss and examine two methods that rely on very different assumptions to estimate the CACE: a maximum likelihood ('joint') method that assumes the 'exclusion restriction,' (ER) and a propensity score-based method that relies on 'principal ignorability.' We detail the assumptions underlying each approach, and assess each methods' sensitivity to both its own assumptions and those of the other method using both simulated data and a motivating example. We find that the ER-based joint approach appears somewhat less sensitive to its assumptions, and that the performance of both methods is significantly improved when there are strong predictors of compliance. Interestingly, we also find that each method performs particularly well when the assumptions of the other approach are violated. These results highlight the importance of carefully selecting an estimation procedure whose assumptions are likely to be satisfied in practice and of having strong predictors of principal stratum membership.

  2. Sensitivity to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Protic, M.; Woloschak, G. E.

    1999-11-12

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive wasted mutation (wst/wst) have abnormalities in T-lymphocytes and in the anterior motor neuron cells of the spinal cord, leading to sensitivity to low doses of ionizing radiation, hind limb paralysis, and immunodeficiency. This defect results in a failure to gain weight by 20 days and death at 28 days of age. The wasted mutation (previously mapped to mouse chromosome 2) is shown to be a 3-bp deletion in a T-cell-specific (and perhaps motor-neuron-specific) regulatory region (promoter) of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene on mouse chromosome 2. A regulatory element is also shown to be important in PCNA expression in T-lymphocytes and motor neuron cells afflicted by the 3-bp deletion in the PCNA promoter. The model is as follows: Absence of PCNA expression in the thymuses (and motor neurons) of wasted mice causes cellular apoptosis; this absence of expression is mediated by a positive transactor that can bind to the wild-type but not the wasted mutant PCNA promoter; the bound protein induces late expression of PCNA in T-lymphocytes and prevents onset of radiation sensitivity in the cells.

  3. Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15) is a potential marker of radiation response and radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Benedek, Anett; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the importance of GDF-15 (secreted cytokine belonging to the TGF-β superfamily) in low and high dose radiation-induced cellular responses. A telomerase immortalized human fibroblast cell line (F11hT) was used in the experiments. A lentiviral system encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA) was used to establish GDF-15 silenced cells. Secreted GDF-15 levels were measured in culture medium by ELISA. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that in irradiated human fibroblasts GDF-15 expression increased with dose starting from 100mGy. Elevated GDF-15 expression was not detected in bystander cells. The potential role of GDF-15 in radiation response was investigated by silencing GDF-15 in immortalized human fibroblasts with five different shRNA encoded in lentiviral vectors. Cell lines with considerably reduced GDF-15 levels presented increased radiation sensitivity, while a cell line with elevated GDF-15 was more radiation resistant than wild type cells. We have investigated how the reduced GDF-15 levels alter the response of several known radiation inducible genes. In F11hT-shGDF-15 cells the basal expression level of CDKN1A was unaltered relative to F11hT cells, while GADD45A and TGF-β1 mRNA levels were slightly higher, and TP53INP1 was considerably reduced. The radiation-induced expression of TP53INP1 was lower in the silenced than in wild type fibroblast cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that radiation-induced early G2/M arrest was abrogated in GDF-15 silenced cells. Moreover, radiation-induced bystander effect was less pronounced in GDF-15 silenced fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results suggest that GDF-15 works as a radiation inducible radiation resistance increasing factor in normal human fibroblast cells, acts by regulating the radiation-induced transcription of several genes and might serve as a radiation-induced early biomarker in exposed cells.

  4. Radiation shielding estimates for manned Mars space flight.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, V E; Kovalev, E E; Kolomensky, A V; Sakovich, V A; Semenov, V F; Demin, V P; Benton, E V

    1992-01-01

    In the analysis of the required radiation shielding protection of spacecraft during a Mars flight, specific effects of solar activity (SA) on the intensity of galactic and solar cosmic rays were taken into consideration. Three spaceflight periods were considered: (1) maximum SA; (2) minimum SA; and (3) intermediate SA, when intensities of both galactic and solar cosmic rays are moderately high. Scenarios of spaceflights utilizing liquid-propellant rocket engines, low- and intermediate-thrust nuclear electrojet engines, and nuclear rocket engines, all of which have been designed in the Soviet Union, are reviewed. Calculations were performed on the basis of a set of standards for radiation protection approved by the U.S.S.R. State Committee for Standards. It was found that the lowest estimated mass of a Mars spacecraft, including the radiation shielding mass, obtained using a combination of a liquid propellant engine with low and intermediate thrust nuclear electrojet engines, would be 500-550 metric tons.

  5. A new method to estimate average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Soupir, Michelle L.

    2012-10-01

    A new model, Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surface (GSRHS), was developed to estimate the average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surfaces (Gh). The GSRHS model uses the transmission function (Tf,ij), which was developed to control hourly global solar radiation, for predicting solar radiation. The inputs of the model were: hour of day, day (Julian) of year, optimized parameter values, solar constant (H0), latitude, and longitude of the location of interest. The parameter values used in the model were optimized at a location (Albuquerque, NM), and these values were applied into the model for predicting average hourly global solar radiations at four different locations (Austin, TX; El Paso, TX; Desert Rock, NV; Seattle, WA) of the United States. The model performance was assessed using correlation coefficient (r), Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and coefficient of determinations (R2). The sensitivities of parameter to prediction were estimated. Results show that the model performed very well. The correlation coefficients (r) range from 0.96 to 0.99, while coefficients of determination (R2) range from 0.92 to 0.98. For daily and monthly prediction, error percentages (i.e. MABE and RMSE) were less than 20%. The approach we proposed here can be potentially useful for predicting average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface for different locations, with the use of readily available data (i.e. latitude and longitude of the location) as inputs.

  6. Estimation of scattered radiation in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, O.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.; Elangovan, P.; Bakic, P. R.; Wells, K.

    2014-08-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising technique to overcome the tissue superposition limitations found in planar 2D x-ray mammography. However, as most DBT systems do not employ an anti-scatter grid, the levels of scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor are significantly higher than that observed in planar 2D x-ray mammography. Knowledge of this field is necessary as part of any correction scheme and for computer modelling and optimisation of this examination. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are often used for this purpose, however they are computationally expensive and a more rapid method of calculation is desirable. This issue is addressed in this work by the development of a fast kernel-based methodology for scatter field estimation using a detailed realistic DBT geometry. Thickness-dependent scatter kernels, which were validated against the literature with a maximum discrepancy of 4% for an idealised geometry, have been calculated and a new physical parameter (air gap distance) was used to estimate more accurately the distribution of scattered radiation for a series of anthropomorphic breast phantom models. The proposed methodology considers, for the first time, the effects of scattered radiation from the compression paddle and breast support plate, which can represent more than 30% of the total scattered radiation recorded within the image receptor. The results show that the scatter field estimator can calculate scattered radiation images in an average of 80 min for projection angles up to 25° with equal to or less than a 10% error across most of the breast area when compared with direct MC simulations.

  7. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1986-12-01

    Four decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modeling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the US and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Estimating worldwide solar radiation resources on a 40km grid

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; George, R.L.; Brady, E.H.

    1996-11-01

    During 1995, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), initiated the Data Grid Task under the auspices of DOE`s Resource Assessment Program. A data grid is a framework of uniformly spaced locations (grid points) for which data are available. Estimates of monthly averages of direct normal, diffuse horizontal, and global horizontal daily-total solar radiation energy (kWh/m{sup 2}) are being made for each point on a grid covering the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and southern Canada. The grid points are separated by approximately 40 km. Using interpolation methods, the digital data grid can be used to estimate solar resources at any location. The most encouraging result to date has been the location of sources providing worldwide data for most of the input parameters required for modeling daily total solar radiation. This is a multiyear task expected to continue through the rest of this century.

  9. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  10. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Atwell, W; Beever, R; Hardy, A

    1986-01-01

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5 degrees, 57 degrees and 90 degrees) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5 degrees orbital inclination.

  11. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; ...

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010more » both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.« less

  12. Sensitivity of cerebellar glutathione system to neonatal ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, C G; Di Toro, P A; Zieher, L M; Guelman, L R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relevant components of living organisms that, besides their role in the regulation of different important physiological functions, when present in excess are capable to affect cell oxidative status, leading to damage of cellular molecules and disturbance of normal cell function. ROS accumulation has been associated with a variety of conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and ionizing radiation exposure. Cell ability to counteract ROS overproduction depends on the capacity of the endogenous antioxidant defenses--which includes the glutathione (GSH) system--to cope with. Since developing central nervous system (CNS) is especially sensitive to ROS-induced damage, the aim of the present work was to evaluate ROS, reduced GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels in the cerebellum at different developmental ages after irradiation, in order to test if any changes were induced on these key oxidative stress-related cellular markers that might explain the high cerebellar vulnerability to radiation-induced injury. Since intracellular levels of GSH are maintained by glutathione reductase (GSHr), this enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Newborn Wistar rats were irradiated in their cephalic ends and the different parameters were measured, from 1h to 90 days post-irradiation. Results showed that an early transient increase in ROS levels followed by a decrease in cerebellar weight at 3-5 days post-irradiation were induced. An increase in cerebellar GSH levels was induced at 30 days after irradiation, together with a decrease in GSHr activity. These results support the hypothesis that ROS may represent a marker of damage prior to radiation-induced cell death. In contrast, it would be suggested that GSH system might play a role in the compensatory mechanisms triggered to counteract radiation-induced cerebellar damage.

  13. Cancer risk estimation caused by radiation exposure during endovascular procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. H.; Cho, J. H.; Yun, W. S.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kwon, S. M.

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the radiation exposure dose of patients, as well as staff caused by fluoroscopy for C-arm-assisted vascular surgical operation and to estimate carcinogenic risk due to such exposure dose. The study was conducted in 71 patients (53 men and 18 women) who had undergone vascular surgical intervention at the division of vascular surgery in the University Hospital from November of 2011 to April of 2012. It had used a mobile C-arm device and calculated the radiation exposure dose of patient (dose-area product, DAP). Effective dose was measured by attaching optically stimulated luminescence on the radiation protectors of staff who participates in the surgery to measure the radiation exposure dose of staff during the vascular surgical operation. From the study results, DAP value of patients was 308.7 Gy cm2 in average, and the maximum value was 3085 Gy cm2. When converted to the effective dose, the resulted mean was 6.2 m Gy and the maximum effective dose was 61.7 milliSievert (mSv). The effective dose of staff was 3.85 mSv; while the radiation technician was 1.04 mSv, the nurse was 1.31 mSv. All cancer incidences of operator are corresponding to 2355 persons per 100,000 persons, which deemed 1 of 42 persons is likely to have all cancer incidences. In conclusion, the vascular surgeons should keep the radiation protection for patient, staff, and all participants in the intervention in mind as supervisor of fluoroscopy while trying to understand the effects by radiation by themselves to prevent invisible danger during the intervention and to minimize the harm.

  14. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  15. Estimating the variation, autocorrelation, and environmental sensitivity of phenotypic selection.

    PubMed

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Visser, Marcel E; Tufto, Jarle

    2015-09-01

    Despite considerable interest in temporal and spatial variation of phenotypic selection, very few methods allow quantifying this variation while correctly accounting for the error variance of each individual estimate. Furthermore, the available methods do not estimate the autocorrelation of phenotypic selection, which is a major determinant of eco-evolutionary dynamics in changing environments. We introduce a new method for measuring variable phenotypic selection using random regression. We rely on model selection to assess the support for stabilizing selection, and for a moving optimum that may include a trend plus (possibly autocorrelated) fluctuations. The environmental sensitivity of selection also can be estimated by including an environmental covariate. After testing our method on extensive simulations, we apply it to breeding time in a great tit population in the Netherlands. Our analysis finds support for an optimum that is well predicted by spring temperature, and occurs about 33 days before a peak in food biomass, consistent with what is known from the biology of this species. We also detect autocorrelated fluctuations in the optimum, beyond those caused by temperature and the food peak. Because our approach directly estimates parameters that appear in theoretical models, it should be particularly useful for predicting eco-evolutionary responses to environmental change.

  16. Estimation of Fire Radiative Energy in Siberia Using MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvetsov, Eugene; Ponomarev, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    The intensity of heat release during biomass combustion is an important characteristic of wildfires. Space-borne systems, such as MODIS radiometer, provide observations of fire locations, as well as an estimate of the amount of radiant energy emitted by the fire. Such measures of fire radiative power (FRP) provide information on the fireline heat release intensity and on the rate of biomass combustion in large scale and are important for the analysis of fire impact on vegetation. In this study we analyzed the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of detected wildfires in Siberia considering their radiative power. For the analysis we used database of fire detections made by MODIS instrument located on TERRA and AQUA satellites for 2002- 2013. For the detected fire pixels the frequency of their occurrence was calculated depending on the radiative power. More than 80% of all detected pixels had radiative power less than 100 MW. The distribution of fires according to their radiative power values was obtained for different regions of Siberia characterized by various vegetation and climatic conditions. Geospatial analysis performed using vegetation maps for the territory of Siberia and GIS layers of active fire detections showed that fires in deciduous and pine forests generally had lower intensities than fires in larch and spruce/fir forests. The rate of biomass combustion and the amount of heat emitted are strongly related to fuel moisture and therefore to weather conditions. In this study weather conditions were characterized using Russian and Canadian weather fire danger indices. Using images obtained during day and night satellite passes daily and long-term dynamics of fire radiative power was calculated. The long-term dynamics of fire radiative power measured by MODIS sensor was compared to weather fire danger indices calculated using on-ground weather stations data located in several Siberian regions mostly liable to fires. For most of the weather stations

  17. Estimation of neutron and other radiation exposure components in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, R. C. Jr; Badavi, F. F.; Shinn, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Wilson, J. W.; Atwell, W.; Beaujean, R.; Kopp, J.; Reitz, G.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of high-energy space radiation with spacecraft materials generates a host of secondary particles, some, such as neutrons, are more biologically damaging and penetrating than the original primary particles. Before committing astronauts to long term exposure in such high radiation environments, a quantitative understanding of the exposure and estimates of the associated risks are required. Energetic neutrons are traditionally difficult to measure due to their neutral charge. Measurement methods have been limited by mass and weight requirements in space to nuclear emulsion, activation foils, a limited number of Bonner spheres, and TEPCs. Such measurements have had limited success in quantifying the neutron component relative to the charged components. We will show that a combination of computational models and experimental measurements can be used as a quantitative tool to evaluate the radiation environment within the Shuttle, including neutrons. Comparisons with space measurements are made with special emphasis on neutron sensitive and insensitive devices. c2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xiao, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010 both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.

  19. New estimates of the Earth radiation budget under cloud-free conditions and cloud radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Folini, Doris; Schär, Christoph; Long, Charles

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies1, 2 we derived new estimates for the magnitude of the components of the global mean energy budget using to the extent possible the information contained in direct observations from surface and space. Here we establish complementary estimates for the global mean energy budget specifically under cloud-free conditions. The energy fluxes under cloud-free conditions at the Top of Atmosphere (TOA) can be determined with high accuracy from satellite measurements (CERES-EBAF). For the estimation of their counterparts at the Earth's surface we follow the approach presented in our recent studies, based on an analysis of 39 state of the art global climate models from CMIP5 and their bias structure compared to a comprehensive set of high quality surface observations from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Thereby we infer a best estimate of 249 Wm-2 for the global mean clear-sky downward shortwave radiation at the surface, and a corresponding clear-sky surface shortwave absorption of 216 Wm-2, considering a global mean surface albedo of 13 %. Combined with a best estimate for the global mean net shortwave influx at the TOA under cloud-free skies from CERES-EBAF of 287 Wm-2, this leaves an amount of 71 Wm-2 absorbed shortwave radiation in the cloud-free atmosphere. The 71 Wm-2 coincide with our earlier estimate for this quantity in Wild et al. (2006)3 based on older models and fewer direct observations, suggesting that this estimate is fairly robust. For the clear-sky downward longwave radiation at the Earth surface we obtain a best estimate of 314 Wm-2. A comparison of the clear-sky global energy balance diagram presented here with the corresponding all-sky diagram established in our previous studies enables a quantification of the global mean shortwave, longwave and net cloud-radiative effects at the TOA, within the atmosphere and at the surface, as well as an assessment of their representation in climate models.

  20. Spectral estimates of net radiation and soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daughtry, C.S.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Pinter, P. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Brown, P.W.; Nichols, W.D.; Gay, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional methods of measuring surface energy balance are point measurements and represent only a small area. Remote sensing offers a potential means of measuring outgoing fluxes over large areas at the spatial resolution of the sensor. The objective of this study was to estimate net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G) using remotely sensed multispectral data acquired from an aircraft over large agricultural fields. Ground-based instruments measured Rn and G at nine locations along the flight lines. Incoming fluxes were also measured by ground-based instruments. Outgoing fluxes were estimated using remotely sensed data. Remote Rn, estimated as the algebraic sum of incoming and outgoing fluxes, slightly underestimated Rn measured by the ground-based net radiometers. The mean absolute errors for remote Rn minus measured Rn were less than 7%. Remote G, estimated as a function of a spectral vegetation index and remote Rn, slightly overestimated measured G; however, the mean absolute error for remote G was 13%. Some of the differences between measured and remote values of Rn and G are associated with differences in instrument designs and measurement techniques. The root mean square error for available energy (Rn - G) was 12%. Thus, methods using both ground-based and remotely sensed data can provide reliable estimates of the available energy which can be partitioned into sensible and latent heat under nonadvective conditions. ?? 1990.

  1. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments.

  2. Towards a comprehensive CT image segmentation for thoracic organ radiation dose estimation and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Ruppertshofen, Heike; Vik, Torbjörn; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Administered dose of ionizing radiation during medical imaging is an issue of increasing concern for the patient, for the clinical community, and for respective regulatory bodies. CT radiation dose is currently estimated based on a set of very simplifying assumptions which do not take the actual body geometry and organ specific doses into account. This makes it very difficult to accurately report imaging related administered dose and to track it for different organs over the life of the patient. In this paper this deficit is addressed in a two-fold way. In a first step, the absorbed radiation dose in each image voxel is estimated based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of X-ray absorption and scattering. In a second step, the image is segmented into tissue types with different radio sensitivity. In combination this allows to calculate the effective dose as a weighted sum of the individual organ doses. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of automatic organ specific dose estimation. With respect to a commercially applicable solution and respective robustness and efficiency requirements, we investigated the effect of dose sampling rather than integration over the organ volume. We focused on the thoracic anatomy as the exemplary body region, imaged frequently by CT. For image segmentation we applied a set of available approaches which allowed us to cover the main thoracic radio-sensitive tissue types. We applied the dose estimation approach to 10 thoracic CT datasets and evaluated segmentation accuracy and administered dose and could show that organ specific dose estimation can be achieved.

  3. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-07

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  4. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F.; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist® in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL-1), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly ‘energy dependent’ for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  5. Recent Updates to Radiation Organ Dose Estimation Tool PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Wiarda, Dorothea; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    A computational phantom with moving arms and legs and an accompanying graphical user interface, PIMAL, was previously developed to enable radiation dose estimation for different postures in a user-friendly manner. This initial version of the software was useful in adjusting the posture, generating the corresponding MCNP input file, and performing the radiation transport simulations for dose calculations using MCNP5 or MCNPX. However, it only included one mathematical phantom model (hermaphrodite) and allowed only isotropic point sources. Recently, the software was enhanced by adding two more mathematical phantom models, a male and female, and the source features were enhanced significantly by adding internal and external source options in a pull-down menu. Although the initial version of the software included only a mathematical hermaphrodite phantom, the features and models in the software are constantly being enhanced by adding more phantoms as well as other options to enable dose assessment for different configurations/cases in a user-friendly manner. In this latest version of the software, ICRP's recently released reference male and female voxel phantoms are included in a pull-down menu. The male and female models are described using 7 and 14 million voxels, respectively. Currently, the software is being modified further to include the International Commission on Radiation Protection's (ICRP) reference male and female voxel phantoms. Additionally, some case studies are being implemented and included in a library of input files. This paper describes recent updates to the software.

  6. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  7. Impact on radiogenic cancer risk of persons exhibiting abnormal sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gentner, N.E.; Morrison, D.P.; Myers, D.K.

    1988-08-01

    Human genotypes are known that confer both increased susceptibility or resistance to DNA damage and increased cancer risk after exposure to carcinogenic agents, including ionizing radiation (NAS 1980). The existence of sensitive subgroups at elevated risk, if they are of appreciable size, could have significant impact on the actual distribution of risk. The radiosensitive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) serves as a good example: the significant at risk group, A-T heterozygotes, is estimated to comprise between 0.5% and 5% of the total population, and has a twofold elevated lifetime risk of fatal neoplasia. Other genetic syndromes that manifest abnormal radiosensitivity are also known, but no estimates are available for the population frequency of all such phenotypes, or for their overall degree of increased risk. As the first part of a program addressing these questions, we have developed a rapid and inexpensive assay for screening members of the general population for abnormal radiosensitivity; such persons would be regarded as at presumptive elevated risk of radiogenic cancer. Our method utilizes lymphoblastoid cell lines and chronic as opposed to acute gamma-ray exposure to amplify the difference between normal and somewhat sensitive strains. A simple grow-back assay assesses the survival response. Information on the extent of natural variation in inherited susceptibility to radiogenic cancers could be most useful for radiation protection in the future.

  8. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  9. Estimating radiation risk induced by CT screening for Korean population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Won Seok; Yang, Hye Jeong; Min, Byung In

    2017-02-01

    The purposes of this study are to estimate the radiation risks induced by chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) screening for healthcare and to determine the cancer risk level of the Korean population compared to other populations. We used an ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator to compute the organ effective dose induced by CT screening (chest, low-dose chest, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis CT). A risk model was applied using principles based on the BEIR VII Report in order to estimate the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) using the Korean Life Table 2010. In addition, several countries including Hong Kong, the United States (U.S.), and the United Kingdom, were selected for comparison. Herein, each population exposed radiation dose of 100 mSv was classified according to country, gender and age. For each CT screening the total organ effective dose calculated by ImPACT was 6.2, 1.5, 5.2 and 11.4 mSv, respectively. In the case of Korean female LAR, it was similar to Hong Kong female but lower than those of U.S. and U.K. females, except for those in their twenties. The LAR of Korean males was the highest for all types of CT screening. However, the difference of the risk level was negligible because of the quite low value.

  10. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  11. Risk estimation based on chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Bonassi, S.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a causal association between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of cancer has been substantiated recently by epidemiological studies. Cytogenetic analyses of crew members of the Mir Space Station have shown that a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations can be detected after flight, and that such an increase is likely to be attributed to the radiation exposure. The risk of cancer can be estimated directly from the yields of chromosomal aberrations, taking into account some aspects of individual susceptibility and other factors unrelated to radiation. However, the use of an appropriate technique for the collection and analysis of chromosomes and the choice of the structural aberrations to be measured are crucial in providing sound results. Based on the fraction of aberrant lymphocytes detected before and after flight, the relative risk after a long-term Mir mission is estimated to be about 1.2-1.3. The new technique of mFISH can provide useful insights into the quantification of risk on an individual basis.

  12. Time-dependent radiation hazard estimations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the out of magnetosphere crewed flights. The cosmic radiation uncrewed flights inside heliosphere and crewed flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot time flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long term crewed missions set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition term. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and coronal mass ejections (CME). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. CME are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but are much more energetic. The probability of CME increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and affection of CME and GCR would be minimized. Applying time dependent models of GCR spectra [1] and estimations of CME we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in a realistic human phantom [2] inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow of secondary induced particles and

  13. Estimated ultraviolet radiation doses in wetlands in six national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, S.A.; Trenham, P.C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hossack, B.R.; Knapp, R.A.; Stark, L.; Bradford, D.; Corn, P.S.; Czarnowski, K.; Brooks, P.D.; Fagre, D.B.; Breen, B.; Dentenbeck, N.E.; Tonnessen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–320-nm wavelengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands in six national parks: Acadia (Acadia), Glacier (Glacier), Great Smoky Mountains (Smoky), Olympic (Olympic), Rocky Mountain (Rocky), and Sequoia/Kings Canyon (Sequoia). Estimates were made using ground-based UV-B data (Brewer spectrophotometers), solar radiation models, GIS tools, field characterization of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates were made for the summer solstice, at a depth of 1 cm in each wetland. The mean dose across all wetlands and parks was 19.3 W-h m−2 (range of 3.4–32.1 W-h m−2). The mean dose was lowest in Acadia (13.7 W-h m−2) and highest in Rocky (24.4 W-h m−2). Doses were significantly different among all parks. These wetland doses correspond to UV-B flux of 125.0 μW cm−2 (range 21.4–194.7 μW cm−2) based on a day length, averaged among all parks, of 15.5 h. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a key determinant of water-column UV-B flux, ranged from 0.6 (analytical detection limit) to 36.7 mg C L−1 over all wetlands and parks, and reduced potential maximal UV-B doses at 1-cm depth by 1%–87 %. DOC concentration, as well as its effect on dose, was lowest in Sequoia and highest in Acadia (DOC was equivalent in Acadia, Glacier, and Rocky). Landscape reduction of potential maximal UV-B doses ranged from zero to 77% and was lowest in Sequoia. These regional differences in UV-B wetland dose illustrate the importance of considering all aspects of exposure in evaluating the potential impact of UV-B on aquatic organisms.

  14. Radiation dose estimate in small animal SPECT and PET.

    PubMed

    Funk, Tobias; Sun, Mingshan; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2004-09-01

    Calculations of radiation dose are important in assessing the medical and biological implications of ionizing radiation in medical imaging techniques such as SPECT and PET. In contrast, radiation dose estimates of SPECT and PET imaging of small animals are not very well established. For that reason we have estimated the whole-body radiation dose to mice and rats for isotopes such as 18F, 99mTc, 201Tl, (111)In, 123I, and 125I that are used commonly for small animal imaging. We have approximated mouse and rat bodies with uniform soft tissue equivalent ellipsoids. The mouse and rat sized ellipsoids had a mass of 30 g and 300 g, respectively, and a ratio of the principal axes of 1:1:4 and 0.7:1:4. The absorbed fractions for various photon energies have been calculated using the Monte Carlo software package MCNP. Using these values, we then calculated MIRD S-values for two geometries that model the distribution of activity in the animal body: (a) a central point source and (b) a homogeneously distributed source, and compared these values against S-value calculations for small ellipsoids tabulated in MIRD Pamphlet 8 to validate our results. Finally we calculated the radiation dose taking into account the biological half-life of the radiopharmaceuticals and the amount of activity administered. Our calculations produced S-values between 1.06 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s and 2.77 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for SPECT agents, and 15.0 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for the PET agent 18F, assuming mouse sized ellipsoids with uniform source distribution. The S-values for a central point source in an ellipsoid are about 10% higher than the values obtained for the uniform source distribution. Furthermore, the S-values for mouse sized ellipsoids are approximately 10 times higher than for the rat sized ellipsoids reflecting the difference in mass. We reviewed published data to obtain administered radioactivity and residence times for small animal imaging. From these values and our computed S-values we estimated

  15. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  16. A systemic administration of liposomal curcumin inhibits radiation pneumonitis and sensitizes lung carcinoma to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua-shan; Gao, Xiang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Qiong-wen; Wang, Yong-sheng; Zheng, Yu; Cai, Lu-Lu; Zhong, Ren-ming; Rui, Ao; Li, Zhi-yong; Zheng, Hao; Chen, Xian-cheng; Chen, Li-juan

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. Previous investigations have shown that curcumin is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions and cancer, suggesting that curcumin may prevent RP and sensitize cancer cells to irradiation. However, the clinical advancement of curcumin is limited by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability after oral administration. Here, a water-soluble liposomal curcumin system was developed to investigate its prevention and sensitizing effects by an intravenous administration manner in mice models. The results showed that liposomal curcumin inhibited nuclear factor-κB pathway and downregulated inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and transforming growth factor-β induced by thoracic irradiation. Furthermore, the combined treatment with liposomal curcumin and radiotherapy increased intratumoral apoptosis and microvessel responses to irradiation in vivo. The significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth also was observed in a murine lung carcinoma (LL/2) model. There were no obvious toxicities observed in mice. The current results indicate that liposomal curcumin can effectively mitigate RP, reduce the fibrosis of lung, and sensitize LL/2 cells to irradiation. This study also suggests that the systemic administration of liposomal curcumin is safe and deserves to be investigated for further clinical application. PMID:22679371

  17. The Concentration Of Tritium In Urine And Internal Radiation Dose Estimation Of PTNBR Radiation Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Aisyah, Neneng Nur

    2010-12-23

    The operation of Triga 2000 reactor in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR BATAN) normally produce tritium radionuclide which is the activation product of deuterium atom in reactor primary cooling water. According to previous monitoring, tritium was detected with the concentration of 8.236{+-}0.677 kBq/L and 1.704{+-}0.046 Bq/L in the primary cooling water and in reactor hall air, respectively. The tritium in reactor hall air chronically can be inhaled by the workers. In this research, tritium content in radiation workers' urine was determined to estimate the internal radiation doses received by the workers. About 50-100 mL of urine samples were collected from 48 PTNBR workers that is classified as 24 radiation workers and 24 administration staffs as a control. Urine samples of 25 mL were then prepared by active charcoal and KMnO{sub 4} addition and followed with complete distillation. The 2 mL of distillate was added with 13 mL scintillator, shaked vigorously and remained in cool and dark condition for about 24 hours. The tritium in the samples was then measured using liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for 1 hour. From the measurement results it was obtained that the tritium concentration in the urine of radiation workers were in the range of not detected and 5.191 Bq/mL, whereas in the administration staffs the concentration were between not detected and 4.607 Bq/mL. Internally radiation doses were calculated using the tritium concentration data, and it was found the averages about 0.602 {mu}Sv/year and 0.532 {mu}Sv/year for radiation workers and administration staffs, respectively. The doses received by the workers were lower than that of the permissible doses from tritium, i.e. 40 {mu}Sv/year.

  18. Radiation dose-rate meter using an energy-sensitive counter

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1988-01-01

    A radiation dose-rate meter is provided which uses an energy-sensitive detector and combines charge quantization and pulse-rate measurement to monitor radiation dose rates. The charge from each detected photon is quantized by level-sensitive comparators so that the resulting total output pulse rate is proportional to the dose-rate.

  19. Cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for space radiation exposure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigiryova, G. P.; Novitskaya, N. N.; Fedorenko, B. S.

    2012-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate radiation induced chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS (International Space Station). Materials and methodsCytogenetic examination which has been performed in the period 1992-2008 included the analysis of chromosome aberrations using conventional Giemsa staining method in 202 blood samples from 48 cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS. ResultsSpace flights led to an increase of chromosome aberration frequency. Frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings (Dic+Rc) depend on the space flight duration and accumulated dose value. After the change of space stations (from Mir Orbital Station to ISS) the radiation load of cosmonauts based on data of cytogenetic examination decreased. Extravehicular activity also adds to chromosome aberration frequency in cosmonauts' blood lymphocytes. Average doses after the first flight, estimated by the frequency of Dic+Rc, were 227 and 113 mGy Eq for long-term flights (LTF) and 107 and 53 mGy Eq for short-term flights (STF). ConclusionCytogenetic examination of cosmonauts can be applied to assess equivalent doses.

  20. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be

  1. Method for increased sensitivity of radiation detection and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1994-01-01

    Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. Reduced background is accomplished by more thorough annealing and enhanced radiation induced luminescence is obtained by treating the crystalline material to coalesce primary damage centers into secondary damage centers.

  2. Genome-based, mechanism-driven computational modeling of risks of ionizing radiation: The next frontier in genetic risk estimation?

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, K; Nikjoo, H

    2015-01-01

    Research activity in the field of estimation of genetic risks of ionizing radiation to human populations started in the late 1940s and now appears to be passing through a plateau phase. This paper provides a background to the concepts, findings and methods of risk estimation that guided the field through the period of its growth to the beginning of the 21st century. It draws attention to several key facts: (a) thus far, genetic risk estimates have been made indirectly using mutation data collected in mouse radiation studies; (b) important uncertainties and unsolved problems remain, one notable example being that we still do not know the sensitivity of human female germ cells to radiation-induced mutations; and (c) the concept that dominated the field thus far, namely, that radiation exposures to germ cells can result in single gene diseases in the descendants of those exposed has been replaced by the concept that radiation exposure can cause DNA deletions, often involving more than one gene. Genetic risk estimation now encompasses work devoted to studies on DNA deletions induced in human germ cells, their expected frequencies, and phenotypes and associated clinical consequences in the progeny. We argue that the time is ripe to embark on a human genome-based, mechanism-driven, computational modeling of genetic risks of ionizing radiation, and we present a provisional framework for catalyzing research in the field in the 21st century.

  3. ESTIMATION OF AQUATIC SPECIES SENSITIVITY AND POPULATION-LEVEL RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining species sensitivity and population-level responses of aquatic organisms to contaminants are critical components of criteria development and ecological risk assessment. To address data gaps in species sensitivity, the U.S. EPA developed the Interspecies Correlation Est...

  4. Estimation of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Moreau, Louis; Cihlar, Josef

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a validation and application of an algorithm by Li and Moreau [1996] for retrieving photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed at the surface (APARSFC). APARSFC is a key input to estimating PAR absorbed by the green canopy during photosynthesis. Extensive ground-based and space-borne observations collected during the BOREAS experiment in 1994 were processed, colocated, and analyzed. They include downwelling and upwelling PAR observed at three flux towers, aerosol optical depth from ground-based photometers, and satellite reflectance measurements at the top of the atmosphere. The effects of three-dimensional clouds, aerosols, and bidirectional dependence on the retrieval of APARSFC were examined. While the algorithm is simple and has only three input parameters, the comparison between observed and estimated APARSFC shows a small bias error (<10 W m-2) and moderate random error (36 W m-2 for clear, 61 W m-2 for cloudy). Temporal and/or spatial mismatch between satellite and surface observations is a major cause of the random error, especially when broken clouds are present. The algorithm was subsequently employed to map the distribution of monthly mean APARSFC over the 1000×1000 km2 BOREAS region. Considerable spatial variation is found due to variable cloudiness, forest fires, and nonuniform surface albedo.

  5. MCNP estimate of ZLS lens sensitivity in an x-ray field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephen E.; Baker, Stuart A.; Howe, Russell A.; Malone, Robert M.

    2016-09-01

    The telecentric zoom lens system (ZLS) has proven to be invaluable in flash x-ray field operations and recent successful experiments pertaining to stockpile stewardship. The ZLS contains 11 custom-manufactured lenses, a turning mirror (pellicle), and an x-ray-to-visible-light converting scintillator. Images are recorded on a fully characterized CCD. All hardware is supported by computerized, programmable, electro-mechanical mounts and alignment apparatus. Seven different glass material types varying in chemical stoichiometry comprise the 11 ZLS lenses. All lenses within the ZLS are out of the path of direct x-ray radiation during normal operation. However, any unshielded scattered x-ray radiation can result in energy deposition into the lenses, which may generate some scintillating light that can couple into the CCD. This extra light may contribute to a decrease in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and lower the overall fidelity of the radiograph images. An estimate of the scintillation generation and sensitivities for each of the seven types of glass used as lenses in the ZLS is presented. This report also includes estimates of the total observed background decoupling that each of the lens material types contribute.

  6. How does the sensitivity of climate affect stratospheric solar radiation management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, K.; Rowlands, D. J.; Ingram, W.; Keith, D.; Morgan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    If implementation of proposals to engineer the climate through solar radiation management (SRM) ever occurs, it is likely to be contingent upon climate sensitivity. Despite this, no modeling studies have examined how the effectiveness of SRM forcings differs between the typical Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) with climate sensitivities close to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) mean and ones with high climate sensitivities. Here, we use a perturbed physics ensemble modeling experiment to examine variations in the response of climate to SRM under different climate sensitivities. When SRM is used as a substitute for mitigation its ability to maintain the current climate state gets worse with increased climate sensitivity and with increased concentrations of greenhouse gases. However, our results also demonstrate that the potential of SRM to slow climate change, even at the regional level, grows with climate sensitivity. On average, SRM reduces regional rates of temperature change by more than 90 percent and rates of precipitation change by more than 50 percent in these higher sensitivity model configurations. To investigate how SRM might behave in models with high climate sensitivity that are also consistent with recent observed climate change we perform a "perturbed physics" ensemble (PPE) modelling experiment with the climateprediction.net (cpdn) version of the HadCM3L AOGCM. Like other perturbed physics climate modelling experiments, we simulate past and future climate scenarios using a wide range of model parameter combinations that both reproduce past climate within a specified level of accuracy and simulate future climates with a wide range of climate sensitivities. We chose 43 members ("model versions") from a subset of the 1,550 from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) climateprediction.net project that have data that allow restarts. We use our results to explore how much assessments of SRM that use best-estimate

  7. Methodological sensitivity of morphometric estimates of coarse fluvial sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, James; Langham, Joe; Rumsby, Barbara

    2003-07-01

    The estimation of fluvial sediment transport rate from measurements of morphological change has received growing recent interest. The revival of the 'morphological method' reflects continuing concern over traditional methods of rate determination but also the availability of new survey methods capable of high-precision, high-resolution topographic monitoring. Remote sensing of river channels through aerial digital photogrammetry is a potentially attractive alternative to labour intensive ground surveys. However, while photogrammetry presents the opportunity to acquire survey data over large areas, data precision and accuracy, particularly in the vertical dimension are lower than in traditional ground survey methods. This paper presents results of recent research in which digital elevation models (DEMs) have been developed for a reach of a large braided gravel-bed river in Scotland using both digital photogrammetry and high-resolution RTK GPS ground surveys. A statistical level of change detection is assessed by comparing surfaces with independent check points. The methodological sensitivity of the annual channel sediment budget (1999-2000) to the threshold is presented. Results suggest that while the remote survey methods employed here can be used to develop qualitatively convincing, moderate precision DEMs of channel topography (RMSE=±0.21 m), the remaining errors imply significant limits on reliable change detection which lead to important information losses. Tests at a 95% confidence interval for change detection show that over 60% of channel deposition and 40% of erosion may be obscured by the lower level of precision associated with photogrammetric monitoring when compared to ground survey measurements. This bias reflects the difficulty of detecting the topographic signature of widespread, but shallow deposition on bar tops.

  8. Extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation of the earth radiation budget satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1989-01-01

    The design and testing of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for ground attitude determination, misalignment estimation and sensor calibration of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) are described. Attitude is represented by the quaternion of rotation and the attitude estimation error is defined as an additive error. Quaternion normalization is used for increasing the convergence rate and for minimizing the need for filter tuning. The development of the filter dynamic model, the gyro error model and the measurement models of the Sun sensors, the IR horizon scanner and the magnetometers which are used to generate vector measurements are also presented. The filter is applied to real data transmitted by ERBS sensors. Results are presented and analyzed and the EKF advantages as well as sensitivities are discussed. On the whole the filter meets the expected synergism, accuracy and robustness.

  9. Use of MODIS-Derived Fire Radiative Energy to Estimate Smoke Aerosol Emissions over Different Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2003-01-01

    Biomass burning is the main source of smoke aerosols and certain trace gases in the atmosphere. However, estimates of the rates of biomass consumption and emission of aerosols and trace gases from fires have not attained adequate reliability thus far. Traditional methods for deriving emission rates employ the use of emission factors e(sub x), (in g of species x per kg of biomass burned), which are difficult to measure from satellites. In this era of environmental monitoring from space, fire characterization was not a major consideration in the design of the early satellite-borne remote sensing instruments, such as AVHRR. Therefore, although they are able to provide fire location information, they were not adequately sensitive to variations in fire strength or size, because their thermal bands used for fire detection saturated at the lower end of fire radiative temperature range. As such, hitherto, satellite-based emission estimates employ proxy techniques using satellite derived fire pixel counts (which do not express the fire strength or rate of biomass consumption) or burned areas (which can only be obtained after the fire is over). The MODIS sensor, recently launched into orbit aboard EOS Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites, have a much higher saturation level and can, not only detect the fire locations 4 times daily, but also measures the at-satellite fire radiative energy (which is a measure of the fire strength) based on its 4 micron channel temperature. Also, MODIS measures the optical thickness of smoke and other aerosols. Preliminary analysis shows appreciable correlation between the MODIS-derived rates of emission of fire radiative energy and smoke over different regions across the globe. These relationships hold great promise for deriving emission coefficients, which can be used for estimating smoke aerosol emissions from MODIS active fire products. This procedure has the potential to provide more accurate emission estimates in near real

  10. How sensitive is Hawking radiation to superluminal dispersion relations?

    SciTech Connect

    Jannes, G.; Barcelo, C.; Garay, L. J.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the Hawking radiation process in a collapse scenario with superluminal dispersion relations. Due to these superluminal modifications, the horizon effectively becomes frequency-dependent. At every moment of the collapse, a critical frequency can be calculated such that frequencies higher than this critical frequency do not couple to the collapsing geometry and hence do not see any horizon. We discuss three important consequences. First, the late-time radiation in general has a lower intensity than in the standard Hawking picture. Second, the thermal output spectrum depends on the surface gravity, thereby effectively exploring the physics inside the black hole. Third, the radiation dies off as time advances.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRA VIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  13. Arctic ocean radiative fluxes and cloud forcing estimated from the ISCCP C2 cloud dataset, 1983-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiger, Axel J.; Key, Jeffrey R.

    1994-01-01

    Radiative fluxes and cloud forcings for the ocean areas of the Arctic are computed from the monthly cloud product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1983-90. Spatially averaged short-wave fluxes are compared well with climatological values, while downwelling longwave fluxes are significantly lower. This is probably due to the fact that the ISCCP cloud amounts are underestimates. Top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes are in excellent agreement with measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Computed cloud forcings indicate that clouds have a warming effect at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere during winter and a cooling effect during summer. The net radiative effect of clouds is larger at the surface during winter but greater at the top of the atmosphere during summer. Overall the net radiative effect of clouds at the top of the atmosphere is one of cooling. This is in contrast to a previous result from ERBE data showing arctic cloud forcings have a net warming effect. Sensitivities to errors in input parameters are generally greater during winter with cloud amount being the most important paarameter. During summer the surface radiation balance is most sensitive to errors in the measurements of surface reflectance. The results are encouraging, but the estimated error of 20 W/sq m in surface net radiative fluxes is too large, given that estimates of the net radiative warming effect due to a doubling of CO2 are on the order of 4 W/sq m. Because it is difficult to determine the accuracy of results with existing in situ observations, it is recommended that the development of improved algorithms for the retrieval of surface radiative properties be accompanied by the simultaneous assembly of validation datasets.

  14. BACKGROUND RADIATION MEASUREMENTS AND CANCER RISK ESTIMATES FOR SEBINKARAHISAR, TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, Asli

    2013-07-19

    This paper presents the measurement results of environmental radioactivity levels for Şebinkarahisar district (uranium-thorium area), Giresun, Turkey. The radioactivity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and the fission product (137)Cs in soil samples collected from 73 regions from the surroundings of the study area were determined. In situ measurements of the gamma dose rate in air were performed in the same 73 locations where the soil samples were collected using a portable NaI detector. Also the mean radioactivity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in rock samples collected from 50 regions were determined. The mean estimated cancer risk value was found. The seasonal variations of the indoor radon activity concentrations were determined in the 30 dwellings in the study area. In addition, the mean gross alpha, gross beta and radon activities in tap water samples were determined in the same 30 dwellings. The excess lifetime cancer risk was calculated using the risk factors of International Commission on Radiological Protection and Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Radiological maps of the Şebinkarahisar region were composed using the results obtained from this study.

  15. Estimation of Sensitive Proportion by Randomized Response Data in Successive Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimation for binomial proportions of sensitive or stigmatizing attributes in the population of interest. Randomized response techniques are suggested for protecting the privacy of respondents and reducing the response bias while eliciting information on sensitive attributes. In many sensitive question surveys, the same population is often sampled repeatedly on each occasion. In this paper, we apply successive sampling scheme to improve the estimation of the sensitive proportion on current occasion. PMID:26089958

  16. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  17. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  18. Sensitivity of Hawking radiation to superluminal dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelo, C.; Garay, L. J.; Jannes, G.

    2009-01-15

    We analyze the Hawking radiation process due to collapsing configurations in the presence of superluminal modifications of the dispersion relation. With such superluminal dispersion relations, the horizon effectively becomes a frequency-dependent concept. In particular, at every moment of the collapse, there is a critical frequency above which no horizon is experienced. We show that, as a consequence, the late-time radiation suffers strong modifications, both quantitative and qualitative, compared to the standard Hawking picture. Concretely, we show that the radiation spectrum becomes dependent on the measuring time, on the surface gravities associated with different frequencies, and on the critical frequency. Even if the critical frequency is well above the Planck scale, important modifications still show up.

  19. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  20. Ion implantation reduces radiation sensitivity of metal oxide silicon /MOS/ devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Implanting nitrogen ions improves hardening of silicon oxides 30 percent to 60 percent against ionizing radiation effects. Process reduces sensitivity, but retains stability normally shown by interfaces between silicon and thermally grown oxides.

  1. Reversal of radiation-dependent heat sensitization of Clostridium perfringens spores.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, R F; Gombas, D E; Herrero, A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of solute concentration on the sensitization of Clostridium perfringens spores to heat by ionizing radiation was investigated. As we have shown previously, spores of C. perfringens treated with gamma radiation are now sensitive to subsequent heat treatments than are spores that receive no radiation treatment. When gamma-irradiated spores were heated in the presence of increasing concentrations of glycerol or sucrose, the heat sensitivity induced by irradiation was progressively decreased. The magnitude of the increase in heat resistance induced by extracellular solutes was greater in gamma-irradiated spores than in nonirradiated spores. Based on these observations, it is proposed that the induction of heat sensitivity in spores by radiation is related to the loss of osmoregulatory or dehydrating mechanisms in irradiated spores. PMID:6247972

  2. Augmenting aquatic species sensitivity distributions with interspecies toxicity estimation models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distribution functions of species toxicity values. The SSD approach is increasingly being used in ecological risk assessment, but is often limited by available toxicity data necessary for diverse species representation. In ...

  3. Eigenvalue Contributon Estimator for Sensitivity Calculations with TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Since the release of the Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) codes in SCALE [1], the use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis techniques for criticality safety applications has greatly increased within the user community. In general, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is transitioning from a technique used only by specialists to a practical tool in routine use. With the desire to use the tool more routinely comes the need to improve the solution methodology to reduce the input and computational burden on the user. This paper reviews the current solution methodology of the Monte Carlo eigenvalue sensitivity analysis sequence TSUNAMI-3D, describes an alternative approach, and presents results from both methodologies.

  4. Position of cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for the space radiation expose estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigireva, Galina; Novitskaya, Natalia; Ivanov, Alexander

    Analysis of chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is widely used for the indication and quantitative assessment of radiation. The dose, as estimated by the frequency of chromosome aberrations takes into account not only the physical impact of radiation on the human body but also its individual characteristics, such as radiation sensitivity and functional conditions during irradiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of radiation on the chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of the cosmonauts who participated in flights on the ISS (International Space Station). Cytogenetic examination was performed in the period 1992-2013 and included the analysis of chromosome aberrations using conventional Giemsa staining method in blood samples from 38 cosmonauts who participated in flights on the ISS. The cytogenetic examination results showed that cosmic flights lead to an increase of chromosome aberrations in the lymphocytes of cosmonauts. Compared with the pre-flight levels frequencies of dicentrics and centric rings (the radiation exposure markers) are about 4 times higher for cosmonauts after flights. The frequency of chromosome aberrations depends on the length of the flight and, correspondingly, on the accumulated dose of cosmic irradiation. Between flights, a decrease in the chromosome aberration frequency is observed, but even several years after a flight, the level of chromosome aberrations in the lymphocytes of cosmonauts remains high. Cytogenetic monitoring of cosmonauts can undoubtedly play an important role in comprehensive medical surveys of these individuals if we take into account the possible connection of higher levels of chromosomal aberrations with the risk of oncological diseases. Analysis of chromosome aberration dynamics after flights will allow the determination of individuals with an increased cancerogenese risk and provision of required treatments.

  5. Optimizing Spectral Wave Estimates with Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    forecasts of nearshore wave conditions are important to a diverse constituency, including vacation destinations such as Miami Beach or San Diego, coastal...a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 FEB 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Sensitivity maps for wave spectra For any type of adjoint, sensitivity maps may be constructed from adjoint output to track the response of system properties

  6. Employing Sensitivity Derivatives to Estimate Uncertainty Propagation in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putko, Michele M.; Newman, Perry A.; Taylor, Arthur C., III

    2004-01-01

    Two methods that exploit the availability of sensitivity derivatives are successfully employed to predict uncertainty propagation through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code for an inviscid airfoil problem. An approximate statistical second-moment method and a Sensitivity Derivative Enhanced Monte Carlo (SDEMC) method are successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional problem. First- and second-order sensitivity derivatives of code output with respect to code input are obtained through an efficient incremental iterative approach. Given uncertainties in statistically independent, random, normally distributed flow parameters (input variables); these sensitivity derivatives enable one to formulate first- and second-order Taylor Series approximations for the mean and variance of CFD output quantities. Additionally, incorporation of the first-order sensitivity derivatives into the data reduction phase of a conventional Monte Carlo (MC) simulation allows for improved accuracy in determining the first moment of the CFD output. Both methods are compared to results generated using a conventional MC method. The methods that exploit the availability of sensitivity derivatives are found to be valid when considering small deviations from input mean values.

  7. Sensitivity analysis and performance estimation of refractivity from clutter techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.

    2009-02-01

    Refractivity from clutter (RFC) refers to techniques that estimate the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter returns. A RFC algorithm works by finding the environment whose simulated clutter pattern matches the radar measured one. This paper introduces a procedure to compute RFC estimator performance. It addresses the major factors such as the radar parameters, the sea surface characteristics, and the environment (region, time of the day, season) that affect the estimator performance and formalizes an error metric combining all of these. This is important for applications such as calculating the optimal radar parameters, selecting the best RFC inversion algorithm under a set of conditions, and creating a regional performance map of a RFC system. The performance metric is used to compute the RFC performance of a non-Bayesian evaporation duct estimator. A Bayesian estimator that incorporates meteorological statistics in the inversion is introduced and compared to the non-Bayesian estimator. The performance metric is used to determine the optimal radar parameters of the evaporation duct estimator for six scenarios. An evaporation duct inversion performance map for a S band radar is created for the larger Mediterranean/Arabian Sea region.

  8. Development of software for estimating clear sky solar radiation in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambarita, H.

    2017-01-01

    Research on solar energy applications in Indonesia has come under scrutiny in recent years. Solar radiation is harvested by solar collector or solar cell and convert the energy into useful energy such as heat and or electricity. In order to provide a better configuration of a solar collector or a solar cell, clear sky radiation should be estimated properly. In this study, an in-house software for estimating clear sky radiation is developed. The governing equations are solved simultaneously. The software is tested in Medan city by performing a solar radiation measurements. For clear sky radiation, the results of the software and measurements ones show a good agreement. However, for the cloudy sky condition it cannot predict the solar radiation. This software can be used to estimate the clear sky radiation in Indonesia.

  9. An update on standards for radiation in the environment and associated estimates of risk

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-06-21

    This presentation reviews current and proposed standards, recommendations, and guidances for limiting routine radiation exposures of the public, and estimates the risk corresponding to standards, recommendations, and guidances. These estimates provide a common basis for comparing different criteria for limiting public exposures to radiation, as well as hazardous chemicals.

  10. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  11. Estimated radiation dose to the newborn in FDG-PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruotsalainen, U.; Suhonen-Polvi, H.; Eronen, E.; Kinnala, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the radiation dose due to intravenous injection of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for infants studied with PET. The radioactivity concentration in the brain and bladder content was measured with PET to determine the cumulated activity in these organs in 21 infant FDG studies. The individual organ masses were estimated according to the whole-body and brain masses, and they were used to calculate the absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity (S values). For organs other than brain and bladder, the cumulated activity was defined from adult studies. For each individual patient, the absorbed dose to the brain, bladder wall and selected organs were calculated. An estimation of the effective dose was determined. Whole-body distribution of FDG in the infants differed from adults: a greater proportion of the injected activity accumulated into the brain (9% versus 7%) and less was excreted to urine (7% versus 20% respectively). The measured cumulated activity in the brain was 0.25 MBq {center_dot} h/MBq and in the bladder content 0.04 MBq {center_dot}h/MBq with a large individual variation in latter. The calculated absorbed dose was 0.24 mGy/MBq to the brain and 1.03 mGy/MBq to the bladder wall. The estimated effective dose was 0.43 mSv/MBq. The dose to the bladder wall was lower in infants as compared to adults with ordinary amounts of injected activity. The greater amount of activity remaining in the body may increase the dose to other organs. The effective dose was lower compared to adults and conventional nuclear medicine studies of infants. PET can be a valuable tool in pediatric nuclear medicine because of good resolution images, sensitive radiation measurement and a variety of tracers labeled with short-lived isotopes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Estimates of cosmic radiation exposure on Tunisian passenger aircraft.

    PubMed

    Zarrouk, Neïla; Bennaceur, Raouf

    2008-01-01

    Radiation field produced by cosmic radiations in the earth's atmosphere is very complex and is significantly different from that found in the nuclear industry and other environments at ground level. Aircraft crew and frequent flyers are exposed to high levels of cosmic radiations of galactic and solar origin and to secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere. Following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in publication 60, the European Union introduced a revised Basic Safety Standard Directive, which included exposure to natural sources of ionising radiations, including cosmic radiation, as occupational exposure. We computed the dose received by some Tunisian flights, using CARI-6, EPCARD, PCAIRE, and SIEVERT codes. Calculations performed during the year 2007, on mostly regular passenger flights of the Nouvelair Tunisian Company, indicate a mean effective dose rate ranging between 3 and 4 microSv/h. We give the general background and details, focusing on the situation in Tunisia with respect to radiation protection aspects of the cosmic radiation exposure. As far as we know, such a study has not previously been carried out.

  13. Estimating the Reliability of Electronic Parts in High Radiation Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everline, Chester; Clark, Karla; Man, Guy; Rasmussen, Robert; Johnston, Allan; Kohlhase, Charles; Paulos, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Radiation effects on materials and electronic parts constrain the lifetime of flight systems visiting Europa. Understanding mission lifetime limits is critical to the design and planning of such a mission. Therefore, the operational aspects of radiation dose are a mission success issue. To predict and manage mission lifetime in a high radiation environment, system engineers need capable tools to trade radiation design choices against system design and reliability, and science achievements. Conventional tools and approaches provided past missions with conservative designs without the ability to predict their lifetime beyond the baseline mission.This paper describes a more systematic approach to understanding spacecraft design margin, allowing better prediction of spacecraft lifetime. This is possible because of newly available electronic parts radiation effects statistics and an enhanced spacecraft system reliability methodology. This new approach can be used in conjunction with traditional approaches for mission design. This paper describes the fundamentals of the new methodology.

  14. A robust hypothesis test for the sensitive detection of constant speed radiation moving sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Boudergui, Karim; Moline, Yoann; Sannié, Guillaume; Gameiro, Jordan; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors are deployed in linear networks to detect radiological material in motion. As a complement to single and multichannel detection algorithms, inefficient under too low signal-to-noise ratios, temporal correlation algorithms have been introduced. Test hypothesis methods based on empirically estimated mean and variance of the signals delivered by the different channels have shown significant gain in terms of a tradeoff between detection sensitivity and false alarm probability. This paper discloses the concept of a new hypothesis test for temporal correlation detection methods, taking advantage of the Poisson nature of the registered counting signals, and establishes a benchmark between this test and its empirical counterpart. The simulation study validates that in the four relevant configurations of a pedestrian source carrier under respectively high and low count rate radioactive backgrounds, and a vehicle source carrier under the same respectively high and low count rate radioactive backgrounds, the newly introduced hypothesis test ensures a significantly improved compromise between sensitivity and false alarm. It also guarantees that the optimal coverage factor for this compromise remains stable regardless of signal-to-noise ratio variations between 2 and 0.8, therefore allowing the final user to parametrize the test with the sole prior knowledge of background amplitude.

  15. Silver nanoparticles: a novel radiation sensitizer for glioma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peidang; Huang, Zhihai; Chen, Zhongwen; Xu, Ruizhi; Wu, Hao; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Cailian; Gu, Ning

    2013-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after AgNP injection, rats bearing glioma received 10 Gy radiation. The mean survival times were 100.5 and 98 days, the corresponding percent increase in life spans was 513.2% and 497.7%, and the cure rates were 41.7 and 38.5% at 200 days for the 10 and 20 μg AgNPs and radiation combination groups, respectively. In contrast, the mean survival times for irradiated controls, 10 and 20 μg AgNPs alone, and untreated controls were 24.5, 16.1, 19.4, and 16.4 days, respectively. Furthermore, a cooperative antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect was obtained when gliomas were treated with AgNPs followed by radiotherapy. Our results showed the therapeutic efficacy of AgNPs in combination with radiotherapy without apparent systemic toxicity, suggesting the clinical potential of AgNPs in improving the outcome of malignant glioma radiotherapy.Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after Ag

  16. Baroreflex Sensitivity Estimation by the Transfer Function Method Revised: Effect of Changing the Coherence Criterion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    BAROREFLEX SENSITIVITY ESTIMATION BY THE TRANSFER FUNCTION METHOD REVISED: EFFECT OF CHANGING THE COHERENCE CRITERION G.D. Pinna1, R. Maestri1, G...In this study we appraised three new criteria for the computation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) using the transfer function magnitude (TFM) method... Baroreflex sensitivity , spectral analysis, transfer function I. INTRODUCTION Among the different spectral methods proposed so far for the estimation of

  17. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  18. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity With DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Julianne M.; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-08-01

    Adverse reactions to radiotherapy represent a confounding phenomenon in radiation oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen Breakage syndrome. A paucity of published data is available detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi anemia was associated with more than one-half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an ataxia-telangiectasia patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this report had complicated illnesses, in addition to cancer, and the radiotherapy administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation doses dangerous. Our findings support previous wisdom that radiotherapy should either be avoided or the doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes, which must be recognized by their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable, and functional assays of DNA repair become available.

  19. Radiative energy budget estimates for the 1979 southwest summer monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1987-01-01

    A major objective of the summer monsoon experiment (SMONEX) was the determination of the heat sources and sinks associated with the southwest summer monsoon. The radiative component is presented here. The vertically integrated tropospheric radiation energy budget is negative and varies significantly as a function of monsoon activity. The gradient in the latitudinal mean tropospheric cooling reverses between the winter periods and the late spring/early summer periods. The radiative component of the vertical profile of the diabatic heating is derived. These profiles are a strong function of the stage of the monsoon as well as the geographic region. In general, the surface experiences a net gain of radiative energy during the late spring and early summer periods. During the winter periods, areas northward of 25 N display net surface losses, while the remaining areas exhibit net gains.

  20. Ionizing radiation exposure of LDEF (pre-recovery estimates)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Heinrich, W.; Parnell, T. A.; Armstrong, T. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Frank, A. L.; Watts, J. W. Jr; Wiegel, B.

    1992-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility (LDEF), launched into a 258 nautical mile orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees, remained in space for nearly 6 yr. The 21,500 lb NASA satellite was one of the largest payloads ever deployed by the Space Shuttle. LDEF completed 32,422 orbits and carried 57 major experiments representing more than 200 investigators from 33 private companies, 21 universities and nine countries. The experiments covered a wide range of disciplines including basic science, electronics, optics, materials, structures and power and propulsion. A number of the experiments were specifically designed to measure the radiation environment. These experiments are of specific interest, since the LDEF orbit is essentially the same as that of the Space Station Freedom. Consequently, the radiation measurements on LDEF will play a significant role in the design of radiation shielding of the space station. The contributions of the various authors presented here attempt to predict the major aspects of the radiation exposure received by the various LDEF experiments and therefore should be helpful to investigators who are in the process of analyzing experiments which may have been affected by exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper discusses the various types and sources of ionizing radiation including cosmic rays, trapped particles (both protons and electrons) and secondary particles (including neutrons, spallation products and high-LET recoils), as well as doses and LET spectra as a function of shielding. Projections of the induced radioactivity of LDEF are also discussed.

  1. Comparison and testing of extended Kalman filters for attitude estimation of the Earth radiation budget satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Rokni, Mohammad

    1990-01-01

    The testing and comparison of two Extended Kalman Filters (EKFs) developed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) is described. One EKF updates the attitude quaternion using a four component additive error quaternion. This technique is compared to that of a second EKF, which uses a multiplicative error quaternion. A brief development of the multiplicative algorithm is included. The mathematical development of the additive EKF was presented in the 1989 Flight Mechanics/Estimation Theory Symposium along with some preliminary testing results using real spacecraft data. A summary of the additive EKF algorithm is included. The convergence properties, singularity problems, and normalization techniques of the two filters are addressed. Both filters are also compared to those from the ERBS operational ground support software, which uses a batch differential correction algorithm to estimate attitude and gyro biases. Sensitivity studies are performed on the estimation of sensor calibration states. The potential application of the EKF for real time and non-real time ground attitude determination and sensor calibration for future missions such as the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) and the Small Explorer Mission (SMEX) is also presented.

  2. Lipid-anthropometric index optimization for insulin sensitivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, J.; Wong, S.; Encalada, L.; Herrera, H.; Severeyn, E.

    2015-12-01

    Insulin sensitivity (IS) is the ability of cells to react due to insulińs presence; when this ability is diminished, low insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance (IR) is considered. IR had been related to other metabolic disorders as metabolic syndrome (MS), obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes. IS can be determined using direct or indirect methods. The indirect methods are less accurate and invasive than direct and they use glucose and insulin values from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The accuracy is established by comparison using spearman rank correlation coefficient between direct and indirect method. This paper aims to propose a lipid-anthropometric index which offers acceptable correlation to insulin sensitivity index for different populations (DB1=MS subjects, DB2=sedentary without MS subjects and DB3=marathoners subjects) without to use OGTT glucose and insulin values. The proposed method is parametrically optimized through a random cross-validation, using the spearman rank correlation as comparator with CAUMO method. CAUMO is an indirect method designed from a simplification of the minimal model intravenous glucose tolerance test direct method (MINMOD-IGTT) and with acceptable correlation (0.89). The results show that the proposed optimized method got a better correlation with CAUMO in all populations compared to non-optimized. On the other hand, it was observed that the optimized method has better correlation with CAUMO in DB2 and DB3 groups than HOMA-IR method, which is the most widely used for diagnosing insulin resistance. The optimized propose method could detect incipient insulin resistance, when classify as insulin resistant subjects that present impaired postprandial insulin and glucose values.

  3. Machine detector interface studies: Layout and synchrotron radiation estimate in the future circular collider interaction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo, Manuela; Burkhardt, Helmut; Sullivan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The interaction region layout for the e+e- future circular collider FCC-ee is presented together with a preliminary estimate of synchrotron radiation that affects this region. We describe in this paper the main guidelines of this design and the estimate of synchrotron radiation coming from the last bending magnets and from the final focus quadrupoles, with the software tools developed for this purpose. The design follows the asymmetric optics layout as far as incoming bend radiation is concerned with the maximum foreseen beam energy of 175 GeV and we present a feasible initial layout with an indication of tolerable synchrotron radiation.

  4. Estimating Surface Radiation Fluxes in the Arctic from TOVS Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiger, A. J.; Key, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for estimating downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes in the Arctic from TOVS brightness temperatures has been developed. The method employs a neural network to bypass computationally intensive inverse and for-ward radiative transfer calculations, Results from two drifting ice camps (CEAREX, LeadEx) and from one coastal station show that downwelling fluxes can be estimated with r.m.s. errors of 20 W/sq m for longwave radiation and 35 W/sq m for shortwave radiation. Mean errors are less than 4 W/sq m and are well within the bounds required for many climate process studies.

  5. Radiation sensitivity and EPR dosimetric potential of gallic acid and its esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuner, Hasan; Oktay Bal, M.; Polat, Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    In the preset work the radiation sensitivities of Gallic Acid anhydrous and monohydrate, Octyl, Lauryl, and Ethyl Gallate (GA, GAm, OG, LG, and EG) were investigated in the intermediate (0.5-20 kGy) and low radiation (<10 Gy) dose range using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While OG, LG, and EG are presented a singlet EPR spectra, their radiation sensitivity found to be very different in the intermediate dose range. At low radiation dose range (<10 Gy) only LG is found to be present a signal that easily distinguished from the noise signals. The intermediate and low dose range radiation sensitivities are compared using well known EPR dosimeter alanine. The radiation yields (G) of the interested material were found to be 1.34×10-2, 1.48×10-2, 4.14×10-2, and 6.03×10-2, 9.44×10-2 for EG, GA, GAm, OG, and LG, respectively at the intermediate dose range. It is found that the simple EPR spectra and the noticeable EPR signal of LG make it a promising dosimetric material to be used below 10 Gy of radiation dose.

  6. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  7. Satellite Estimates of the Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass Burning Aerosols Over South America and Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Kliche, Donna V.; Berendes, Todd; Welch, Ronald M.; Yang, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic are important to the earth's radiative balance. Therefore it is important to provide adequate validation information on the spatial, temporal and radiative properties of aerosols. This will enable us to predict realistic global estimates of aerosol radiative effects more confidently. The current study utilizes 66 AVHRR LAC (Local Area Coverage) and coincident Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) images to characterize the fires, smoke and radiative forcings of biomass burning aerosols over four major ecosystems of South America.

  8. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario.

  9. SU11248 (Sunitinib) Sensitizes Pancreatic Cancer to the Cytotoxic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Geng Ling; Fu, Allie; Orton, Darren; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Chakravarthy, Anuradha Bapsi

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: SU11248 (sunitinib) is a small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor which targets VEGFR and PDGFR isoforms. In the present study, the effects of SU11248 and ionizing radiation on pancreatic cancer were studied. Methods and Materials: For in vitro studies human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells lines were treated with 1 {mu}M SU11248 1 h before irradiation. Western blot analysis was used to determine the effect of SU11248 on radiation-induced signal transduction. To determine if SU11248 sensitized pancreatic cancer to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, a clonogenic survival assay was performed using 0-6 Gy. For in vivo assays, CAPAN-1 cells were injected into the hind limb of nude mice for tumor volume and proliferation studies. Results: SU11248 attenuated radiation-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK at 0, 5, 15, and 30 min. Furthermore, SU11248 significantly reduced clonogenic survival after treatment with radiation (p < 0.05). In vivo studies revealed that SU11248 and radiation delayed tumor growth by 6 and 10 days, respectively, whereas combined treatment delayed tumor growth by 30 days. Combined treatment with SU11248 and radiation further attenuated Brdu incorporation by 75% (p = 0.001) compared to control. Conclusions: SU11248 (sunitinib) sensitized pancreatic cancer to the cytotoxic effects of radiation. This compound is promising for future clinical trials with chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Estimation of sensitivity depending on sojourn time and time spent in preclinical state.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Wu, Dongfeng

    2016-04-01

    The probability model for periodic screening was extended to provide statistical inference for sensitivity depending on sojourn time, in which the sensitivity was modeled as a function of time spent in the preclinical state and the sojourn time. The likelihood function with the proposed sensitivity model was then evaluated with simulated data to check its reliability in terms of the mean estimation and the standard error. Simulation results showed that the maximum likelihood estimates of the proposed model have little bias and small standard errors. The extended probability model was further applied to the Johns Hopkins Lung Project data using both maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo.

  11. Development of passive radiation detectors of improved sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The future development of a solid track high energy particle detector is discussed. The goal is to improve the sensitivity and lower the threshold of the detector. One most widely used material for such purpose is a plastic commercially known as CR-39. A scheme is presented which involves changing the formula of the monomer, diethylene glycol-bis-allyl carbonate. This is to be accomplished by substituting some heteroatoms for H and substituting sulfur atoms for oxygen in the ether linkages. Use of a new plasticizer to make the etched surface clearer than what has been accomplished as of today is suggested. Possible improvement in acquiring better tracks and increasing the ratio of V sub T/V sub B was planned. This is to be accomplished by changing the composition of the etchants, etching time, and etching temperature.

  12. Estimates of the direct and indirect radiative forcing due to tropospheric aerosols: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, James; Boucher, Olivier

    2000-11-01

    This paper reviews the many developments in estimates of the direct and indirect global annual mean radiative forcing due to present-day concentrations of anthropogenic tropospheric aerosols since Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [1996]. The range of estimates of the global mean direct radiative forcing due to six distinct aerosol types is presented. Additionally, the indirect effect is split into two components corresponding to the radiative forcing due to modification of the radiative properties of clouds (cloud albedo effect) and the effects of anthropogenic aerosols upon the lifetime of clouds (cloud lifetime effect). The radiative forcing for anthropogenic sulphate aerosol ranges from -0.26 to -0.82 W m-2. For fossil fuel black carbon the radiative forcing ranges from +0.16 W m-2 for an external mixture to +0.42 W m-2 for where the black carbon is modeled as internally mixed with sulphate aerosol. For fossil fuel organic carbon the two estimates of the likely weakest limit of the direct radiative forcing are -0.02 and -0.04 W m-2. For biomass-burning sources of black carbon and organic carbon the combined radiative forcing ranges from -0.14 to -0.74 W m-2. Estimates of the radiative forcing due to mineral dust vary widely from +0.09 to -0.46 W m-2; even the sign of the radiative forcing is not well established due to the competing effects of solar and terrestrial radiative forcings. A single study provides a very tentative estimate of the radiative forcing of nitrates to be -0.03 W m-2. Estimates of the cloud albedo indirect radiative forcing range from -0.3 to approximately -1.8 W m-2. Although the cloud lifetime effect is identified as a potentially important climate forcing mechanism, it is difficult to quantify in the context of the present definition of radiative forcing of climate change and current model simulations. This is because its estimation by general circulation models necessarily includes some level of cloud and water vapor feedbacks

  13. Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in Six National Parks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been suggested as a potential cause of population declines and increases in malformations in amphibians. This study indicates that the present distributions of amphibians in four western U.S. National Parks are not related to UVR exposure, and sugg...

  14. ESTIMATION OF UV RADIATION DOSE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) B wavelength range (280 nm to 320 nm) of solar radiation can be a significant biological stressor, and has been hypothesized to be partially responsible for amphibian declines and malformation. This hypothesis has been difficult to evaluate, in part, because ...

  15. Large-scale transient sensitivity analysis of a radiation damaged bipolar junction transistor.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Gay, David M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Phipps, Eric Todd

    2007-11-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is useful in transient sensitivity analysis of a computational simulation of a bipolar junction transistor subject to radiation damage. We used forward-mode AD, implemented in a new Trilinos package called Sacado, to compute analytic derivatives for implicit time integration and forward sensitivity analysis. Sacado addresses element-based simulation codes written in C++ and works well with forward sensitivity analysis as implemented in the Trilinos time-integration package Rythmos. The forward sensitivity calculation is significantly more efficient and robust than finite differencing.

  16. Sensitivity of hyperthermia-treated human cells to killing by ultraviolet or gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, R.E.; Smith, B.P.; Wheatly, N.; Chan, A.; Child, S.; Paterson, M.C.

    1985-11-01

    Human xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or Fanconi anemia (FA) fibroblasts displayed shouldered 45/sup 0/C heat survival curves not significantly different from normal fibroblasts, a result similar to that previously found for ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells, indicating heat resistance is not linked to either uv or low-LET ionizing radiation resistance. Hyperthermia (45/sup 0/C) sensitized normal and XP fibroblasts to killing by gamma radiation but failed to sensitize the cells to the lethal effects of 254 nm uv radiation. Thermal inhibition of repair of ionizing radiation lesions but not uv-induced lesions appears to contribute synergistically to cell death. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) for the synergistic interaction of hyperthermia (45/sup 0/C, 30 min) and gamma radiation was significantly lower in one FA and two strains (TER = 1.7-1.8) than that reported previously for three normal strains (TER = 2.5-3.0). These XP and FA strains may be more gamma sensitive than normal human fibroblasts. Since hyperthermia treatment only slightly increases the gamma-radiation sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts compared to normal strains, it is possible that the degree of thermal enhancement attainable reflects the genetically inherent ionizing radiation repair capacity of the cells. The data indicate that both repair inhibition and particular lesion types are required for lethal synergism between heat and radiation. We therefore postulate that the transient thermal inhibition of repair results in the conversion of gamma-induced lesions to irrepairable lethal damage, while uv-type damage can remain unaltered during this period.

  17. Sensitivity of Active Remotely Sensed Total Column Observations to Atmospheric State Estimation Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Moore, B.

    2013-12-01

    The proposed Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission will retrieve total column CO2 using a laser-based measurement. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) approach utilizes the difference in absorption between neighboring spectral lines to effectively determine the difference in absorption due to CO2. The actual measured quantity is equivalent to the differential absorption, defined by Δτ = ∫ q(p) Δξ(p) dp / g m, where m is the molar mass of air and Δξ is the differential absorption cross section. The main use of the measurement is the characterization of sources and sinks using atmospheric inverse methods. Changes in surface pressure or Δξ can change Δτ independent of sources and sinks and are, thus "nuisance variables". Δξ is strongly dependent on variations in temperature (T) and water vapor (w), which are usually taken from numerical models as estimates of the local atmospheric state. The authors seek to determine observable that contains the most information on the model column of CO2, which will provide the best estimates of sources and sinks in a transport model inversion. Three candidate observables are the differential optical depth on a CO2 line, the ratio of this to the differential optical depth on an O2 line, the weighting function averaged column CO2. Each of these observables will have different sensitivities to surface pressure and spectroscopy by virtue of the functional form that defines them. For example, the O2 measurement should be less sensitive to surface pressure fluctuations due to the near constancy of O2 in the atmosphere. The information contained in the observation about the model state is encapsulated in the quantity HTR-1H, where R is the observation error covariance and H is the Jacobian of the observation operator with respect to the model mixing ratio of CO2. We can decompose the error variance for a particular observation into contributions from the surface pressure errors

  18. Molecular size of the Na+-H+ antiport in renal brush border membranes, as estimated by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Beliveau, R.; Demeule, M.; Potier, M.

    1988-04-15

    The radiation inactivation method was applied to brush border membrane vesicles from rat kidney, in order to estimate the molecular size of the Na+-H+ antiporter. Sodium influx (1mM) driven by an acid intravesicular pH was unaffected by the high osmolarity of the cryoprotective solution. Initial rate of influx was estimated by linear regression performed on the first 10 seconds of transport: 0.512 pmol/micrograms protein/s. There was no binding component involved. Incubation performed in the presence of 1 mM amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na+-H+ antiport gave an initial rate of only 0.071 pmol/microgram/s, an 82% inhibition. Membrane vesicles were irradiated at -78 degrees C in a Gammacel Model 220. Sodium influx was reduced, as the dose of radiation increased, but the influx remained linear for the period of time (10s) during which the initial rate was estimated, indicating no alteration of the proton driving force during this time period. Amiloride-insensitive flux remained totally unaffected by the radiation dose, indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards sodium was unaffected. The amiloride-sensitive pathway presented a monoexponential profile of inactivation, allowing the molecular size to be estimated at 321 kDa. Based on DCCD-binding studies suggesting the molecular size of the monomer to be around 65 kDa for rat kidney, our results suggest that the functional transporter in the membrane to be a multimer.

  19. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  20. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION IN NORTH AMERICAN LAKES: ATTENUATION ESTIMATES FROM DOC MEASUREMENTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANKTON COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate warming in North America is likely to be accompanied by changes in other environmental stresses such as UV-B radiation. We apply an empirical model to available DOC (dissolved organic C) data to estimate the depths to which 1% of surface UV-B and UV-A radiation penetrate ...

  1. An algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation using an efficient method for approximating sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for maximum likelihood (ML) estimation is developed primarily for multivariable dynamic systems. The algorithm relies on a new optimization method referred to as a modified Newton-Raphson with estimated sensitivities (MNRES). The method determines sensitivities by using slope information from local surface approximations of each output variable in parameter space. The fitted surface allows sensitivity information to be updated at each iteration with a significant reduction in computational effort compared with integrating the analytically determined sensitivity equations or using a finite-difference method. Different surface-fitting methods are discussed and demonstrated. Aircraft estimation problems are solved by using both simulated and real-flight data to compare MNRES with commonly used methods; in these solutions MNRES is found to be equally accurate and substantially faster. MNRES eliminates the need to derive sensitivity equations, thus producing a more generally applicable algorithm.

  2. Estimation of top-altitude of Asian Dust from Satellite Observations of Backscattered UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.

    2008-12-01

    Asian dust (Hwangsa in Korean), which is a typical example of mineral dust aerosol, frequently occurs in the desert and loess plateau in northern China and Mongolia during the spring season (Park and Lee 2004). In particular, they mainly originate from the arid area above 1500m from sea level (Wang et al. 2000) and some of them affect to North Pacific Ocean and North America (Husar et al. 2001). In addition, UV-absorbing aerosols such as mineral dust have a strong altitude dependence in the near UV region that is a low surface reflectivity and nearly constant over land and water ( Herman et al. 1997; Torres et al. 1998). Thus, in this study, we concentrate on estimation of top-altitude for UV-absorbing aerosol like a mineral dust by using weather charts and radiative transfer model (RTM) and satellite data. To estimate the top-altitude of Asian dust using multiple satellite data, in the first, we investigate the source regions of Asian dust based on results of HYSPLIT backward trajectory for the period from Jan 2001 to May 2008 and analyze qualitative synoptic weather patterns associated with the long-range transport. Next, assuming that vertical profile of Asian dust is similar to Gaussian distribution from surface to maximum altitude, we select a sensitive wavelength for Asian dust from RTM test. Then, we evaluate the top-altitude of Asian dust estimated from the satellite data, MODIS, OMI, CALIOP and Rstar5b model. Rstar5b inputs are generated by MODIS-AOD and OMI geometry information, which is located in minimum distance from CALIOP data pixel. At last, we compare altitude calculated from Rstar5b with that retrieved from CALIOP using radiance of simulated Rstar5b and measured OMI. This simultaneous approach of multi-satellite platform and RTM is expected to contribute to the comprehension of the mechanism as well as the estimation of the altitude for Asian dust.

  3. Estimating the Radiation Dose to the Fetus in Prophylactic Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kentaro; Hamada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Akitoshi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nasu, Kaei; Narahara, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although radiation exposure is of great concern to expecting patients, little information is available on the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO). Here we estimated the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic IIABO in Caesarean section (CS). Cases. We report our experience with the IIABO procedure in three consecutive patients with suspected placenta previa/accreta. Fetal radiation dose measurements were conducted prior to each CS by using an anthropomorphic phantom. Based on the simulated value, we calculated the fetal radiation dose as the absorbed dose. We found that the fetal radiation doses ranged from 12.88 to 31.6 mGy. The fetal radiation dose during the prophylactic IIABOs did not exceed 50 mGy. Conclusion. The IIABO procedure could result in a very small increase in the risk of harmful effects to the fetus. PMID:26180648

  4. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Estimates of phase-transition heats in steels and ceramics heated by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsar'kova, O. G.; Garnov, Sergei V.

    2003-08-01

    Measurements of the high-temperature dependences of the heat capacity of solids heated by high-power laser radiation and the model of formation of structural point defects (vacancies) are used to estimate the heats of sublimation, evaporation and melting, as well as enthalpy of phase transformations for modern processing of steels and ceramics.

  6. An iterative method for coil sensitivity estimation in multi-coil MRI systems.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qiang; Li, Zhaohui; Song, Kaikai; Li, Feng

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an iterative coil sensitivity estimation method for multi-coil MRI systems. The proposed method works with coil images in the magnitude image domain. It determines a region of support (RoS), a region being composed of the same type of tissues, by a region growing algorithm, which makes use of both intensities and intensity gradients of pixels. By repeating this procedure, it can determine multiple regions of support, which together cover most of the concerned image area. The union of these regions of support provides a rough estimate of the sensitivity of each coil through dividing the intensities of pixels by the average intensity inside every region of support. The obtained rough coil sensitivity estimate is further approached with the product of multiple low-order polynomials, rather than a single one. The product of these polynomials provides a smooth estimate of the sensitivity of each coil. With the obtained sensitivities of coils, it can produce a better reconstructed image, which determines more correct regions of support and yields preciser estimates of the sensitivities of coils. In other words, the method can be iteratively implemented to improve the estimation performance. The proposed method was verified through both simulated data and clinical data from different body parts. The experimental results confirm the superiority of our method to some conventional methods.

  7. Kernel density estimator methods for Monte Carlo radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kaushik

    In this dissertation, the Kernel Density Estimator (KDE), a nonparametric probability density estimator, is studied and used to represent global Monte Carlo (MC) tallies. KDE is also employed to remove the singularities from two important Monte Carlo tallies, namely point detector and surface crossing flux tallies. Finally, KDE is also applied to accelerate the Monte Carlo fission source iteration for criticality problems. In the conventional MC calculation histograms are used to represent global tallies which divide the phase space into multiple bins. Partitioning the phase space into bins can add significant overhead to the MC simulation and the histogram provides only a first order approximation to the underlying distribution. The KDE method is attractive because it can estimate MC tallies in any location within the required domain without any particular bin structure. Post-processing of the KDE tallies is sufficient to extract detailed, higher order tally information for an arbitrary grid. The quantitative and numerical convergence properties of KDE tallies are also investigated and they are shown to be superior to conventional histograms as well as the functional expansion tally developed by Griesheimer. Monte Carlo point detector and surface crossing flux tallies are two widely used tallies but they suffer from an unbounded variance. As a result, the central limit theorem can not be used for these tallies to estimate confidence intervals. By construction, KDE tallies can be directly used to estimate flux at a point but the variance of this point estimate does not converge as 1/N, which is not unexpected for a point quantity. However, an improved approach is to modify both point detector and surface crossing flux tallies directly by using KDE within a variance reduction approach by taking advantage of the fact that KDE estimates the underlying probability density function. This methodology is demonstrated by several numerical examples and demonstrates that

  8. An Analysis of the Sensitivity of Quasi-Experimental Net Impact Estimates of CETA Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Katherine P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Net impact estimates of Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs vary widely and can be explained by the different evaluation methodologies used. Estimates are sensitive to the inclusion of recently unemployed persons in the comparison sample and assumptions about the time of decision to enroll in CETA. (GDC)

  9. Parameter estimation applied to Nimbus 6 wide-angle longwave radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A parameter estimation technique was used to analyze the August 1975 Nimbus 6 Earth radiation budget data to demonstrate the concept of deconvolution. The longwave radiation field at the top of the atmosphere is defined from satellite data by a fifth degree and fifth order spherical harmonic representation. The variations of the major features of the radiation field are defined by analyzing the data separately for each two-day duty cycle. A table of coefficient values for each spherical harmonic representation is given along with global mean, gradients, degree variances, and contour plots. In addition, the entire data set is analyzed to define the monthly average radiation field.

  10. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for 18F-BPA PET.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuzuru; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Yasui, Naoko; Honda, Naoki; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a molecular radiation therapy approach based on the (10)B (n, α) (7)Li nuclear reaction in cancer cells. In BNCT, delivery of (10)B in the form of 4-borono-phenylalanine conjugated with fructose (BPA-fr) to the cancer cells is important. The PET tracer 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) has been used to predict the accumulation of BPA-fr before BNCT. Purpose To determine the biodistribution and dosimetric parameters in 18F-BPA PET/CT studies. Material and Methods Human biokinetic data were obtained during clinical 18F-BPA PET studies between February and June 2015 at one institution. Nine consecutive patients were studied prospectively. The internal radiation dose was calculated on the basis of radioactivity data from blood, urine, and normal tissue of the heart, liver, spleen, kidney, and other parts of the body at each time point using OLINDA/EXM1.1 program. We compared our calculations with published 18F-FDG data. Results Adult patients (3 men, 3 women; age range, 28-68 years) had significantly smaller absorbed doses than pediatric patients (3 patients; age range, 5-12 years) ( P = 0.003). The mean effective dose was 57% lower in adult patients compared with pediatric patients. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were 25% lower than those for 18F-FDG presented in International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) publication 106. Conclusion We found significant differences in organ absorbed doses for 18F-BPA against those for 18F-FDG presented in ICRP publication 106. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were smaller than those for 18F-FDG in the publication by 0.5-38% (mean difference, 25%).

  11. Sensitivity of UV Erythemal Radiation to Total Ozone Changes under Different Sky Conditions: Results for Granada, Spain.

    PubMed

    Antón, Manuel; Cazorla, Alberto; Mateos, David; Costa, Maria J; Olmo, Francisco J; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the sensitivity of UV erythemal radiation (UVER) to variations in the total ozone column (TOC) under different sky conditions at Granada (southeastern Spain). The sensitivity is studied both in relative terms by means of the Radiation Amplification Factor (RAF) and in absolute terms using the Ozone Efficiency (OE). These two variables are determined for diverse sky conditions characterized by the cloud cover information given by a sky camera (in oktas) and the cloud optical depth (COD) estimated from global solar radiation measurements. As expected, in absolute terms, the TOC variations cause substantially smaller UVER changes during completely overcast situations than during cloud-free cases. For instance, the OE (SZA = 30°, TOC = 290 DU) decreases from 0.68 mW m(-2) per unit of TOC (0 oktas) to 0.50 mW m(-2) per unit of TOC (8 oktas). However, the opposite is observed when the analysis is performed in relative terms. Thus, the RAF (determined for SZA cases below 80°) increases from 1.1 for cloud-free cases (0 oktas) to 1.4 for completely overcast situations (8 oktas). This opposite behavior is also found when both RAF and OE are analyzed as functions of COD. Thus, while the OE strongly decreases with increasing COD, the RAF increases as COD increases.

  12. Estimating two-loop radiative effects in the MOLLER experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, A. G.; Barkanova, S. G.; Zykunov, V. A.; Kuraev, E. A.

    2013-07-15

    Within the on-shell renormalization scheme, two-loop electroweak corrections to the parityviolating polarization asymmetry in the reaction e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma}) were estimated for the MOLLER experiment at JLab. The infrared divergence and the imaginary part of the amplitude were taken completely under control. Relevant compact expressions obtained by using asymptotic methods are free from unphysical parameters and are convenient for analysis and for numerical estimations. A numerical analysis revealed a significant scale of two-loop effects and the need for taking them into account in the MOLLER experiment.

  13. Problems and solutions in the estimation of genetic risks from radiation and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive investigations with mice on the effects of various physical and biological factors, such as dose rate, sex and cell stage, on radiation-induced mutation have provided an evaluation of the genetics hazards of radiation in man. The mutational results obtained in both sexes with progressive lowering of the radiation dose rate have permitted estimation of the mutation frequency expected under the low-level radiation conditions of most human exposure. Supplementing the studies on mutation frequency are investigations on the phenotypic effects of mutations in mice, particularly anatomical disorders of the skeleton, which allow an estimation of the degree of human handicap associated with the occurrence of parallel defects in man. Estimation of the genetic risk from chemical mutagens is much more difficult, and the research is much less advanced. Results on transmitted mutations in mice indicate a poor correlation with mutation induction in non-mammalian organisms.

  14. The children of parents exposed to atomic bombs: estimates of the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans.

    PubMed

    Neel, J V; Schull, W J; Awa, A A; Satoh, C; Kato, H; Otake, M; Yoshimoto, Y

    1990-06-01

    The data collected in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the past 40 years on the children of survivors of the atomic bombings and on the children of a suitable control population are analyzed on the basis of the newly revised estimates of radiation doses. No statistically significant effects emerge with respect to eight different indicators. Since, however, it may confidently be assumed some mutations were induced, we have taken the data at face value and calculated the minimal gametic doubling doses of acute radiation for the individual indicators at various probability levels. An effort has also been made to calculate the most probable doubling dose for the indicators combined. The latter value is between 1.7 and 2.2 Sv. It is suggested the appropriate figure for chronic radiation would be between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. These estimates suggest humans are less sensitive to the genetic effects of radiation than has been assumed on the basis of past extrapolations from experiments with mice.

  15. The children of parents exposed to atomic bombs: Estimates of the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.; Schull, W.J.; Awa, A.A.; Satoh, C.; Kato, H.; Otake, M.; Yoshimoto, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    The data collected in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the past 40 years on the children of survivors of the atomic bombings and on the children of a suitable control population are analyzed on the basis of the newly revised estimates of radiation doses. No statistically significant effects emerge with respect to eight different indicators. Since, however, it may confidently be assumed some mutations were induced, we have taken the data at face value and calculated the minimal gametic doubling doses of acute radiation for the individual indicators at various probability levels. An effort has also been made to calculate the most probable doubling dose for the indicators combined. The latter value is between 1.7 and 2.2 Sv. It is suggested the appropriate figure for chronic radiation would be between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. These estimates suggest humans are less sensitive to the genetic effects of radiation than has been assumed on the basis of past extrapolations from experiments with mice.

  16. The children of parents exposed to atomic bombs: estimates of the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans.

    PubMed Central

    Neel, J V; Schull, W J; Awa, A A; Satoh, C; Kato, H; Otake, M; Yoshimoto, Y

    1990-01-01

    The data collected in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the past 40 years on the children of survivors of the atomic bombings and on the children of a suitable control population are analyzed on the basis of the newly revised estimates of radiation doses. No statistically significant effects emerge with respect to eight different indicators. Since, however, it may confidently be assumed some mutations were induced, we have taken the data at face value and calculated the minimal gametic doubling doses of acute radiation for the individual indicators at various probability levels. An effort has also been made to calculate the most probable doubling dose for the indicators combined. The latter value is between 1.7 and 2.2 Sv. It is suggested the appropriate figure for chronic radiation would be between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. These estimates suggest humans are less sensitive to the genetic effects of radiation than has been assumed on the basis of past extrapolations from experiments with mice. PMID:2339701

  17. Estimation of the lead thickness required to shield scattered radiation from synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In the enclosure of synchrotron radiation experiments using a monochromatic beam, secondary radiation arises from two effects, namely fluorescence and scattering. While fluorescence can be regarded as isotropic, the angular dependence of Compton scattering has to be taken into account if the shielding shall not become unreasonably thick. The scope of this paper is to clarify how the different factors starting from the spectral properties of the source and the attenuation coefficient of the shielding, over the spectral and angular distribution of the scattered radiation and the geometry of the experiment influence the thickness of lead required to keep the dose rate outside the enclosure below the desired threshold.

  18. The WST survival assay: an easy and reliable method to screen radiation-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Guertler, A; Kraemer, A; Roessler, U; Hornhardt, S; Kulka, U; Moertl, S; Friedl, A A; Illig, T; Wichmann, E; Gomolka, M

    2011-02-01

    An easy, fast and reliable method was developed to screen hundreds of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell lines (lymphoblastoid cell lines, LCLs) for radiation sensitivity that were generated from lymphocytes isolated from young lung cancer patients. The WST-1 test explores the metabolic activity of the mitochondria as an indicator for the vital status of cells. Cell proliferation as well as indirect cell death can be quantified by this method on a large scale in microtiter plates. Cell survival was measured at 24- and 48-h post-irradiation with 10 Gy ((137)Cs source) by the WST-1 assay and Trypan blue staining. To set up the experimental screening conditions and to establish a positive and a negative control, an ATM-mutated cell line from a radiation-sensitive ATM patient and an ATM proficient cell line from a healthy brother were compared. An optimal differentiation between the two cell lines was demonstrated for 10 Gy and 24- and 48-h cell growth after irradiation. Upon screening 120 LCLs of young lung cancer patients under these conditions, 5 of them were found to be radiation sensitive to a high degree of statistical significance. The results have been confirmed by a second laboratory by means of Trypan blue testing. The WST-1 test represents an efficient and reliable method by means of screening for radiation-sensitive cell lines.

  19. An Investigation of the Potential of 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Predict Radiation Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Effectiveness .... 42 E. Clonogenic Assay .......................... 45 1. Description of Technique .............. 45 2. Evaluation of Results...52 3. Anesthesia Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and NMR Parameters ....... 61 B. Fractionated Dose Experiments ............. 65 1...cell proliferation during the treatment period appears to limit the effectiveness of radiotherapy (2). During growth, tumors exhibit gradual 31

  20. Integrating Biological Covariates into Gene Expression-Based Predictors of Radiation Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Vidya P.; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene expression-based classifiers has resulted in a number of promising potential signatures of patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy. However, these approaches have also created difficulties in trying to use gene expression alone to predict a complex trait. A practical approach to this problem is to integrate existing biological knowledge with gene expression to build a composite predictor. We studied the problem of predicting radiation sensitivity within human cancer cell lines from gene expression. First, we present evidence for the need to integrate known biological conditions (tissue of origin, RAS, and p53 mutational status) into a gene expression prediction problem involving radiation sensitivity. Next, we demonstrate using linear regression, a technique for incorporating this knowledge. The resulting correlations between gene expression and radiation sensitivity improved through the use of this technique (best-fit adjusted R2 increased from 0.3 to 0.84). Overfitting of data was examined through the use of simulation. The results reinforce the concept that radiation sensitivity is not driven solely by gene expression, but rather by a combination of distinct parameters. We show that accounting for biological heterogeneity significantly improves the ability of the model to identify genes that are associated with radiosensitivity.

  1. NATIONAL- AND STATE-LEVEL EMISSIONS ESTIMATES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES (RITGS) FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development of national- and state- level emissions estimates of radiatively important trace gases (RlTGs). Emissions estimates are presented for the principal anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and o...

  2. Improving the S-Shape Solar Radiation Estimation Method for Supporting Crop Models

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Nándor

    2012-01-01

    In line with the critical comments formulated in relation to the S-shape global solar radiation estimation method, the original formula was improved via a 5-step procedure. The improved method was compared to four-reference methods on a large North-American database. According to the investigated error indicators, the final 7-parameter S-shape method has the same or even better estimation efficiency than the original formula. The improved formula is able to provide radiation estimates with a particularly low error pattern index (PIdoy) which is especially important concerning the usability of the estimated radiation values in crop models. Using site-specific calibration, the radiation estimates of the improved S-shape method caused an average of 2.72 ± 1.02 (α = 0.05) relative error in the calculated biomass. Using only readily available site specific metadata the radiation estimates caused less than 5% relative error in the crop model calculations when they were used for locations in the middle, plain territories of the USA. PMID:22645451

  3. Estimation of Effective Doses for Radiation Cancer Risks on ISS, Lunar, and Mars Missions with Space Radiation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) of NASA s Operational Radiation Protection Program has provided the actual flight measurements of active and passive dosimeters which were placed throughout the phantom on STS-91 mission for 10 days and on ISS Increment 2 mission. For the PTE, the variation in organ doses, which is resulted by the absorption and the changes in radiation quality with tissue shielding, was considered by measuring doses at many tissue sites and at several critical body organs including brain, colon, heart, stomach, thyroid, and skins. These measurements have been compared with the organ dose calculations obtained from the transport models. Active TEPC measurements of lineal energy spectra at the surface of the PTE also provided the direct comparison of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) or trapped proton dose and dose equivalent. It is shown that orienting the phantom body as actual in ISS is needed for the direct comparison of the transport models to the ISS data. One of the most important observations for organ dose equivalent of effective dose estimates on ISS is the fractional contribution from trapped protons and GCR. We show that for most organs over 80% is from GCR. The improved estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks will be made with the resultant tissue weighting factors and the modified codes.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of numerical weather prediction radiative schemes to forecast direct solar radiation over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukkavilli, S. K.; Kay, M. J.; Taylor, R.; Prasad, A. A.; Troccoli, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Australian Solar Energy Forecasting System (ASEFS) project requires forecasting timeframes which range from nowcasting to long-term forecasts (minutes to two years). As concentrating solar power (CSP) plant operators are one of the key stakeholders in the national energy market, research and development enhancements for direct normal irradiance (DNI) forecasts is a major subtask. This project involves comparing different radiative scheme codes to improve day ahead DNI forecasts on the national supercomputing infrastructure running mesoscale simulations on NOAA's Weather Research & Forecast (WRF) model. ASEFS also requires aerosol data fusion for improving accurate representation of spatio-temporally variable atmospheric aerosols to reduce DNI bias error in clear sky conditions over southern Queensland & New South Wales where solar power is vulnerable to uncertainities from frequent aerosol radiative events such as bush fires and desert dust. Initial results from thirteen years of Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) deseasonalised DNI and MODIS NASA-Terra aerosol optical depth (AOD) anomalies demonstrated strong negative correlations in north and southeast Australia along with strong variability in AOD (~0.03-0.05). Radiative transfer schemes, DNI and AOD anomaly correlations will be discussed for the population and transmission grid centric regions where current and planned CSP plants dispatch electricity to capture peak prices in the market. Aerosol and solar irradiance datasets include satellite and ground based assimilations from the national BOM, regional aerosol researchers and agencies. The presentation will provide an overview of this ASEFS project task on WRF and results to date. The overall goal of this ASEFS subtask is to develop a hybrid numerical weather prediction (NWP) and statistical/machine learning multi-model ensemble strategy that meets future operational requirements of CSP plant operators.

  5. Effects of sensitizer length on radiation crosslinked shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor; Voit, Walter; Gall, Ken

    2010-04-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can be designed to retain a metastable state and upon activation, recover a preprogrammed shape. In this study, poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) is blended with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) of various molecular weights in various concentrations and subsequently exposed to ionizing radiation. PEGDA sensitizes the radiation crosslinking of PMA, lowering the minimum absorbed dose for gelation and increasing the rubbery modulus, after crosslinking. Minimum dose for gelation, as determined by the Charlesby-Pinner equation, decreases from 25.57 kGy for unblended PMA to 2.06 kGy for PMA blended with 10.00 mole% PEGDA. Moreover, increase in the blend concentration of PEGDA increases the crosslinking density of the resulting networks. Sensitizer length, namely Mn of PEGDA, also affects crosslinking and final mechanical properties. Increase in the length of the PEGDA molecule at a constant molar ratio increases the efficacy of the molecule as a radiation sensitizer as determined by the increase in gel fraction and rubbery modulus across doses. However, at a constant weight ratio of PEGDA to PMA, shorter PEGDA chains sensitize more crosslinking because they have more reactive ends per weight fraction. Sensitized samples of PMA with PEGDA were tested for shape-memory properties and showed shape fixity of greater than 99%. Samples had a glass transition temperature near 28 °C and recovered between 97% and 99% of the induced strain when strained to 50%.

  6. RADIATION PRESSURE DETECTION AND DENSITY ESTIMATE FOR 2011 MD

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T. E-mail: tholen@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present our astrometric observations of the small near-Earth object 2011 MD (H ∼ 28.0), obtained after its very close fly-by to Earth in 2011 June. Our set of observations extends the observational arc to 73 days, and, together with the published astrometry obtained around the Earth fly-by, allows a direct detection of the effect of radiation pressure on the object, with a confidence of 5σ. The detection can be used to put constraints on the density of the object, pointing to either an unexpectedly low value of ρ=(640±330)kg m{sup −3} (68% confidence interval) if we assume a typical probability distribution for the unknown albedo, or to an unusually high reflectivity of its surface. This result may have important implications both in terms of impact hazard from small objects and in light of a possible retrieval of this target.

  7. Study of factors determining the radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators (A0189)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venables, J. D.; Ahearn, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The correlation between defect cluster concentrations observed for different grades of quartz examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the electrical stability of quartz resonators exposed to complex radiation in an orbital LDEF was determined. It is demonstrated that the technique TEM provides a powerful method for studying the effect of radiation on crystalline quartz. Two factors suggest that the observed clusters may be responsible for the radiation-induced frequency drift and acoustic absorption effects associated with irradiated quartz resonators: (1) the clusters are expected to be very effective in modifying the piezoelectric properties of quartz because of the large strain fields associated with them; (2) both phenomena appear to be sensitive to the impurity concentration. It is suggested that TEM can be used to classify grades of quartz according to their suitability for use in radiation-hard resonators. This technique may identify the impurities that are responsible and thereby effect an improvement in the stability of quartz oscillators.

  8. Radiative transfer theory for estimation of the seismic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Wegler, U.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new technique to obtain source spectra and seismic moments of regional earthquakes from envelopes of seismic coda. As compared to existing methods, our approach is based on a physical model of the scattering process that produces the seismic coda. This allows the direct estimation of source parameters, without the necessity to fix proportionality coefficients with reference events. We see an appreciable advantage because the method is independent of the output from other techniques, such as reference events provided by moment inversions. The main component of our method is a joint inversion of the seismic records for source and site parameters, as well as for medium parameters assuming isotropic sources and isotropic, acoustic scattering in a half-space. The method is tested with recordings of 11 earthquakes (4 <= Ml <= 6) by the German Regional Seismic Network at epicentral distances less than 1000 km. We invert the traces in eight frequency bands between 0.2 and 24 Hz and demonstrate that our estimates of the seismic moment are in good agreement with values obtained in independent studies using waveform inversion techniques. In fact our estimates of the seismic moment are better than approximations obtained from local magnitudes using empirical relations specifically derived for the region under study. The parameters that describe the scattering medium are mean free path that we found to average around 690 km and the intrinsic quality factor for which we obtain IQ = 500 below 3 Hz.

  9. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  10. Novel use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to screen radiation protectors and sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances . E-mail: adam.dicker@mail.tju.edu; Davidson, Christian; Davidson, William Robert; Yentzer, Brad; Farber, Steven A.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Dicker, Adam P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos provide a unique vertebrate model to screen therapeutic agents easily and rapidly because of their relatively close genetic relationship to humans, ready abundance and accessibility, short embryonal development, and optical clarity. To validate zebrafish embryos as a screen for radiation modifiers, we evaluated the effects of ionizing radiation in combination with a known radioprotector (free radical scavenger Amifostine) or radiosensitizing agent (tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478). Methods and materials: Viable zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0-10 Gy single-fraction 250 kVp X-rays with or without either Amifostine (0-4 mM) or AG1478 (0-10 {mu}M) at defined developmental stages from 1-24 h postfertilization (hpf). Embryos were examined for morphologic abnormalities and viability until 144 hpf. Results: Radiation alone produced a time- and dose-dependent perturbation of normal embryonic development and survival with maximal sensitivity at doses {>=}4 Gy delivered before 4 hpf. Amifostine markedly attenuated this effect, whereas AG1478 enhanced teratogenicity and lethality, particularly at therapeutically relevant (2-6 Gy) radiation doses. Conclusions: Collectively, these data validate the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model to assess the effect of radiation alone or with radiation response modulators. Zebrafish embryos may thus provide a rapid, facile system to screen novel agents ultimately intended for human use in the context of therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure.

  11. Quiescent adult neural stem cells are exceptionally sensitive to cosmic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Switzer, Robert C.; Chamberland, Dennis W.; Nick, Harry; Levine, Howard G.; Scarpa, Philip J.; Enikolopov, Grigori; Steindler, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Generation of new neurons in the adult brain, a process that is likely to be essential for learning, memory, and mood regulation, is impaired by radiation. Therefore, radiation exposure might have not only such previously expected consequences as increased probability of developing cancer, but might also impair cognitive function and emotional stability. Radiation exposure is encountered in settings ranging from cancer therapy to space travel; evaluating the neurogenic risks of radiation requires identifying the at-risk populations of stem and progenitor cells in the adult brain. Here we have used a novel reporter mouse line to find that early neural progenitors are selectively affected by conditions simulating the space radiation environment. This is reflected both in a decrease in the number of these progenitors in the neurogenic regions and in an increase in the number of dying cells in these regions. Unexpectedly, we found that quiescent neural stem cells, rather than their rapidly dividing progeny, are most sensitive to radiation. Since these stem cells are responsible for adult neurogenesis, their death would have a profound impact on the production of new neurons in the irradiated adult brain. Our finding raises an important concern about cognitive and emotional risks associated with radiation exposure. PMID:18076878

  12. Annual cycle of radiation fluxes over the Arctic ocean: Sensitivity to cloud optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A. ); Ebert, E.E. )

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes are derived. Existing data on cloud fraction and cloud microphysical properties are utilized. Four types of cloud are considered: low stratus clouds, midlevel clouds, citrus clouds, and wintertime ice crystal precipitation. Internally consistent annual cycles of surface temperature, surface albedo, cloud fraction and cloud optical properties, components of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes, and cloud radiative forcing are presented. The modeled total cloud optical depth (weighted by cloud fraction) ranges from a low value in winter of 2 to a high summertime value of 8. Infrared emmissivities for liquid water clouds are shown to be substantially less than unity during the cold half of the year. Values of modeled surface cloud radiative forcing are positive except for two weeks in midsummer; over the course of the year clouds have a net warming effect on the surface in the Arctic. Total cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere is determined to be positive only briefly in early autumn. Surface longwave fluxes are shown to be very sensitive to the presence of lower-tropospheric ice crystal precipitation during the cold half of the year.

  13. Helicity sensitive terahertz radiation detection by dual-grating-gate high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Faltermeier, P.; Olbrich, P.; Probst, W.; Schell, L.; Ganichev, S. D.; Watanabe, T.; Boubanga-Tombet, S. A.; Otsuji, T.

    2015-08-28

    We report on the observation of a radiation helicity sensitive photocurrent excited by terahertz (THz) radiation in dual-grating-gate (DGG) InAlAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/InP high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). For a circular polarization, the current measured between source and drain contacts changes its sign with the inversion of the radiation helicity. For elliptically polarized radiation, the total current is described by superposition of the Stokes parameters with different weights. Moreover, by variation of gate voltages applied to individual gratings, the photocurrent can be defined either by the Stokes parameter defining the radiation helicity or those for linear polarization. We show that artificial non-centrosymmetric microperiodic structures with a two-dimensional electron system excited by THz radiation exhibit a dc photocurrent caused by the combined action of a spatially periodic in-plane potential and spatially modulated light. The results provide a proof of principle for the application of DGG HEMT for all-electric detection of the radiation's polarization state.

  14. An Improved Approach for Estimating Daily Net Radiation over the Heihe River Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingfang; Liu, Shufu; Zhu, Weiwei; Yan, Nana; Xing, Qiang; Tan, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Net radiation plays an essential role in determining the thermal conditions of the Earth’s surface and is an important parameter for the study of land-surface processes and global climate change. In this paper, an improved satellite-based approach to estimate the daily net radiation is presented, in which sunshine duration were derived from the geostationary meteorological satellite (FY-2D) cloud classification product, the monthly empirical as and bs Angstrom coefficients for net shortwave radiation were calibrated by spatial fitting of the ground data from 1997 to 2006, and the daily net longwave radiation was calibrated with ground data from 2007 to 2010 over the Heihe River Basin in China. The estimated daily net radiation values were validated against ground data for 12 months in 2008 at four stations with different underlying surface types. The average coefficient of determination (R2) was 0.8489, and the averaged Nash-Sutcliffe equation (NSE) was 0.8356. The close agreement between the estimated daily net radiation and observations indicates that the proposed method is promising, especially given the comparison between the spatial distribution and the interpolation of sunshine duration. Potential applications include climate research, energy balance studies and the estimation of global evapotranspiration. PMID:28054976

  15. An Improved Approach for Estimating Daily Net Radiation over the Heihe River Basin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bingfang; Liu, Shufu; Zhu, Weiwei; Yan, Nana; Xing, Qiang; Tan, Shen

    2017-01-04

    Net radiation plays an essential role in determining the thermal conditions of the Earth's surface and is an important parameter for the study of land-surface processes and global climate change. In this paper, an improved satellite-based approach to estimate the daily net radiation is presented, in which sunshine duration were derived from the geostationary meteorological satellite (FY-2D) cloud classification product, the monthly empirical as and bs Angstrom coefficients for net shortwave radiation were calibrated by spatial fitting of the ground data from 1997 to 2006, and the daily net longwave radiation was calibrated with ground data from 2007 to 2010 over the Heihe River Basin in China. The estimated daily net radiation values were validated against ground data for 12 months in 2008 at four stations with different underlying surface types. The average coefficient of determination (R²) was 0.8489, and the averaged Nash-Sutcliffe equation (NSE) was 0.8356. The close agreement between the estimated daily net radiation and observations indicates that the proposed method is promising, especially given the comparison between the spatial distribution and the interpolation of sunshine duration. Potential applications include climate research, energy balance studies and the estimation of global evapotranspiration.

  16. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion.

  17. A novel high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Tyler L.

    Given the emphasis on more personalized radiation therapy there is an ongoing and compelling need to develop high-throughput screening tools to further examine the biological effects of ionizing radiation on cells, tissues and organ systems in either the research or clinical setting. Conventional x-ray irradiators are designed to provide maximum versatility to radiobiology researchers, typically accommodating small animals, tissue or blood samples, and cellular applications. This added versatility often impedes the overall sensitivity and specificity of an experiment resulting in a trade-off between the number of absorbed doses (or dose rates) and biological endpoints that can be investigated in vitro in a reasonable amount of time. Therefore, modern irradiator designs are incompatible with current high-throughput bioassay technologies. Furthermore, important dosimetry and calibration characteristics (i.e. dose build-up region, beam attenuation, and beam scatter) of these irradiators are typically unknown to the end user, which can lead to significant deviation between delivered dose and intended dose to cells that adversely impact experimental results. Therefore, the overarching goal of this research is to design and develop a robust and fully automated high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity investigations. Additionally, in vitro biological validation of this system was performed by assessing intracellular reactive oxygen species production, physical DNA double strand breaks, and activation of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. Finally, the high-throughput irradiator was used to investigate autophagic flux, a cellular adaptive response, as a potential biomarker of radiation sensitivity.

  18. Bayesian estimation of a source term of radiation release with approximately known nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek

    2016-04-01

    We are concerned with estimation of a source term in case of an accidental release from a known location, e.g. a power plant. Usually, the source term of an accidental release of radiation comprises of a mixture of nuclide. The gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition. However, physical properties of respective nuclide (deposition properties, decay half-life) can be used when uncertain information on nuclide ratios is available, e.g. from known reactor inventory. The proposed method is based on linear inverse model where the observation vector y arise as a linear combination y = Mx of a source-receptor-sensitivity (SRS) matrix M and the source term x. The task is to estimate the unknown source term x. The problem is ill-conditioned and further regularization is needed to obtain a reasonable solution. In this contribution, we assume that nuclide ratios of the release is known with some degree of uncertainty. This knowledge is used to form the prior covariance matrix of the source term x. Due to uncertainty in the ratios the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix are considered to be unknown. Positivity of the source term estimate is guaranteed by using multivariate truncated Gaussian distribution. Following Bayesian approach, we estimate all parameters of the model from the data so that y, M, and known ratios are the only inputs of the method. Since the inference of the model is intractable, we follow the Variational Bayes method yielding an iterative algorithm for estimation of all model parameters. Performance of the method is studied on simulated 6 hour power plant release where 3 nuclide are released and 2 nuclide ratios are approximately known. The comparison with method with unknown nuclide ratios will be given to prove the usefulness of the proposed approach. This research is supported by EEA/Norwegian Financial Mechanism under project MSMT-28477/2014 Source-Term Determination of Radionuclide Releases

  19. Sensitivity and uncertainty investigations for Hiroshima dose estimates and the applicability of the Little Boy mockup measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.; Cacuci, D.G.

    1983-09-13

    This paper describes sources of uncertainty in the data used for calculating dose estimates for the Hiroshima explosion and details a methodology for systematically obtaining best estimates and reduced uncertainties for the radiation doses received. (ACR)

  20. Radiatively important parameters best estimate (RIPBE) value-added product (VAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shippert,T.; Jensen,M.; McFarlane, S.; Mather, J.; Flynn, C.; Mlawer, E.; Delamere, J.; Oreopoulos, L.; Turner, D.; Xie, S.

    2010-03-15

    Currently, to calculate radiative heating rate profiles for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) product, radiatively important parameters (water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, aerosol properties, and cloud properties) from multiple VAPs and datastreams are combined into input text files that are then used to run the RRTM radiative transfer codes. These input parameters have different temporal and spatial scales and are difficult to extract from the text files to be used for other purposes such as running other radiative transfer codes, analyzing results, or error tracking. The purpose of the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP is to improve this process by creating a clearly identified set of inputs for BBHRP (and other radiation codes) on a uniform vertical and temporal grid. This process will decouple the input/output portion of the BBHRP from the core physics (the RRTM radiative transfer model) and will add error tracking and version information to the input data set. Critical parameters (which must exist for the radiation code to be run) will be designated; for other parameters, climatological or fixed values will be used when the preferred values are missing. This should increase the number of cases for which radiative transfer calculations can be run. In all cases, flags will clearly identify the source for each parameter. RIPBE will serve multiple functions: (1) it will provide a clearly identifiable set of inputs for BBHRP, (2) it will facilitate the use of BBHRP as a retrieval and radiation code development testbed by providing a vehicle for easily extracting and swapping input parameters needed to conduct radiative transfer calculations, and (3) it will be a complement to the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) VAP and will provide a significantly expanded set of parameters for model evaluation in a showcase data set form. At the ASR meeting, we will present examples and evaluation of the initial RIPBE dataset at SGP.

  1. Different growth sensitivity to enhanced UV-B radiation between male and female Populus cathayana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Zhao, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaolu; Hänninen, Heikki; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2010-12-01

    We investigated sex-related morphological and physiological responses to enhanced UV-B radiation in the dioecious species Populus cathayana Rehd. Cuttings were subjected to two UV-B radiation regimes: ambient (4.5 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) and enhanced (12.5 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) biologically effective UV-B radiation for one growing season. Enhanced UV-B radiation was found to significantly decrease the shoot height and basal diameter and to reduce the leaf area, dry matter accumulation, net photosynthesis rate (P(n)), chlorophyll a/b ratio (Chl a/b) and anthocyanin content. Enhanced UV-B radiation also increased chlorophyll pigment, leaf nitrogen, malondialdehyde and abscisic acid (ABA) content, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities and UV-B-absorbing compounds. No significant effects of enhanced UV-B radiation were found on biomass allocation, gas exchange (except for P(n)), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II or water use efficiency. Moreover, different sensitivity to enhanced UV-B radiation between males and females was detected. Under enhanced UV-B radiation, males exhibited significantly higher basal diameter and leaf nitrogen, and lower Chl a/b, ABA content, UV-B-absorbing compounds, as well as less decrement of leaf area and dry matter accumulation than did females. However, no significant sexual differences in these traits were found under ambient UV-B radiation. Our results suggest that males may possess a greater UV-B resistance than do females, with males having a more efficient antioxidant system and higher anthocyanin content to alleviate UV-B penetration stress than females.

  2. Mathematical modeling of cell proliferation dynamics in psoriatic epidermis sensitized by the furocoumarins under UVA radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, Pavel V.; Stolnitz, Mikhail M.

    1997-02-01

    In the work the mathematical model is presented which describes the processes in the epidermis sensitized by the furocoumarins under UVA-radiation. The model describes the processes at three levels: molecular (the photochemical transformations of the psoralen molecules and their reactions with the DNA-molecules), cellular (proliferation, differentiation and repairing of injuries), and tissue (humoral regulation, space-time cell dynamics in the epidermis). The results of the numerical simulations of both the latent period and psoriasis manifestation are given. The therapeutical effect of the UV-radiation is considered in the framework of the model.

  3. Aerosol types and radiative forcing estimates over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawar, Rohini L.; Lee, Woo-Seop; Rahul, P. R. C.

    2016-09-01

    Using the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data sets along with the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations, we analyzed the aerosol optical depth (AOD) variability during March-May (MAM), June-August (JJA) along with their annual mean variability over East Asia for the period 2006-2012. The CALIPSO measurements correlated well with the MODIS measurements and the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations over the spatial distribution patterns of the aerosols, but CALIPSO underestimated the magnitudes of the AOD. Maximum smoke aerosol loading is observed to occur during JJA, as a result of wind transport from Southern China while dust loading dominated during MAM via the transport from desert region. The vertical distribution profiles revealed that there is uniform distribution of smoke aerosols during both MAM and JJA, only differing at the altitude at which they peak; while the dust aerosols during MAM showed a significant distribution from the surface to 10 km altitude and JJA was marked with lower dust loading at the same altitudes. Both dust and smoke aerosols warm the atmosphere in MAM but due to the absorbing nature of smoke aerosols, they cause considerable cooling at the surface which is double when compared to the dust aerosols. The top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) due to smoke and dust aerosols is positive in MAM which indicates warming over East Asia. During MAM a consistent declining trend of the surface ARF due to smoke aerosols persisted over the last three decades as conspicuously evidenced from model analysis; the decline is ∼10 W/m2 from 1980 to 2012.

  4. Identification of Sensitive Serum microRNA Biomarkers for Radiation Biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Naduparambil Korah; Cooley, James V.; Yee, Tamara N.; Jacob, Jidhin; Alder, Hansjuerg; Wickramasinghe, Priyankara; Maclean, Kirsteen H.; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation through environmental, occupational or a nuclear reactor accident such as the recent Fukushima Daiichi incident often results in major consequences to human health. The injury caused by radiation can manifest as acute radiation syndromes within weeks in organs with proliferating cells such as hematopoietic and gastrointestinal systems. Cancers, fibrosis and degenerative diseases are also reported in organs with differentiated cells, months or years later. Studies conducted on atom bomb survivors, nuclear reactor workers and animal models have shown a direct correlation of these effects with the absorbed dose. Physical dosimeters and the available radio-responsive biologics in body fluids, whose responses are rather indirect, have limitations to accurately evaluate the extent of post exposure damage. We have used an amplification-free, hybridization based quantitative assay utilizing the nCounter multiplex platform developed by nanoString Technologies to compare the levels of over 600 miRNAs in serum from mice irradiated at a range of 1 to 12 Gy at 24 and 48 hr time points. Development of a novel normalization strategy using multiple spike-in oligonucleotides allowed accurate measurement of radiation dose and time dependent changes in serum miRNAs. The response of several evolutionarily conserved miRNAs abundant in serum, were found to be robust and sensitive in the dose range relevant for medical triage and in patients who receive total body radiation as preparative regimen for bone marrow transplantation. Notably, miRNA-150, abundant in lymphocytes, exhibited a dose and time dependent decrease in serum, which we propose as a sensitive marker indicative of lymphocyte depletion and bone marrow damage. Our study has identified several markers useful for evaluation of an individual’s response by minimally invasive methods, relevant to triage in case of a radiation accident and evaluation of toxicity and response during and after

  5. Rapamycin‐induced autophagy sensitizes A549 cells to radiation associated with DNA damage repair inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liu, Fen; Wang, Yong; Li, Donghai; Guo, Fei; Xu, Liyao; Zeng, Zhengguo; Zhong, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Autophagy has been reported to increase in cancer cells after radiation. However, it remains unknown whether increased autophagy as a result of radiation affects DNA damage repair and sensitizes cancer cells. In this study, the radiosensitization effect of rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that induces autophagy, on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was investigated. Methods A549 cells were treated with different concentrations of rapamycin. Cell viability was evaluated by methyl‐thiazolyl‐tetrazolium assay. Survival fraction values of A549 cells after radiotherapy were detected by colony formation assay. Autophagosome was observed by a transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, Western blot was employed to examine alterations in autophagy protein LC3 and p62, DNA damage protein γ–H2AX, and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80. Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels were examined by real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Rapamycin suppressed A549 cell proliferation in dose and time‐dependent manners. An inhibitory concentration (IC) 10 dose of rapamycin could induce autophagy in A549 cells. Rapamycin combined with radiation significantly decreased the colony forming ability of cells, compared with rapamycin or radiation alone. Rapamycin and radiation combined increased γ–H2AX expression levels and decreased Rad51 and Ku80 expression levels, compared with single regimens. However, rapamycin treatment did not induce any change in Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 mRNA levels, regardless of radiation. Conclusions These findings indicate that increasing autophagy sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation. PMID:27385978

  6. Sensitivity analysis of add-on price estimate for select silicon wafering technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    The cost of producing wafers from silicon ingots is a major component of the add-on price of silicon sheet. Economic analyses of the add-on price estimates and their sensitivity internal-diameter (ID) sawing, multiblade slurry (MBS) sawing and fixed-abrasive slicing technique (FAST) are presented. Interim price estimation guidelines (IPEG) are used for estimating a process add-on price. Sensitivity analysis of price is performed with respect to cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials (blade life) and utilities, and the production parameters such as slicing rate, slices per centimeter and process yield, using a computer program specifically developed to do sensitivity analysis with IPEG. The results aid in identifying the important cost parameters and assist in deciding the direction of technology development efforts.

  7. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; McIntosh, Dawn

    2000-01-01

    Ames researchers have combined measurements from satellite, aircraft, and the surface to estimate the effect of airborne particles (aerosols) on the solar radiation over the North Atlantic region. These aerosols (which come from both natural and pollution sources) can reflect solar radiation, causing a cooling effect that opposes the warming caused by carbon dioxide. Recently, increased attention has been paid to aerosol effects to better understand the Earth climate system.

  8. Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Pacific Warm Pool Estimated Using TOGA COARE Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zhao, Wenzhong

    1999-01-01

    The energy budget of the tropical western Pacific (TWP) is particularly important because this is one of the most energetic convection regions on the Earth. Nearly half of the solar radiation incident at the top of atmosphere is absorbed at the surface and only about 22% absorbed in the atmosphere. A large portion of the excess heat absorbed at the surface is transferred to the atmosphere through evaporation, which provides energy and water for convection and precipitation. The western equatorial Pacific is characterized by the highest sea surface temperature (SST) and heaviest rainfall in the world ocean. A small variation of SST associated with the eastward shift of the warm pool during El-Nino/Souther Oscillation changes the atmospheric circulation pattern and affects the global climate. In a study of the TWP surface heat and momentum fluxes during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) Intensive observing period (IOP) from November 1992 to February have found that the solar radiation is the most important component of the surface energy budget, which undergoes significant temporal and spatial variation. The variations are influenced by the two 40-50 days Madden Julian Oscillations (MJOs) which propagated eastward from the Indian Ocean to the Central Pacific during the IOP. The TWP surface solar radiation during the COARE IOP was investigated by a number of studies. In addition, the effects of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere in the TWP was studied using energy budget analysis. In this study, we present some results of the TWP surface solar shortwave or SW radiation budget and the effect of clouds on the atmospheric solar heating using the surface radiation measurements and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 4 radiance measurements during COARE IOP.

  9. Estimating daily net radiation in the FAO Penman-Monteith method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Facundo; Rivas, Raúl; Kruse, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we evaluate the procedures of the Manual No. 56 of the FAO (United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization) for predicting daily net radiation using measures collected in Tandil (Argentina) between March 2007 and June 2010. In addition, a new methodology is proposed for estimating daily net radiation over the reference crop considered in the FAO Penman-Monteith method. The calculated and observed values of daily net radiation are compared. Estimation errors are reduced from ±22 to ±12 W m-2 considering the new model. From spring-summer data, estimation errors of less than ±10 % were observed for the new physical model, which represents an error of just ±0.4 mm d-1 for computing reference evapotranspiration. The new model presented here is not restricted to a climate regime and is mainly appropriate for application in the FAO Penman-Monteith method to determine the reference crop evapotranspiration.

  10. A Temperature-Based Model for Estimating Monthly Average Daily Global Solar Radiation in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huashan; Cao, Fei; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS) method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model) against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China. PMID:24605046

  11. A temperature-based model for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Huashan; Cao, Fei; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS) method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model) against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China.

  12. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use change and sensitivity to snow and interannual albedo variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite-derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data were used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 58 ecoregions covering 69% of the conterminous United States. A net positive surface radiative forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.029 Wm−2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated. The forcings for individual ecoregions were similar in magnitude to current global forcing estimates, with the most negative forcing (as low as −0.367 Wm−2) due to the transition to forest and the most positive forcing (up to 0.337 Wm−2) due to the conversion to grass/shrub. Snow exacerbated both negative and positive forcing for LCLU transitions between snow-hiding and snow-revealing LCLU classes. The surface radiative forcing estimates were highly sensitive to snow-free interannual albedo variability that had a percent average monthly variation from 1.6% to 4.3% across the ecoregions. The results described in this paper enhance our understanding of contemporary LCLU change on surface radiative forcing and suggest that future forcing estimates should model snow and interannual albedo variation.

  13. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  14. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  15. Exploiting sensitization windows of opportunity in hyper and hypo-fractionated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Anish; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Coleman, C. Norman

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the conventional radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy paradigms used in the treatment of majority of cancer types, this review will describe two areas of radiobiology, hyperfractionated and hypofractionated radiation therapy, for cancer treatment focusing on application of novel concepts underlying these treatment modalities. The initial part of the review discusses the phenomenon of hyper-radiation sensitivity (HRS) at lower doses (0.1 to 0.6 Gy), describing the underlying mechanisms and how this could enhance the effects of chemotherapy, particularly, in hyperfractionated settings. The second part examines the radiobiological/physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of high-dose hypofractionated radiation therapy that can be exploited for tumor cure. These include abscopal/bystander effects, activation of immune system, endothelial cell death and effect of hypoxia with re-oxygenation. These biological properties along with targeted dose delivery and distribution to reduce normal tissue toxicity may make high-dose hypofractionation more effective than conventional radiation therapy for treatment of advanced cancers. The novel radiation physics based methods that take into consideration the tumor volume to be irradiated and normal tissue avoidance/tolerance can further improve treatment outcome and post-treatment quality of life. In conclusion, there is enough evidence to further explore novel avenues to exploit biological mechanisms from hyper-fractionation by enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy and hypo-fractionated radiation therapy that could enhance tumor control and use imaging and technological advances to reduce toxicity. PMID:24688774

  16. Sensitivity estimation for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks in the presence of extrinsic variability.

    PubMed

    Ruess, Jakob; Koeppl, Heinz; Zechner, Christoph

    2017-03-28

    Determining the sensitivity of certain system states or outputs to variations in parameters facilitates our understanding of the inner working of that system and is an essential design tool for the de novo construction of robust systems. In cell biology, the output of interest is often the response of a certain reaction network to some input (e.g., stressors or nutrients) and one aims to quantify the sensitivity of this response in the presence of parameter heterogeneity. We argue that for such applications, parametric sensitivities in their standard form do not paint a complete picture of a system's robustness since one assumes that all cells in the population have the same parameters and are perturbed in the same way. Here, we consider stochasticreaction networks in which the parameters are randomly distributed over the population and propose a new sensitivity index that captures the robustness of system outputs upon changes in the characteristics of the parameter distribution, rather than the parameters themselves. Subsequently, we make use of Girsanov's likelihood ratio method to construct a Monte Carlo estimator of this sensitivity index. However, it turns out that this estimator has an exceedingly large variance. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel estimation algorithm that makes use of a marginalization of the path distribution of stochasticreaction networks and leads to Rao-Blackwellized estimators with reduced variance.

  17. Estimate of Space Radiation-Induced Cancer Risks for International Space Station Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Atwell, William; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yang, Chui-hsu

    1996-01-01

    Excess cancer risks from exposures to space radiation are estimated for various orbits of the International Space Station (ISS). Organ exposures are computed with the transport codes, BRYNTRN and HZETRN, and the computerized anatomical male and computerized anatomical female models. Cancer risk coefficients in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements report No. 98 are used to generate lifetime excess cancer incidence and cancer mortality after a one-month mission to ISS. The generated data are tabulated to serve as a quick reference for assessment of radiation risk to astronauts on ISS missions.

  18. Estimation of radiation characteristics of circular microstrip antenna in weakly ionized plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Pramod

    2010-02-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of circular microstrip antenna in weakly ionized plasma medium using the concept of vector magnetic potential, the expression for electric field and magnetic field has been obtained. Attempt has also been made to obtain the radiation resistance, trans-conductance and power radiated from the antenna. Particular emphasis has been given to estimate the effects of weakly ionized plasma medium on the directivity of antenna. It has been found that radiation characteristics and directivity of antenna affected sincerely by the weakly ionized plasma medium.

  19. Radiation damage estimation in the Al-alloy cladding of the MNSR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukieh, M.; Ghazi, N.

    2014-06-01

    The radiation damage rates in the Al-303-1-alloy cladding of the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor reactor has been numerically estimated with the The MCNP-4C and NJOY93 codes and the ENDF/B-VI library. The calculations showed that the Al-cladding alloy had received a maximum radiation damage rate equal to 7.01×10-9 (dpa/s). The total damage and helium production rates in the Al-cladding alloy were 0.13 (dpa) and 1.01×10-2 (appm, He), respectively. The contribution of the fast neutrons in the radiation damage was most effective.

  20. Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE): An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Shippert, T; Mather, J

    2011-06-30

    The Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to create a complete set of clearly identified set of parameters on a uniform vertical and temporal grid to use as input to a radiative transfer model. One of the main drivers for RIPBE was as input to the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP, but we also envision using RIPBE files for user-run radiative transfer codes, as part of cloud/aerosol retrieval testbeds, and as input to averaged datastreams for model evaluation.

  1. Estimate of Space Radiation-Induced Cancer Risks for International Space Station Orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Yang, C.

    1996-03-01

    Excess cancer risks from exposures to space radiation are estimated for various orbits of the International Space Station (ISS). Organ exposures are computed with the transport codes, BRYNTRN and HZETRN, and the computerized anatomical male and computerized anatomical female models. Cancer risk coefficients in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements report No. 98 are used to generate lifetime excess cancer incidence and cancer mortality after a one-month mission to ISS. The generated data are tabulated to serve as a quick reference for assessment of radiation risk to astronauts on ISS missions.

  2. Estimation of organ dose equivalents from residents of radiation-contaminated buildings with Rando phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Dong, S L; Wu, T H

    1999-05-01

    Since August 1996, a dose reconstruction model has been conducted with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-embedded chains, belts and badges for external dose measurements on the residents in radiation-contaminated buildings. The TLD dosimeters, worn on the front of the torso, would not be adequate for dose measurement in cases when the radiation is anisotropic or the incident angles of radiation sources are not directed in the front-to-back direction. The shielding and attenuation by the body would result in the dose equivalent estimation being somewhat skewed. An organ dose estimation method with a Rando phantom under various exposure geometries is proposed. The conversion factors, obtained from the phantom study, may be applicable to organ dose estimations for residents in the contaminated buildings if the incident angles correspond to the phantom simulation results. There is a great demand for developing a mathematical model or Monte Carlo calculation to deal with complicated indoor layout geometry problems involving ionizing radiation. Further research should be directed toward conducting laboratory simulation by investigating the relationship between doses delivered from multiple radiation sources. It is also necessary to collaborate with experimental biological dosimetry, such as chromosome aberration analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and retrospective ESR-dosimetry with teeth, applied to the residents, so that the organ dose equivalent estimations may be more reliable for radio-epidemiological studies.

  3. Radiation-sensitive indicator based on radiation-chemical formation of acids in polyvinyl butyral films containing chloral hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Atef A.; El-Kelany, M.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation-sensitive indicators based on dyed polyvinyl butyral (PVB) containing acid-sensitive dye (bromophenol blue, BPB) and chloral hydrate (CCl 3CH(OH) 2, 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1, 1-diol) have been developed. These plastic film dosimeters undergo colour change from blue (the alkaline form of BPB) to yellow (the acidic form of BPB), indicating acid formation. The concentration of radiation-formed acids in the films containing different concentrations of chloral hydrate was calculated at different doses. The kinetics of the acid-formation reaction is discussed, indicating a half-order reaction with respect to chloral hydrate concentration. These films can be used as dosimeters for food irradiation applications where the maxima of the useful dose ranges are between 1 and 4 kGy depending on chloral hydrate concentration in the film. The response of these films depends on temperature during irradiation; therefore a correction should be applied. These films have the advantage of negligible humidity effects on response in the intermediate range of relative humidity from 10 to 70% as well as good post-irradiation stability when stored in the dark at room temperature.

  4. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzler, B.G. ); Borowski, S.K. . Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Best-estimate LOCA radiation signature for equipment qualification. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, N.A.; Bonzon, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation aspect of reactor equipment qualification depends on a knowledge of the appropriate source term. An attempt has been made to define a realistic radiation source corresponding to the loss-of-coolant accident. This best-estimate source is based on available fission product release data from damaged fuel during an unterminated LOCA as described in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). Energy release rates as a function of time have been calculated for both betas and gamma rays. The results are significantly different from the sources specified in Regulatory Guide 1.89. Spectra corresponding to the best-estimate source have also been computed at selected cooling times.

  6. The role of DNA polymerase β in determining sensitivity to ionizing radiation in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vens, Conchita; Dahmen-Mooren, Els; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; Blyweert, Wim; Graversen, Lise; Bartelink, Harry; Begg, Adrian C.

    2002-01-01

    Lethal lesions after ionizing radiation are thought to be mainly unrepaired or misrepaired DNA double-strand breaks, ultimately leading to lethal chromosome aberrations. However, studies with radioprotectors and repair inhibitors indicate that single-strand breaks, damaged nucleotides or abasic sites can also influence cell survival. This paper reports on studies to further define the role of base damage and base excision repair on the radiosensitivity of human cells. We retrovirally transduced human tumor cells with a dominant negative form of DNA polymerase β, comprising the 14 kDa DNA-binding domain of DNA polymerase β but lacking polymerase function. Radiosensitization of two human carcinoma cell lines, A549 and SQD9, was observed, achieving dose enhancement factors of 1.5–1.7. Sensitization was dependent on expression level of the dominant negative and was seen in both single cell clones and in unselected virally transduced populations. Sensitization was not due to changes in cell cycle distribution. Little or no sensitization was seen in G1-enriched populations, indicating cell cycle specificity for the observed sensitization. These results contrast with the lack of effect seen in DNA polymerase β knockout cells, suggesting that polDN also inhibits the long patch, DNA polymerase β-independent repair pathway. These data demonstrate an important role for BER in determining sensitivity to ionizing radiation and might help identify targets for radiosensitizing tumor cells. PMID:12087186

  7. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  8. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  9. Estimation of shortwave radiation using MODIS products under all sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, K.; Kang, S.

    2010-12-01

    Shortwave radiation (Rs) is one of key components in the surface energy budget and is vitally important for climate study and many other applications such as hydrological modeling, climate monitoring, weather prediction, agricultural meteorology and air-sea-ice interaction study. The accurate monitoring of Rs is a fundamental process in various meteorological and ecological studies including estimations of net radiation, evapotranspiration, and vegetation productivity. Among numerous methods for estimating Rs, satellite remote sensing data such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradometer (MODIS) offers a promising technique for estimating Rs with 1-km pixel resolution and is useful to monitor regional or global energy balance and land surface biophysical processes. But it is hampered by frequent cloud contamination. The missing data due to cloud contamination in some pixels identified as a major factor contributing to the low retrieval rate of Rs. The objective of this study, therefore, is estimation of Rs using MODIS atmosphere and land products under clear and cloudy sky conditions. Under clear sky condition, Rs is estimated using a combination of MODIS04, MODIS06, MODIS07, and MODIS43 products. To estimate Rs under cloudy sky condition, MODIS06 cloud product and MODIS04 aerosol product are utilized. Incoming shortwave radiation (Rsd) is estimated by using cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness with potential clear sky shortwave radiation, which can be calculated by using atmospheric transmittance and extraterrestrial shortwave radiation. Outgoing shortwave radiation (Rsup) is calculated by applying MODIS43 albedo data to the Rsd. Incoming shortwave radiation derived from MODIS products for cloudy condition is validated by both 22 National Weather Stations (NWS), which showed good agreements. Also we compared MODIS-based Rsd and Rsup with two flux tower observations for 2006 in Korea. The results showed good accuracy with +12.60 (112.81) W m-2 of bias

  10. Sensitivity of ground - water recharge estimates to climate variability and change, Columbia Plateau, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, John J.

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of groundwater recharge estimates was investigated for the semiarid Ellensburg basin, located on the Columbia Plateau, Washington, to historic and projected climatic regimes. Recharge was estimated for predevelopment and current (1980s) land use conditions using a daily energy-soil-water balance model. A synthetic daily weather generator was used to simulate lengthy sequences with parameters estimated from subsets of the historical record that were unusually wet and unusually dry. Comparison of recharge estimates corresponding to relatively wet and dry periods showed that recharge for predevelopment land use varies considerably within the range of climatic conditions observed in the 87-year historical observation period. Recharge variations for present land use conditions were less sensitive to the same range of historical climatic conditions because of irrigation. The estimated recharge based on the 87-year historical climatology was compared with adjustments to the historical precipitation and temperature records for the same record to reflect CO2-doubling climates as projected by general circulation models (GCMs). Two GCM scenarios were considered: an average of conditions for three different GCMs with CO2 doubling, and a most severe “maximum” case. For the average GCM scenario, predevelopment recharge increased, and current recharge decreased. Also considered was the sensitivity of recharge to the variability of climate within the historical and adjusted historical records. Predevelopment and current recharge were less and more sensitive, respectively, to the climate variability for the average GCM scenario as compared to the variability within the historical record. For the maximum GCM scenario, recharge for both predevelopment and current land use decreased, and the sensitivity to the CO2-related climate change was larger than sensitivity to the variability in the historical and adjusted historical climate records.

  11. Evaluation of simple model for net radiation estimates above various vegetation covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of submitted study was to calibrate and verify the simple model for net radiation (Rn) estimates during the growing periods of selected agricultural crops. In the same time the soil heat flux (G) measurements were analysed. The model needs incoming solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure measurements and information about albedo as input. The net radiation is determined as difference between the incoming net shortwave radiation (Rns) and the outgoing net longwave radiation (Rnl). The Rns is estimated from incoming solar radiation using albedo. The Rnl is estimated from daily maximum and minimum temperature, vapour pressure, incoming solar radiation and derived clear-sky radiation. The accuracy of the model was assessed on the basis of radiation balance measurements (by Net radiometer Schenk 8110) at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (i.e. Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. The parameter G was measured by Hukseflux Thermal Sensor HFP01. For the purpose of mentioned analyses the measurements were conducted during the growing season of spring barley, winter wheat, winter rape, grass, poplars and above field after harvest of cereals (after/without tillage). These covers are very common type of surface within agricultural landscape in Central Europe. The enhanced method of Rn and G estimation were then used for the SoilClim model runs. The present version of SoilClim uses very simple algorithm for radiation balance and should be modified to be closer to reality. Namely the estimates of reference evapotranspiration (ETo), actual evapotranspiration (ETa) and soil water content could be substantially improved by this way. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of

  12. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.

    2015-09-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (all anthropogenic, biomass burning and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. On the global scale, our results show that land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ~ 9 %. At the regional scale, plant productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols, in regions where complex canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Europe, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +8-12 % on an annual average, with a stronger increase during the growing season (> 12 %). In the Amazon basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the Amazon basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). In Europe and China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on the annual average. Anthropogenic aerosols affect land carbon fluxes via different mechanisms and we suggest that the dominant mechanism varies across regions: (1) light scattering dominates in the eastern US; (2) cooling in the Amazon basin; and (3) reduction in direct radiation in Europe and China.

  13. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Charon, N W

    1988-01-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10, and 1% survival were determined for representative serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay, L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species. PMID:3132098

  14. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, L.V.; Charon, N.W.

    1988-03-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10 and 1% survival were determined for representive serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay., L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species.

  15. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  16. Exploiting the power law distribution properties of satellite fire radiative power retrievals: A method to estimate fire radiative energy and biomass burned from sparse satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. S.; Roy, D. P.; Boschetti, L.; Kremens, R.

    2011-10-01

    Instantaneous estimates of the power released by fire (fire radiative power, FRP) are available with satellite active fire detection products. The temporal integral of FRP provides an estimate of the fire radiative energy (FRE) that is related linearly to the amount of biomass burned needed by the atmospheric emissions modeling community. The FRE, however, is sensitive to satellite temporal and spatial FRP undersampling due to infrequent satellite overpasses, cloud and smoke obscuration, and failure to detect cool and/or small fires. Satellite FRPs derived over individual burned areas and fires have been observed to exhibit power law distributions. This property is exploited to develop a new way to derive FRE, as the product of the fire duration and the expected FRP value derived from the FRP power law probability distribution function. The method is demonstrated and validated by the use of FRP data measured with a dual-band radiometer over prescribed fires in the United States and by the use of FRP data retrieved from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) active-fire detections over Brazilian deforestation and Australian savanna fires. The biomass burned derived using the conventional FRP temporal integration and power law FRE estimation methods is compared with biomass burned measurements (prescribed fires) and available fuel load information reported in the literature (Australian and Brazilian fires). The results indicate that the FRE power law derivation method may provide more reliable burned biomass estimates under sparse satellite FRP sampling conditions and correct for satellite active-fire detection omission errors if the FRP power law distribution parameters and the fire duration are known.

  17. Dependence of diode sensitivity on the pulse rate of delivered radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that diode sensitivity decreases by as much as 2% when the average dose rate set at the accelerator console was decreased from 600 to 40 MU/min. No explanation was given for this effect in earlier publications. This work is a detailed investigation of this phenomenon: the change of diode sensitivity versus the rate of delivery of dose pulses in the milliseconds and seconds range. Methods: X-ray beams used in this work had nominal energies of 6 and 15 MV and were generated by linear accelerators. The average dose rate was varied from 25 to 600 MU/min, which corresponded to time between microsecond-long dose pulses of 60-2.7 ms, respectively. The dose-per-pulse, dpp, was changed by positioning the detector at different source-to-detector distance. A variety of diodes fabricated by a number of manufacturers were tested in this work. Also, diodes in three different MapCHECKs (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were tested. Results: For all diodes tested, the diode sensitivity decreases as the average dose rate is decreased, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period, the time between radiation pulses. A sensitivity decrease as large as 5% is observed for a 60-ms pulse period. The diode sensitivity versus the pulse period is modeled by an empirical exponential function. This function has a fitting parameter, t{sub eff}, defined as the effective lifetime. The values of t{sub eff} were found to be 1.0-14 s, among the various diodes. For all diodes tested, t{sub eff} decreases as the dpp decreases and is greater for 15 MV than for 6 MV x rays. The decrease in diode sensitivity after 20 s without radiation can be reversed by as few as 60 radiation pulses. Conclusions: A decrease in diode sensitivity occurs with a decrease in the average dose rate, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period of radiation. The sensitivity decrease is modeled by an empirical exponential function that decreases with an effective lifetime, t{sub eff}, of

  18. Estimation of available global solar radiation using sunshine duration over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amrita; Park, Jin-ki; Park, Jong-hwa

    2015-11-01

    Besides designing a solar energy system, accurate insolation data is also a key component for many biological and atmospheric studies. But solar radiation stations are not widely available due to financial and technical limitations; this insufficient number affects the spatial resolution whenever an attempt is made to construct a solar radiation map. There are several models in literature for estimating incoming solar radiation using sunshine fraction. Seventeen of such models among which 6 are linear and 11 non-linear, have been chosen for studying and estimating solar radiation on a horizontal surface over South Korea. The better performance of a non-linear model signifies the fact that the relationship between sunshine duration and clearness index does not follow a straight line. With such a model solar radiation over 79 stations measuring sunshine duration is computed and used as input for spatial interpolation. Finally monthly solar radiation maps are constructed using the Ordinary Kriging method. The cross validation results show good agreement between observed and predicted data.

  19. Confidence interval estimation for sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity for combined biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lili

    2013-05-01

    In diagnostic studies, we often need to combine several biomarkers to increase the diagnostic accuracy. For continuous-scaled biomarkers or diagnostic tests, it is often of interest to estimate the confidence interval for sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity. Despite the fact that there exist many literature reports on confidence interval estimation of sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity for a single marker, the inference procedures for sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity for combined markers have rarely been addressed. This article fills this gap by investigating a generalized variable procedure for this purpose. The performance of the proposed generalized approach is numerically studied. For the optimal linear combination proposed by Su and Liu ( 1993 ), simulation study demonstrates that the proposed approach generally can provide confidence intervals with excellent coverage probabilities. The robustness of the proposed approach is investigated for categorical data. In the end, the proposed approach is applied to a real-life data set.

  20. Accelerated regularized estimation of MR coil sensitivities using augmented Lagrangian methods.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael J; Ramani, Sathish; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    Several magnetic resonance parallel imaging techniques require explicit estimates of the receive coil sensitivity profiles. These estimates must be accurate over both the object and its surrounding regions to avoid generating artifacts in the reconstructed images. Regularized estimation methods that involve minimizing a cost function containing both a data-fit term and a regularization term provide robust sensitivity estimates. However, these methods can be computationally expensive when dealing with large problems. In this paper, we propose an iterative algorithm based on variable splitting and the augmented Lagrangian method that estimates the coil sensitivity profile by minimizing a quadratic cost function. Our method, ADMM-Circ, reformulates the finite differencing matrix in the regularization term to enable exact alternating minimization steps. We also present a faster variant of this algorithm using intermediate updating of the associated Lagrange multipliers. Numerical experiments with simulated and real data sets indicate that our proposed method converges approximately twice as fast as the preconditioned conjugate gradient method over the entire field-of-view. These concepts may accelerate other quadratic optimization problems.

  1. Estimates of Carrington-class solar particle event radiation exposures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Pourarsalan, M.; Hall, M. I.; Anderson, J. A.; Bhatt, S.; Delauder, N.; Adamczyk, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    Radiation exposure estimates for crew members on the surface of Mars are made for solar particle event proton radiation environments comparable to the Carrington event of 1859. We assume that the proton energy distributions for these Carrington-type events are similar to those measured for other, more recent large events. The fluence levels of these hypothetical events are normalized to the value for the Carrington event, as reported from measurements in ice core data. In this work, we use the BRYNTRN radiation transport code, originally developed at NASA Langley Research Center, and the Computerized Anatomical Male and Female human geometry models to estimate exposures for aluminum shield areal densities similar to those provided by a spacesuit, a surface lander, and a permanent habitat located at various altitudes in the Mars atmosphere. Comparisons of the predicted organ exposures with current NASA Permissible Exposure Limits are made.

  2. Deconvolution estimation theory applied to Nimbus 6 ERB data. [Earth Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    It is pointed out that the ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) Experiment aboard the Nimbus 6 spacecraft has provided nearly 3 years of data thus far from its wide field of view (WFOV) radiometers. Each data point is an integral of the irradiance from all points within the field of view of the WFOV sensor, which is an approximately 60 deg diameter circular region on the earth. House (1972) proposed that the data, being a convolution of the flux field at the top of the atmosphere, could be convoluted so as to enhance the resolution. The problem was solved by Smith and Green (1975-76) for the case of earth emitted radiation. A parameter estimation approach to the deconvolution problem was formulated. A description is presented of the deconvolution estimation concept and the results obtained by its application to the Nimbus 6 ERB WFOV data for earth emitted radiation for August 1975.

  3. Semianalytical estimates of scattering thresholds and gravitational radiation in ultrarelativistic black hole encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Hinderer, Tanja; Lemos, Madalena; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-05-15

    Ultrarelativistic collisions of black holes are ideal gedanken experiments to study the nonlinearities of general relativity. In this paper we use semianalytical tools to better understand the nature of these collisions and the emitted gravitational radiation. We explain many features of the energy spectra extracted from numerical relativity simulations using two complementary semianalytical calculations. In the first calculation we estimate the radiation by a 'zero-frequency limit' analysis of the collision of two point particles with finite impact parameter. In the second calculation we replace one of the black holes by a point particle plunging with arbitrary energy and impact parameter into a Schwarzschild black hole, and we explore the multipolar structure of the radiation paying particular attention to the near-critical regime. We also use a geodesic analogy to provide qualitative estimates of the dependence of the scattering threshold on the black hole spin and on the dimensionality of the spacetime.

  4. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at mid-latitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30â€"50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  5. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  6. A Method for Estimating the Probability of Floating Gate Prompt Charge Loss in a Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Since advancing technology has been producing smaller structures in electronic circuits, the floating gates in modern flash memories are becoming susceptible to prompt charge loss from ionizing radiation environments found in space. A method for estimating the risk of a charge-loss event is given.

  7. A Method for Estimating the Probability of Floating Gate Prompt Charge Loss in a Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Because advancing technology has been producing smaller structures in electronic circuits, the floating gates in modern flash memories are becoming susceptible to prompt charge loss from ionizing radiation environments found in space. A method for estimating the risk of a charge-loss event is given.

  8. Evaluation of Multispectral Based Radiative Transfer Model Inversion to Estimate Leaf Area Index in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a critical variable for predicting the growth and productivity of crops. Remote sensing estimates of LAI have relied upon empirical relationships between spectral vegetation indices and ground measurements that are costly to obtain. Radiative transfer model inversion based o...

  9. Estimating crop biophysical properties from remote sensing data by inverting linked radiative transfer and ecophysiological models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing technology can rapidly provide spatial information on crop growth status, which ideally could be used to invert radiative transfer models or ecophysiological models for estimating a variety of crop biophysical properties. However, the outcome of the model inversion procedure will be ...

  10. Photosynthetically active radiation and comparison of methods for its estimation in equatorial Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Puay Yok; Ismail, Mirza Rifqi Bin

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important input variable for urban climate, crop modelling and ecosystem services studies. Despite its importance, only a few empirical studies have been conducted on PAR, its relationship to global solar radiation and sky conditions and its estimation in the tropics. We report in this study, the characterisation of PAR in Singapore through direct measurements and development of models for its estimation using input variables of global solar radiation ( H), photometric radiation ( L), clearness index ( k t ) and sky view factor (SVF). Daily PAR showed a good correlation with daily H and had a comparatively small seasonal variation in PAR due to Singapore's equatorial position. The ratio of PAR to H ( PAR/ H) showed a slight depression in midyear from May to August, which correlated well with seasonal patterns in rainfall over the study period. Hourly PAR/ H increased throughout the day. Three empirical models developed in this study were able to predict daily PAR satisfactorily, with the most accurate model being one which included both H and k t as independent variables. A regression model for estimation of PAR under shaded conditions using SVF produced satisfactory estimation of daily PAR but was prone to high mean percentage error at low PAR levels.

  11. Sensitivity analysis for leaf area index (LAI) estimation from CHRIS/PROBA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Gu, Zhujun; Xu, Jianhua; Duan, Yushan; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Yongjuan; Li, Dongliang

    2014-09-01

    Sensitivity analyses were conducted for the retrieval of vegetation leaf area index (LAI) from multiangular imageries in this study. Five spectral vegetation indices (VIs) were derived from Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Project for On Board Autonomy (CHRIS/PROBA) images, and were related to LAI, acquired from in situ measurement in Jiangxi Province, China, for five vegetation communities. The sensitivity of LAI retrieval to the variation of VIs from different observation angles was evaluated using the ratio of the slope of the best-fit linear VI-LAI model to its root mean squared error. Results show that both the sensitivity and reliability of VI-LAI models are influenced by the heterogeneity of vegetation communities, and that performance of vegetation indices in LAI estimation varies along observation angles. The VI-LAI models are more reliable for tall trees than for low growing shrub-grasses and also for forests with broad leaf trees than for coniferous forest. The greater the tree height and leaf size, the higher the sensitivity. Forests with broad-leaf trees have higher sensitivities, especially at oblique angles, while relatively simple-structured coniferous forests, shrubs, and grasses show similar sensitivities at all angles. The multi-angular soil and/or atmospheric parameter adjustments will hopefully improve the performance of VIs in LAI estimation, which will require further investigation.

  12. Development of an in vitro method to estimate the sensitization induction level of contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Marinovich, Marina; Gibbs, Sue; Roggen, Erwin; Corsini, Emanuela

    2017-04-05

    No standardized in vitro methods to assess potency of skin sensitizers are available. Recently, we standardized a procedure which combines the epidermal equivalent potency assay with assessment of IL-18 to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizers. This current study aimed to extend tested chemicals, and to provide a simple in vitro method for estimation of the expected sensitization induction level interpolating in vitro EC50 and IL-18 SI2 values to predict LLNA EC3 and/or human NOEL from standards curves generated using reference contact allergens. Reconstituted human epidermis was challenged with 14 chemicals not previously tested benzoquinone, chlorpromazine, chloramine T, benzyl salicylate, diethyl maleate, dihydroeugenol, 2,4-dichloronitrobenzene, benzyl cinnamate, imidazolidinyl urea, and limonene as contact sensitizers while benzyl alcohol, isopropanol, dimethyl isophthalate and 4-aminobenzoic acid as non-sensitizers in the LLNA. Where for benzyl salicylate and benzyl cinnamate no sensitization was observed in human predictive studies, positive responses to benzyl alcohol and dimethyl isophthalate were reported. The proposed method correlates better with human data, correctly predicting substances incorrectly classified by LLNA. With the exception of benzoquinone (interference with both MTT and IL-18 ELISA), and chloramine T (underestimated in the interpolation), a good estimation of LLNA EC3 and in vivo available human NOEL values was obtained.

  13. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably

  14. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis to Burnup Estimates on ADS using the ACAB Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Embid, M.; Alvarez, F.; Reyes, S.

    2005-05-24

    Within the scope of the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concept for nuclear waste management applications, the burnup uncertainty estimates due to uncertainty in the activation cross sections (XSs) are important regarding both the safety and the efficiency of the waste burning process. We have applied both sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo methodology to actinides burnup calculations in a lead-bismuth cooled subcritical ADS. The sensitivity analysis is used to identify the reaction XSs and the dominant chains that contribute most significantly to the uncertainty. The Monte Carlo methodology gives the burnup uncertainty estimates due to the synergetic/global effect of the complete set of XS uncertainties. These uncertainty estimates are valuable to assess the need of any experimental or systematic re-evaluation of some uncertainty XSs for ADS.

  15. Depolarization ratio, SNR estimation, and polarization sensitivity analysis for a commercial Raman depolarization lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdikos, George; Georgoussis, George

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the estimation of the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating in UK, and also, we perform a basic lidar polarization sensitivity analysis. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and prove that such system is able to detect volcanic ash detection over a range of 20 km. We also assess the lidar polarization sensitivity and then, we estimate the linear depolarization ratio. By careful choice of the optical components (emitting and receiving optics), it has been shown that uncertainties of polarization states at receiver (and thus too depolarization ratio estimation) can be much reduced.

  16. New estimates of Earth System vs. Chaney sensitivity from the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, D. J.; Haywood, A. M.; Valdes, P. J.; Dowsett, H. J.; PlioMIP Team

    2011-12-01

    Here we describe new insights into the relationship between Earth system and Charney sensitivity, focusing on two time periods in the Cenozoic - the mid-Pliocene and the Early Eocene. The Pliocene has proven to be a useful time period for investigating Earth system sensitivity (ESS) and its relationship to Charney sensitivity (CS) (Lunt et al, 2010, Pagani et al, 2010). This is due to the existence of relatively strong constraints on the forcings and response from the proxy record at this time, and a history of concerted modelling effort to understand the climate. Furthermore, its similarity to the present in terms of paleogeography means that estimates of ESS derived from the Pliocene have potential relevance to informing future greenhouse gas stabilisation targets. Our previous work, based on a combined modelling and data approach (Lunt et al, 2010) indicated ESS to be 45% greater than CS. Since then, two advances have meant that this early estimate can be re-assessed: (1) New reconstructions of mid-Pliocene vegetation, ice sheet geometry, and topography, produced in the framework of the USGS PRISM project, have a significant effect on modelled estimates of mid-Pliocene climate, and therefore ESS estimates. (2) The launch of the PlioMIP project, an international collaboration consisting of a dozen modelling groups all carrying out Pliocene simulations, means that estimates of ESS are being produced by an ensemble of models, as opposed to just one. Here, we present results from the PlioMIP project, which incorporate the latest PRISM Pliocene reconstructions. Our results show Earth system sensitivity to be greater than we previously estimated, and 65% greater than Charney sensitivity. This increased estimate in ESS is due primarily to the re-assessment of Pliocene topography, which means that more of the mid-Pliocene temperature signal is attributable to CO2 forcing. The Early Eocene provides an opportunity to study ESS in a high-CO2, largely ice-free world

  17. Estimation of daily global solar radiation as a function of routine meteorological data in Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Francisco Javier; Yebra, María Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Solar radiation is the main responsible of many processes of the biophysical environment. Temperature changes, snow melt dynamics, carbon sequestration, evaporation from soils, plants, and open water bodies are explained by the amount of radiation received in a surface. Lack of direct observations and insufficient record length limit the ability to use global solar radiation information for resource use management and planning. Based on the general equation of Bristow and Campbell, we propose a modification that allows us to better represent atmospheric transmissivity as a function of routine meteorological variables and improve estimates of global solar radiation in Mediterranean and semi arid areas. The improved Bristow-Campbell model (IBC) is easy to use in any location where measurements of temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity are available, and present a simple solution that can be used as proxy for relative humidity in case that variable is not been measured.

  18. Possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone by a radiosonde equipped with two temperature sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaoka, T.; Sumi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitiveness of white coated thermistor sensors and non-sensitiveness of the gold coated over white thermistor sensors (which have been manufactured by a vacuum evaporation process) to long wave radiation were ascertained by some simple experiments in-room and also by analyses of some results of experimental soundings. From results of analyses on the temperature discrepancies caused by long wave radiation, the possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone partial pressure by a radiosonde equipped with two kinds of sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation was suggested, and the test results of the newly developed software for the deduction of ozone partial pressure in upper layers was also shown. However, it was found that the following is the necessary condition to realize the purpose. The sounding should be made by a radiosonde equipped with three sensors, instead of two, one being non-sensitive to the long wave radiation perfectly, and the other two also non-sensitive partially to the downward one, with two different angles of exposure upward. It is essential for the realization of the purpose to get two different values of temperature discrepancies simultaneously observed by the three sensors mentioned above and to avoid the troublesome effects of the upward long wave radiation.

  19. Selective Fragmentation of Radiation-Sensitive Novel Polymeric Resist Materials by Inner-Shell Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Gabriela Ramos; Satyanarayana, Vardhineedi Sri Venkata; Kessler, Felipe; Belmonte, Guilherme Kretzmann; Gonsalves, Kenneth E; Weibel, Daniel Eduardo

    2015-08-05

    Two key concepts in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) are important for it to be a candidate for the mass production of future integrated circuits: the polymer formulation and the photofragmentation process. In this work, both concepts were carefully studied. The design and synthesis of radiation-sensitive organic polymeric materials based on the inclusion of a radiation-sensitive tetrahydrothiophenium functional group are outlined. A 1-(4-methacryloyoxy)naphthalene-1-yl)tetrahydro-1H-thiophenium trifluoromethanesulfonate (MANTMS) monomer containing the tetrahydrothiophenium group undergoes homo- and copolymerizations using free-radical polymerization with a 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) initiator. The surface photodegradation and oxidation of these novel polymeric materials were investigated using highly monochromatized soft X-rays from synchrotron radiation at the carbon K-edge excitation region. An efficient functionalization was observed when the excitation energy was tuned to C 1s → π*C═C. A high rate of defluorination and a loss of sulfonated groups as a result of an increase in the irradiation time for the MANTMS homopolymer thin films were mainly observed under the π*C═C excitation of the naphthyl functional groups. On the contrary, excitation similar to C 1s → π*C═O or C 1s → σ*C-F did not produce important degradation, showing a highly selective process of bond breaking. Additionally, the presence of methyl methacrylate copolymer in the original MANTMS yielded a much higher degree of stability against inner-shell radiation damage. Our results highlight the importance of choosing the right polymer formulation and excitation energy to produce a sensitive material for EUVL without using the concept of chemical amplification.

  20. Effectiveness of stratospheric solar-radiation management as a function of climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine L.; Rowlands, Daniel J.; Ingram, William J.; Keith, David W.; Granger Morgan, M.

    2012-02-01

    If implementation of proposals to engineer the climate through solar-radiation management (SRM) ever occurs, it is likely to be contingent on climate sensitivity. However, modelling studies examining the effectiveness of SRM as a strategy to offset anthropogenic climate change have used only the standard parameterizations of atmosphere-ocean general circulation models that yield climate sensitivities close to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project mean. Here, we use a perturbed-physics ensemble modelling experiment to examine how the response of the climate to SRM implemented in the stratosphere (SRM-S) varies under different greenhouse-gas climate sensitivities. When SRM-S is used to compensate for rising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, its effectiveness in stabilizing regional climates diminishes with increasing climate sensitivity. However, the potential of SRM-S to slow down unmitigated climate change, even regionally, increases with climate sensitivity. On average, in variants of the model with higher sensitivity, SRM-S reduces regional rates of temperature change by more than 90% and rates of precipitation change by more than 50%.

  1. Estimating scattered and absorbed radiation in plant canopies by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, G. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    Several research avenues are summarized. The relationships of canopy characteristics to multispectral reflectance factors of vegetation are reviewed. Several alternative approaches for incorporating spectrally derived information into plant models are discussed, using corn as the main example. A method is described and evaluated whereby a leaf area index is estimated from measurements of radiation transmitted through plant canopies, using soybeans as an example. Albedo of a big bluestem grass canopy is estimated from 60 directional reflectance factor measurements. Effects of estimating albedo with substantially smaller subsets of data are evaluated.

  2. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xi; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Olsen, Ylva S.; Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Wernberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia–Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16–30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius’ model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change. PMID:26630025

  3. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xi; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Olsen, Ylva S; Agusti, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M; Wernberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia-Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16-30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius' model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  4. Estimating fire radiative power obscuration by tree canopies through laboratory experiments: Estimating fire radiative energy in a longleaf pine forest from airborne thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, William

    Remote sensing has been proven as a useful tool in characterizing the effects of fire on a landscape scale. The radiant energy released during biomass burning can be measured remotely, and is directly related to the rate biomass consumed from the fire. This is an important measurement as it can characterize fire effects on the ground along with provide important information about the amount of gases produced by the fire. One source of error associated with estimating the fire radiative energy (FRE) remotely is the obscuration of the signal by the forest canopy. We quantify the relationship between canopy cover and the amount of energy observed by a sensor rom laboratory experiments. A prescribed fire was conducted in northwestern Florida and a suite of pre-, active, and post-fire measurements were taken by an interdisciplinary team. From those data we measured the amount of biomass consumed by the fire FRE estimates.

  5. Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure. Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y.; Long, C. N.

    2002-10-01

    This document describes some specifics of the algorithm for best estimate evaluation of radiation fluxes at Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). It uses the data available from the three co-located surface radiometer platforms at the SGP CF to automatically determine the best estimate of the irradiance measurements available. The Best Estimate Flux (BEFlux) value-added procedure (VAP) was previously named Best Estimate ShortWave (BESW) VAP, which included all of the broadband and spectral shortwave (SW) measurements for the SGP CF. In BESW, multiple measurements of the same quantities were handled simply by designating one as the primary measurement and using all others to merely fill in any gaps. Thus, this “BESW” is better termed “most continuous,” since no additional quality assessment was applied. We modified the algorithm in BESW to use the average of the closest two measurements as the best estimate when possible, if these measurements pass all quality assessment criteria. Furthermore, we included longwave (LW) fields in the best estimate evaluation to include all major components of the surface radiative energy budget, and renamed the VAP to Best Estimate Flux (BEFLUX1LONG).

  6. Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y; Long, CN

    2002-10-01

    This document describes some specifics of the algorithm for best estimate evaluation of radiation fluxes at Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). It uses the data available from the three co-located surface radiometer platforms at the SGP CF to automatically determine the best estimate of the irradiance measurements available. The Best Estimate Flux (BEFlux) value-added procedure (VAP) was previously named Best Estimate ShortWave (BESW) VAP, which included all of the broadband and spectral shortwave (SW) measurements for the SGP CF. In BESW, multiple measurements of the same quantities were handled simply by designating one as the primary measurement and using all others to merely fill in any gaps. Thus, this “BESW” is better termed “most continuous,” since no additional quality assessment was applied. We modified the algorithm in BESW to use the average of the closest two measurements as the best estimate when possible, if these measurements pass all quality assessment criteria. Furthermore, we included longwave (LW) fields in the best estimate evaluation to include all major components of the surface radiative energy budget, and renamed the VAP to Best Estimate Flux (BEFLUX1LONG).

  7. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  8. MicroRNA-9 suppresses the sensitivity of CNE2 cells to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao-Pan; Han, Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Tang, Jun; Wen, Yi-Hui; Fu, Ran; Wang, Yue-Jian; Wen, Wei-Ping

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-9 has been demonstrated to regulate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. In the present study, the mechanism by which miR-9 modulates the sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells to ultraviolet (UV) radiation was investigated. The results demonstrated that exposure of NPC cells to UV light resulted in a significant increase in the expression of miR-9, and that CNE2 cells overexpressing miR-9 exhibited reduced levels of DNA damage and increased levels of total glutathione upon UV exposure. Accordingly, the inhibition of the expression of miR-9 promoted UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Although miR-9 inhibited the expression of E-cadherin in the CNE2 cells and increased their resistance to UV radiation, the use of small interfering RNA to inhibit the expression of E-cadherin was not sufficient to decrease the radiosensitivity of the NPC cells. These data demonstrated that miR-9 did not modulate the sensitivity of the CNE2 cells to UV radiation through E-cadherin, but suggested that miR-9 regulated radiosensitivity through its effects on glutathione. These findings suggest that miR-9 may be a potential target for modulating the radiosensitivity of NPC cells.

  9. Radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators experiment for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, J. S.; Venables, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Factors determining the radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators were studied on NASA's LDEF. Quartz materials were examined in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) and classified as to their sensitivity to radiation damage by establishing the rate of damage caused by the electron beam in the microscope. Two types of materials, i.e., swept premium Q quartz and natural quartz were chosen because clear differences were observed in their response to the electron beam in the TEM studies. Quartz resonators were then fabricated from them, tested for frequency stability over a greater than 6 mo. period and flown on the LDEF satellite. After retrieval (more than 7 yrs in space) the stability of the resonators was again determined. All of the space exposed resonators fabricated with swept premium Q material exhibited a frequency shift above that of the control resonators: none of the resonators fabricated from the natural quartz materials exhibited such a shift. The significant differences observed between the two types of materials in both the ground-based TEM studies and the space radiation induced frequency changes suggest that there may be a correlation between the two observations.

  10. Modification of the cellular heat sensitivity of cucumber by growth under supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation on the thermal sensitivity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was studied using UV-B-sensitive cv Poinsett 76 and UV-B-resistant cv Ashley grown under control and elevated (300 mW m{sup -2}) UV-B radiation levels. Using both cotyledon and leaf discs, the ability of the tissue to reduce triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) was determined after treatment at 50{degrees}C for various times. Semilogarithmic plots of TTC reduction as a function of time at 50{degrees}were curvilinear. They were monophasic for the control cucumber and biphasic for cucumber grown in the presence of elevated UV-B. Treatment of cucumber plants at 37{degrees}C for 24 h or of tissue discs at acute UV-B levels for 1 h further modified their response to elevated temperature. These results suggest that growth of cucumber under enhanced UV-B radiation levels increased its ability to withstand elevated temperatures. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Modification of the Cellular Heat Sensitivity of Cucumber by Growth under Supplemental Ultraviolet-B Radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation on the thermal sensitivity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was studied using UV-B-sensitive cv Poinsett 76 and UV-B-resistant cv Ashley grown under control and elevated (300 mW m-2) UV-B radiation levels. Using both cotyledon and leaf discs, the ability of the tissue to reduce triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) was determined after treatment at 50[deg]C for various times. Semilogarithmic plots of TTC reduction as a function of time at 50[deg]C were curvilinear. They were monophasic for the control cucumber and biphasic for cucumber grown in the presence of elevated UV-B. Treatment of cucumber plants at 37[deg]C for 24 h or of tissue discs at acute UV-B levels for 1 h further modified their response to elevated temperature. These results suggest that growth of cucumber under enhanced UV-B radiation levels increased its ability to withstand elevated temperatures. PMID:12232090

  12. Radiation sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors and other thin film architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward

    An important contemporary motivation for advancing radiation detection science and technology is the need for interdiction of nuclear and radiological materials, which may be used to fabricate weapons of mass destruction. The detection of such materials by nuclear techniques relies on achieving high sensitivity and selectivity to X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons. To be attractive in field deployable instruments, it is desirable for detectors to be lightweight, inexpensive, operate at low voltage, and consume low power. To address the relatively low particle flux in most passive measurements for nuclear security applications, detectors scalable to large areas that can meet the high absolute detection efficiency requirements are needed. Graphene-based and thin-film-based radiation detectors represent attractive technologies that could meet the need for inexpensive, low-power, size-scalable detection architectures, which are sensitive to X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons. The utilization of graphene to detect ionizing radiation relies on the modulation of graphene charge carrier density by changes in local electric field, i.e. the field effect in graphene. Built on the principle of a conventional field effect transistor, the graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) utilizes graphene as a channel and a semiconducting substrate as an absorber medium with which the ionizing radiation interacts. A radiation interaction event that deposits energy within the substrate creates electron-hole pairs, which modify the electric field and modulate graphene charge carrier density. A detection event in a GFET is therefore measured as a change in graphene resistance or current. Thin (micron-scale) films can also be utilized for radiation detection of thermal neutrons provided nuclides with high neutron absorption cross section are present with appreciable density. Detection in thin-film detectors could be realized through the collection of charge carriers generated within the

  13. Characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant (radB101) sensitive to. gamma. and uv radiation, and methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Sargentini, N.J.; Smith, K.C.

    1983-03-01

    After N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of Escherichia coli K-12 (xthA14), an X-ray-sensitive mutant was isolated. This sensitivity is due to a mutation, radB101, which is located at 56.5 min on the E.coli K-12 linkage map. The radB101 mutation sensitized wild-type cells to ..gamma.. and uv radiation, and to methyl methanesulfonate. When known DNA repair-deficient mutants were ranked for their ..gamma..-radiation sensitivity relative to their uv-radiation sensitivity, their order was (starting with the most selectively ..gamma..-radiation-sensitive strain): recB21, radB101, wild type, polA1, recF143, lexA101, recA56, uvrD3, and uvrA6. The radB mutant was normal for ..gamma..- and uv-radiation mutagenesis, it showed only a slight enhancement of ..gamma..- and uv-radiation-induced DNA degradation, and it was approx. 60% deficient in recombination ability. The radB gene is suggested to play a role in the recA gene-dependent (Type III) repair of DNA single-strand breaks after ..gamma.. irradiation and in postreplication repair after uv irradiation for the following reasons: the radB strain was normal for the host-cell reactivation of ..gamma..- and uv-irradiated bacteriophage lambda; the radB mutation did not sensitize a recA strain, but did sensitize a polA strain to ..gamma.. and uv radiation; the radB mutation sensitized a uvrB strain to uv radiation.

  14. EARTH, WIND AND FIRE: BUILDING METEOROLOGICALLY-SENSITIVE BIOGENIC AND WILDLAND FIRE EMISSION ESTIMATES FOR AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission estimates are important for ensuring the accuracy of atmospheric chemical transport models. Estimates of biogenic and wildland fire emissions, because of their sensitivity to meteorological conditions, need to be carefully constructed and closely linked with a meteorolo...

  15. Aircrew radiation dose estimates during recent solar particle events and the effect of particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Al Anid, H; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Takada, M; Duldig, M

    2014-01-01

    A model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX, to estimate the additional radiation exposure to aircrew members during solar particle events. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to aircraft altitudes. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during ground level enhancements (GLEs) 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis.

  16. Regression model for estimating inactivation of microbial aerosols by solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Sagripanti, Jose-Luis

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of pathogenic aerosols by solar radiation is relevant to public health and biodefense. We investigated whether a relatively simple method to calculate solar diffuse and total irradiances could be developed and used in environmental photobiology estimations instead of complex atmospheric radiative transfer computer programs. The second-order regression model that we developed reproduced 13 radiation quantities calculated for equinoxes and solstices at 35(°) latitude with a computer-intensive and rather complex atmospheric radiative transfer program (MODTRAN) with a mean error <6% (2% for most radiation quantities). Extending the application of the regression model from a reference latitude and date (chosen as 35° latitude for 21 March) to different latitudes and days of the year was accomplished with variable success: usually with a mean error <15% (but as high as 150% for some combination of latitudes and days of year). This accuracy of the methodology proposed here compares favorably to photobiological experiments where the microbial survival is usually measured with an accuracy no better than ±0.5 log10 units. The approach and equations presented in this study should assist in estimating the maximum time during which microbial pathogens remain infectious after accidental or intentional aerosolization in open environments.

  17. Internally Consistent MODIS Estimate of Aerosol Clear-Sky Radiative Effect Over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2004-01-01

    Modern satellite remote sensing, and in particular the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), offers a measurement-based pathway to estimate global aerosol radiative effects and aerosol radiative forcing. Over the Oceans, MODIS retrieves the total aerosol optical thickness, but also reports which combination of the 9 different aerosol models was used to obtain the retrieval. Each of the 9 models is characterized by a size distribution and complex refractive index, which through Mie calculations correspond to a unique set of single scattering albedo, assymetry parameter and spectral extinction for each model. The combination of these sets of optical parameters weighted by the optical thickness attributed to each model in the retrieval produces the best fit to the observed radiances at the top of the atmosphere. Thus the MODIS Ocean aerosol retrieval provides us with (1) An observed distribution of global aerosol loading, and (2) An internally-consistent, observed, distribution of aerosol optical models that when used in combination will best represent the radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We use these two observed global distributions to initialize the column climate model by Chou and Suarez to calculate the aerosol radiative effect at top of the atmosphere and the radiative efficiency of the aerosols over the global oceans. We apply the analysis to 3 years of MODIS retrievals from the Terra satellite and produce global and regional, seasonally varying, estimates of aerosol radiative effect over the clear-sky oceans.

  18. Increasing oxygenation and radiation sensitivity following photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in the RIF-1 tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Demidenko, Eugene; Wilmot, Carmen M.; Chen, Bin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2003-06-01

    The combination of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) wiht radiaiton therapy from an orthovoltage device has been examiend in the radiation induced fibrosarcoma tumor model. PDT with verteporfin using a 3 hour delay between injection and the time of optical irradiation has been shown to cause a significant rise in overlal tumor oxygenation. It was huypothesized that this mechanism arises from the reduced oxygen consumption from cells where the PDT has targeted the mitochondria and shut down cellular respiration. Tumor blood flow was measured and found to be still be patent immediately following therapy. This increasing oxygenation was thought to provide an opportunity to increase the radiation sensitivity of the tumor immediately following PDT. When this type of treatment was combined with radiation therapy, a delay in the tumor regrowth time demonstrated that the combined effect was greater than additive. Further study of this phenomenon will provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the effect and possibly provide a viable pre-treatment for radiation therapy of tumore that increases the therapeutic ratio. This effect could be used to either increase the radiaton dose without increasing the side effects or decrease the dose needed for the same effect on the tumor.

  19. Modeling of Space Radiation Exposure Estimation Program for Pilots, Crew and Passengers on Commercial Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Junga; Dokgo, Kyunghwan; Choi, Enjin; Park, Jong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Kim, Hang-Pyo

    2014-03-01

    There has been a rapid increase of the concern on the space radiation effect on pilots, crew and passengers at the commercial aircraft altitude (~ 10 km) recently. It is because domestic airline companies, Korean Air and Asiana Airlines have just begun operating the polar routes over the North Pole since 2006 and 2009 respectively. CARI-6 and CARI-6M are commonly used space radiation estimation programs which are provided officially by the U.S. federal aviation administration (FAA). In this paper, the route doses and the annual radiation doses for Korean pilots and cabin crew were estimated by using CARI-6M based on 2012 flight records. Also the modeling concept was developed for our own space radiation estimation program which is composed of GEANT4 and NRLMSIS00 models. The GEANT4 model is used to trace the incident particle transports in the atmosphere and the NRLMSIS00 model is used to get the background atmospheric densities of various neutral atoms at the aircraft altitude. Also presented are the results of simple integration tests of those models and the plan to include the space weather variations through the solar proton event (SPE) prediction model such as UMASEP and the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) prediction model such as Badhwar-O¡¯Neill 2010.

  20. Risk estimators for radiation-induced bone marrow syndrome lethality in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; McClellan, R.O.; Seiler, F.A.

    1988-09-01

    This manuscript provides risk estimators for acute lethality from radiation-induced injury to the bone marrow of humans after uniform total-body exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. The risk estimators are needed for nuclear disaster risk assessment. The approach used is based on the dose X, in units of D50 (i.e., the dose required for 50% lethality). Using animal data, it is demonstrated that the use of dose in units of D50 eliminates most of the variability associated with mammalian species, type of low-LET radiation, and low-LET dose rate. Animal data are used to determine the shape of the dose-effect curve for marrow-syndrome lethality in man and to develop a functional relationship for the dependence of the D50 on dose rate. The functional relationship is used, along with the Weibull model, to develop acute lethality risk estimators for complex temporal patterns of continuous exposure to low-LET radiation. Animal data are used to test model predictions.

  1. The economic costs of radiation-induced health effects: Estimation and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.

    1988-08-01

    This effort improves the quantitative information available for use in evaluating actions that alter health risks due to population exposure to ionizing radiation. To project the potential future costs of changes in health effects risks, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) constructed a probabilistic computer model, Health Effects Costs Model (HECOM), which utilizes the health effect incidence estimates from accident consequences models to calculate the discounted sum of the economic costs associated with population exposure to ionizing radiation. Application of HECOM to value-impact and environmental impact analyses should greatly increase the quality of the information available for regulatory decision making. Three major types of health effects present risks for any population sustaining a significant radiation exposure: acute radiation injuries (and fatalities), latent cancers, and impairments due to genetic effects. The literature pertaining to both incidence and treatment of these health effects was reviewed by PNL and provided the basis for developing economic cost estimates. The economic costs of health effects estimated by HECOM represent both the value of resources consumed in diagnosing, treating, and caring for the patient and the value of goods not produced because of illness or premature death due to the health effect. Additional costs to society, such as pain and suffering, are not included in the PNL economic cost measures since they do not divert resources from other uses, are difficult to quantify, and do not have a value observable in the marketplace. 83 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Study on inverse estimation of radiative properties from directional radiances by using statistical RPSO algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kuk-Il; Kim, Do-Hwi; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Kuk; Shin, Jong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Infrared signals are widely used to discriminate objects against the background. Prediction of infrared signal from an object surface is essential in evaluating the detectability of the object. Appropriate and easy method of procurement of the radiative properties such as the surface emissivity, bidirectional reflectivity is important in estimating infrared signals. Direct measurement can be a good choice but a costly and time consuming way of obtaining the radiative properties for surfaces coated with many different newly developed paints. Especially measurement of the bidirectional reflectivity usually expressed by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is the most costly job. In this paper we are presenting an inverse estimation method of the radiative properties by using the directional radiances from the surface of concern. The inverse estimation method used in this study is the statistical repulsive particle swarm optimization (RPSO) algorithm which uses the randomly picked directional radiance data emitted and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we test the proposed inverse method by considering the radiation from a steel plate surface coated with different paints at a clear sunny day condition. For convenience, the directional radiance data from the steel plate within a spectral band of concern are obtained from the simulation using the commercial software, RadthermIR, instead of the field measurement. A widely used BRDF model called as the Sandford-Robertson(S-R) model is considered and the RPSO process is then used to find the best fitted model parameters for the S-R model. The results obtained from this study show an excellent agreement with the reference property data used for the simulation for directional radiances. The proposed process can be a useful way of obtaining the radiative properties from field measured directional radiance data for surfaces coated with or without various kinds of paints of unknown radiative

  3. Thermo-Sensitive Receptor Protein: Role of TRPVs in Control of Body Temperature under Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kusuno, Tomoyuki; Hanada, Tsunehisa; Tominaga, Makoto; Tominaga, Tomoko; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamada, Hisao; Yamada, Hironari

    2007-03-01

    In vertebrate peripheral nervous system, skin heating and cooling are detected by thermo-sensitive neurons tuned to respond over distinct temperature ranges. TRP-family is thermo-sensitive receptor protein which is Ca2+-permeable ion channels expressing in cellular membrane. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat above 42 °C, whereas TRPV3 and TRPV4 are sensitive to moderate temperatures (<34 °C). Although the amino acid sequence and the channel properties have been characterized, the molecular mechanism of temperature sensation remains poorly understood. In environment, mid and far infrared radiation act as physical stimuli. Here we examined the role of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in regulation of body temperature (BT) by using infrared laser as mild heat stimuli. In wild type mouse, the laser irradiation which caused the increase in skin temperature up to 55 °C did not induce the change in BT without any treatment of TRPVs. However, desensitization of TRPV1 with capsaicin resulted in the increase in BT by laser irradiation. On the other hand, in TRPV4-knockout mouse, moderate thermal stimulus (skin surface temperature <43 °C) caused the increase in the BT. These results suggest that the processing of noxious and moderate thermal radiation stimuli may depend on the TRPV1 and TRPV4, respectively.

  4. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  5. Estimated effects of ionizing radiation upon military task performance: individual combat crewmember assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Wilson, D.B.

    1984-04-01

    Quantitative estimates are developed of the performance levels for selected individual Army combat crewmembers exposed to prompt ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons. The performance levels, expressed in percent of normal (baseline) task performance, provide information for military operations planning, combat training, and computer simulation modeling of combat crew and unit effectiveness. The methodology is described where data from two separate bodies of information: acute radiation sickness symptomatology, and judgment of task performance time from Army combat crew questionnaires - are integrated to compute performance levels as a function of dose (free-in-air) and post-exposure time.

  6. Annexin A2 Modulates Radiation-Sensitive Transcriptional Programming and Cell Fate

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Stenoien, David L.; Sowa, Marianne B.; von Neubeck, Claere; Chrisler, William B.; Tan, Ruimin; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable public interest in the health effects of low doses of radiation (LDR) that fall below the doses that can be plausibly investigated in epidemiological studies. At these low doses, experimental models can detect perturbations in signaling pathways and use this information to define functional consequences of LDR exposures prospectively. In this study, we show increased nuclear annexin A2 (AnxA2) levels in human skin organotypic culture and murine progenitor cell model systems following exposure to X-radiation (10-200 cGy). LDR (2-20 cGy) inhibits cell transformation responses following epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) exposures, indicating LDR may have a protective component mediated in part by nuclear localization of AnxA2. Oncogenic protein kinase C epsilon (PKC) levels are increased in nuclear extracts from AnxA2 silenced [shRNA] cells, suggesting that AnxA2 may contribute to PKC nuclear export, perhaps reducing oncogenic potential. Coordinately, silencing AnxA2 results in a sensitive phenotype and cells grow constitutively in soft agar. Using global microarray analysis, we show that silencing AnxA2 fundamentally alters transcriptional programming, changing the radioresponsive transcriptome and revealing biological processes that are induced in the absence of AnxA2. These observations suggest that AnxA2 plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of cellular and tissue response to ionizing radiation, and deficiency of AnxA2 could result in a permissive environment for radiation-induced health effects.

  7. Quantitative estimation of UV light dose concomitant to irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Vladislav G.; Morozov, Ivan I.; Kim, Jin Kyu; Semkina, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for biological estimation of UV light dose concomitant to ionizing radiation was suggested. This approach was applied to determine the dependency of equivalent UV light dose accompanied by 100 Gy of ionizing radiation on energy of sparsely ionizing radiation and on volume of the exposed cell suspension. It was revealed that the relative excitation contribution to the total lethal effect and the value of UV dose was greatly increased with an increase in energy of ionizing radiation and volume of irradiated suspensions. It is concluded that these observations are in agreement with the supposition that Čerenkov emission is responsible for the production of UV light damage and the phenomenon of photoreactivation observed after ionizing exposure of bacterial and yeast cells hypersensitive to UV light. A possible synergistic interaction of the damages produced by ionizations and excitations as well as a probable participation of UV component of ionizing radiation in the mechanism of hormesis and adaptive response observed after ionizing radiation exposure is discussed.

  8. A hybrid numerical prediction scheme for solar radiation estimation in un-gauged catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, M. A.; Bray, M.; Ishak, A. M.; Remesan, R.; Han, D.

    2009-09-01

    The importance of solar radiation on earth's surface is depicted in its wide range of applications in the fields of meteorology, agricultural sciences, engineering, hydrology, crop water requirements, climatic changes and energy assessment. It is quite random in nature as it has to go through different processes of assimilation and dispersion while on its way to earth. Compared to other meteorological parameters, solar radiation is quite infrequently measured, for example, the worldwide ratio of stations collecting solar radiation to those collecting temperature is 1:500 (Badescu, 2008). Researchers, therefore, have to rely on indirect techniques of estimation that include nonlinear models, artificial intelligence (e.g. neural networks), remote sensing and numerical weather predictions (NWP). This study proposes a hybrid numerical prediction scheme for solar radiation estimation in un-gauged catchments. It uses the PSU/NCAR's Mesoscale Modelling system (MM5) (Grell et al., 1995) to parameterise the cloud effect on extraterrestrial radiation by dividing the atmosphere into four layers of very high (6-12 km), high (3-6 km), medium (1.5-3) and low (0-1.5) altitudes from earth. It is believed that various cloud forms exist within each of these layers. An hourly time series of upper air pressure and relative humidity data sets corresponding to all of these layers is determined for the Brue catchment, southwest UK, using MM5. Cloud Index (CI) was then determined using (Yang and Koike, 2002): 1 p?bi [ (Rh - Rh )] ci =------- max 0.0,---------cri dp pbi - ptipti (1- Rhcri) where, pbi and pti represent the air pressure at the top and bottom of each layer and Rhcri is the critical value of relative humidity at which a certain cloud type is formed. Output from a global clear sky solar radiation model (MRM v-5) (Kambezidis and Psiloglu, 2008) is used along with meteorological datasets of temperature and precipitation and astronomical information. The analysis is aided by the

  9. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, Susanna; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ˜ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +5-8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  10. Phenylbutyrate Sensitizes Human Glioblastoma Cells Lacking Wild-Type P53 Function to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Carlos A. Feng, Felix Y.; Herman, Joseph M.; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ljungman, Mats

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a HDAC inhibitor used clinically for treatment of urea cycle disorders. Because of its low cytotoxicity, cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and high oral bioavailability, we investigated PB as a potential radiation sensitizer in human glioblastoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: Four glioblastoma cell lines were selected for this study. Phenylbutyrate was used at a concentration of 2 mM, which is achievable in humans. Western blots were used to assess levels of acetylated histone H3 in tumor cells after treatment with PB. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed to assess the effect of PB on radiation sensitivity. We used shRNA against p53 to study the role of p53 in radiosensitization. Results: Treatment with PB alone resulted in hyperacetylation of histones, confirmed by Western blot analysis. The PB alone resulted in cytostatic effects in three cell lines. There was no evidence of G{sub 1} arrest, increase in sub-G{sub 1} fraction or p21 protein induction. Clonogenic assays showed radiosensitization in two lines harboring p53 mutations, with enhancement ratios ({+-} SE) of 1.5 ({+-} 0.2) and 1.3 ({+-} 0.1), respectively. There was no radiopotentiating effect in two cell lines with wild-type p53, but knockdown of wild-type p53 resulted in radiosensitization by PB. Conclusions: Phenylbutyrate can produce p21-independent cytostasis, and enhances radiation sensitivity in p53 mutant human glioblastoma cells in vitro. This suggests the potential application of combined PB and radiotherapy in glioblastoma harboring mutant p53.

  11. MiR-224 expression increases radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Upraity, Shailendra; Kazi, Sadaf; Padul, Vijay; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • MiR-224 expression in established glioblastoma cell lines and sporadic tumor tissues is low. • Exogenous miR-224 expression was found to increase radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • MiR-224 expression brought about 55–60% reduction in API5 expression levels. • Transfection with API5 siRNA increased radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • Low miR-224 and high API5 expression correlated with worse survival of GBM patients. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of this brain tumor limits the efficacy of administered treatment like radiation therapy. In the present study, effect of miR-224 expression on growth characteristics of established GBM cell lines was analyzed. MiR-224 expression in the cell lines as well as in primary GBM tumor tissues was found to be low. Exogenous transient expression of miR-224 using either synthetic mimics or stable inducible expression using doxycycline inducible lentiviral vector carrying miR-224 gene, was found to bring about 30–55% reduction in clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells. MiR-224 expression reduced clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells by 85–90% on irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy, a dose that brought about 50% reduction in clonogenic potential in the absence of miR-224 expression. MiR-224 expression in glioblastoma cells resulted in 55–65% reduction in the expression levels of API5 gene, a known target of miR-224. Further, siRNA mediated down-regulation of API5 was also found to have radiation sensitizing effect on glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas data showed lower miR-224 expression levels in male GBM patients to correlate with poorer survival. Higher expression levels of miR-224 target API5 also showed significant correlation with poorer survival of GBM patients. Up-regulation of miR-224 or down-regulation of its target API5 in combination with radiation therapy

  12. Efficient estimators for likelihood ratio sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that centered likelihood ratio estimators for the sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics are highly efficient with low, constant in time variance and consequently they are suitable for sensitivity analysis in long-time and steady-state regimes. These estimators rely on a new covariance formulation of the likelihood ratio that includes as a submatrix a Fisher information matrix for stochastic dynamics and can also be used for fast screening of insensitive parameters and parameter combinations. The proposed methods are applicable to broad classes of stochastic dynamics such as chemical reaction networks, Langevin-type equations and stochastic models in finance, including systems with a high dimensional parameter space and/or disparate decorrelation times between different observables. Furthermore, they are simple to implement as a standard observable in any existing simulation algorithm without additional modifications.

  13. Efficient estimators for likelihood ratio sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate that centered likelihood ratio estimators for the sensitivity indices of complex stochastic dynamics are highly efficient with low, constant in time variance and consequently they are suitable for sensitivity analysis in long-time and steady-state regimes. These estimators rely on a new covariance formulation of the likelihood ratio that includes as a submatrix a Fisher information matrix for stochastic dynamics and can also be used for fast screening of insensitive parameters and parameter combinations. The proposed methods are applicable to broad classes of stochastic dynamics such as chemical reaction networks, Langevin-type equations and stochastic models in finance, including systems with a high dimensional parameter space and/or disparate decorrelation times between different observables. Furthermore, they are simple to implement as a standard observable in any existing simulation algorithm without additional modifications.

  14. Uncertainties in estimating health risks associated with exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Preston, R Julian; Boice, John D; Brill, A Bertrand; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Conolly, Rory; Hoffman, F Owen; Hornung, Richard W; Kocher, David C; Land, Charles E; Shore, Roy E; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-09-01

    The information for the present discussion on the uncertainties associated with estimation of radiation risks and probability of disease causation was assembled for the recently published NCRP Report No. 171 on this topic. This memorandum provides a timely overview of the topic, given that quantitative uncertainty analysis is the state of the art in health risk assessment and given its potential importance to developments in radiation protection. Over the past decade the increasing volume of epidemiology data and the supporting radiobiology findings have aided in the reduction of uncertainty in the risk estimates derived. However, it is equally apparent that there remain significant uncertainties related to dose assessment, low dose and low dose-rate extrapolation approaches (e.g. the selection of an appropriate dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), the biological effectiveness where considerations of the health effects of high-LET and lower-energy low-LET radiations are required and the transfer of risks from a population for which health effects data are available to one for which such data are not available. The impact of radiation on human health has focused in recent years on cancer, although there has been a decided increase in the data for noncancer effects together with more reliable estimates of the risk following radiation exposure, even at relatively low doses (notably for cataracts and cardiovascular disease). New approaches for the estimation of hereditary risk have been developed with the use of human data whenever feasible, although the current estimates of heritable radiation effects still are based on mouse data because of an absence of effects in human studies. Uncertainties associated with estimation of these different types of health effects are discussed in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner as appropriate. The way forward would seem to require additional epidemiological studies, especially studies of low dose and low dose

  15. Sensitive measurement of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds by intensity correlation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stites, Ronald; Beeler, Matthew; Feeney, Laura; Kim, Soo; Bali, Samir

    2004-12-01

    We present experimental evidence that the intensity correlations of light scattered from a cold-atom cloud are sensitive to the presence of small amounts of radiation trapping in an atomic sample of density 6×10^8/cm3, with an optical depth (for a resonant light beam) of 0.4. This density and optical depth are approximately an order of magnitude less than the density and on-resonance optical depth at which effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [Phys.Rev.Lett.64, 408 (1990)].

  16. Ionizing radiation sensitizes leukemic MOLT-4 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rezácová, Martina; Vávrová, Jirina; Vokurková, Doris

    2008-01-01

    One of perspective approaches in treatment of hematological malignancies is activation of death receptors for TRAIL. However, leukemia cells studied to date have shown variable susceptibility to TRAIL. Our study demonstrates that cells of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 are resistant to TRAIL and that ionizing radiation in the therapeutically achievable dose of 1 Gy sensitizes TRAIL-resistant cells MOLT-4 to the TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increase in death receptors for TRAIL DR5. When TRAIL is applied after the irradiation in the time of increased DR5 positivity more efficient cell killing is achieved.

  17. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Test Data for DNAPL Saturation Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Miller, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is a critical component for successful remediation of sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Although Push-Pull Tracer Tests (PPTTs) offer a promising approach for local in situ source zone characterization, non-equilibrium mass transfer effects and the spatial variability of saturation make their interpretation difficult. To better understand the dependence of well test data on these factors and as the basis for the estimation of the spatial DNAPL distribution, here we develop numerical methods based on the use of adjoint sensitivity mehtods to explore the sensitivity of PPTT observations to the distribution of DNAPL saturation. We examine the utility of the developed approach using three-dimensional hypothetical source zones containing heterogeneous DNAPL distributions. For model applications the flow fields are generated with MODFLOW and non-equilibrium tracer mass transfer is described by a linear driving force expression. Comprehensive modeling of partitioning tracer tests requires the solution of tracer mass balance equations in the aqueous and DNAPL phases. Consistent with this process coupling, the developed adjoint method introduces a vector of adjoint variables to formulate the coupled adjoint states equations for tracer concentrations in both the aqueous and NAPL phases. For the sensitivity analysis, we investigate how the tracer concentration in the well changes with perturbations of the saturation within the interrogated zone. Using the calculated sensitivity functions, coupled with the observed tracer breakthrough curve, we develop a nonlinear least-squares inverse method to determine three metrics related to the spatial distribution of DNAPL in the source zone: average DNAPL saturation, total mass of DNAPL and distance of the DNAPL from the test well. These results have utility for local source zone characterization and can provide an initial quantitative understanding of

  18. The effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the radiation sensitivity of bacterial spores. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, D.

    1982-01-01

    Dimethylsufoxide (DMSO) is a potent sensitizer of irradiated bacterial spores (Bacillus megaterium). It is effective under either anoxic or well-oxygenated conditions; in both cases, DMSO increases the response by a factor of 3 to 4. In water, the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with 260-kVp X rays is 1.9, while in pure DMSO, which is not toxic to spores, the OER is reduced to 1.1. Spores exposed to DMSO and then washed and resuspended in water still show most of the DMSO-characteristic sensitization, even when the spores are soaked in water for 24 hr before irradiation. This effect is not attributable to DMSO retention by the spore; instead, we suggest that DMSO causes a long-lasting change in a critical spore component that changes the way the entire cell responds to radiation.

  19. Luminescence, radiative recombination, and current voltage characteristics in sensitized TiO2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smestad, Greg P.

    1992-12-01

    A connection is made between the luminescence or radiative recombination in an absorber material and the current voltage characteristics of a quantum converter of light. A relationship between luminescence and voltage is derived, using detailed balance and the chemical potential of the excitation, which is similar to that obtained using the techniques of Shockley and Queisser or R. T. Ross. This model relates the absorptivity and photoluminescence efficiency of the light absorber to the I V curve. In this way both thermodynamic properties, or voltage, and the kinetics, or charge transfer and current, can be combined in order to optimize materials and configurations. The model is applied to dye sensitized Ti02 solar cells, and compared with preliminary experimental data for Ru based charge transfer dyes and inorganic compounds. The luminescence model is found to be applicable to dye sensitized converters, as well as to standard silicon solar cells, light detectors, and LEDs.

  20. Hydrograph sensitivity to estimates of map impervious cover: a WinHSPF BASINS case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endreny, Theodore A.; Somerlot, Christopher; Hassett, James M.

    2003-04-01

    The BASINS geographic information system hydrologic toolkit was designed to compute total maximum daily loads, which are often derived by combining water quantity estimates with pollutant concentration estimates. In this paper the BASINS toolkit PLOAD and WinHSPF sub-models are briefly described, and then a 0·45 km2 headwater watershed in the New York Croton River area is used for a case study illustrating a full WinHSPF implementation. The goal of the Croton study was to determine the sensitivity of WinHSPF hydrographs to changes in land cover map inputs. This scenario occurs when scaling the WinHSPF model from the smaller 0·45 km2 watershed to the larger 1000 km2 management basin of the entire Croton area. Methods used to test model sensitivity include first calibrating the WinHSPF hydrograph using research-monitored precipitation and discharge data together with high spatial resolution and accuracy land cover data of impervious and pervious areas, and then swapping three separate land cover files, known as GIRAS, MRLC, and DOQQ data, into the calibrated model. Research results indicated that the WinHSPF land cover swapping had peak flow sensitivity in December 2001 hydrographs between 35% underestimation and 20% overestimation, and that errors in land-cover-derived runoff ratios for storm totals and peak flows tracked with the land cover data estimates of impervious area.

  1. Radiative Effect of Clouds on Tropospheric Chemistry: Sensitivity to Cloud Vertical Distributions and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Crawford, J. H.; Pierce, R. B.; Considine, D. B.; Logan, J. A.; Duncan, B. N.; Norris, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Chen, G.; Yantosca, R. M.; Evans, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Representation of clouds in global models poses a significant challenge since most cloud processes occur on sub-grid scales and must be parameterized. Uncertainties in cloud distributions and optical properties are therefore a limiting factor in model assessments of the radiative effect of clouds on global tropospheric chemistry. We present an analysis of the sensitivity of the radiative effect of clouds to cloud vertical distributions and optical properties with the use of the GEOS-CHEM global 3-D chemistry transport model coupled with the Fast-J radiative transfer algorithm. GEOS-CHEM was driven with a series of meteorological archives (GEOS1-STRAT, GEOS-3, and GEOS-4) generated by the Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation system (GEOS DAS) at the NASA global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), which have significantly different cloud optical depths and vertical distributions. The column cloud optical depths in GEOS-3 generally agree with the satellite retrieval products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) within ±10%, while those in GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-4 are too low by factors of about 5 and 2, respectively. With respect to vertical distribution, clouds in GEOS-4 are optically much thinner in the tropical upper troposphere compared to those in GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-3. Assuming linear scaling of cloud optical depth with cloud fraction in a grid-box, our model calculations indicate that the changes in global mean hydroxyl radical (OH) due to the radiative effect of clouds in June are about -1% (GEOS1-STRAT), 1% (GEOS-3), and 14% (GEOS-4), respectively. The effects on global mean OH are similar for GEOS1-STRAT and GEOS-3 due to similar vertical distributions of clouds, even though the column cloud optical depths in the two archives differ by a factor of about 5. Clouds in GEOS-4 have a much larger impact on global mean OH because more solar radiation is

  2. Radiation sensitivity of Salmonella isolates relative to resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol or gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Lonczynski, Kelly A.; Sommers, Christopher H.

    2006-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance of inoculated bacteria is a commonly used selective marker. Bacteria resistant to the antibiotic nalidixic acid have been shown to have an increased sensitivity to irradiation. The purpose of this research was to screen a collection of Salmonella isolates for antibiotic resistance and determine the association, if any, of antibiotic resistance with radiation sensitivity. Twenty-four clinical isolates of Salmonella were screened for native resistance to multiple concentrations of ampicillin (Amp), chloramphenicol (Chl), or gentamicin (Gm). Test concentrations were chosen based on established clinical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels, and isolates were classified as either sensitive or resistant based on their ability to grow at or above the MIC. Salmonella cultures were grown overnight at (37 °C) in antibiotic-amended tryptic soy broth (TSB). Native resistance to Gm was observed with each of the 24 isolates (100%). Eight isolates (33%) were shown to be resistant to Amp, while seven isolates (29%) were shown to be resistant to Chl. In separate experiments, Salmonella cultures were grown overnight (37 °C) in TSB, centrifuged, and the cell pellets were re-suspended in phosphate buffer. The samples were then gamma irradiated at doses up to 1.0 kGy. The D10 values (the ionizing radiation dose required to reduce the viable number of microorganisms by 90%) were determined for the 24 isolates and they ranged from 0.181 to 0.359 kGy. No correlation was found between the D10 value of the isolate and its sensitivity or resistance to each of the three antibiotics. Resistance to Amp or Chl is suggested as appropriate resistance marker for Salmonella test strains to be used in studies of irradiation.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of Enclosure Radiation with Applications to Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, Michael M.

    1995-01-01

    In engineering, simulation software is often used as a convenient means for carrying out experiments to evaluate physical systems. The benefit of using simulations as 'numerical' experiments is that the experimental conditions can be easily modified and repeated at much lower cost than the comparable physical experiment. The goal of these experiments is to 'improve' the process or result of the experiment. In most cases, the computational experiments employ the same trial and error approach as their physical counterparts. When using this approach for complex systems, the cause and effect relationship of the system may never be fully understood and efficient strategies for improvement never utilized. However, it is possible when running simulations to accurately and efficiently determine the sensitivity of the system results with respect to simulation to accurately and efficiently determine the sensitivity of the system results with respect to simulation parameters (e.g., initial conditions, boundary conditions, and material properties) by manipulating the underlying computations. This results in a better understanding of the system dynamics and gives us efficient means to improve processing conditions. We begin by discussing the steps involved in performing simulations. Then we consider how sensitivity information about simulation results can be obtained and ways this information may be used to improve the process or result of the experiment. Next, we discuss optimization and the efficient algorithms which use sensitivity information. We draw on all this information to propose a generalized approach for integrating simulation and optimization, with an emphasis on software programming issues. After discussing our approach to simulation and optimization we consider an application involving crystal growth. This application is interesting because it includes radiative heat transfer. We discuss the computation of radiative new factors and the impact this mode of heat

  4. On piecewise interpolation techniques for estimating solar radiation missing values in Kedah

    SciTech Connect

    Saaban, Azizan; Zainudin, Lutfi; Bakar, Mohd Nazari Abu

    2014-12-04

    This paper discusses the use of piecewise interpolation method based on cubic Ball and Bézier curves representation to estimate the missing value of solar radiation in Kedah. An hourly solar radiation dataset is collected at Alor Setar Meteorology Station that is taken from Malaysian Meteorology Deparment. The piecewise cubic Ball and Bézier functions that interpolate the data points are defined on each hourly intervals of solar radiation measurement and is obtained by prescribing first order derivatives at the starts and ends of the intervals. We compare the performance of our proposed method with existing methods using Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and Coefficient of Detemination (CoD) which is based on missing values simulation datasets. The results show that our method is outperformed the other previous methods.

  5. Estimates of radiation doses in space on the basis of current data.

    PubMed

    Foelsche, T

    1963-01-01

    A gross survey of data on Van Allen belt radiations, galactic cosmic radiation, and solar cosmic radiation is presented. On the basis of these data that are, in part, fragmentary and uncertain, upper and lower limits of rad doses under different amounts of mass shielding are estimated. The estimates are preliminary especially in the cases of chance encounter with solar flare protons. Generally, the relative biological effectiveness of the high energetic space radiations and their secondaries appear insufficiently known to give detailed biological or rem doses. The overall ionization dosage of the low level galactic cosmic radiation in free space is estimated to be even in solar minimum years equivalent to less than 50 rem/year or 1 rem/week. Mass shielding up to 80 g/cm2 would not reduce the ionization dosage but would shield against heavy primaries and heavy ionizing secondaries, thus reducing the biological dose. The flux of energetic protons in the maximum intensity zone of the inner Van Allen belt is by about four orders of magnitude higher, their energy and penetration power, of course, lower. A shield of 25 g/cm2 would reduce the dose rate from 20 rad/hour under 2 g/cm2 to 5 rad/hour. These proton dose rates and also the electron and X-radiation dose rates under some g/cm2 shielding of low z-number material will not constitute a radiation hazard for flights straight through the inner and outer belt in about two hours. Staying within the maximum of the inner belt for two days would, however, lead even within 25 g/cm2 depth of outer shield and body itself to a dose of 200 rad which is on the permissible limit. Extreme solar cosmic ray events or proton showers of high intensity and a duration of days occurred with a frequency of 1-4 per year during the last highly active cycle. For the penetrating, most intense high energy event of February 23, 1956, the dose within 25 g/cm2 is estimated to have been in the order of 50 rad. In most cases the dose decreased more

  6. Analysis of solar radiation on the surface estimated from GWNU solar radiation model with temporal resolution of satellite cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Bu-Yo

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary analysis with a solar radiation model is generally performed for photovoltaic power generation projects. Therefore, model accuracy is extremely important. The temporal and spatial resolutions used in previous studies of the Korean Peninsula were 1 km × 1 km and 1-h, respectively. However, calculating surface solar radiation at 1-h intervals does not ensure the accuracy of the geographical effects, and this parameter changes owing to atmospheric elements (clouds, aerosol, ozone, etc.). Thus, a change in temporal resolution is required. In this study, one-year (2013) analysis was conducted using Chollian geostationary meteorological satellite data from observations recorded at 15-min intervals. Observation data from the intensive solar site at Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) showed that the coefficient of determination (R²), which was estimated for each month and season, increased, whereas the standard error (SE) decreased when estimated in 15-min intervals over those obtained in 1-h intervals in 2013. When compared with observational data from 22 solar sites of the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA), R2 was 0.9 or higher on average, and over- or under-simulated sites did not exceed 3 sites. The model and 22 solar sites showed similar values of annual accumulated solar irradiation, and their annual mean was similar at 4,998 MJ m-2 (3.87 kWh m-2). These results show a difference of approximately ± 70 MJ m-2 (± 0.05 kWh m-2) from the distribution of the Korean Peninsula estimated in 1-h intervals and a higher correlation at higher temporal resolution.

  7. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E; Maher, Cameron A; Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities-that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization

  8. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal

  9. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because the thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150 °C for up to 5 h or to 125 °C for up to 24 h if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125 °C for up to 5 h if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of

  10. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor ( SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated ( R 2 = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site productivity.

  11. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain.

    PubMed

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor (SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated (R (2) = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site

  12. Estimation of radiofrequency power leakage from microwave ovens for dosimetric assessment at nonionizing radiation exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied.

  13. Estimates of the generation of available potential energy by infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, A. R.; Nagle, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the National Meteorological Center and net outgoing infrared radiation (IR) data measured by NOAA satellites for January 1977 are used to compute estimates of the spectral and spatial contributions to the net generation of available potential energy in the Northern Hemisphere due to infrared radiation. Although these estimates are necessarily crude, the results obtained indicate that IR causes destruction of both zonal and eddy available potential energy. The contributions from midlatitudes to the zonal and eddy generation are about -5.0 W/sq m and about -0.6 W/sq m, respectively. The eddy generation is due almost entirely to stationary wavenumbers one and two. Comparison with earlier studies and computation of Newtonian cooling coefficients are discussed.

  14. Estimation of Radiofrequency Power Leakage from Microwave Ovens for Dosimetric Assessment at Nonionizing Radiation Exposure Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied. PMID:25705676

  15. Sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to 100 years of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, R. P.; Stagge, J. H.; Tallaksen, L. M.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrological modeling frameworks require an accurate representation of evaporation fluxes for appropriate quantification of, e.g., the water balance, soil moisture budget, recharge and groundwater processes. Many frameworks have used the concept of potential evaporation, often estimated for different vegetation classes by multiplying the evaporation from a reference surface ("reference evaporation") by crop-specific scaling factors ("crop factors"). Though this two-step potential evaporation approach undoubtedly has practical advantages, the empirical nature of both reference evaporation methods and crop factors limits its usability in extrapolations under non-stationary climatic conditions. In this paper, rather than simply warning about the dangers of extrapolation, we quantify the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates for different vegetation classes using the two-step approach when calibrated using a non-stationary climate. We used the past century's time series of observed climate, containing non-stationary signals of multi-decadal atmospheric oscillations, global warming, and global dimming/brightening, to evaluate the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to the choice and length of the calibration period. We show that using empirical coefficients outside their calibration range may lead to systematic differences between process-based and empirical reference evaporation methods, and systematic errors in estimated potential evaporation components. Quantification of errors provides a possibility to correct potential evaporation calculations and to rate them for their suitability to model climate conditions that differ significantly from the historical record, so-called no-analog climate conditions.

  16. The implications for climate sensitivity of AR5 forcing and heat uptake estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas; Curry, Judith A.

    2015-08-01

    Energy budget estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) and transient climate response (TCR) are derived using the comprehensive 1750-2011 time series and the uncertainty ranges for forcing components provided in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Working Group I Report, along with its estimates of heat accumulation in the climate system. The resulting estimates are less dependent on global climate models and allow more realistically for forcing uncertainties than similar estimates based on forcings diagnosed from simulations by such models. Base and final periods are selected that have well matched volcanic activity and influence from internal variability. Using 1859-1882 for the base period and 1995-2011 for the final period, thus avoiding major volcanic activity, median estimates are derived for ECS of 1.64 K and for TCR of 1.33 K. ECS 17-83 and 5-95 % uncertainty ranges are 1.25-2.45 and 1.05-4.05 K; the corresponding TCR ranges are 1.05-1.80 and 0.90-2.50 K. Results using alternative well-matched base and final periods provide similar best estimates but give wider uncertainty ranges, principally reflecting smaller changes in average forcing. Uncertainty in aerosol forcing is the dominant contribution to the ECS and TCR uncertainty ranges.

  17. Radiation passport: an iPhone and iPod touch application to track radiation dose and estimate associated cancer risks.

    PubMed

    Baerlocher, Mark Otto; Talanow, Roland; Baerlocher, Adrian F

    2010-04-01

    The rapid increase in the use of radiology and related exams and procedures has led to a concomitant increase in associated radiation risk. An application for the iPhone and iPod Touch called 'Radiation Passport' is described, which provides radiation dose estimates and associated cancer risks (non fatal and fatal) and serves as a method by which to track an individual's cumulative exposure.

  18. On high-frequency radiation scattering sensitivity to surface roughness in particulate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sensitivity of high-frequency radiation scattering in particulate media, to particle surface roughness. Ray-tracing theory and computation are employed. Since the magnitude of the Poynting vector ray, the irradiance, is the appropriate quantity to be tracked, the behavior of the reflectance, which controls the ratio of the reflected and incident Poynting vector magnitudes, is of primary concern. The reflectance is a highly nonlinear function of the refractive indices and angle of incidence. The present work first addresses the relationship between a single scatterer's sensitivity to its surface roughness and then the response of a large number of scatterers to the surface roughness. The analysis indicates that, for a single scatterer, the sensitivity of the response to roughness decreases, up to a point, and then increases again, i.e., it is nonmonotone. However, for a system of multiple scatterers, this effect vanishes, due to multiple internal reflections which dominate the overall response characteristics. While it was relatively straightforward to compute the overall sensitivity of a single scattering body, for example a sphere, when multiple reflecting bodies are considered, numerical simulations are necessary because the reflected rays from one "rough" body will, in turn, be reflected to another "rough" body, etc. Examples are given for a system of randomly distributed scatterers.

  19. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  20. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  1. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  2. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamarov, Konstantin P; Osminkina, Liubov A; Zinovyev, Sergey V; Maximova, Ksenia A; Kargina, Julia V; Gongalsky, Maxim B; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V; Nikiforov, Vladimir N; Kabashin, Andrei V; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-13

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50 °C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm(2)). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  3. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  4. Radiation sensitive indicator based on tetrabromophenol blue dyed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshir, W. B.

    2013-05-01

    Radiation sensitive indicators based on dyed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing acid- sensitive dye (tetrabromophenol blue, TBPB) and chloral hydrate (CCl3·CH·(OH)2, 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1,1-diol) have been developed. These plastic film dosimeters undergo color change from blue (the alkaline form of TBPB) to yellow (the acidic form of TBPB), indicating acid formation. The concentration of radiation formed acids in the films containing different concentrations of chloral hydrate was calculated at different doses. These films can be used as dosimeters for food irradiation applications where the maximum of the useful dose ranges are between 1 and 8 kGy depending on chloral hydrate concentration in the film. The films have the advantage of negligible humidity effects on response in the intermediate range of relative humidity from 0 to 70% as good post irradiation stability when stored in the dark at room temperature. The overall combined uncertainty (at 2σ) associated with measurement of response (ΔA mm-1) at 623 nm for dose range 1-8 kGy is 4.53%.

  5. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-01-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1–5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy. PMID:25391603

  6. Are freshwater mixotrophic ciliates less sensitive to solar ultraviolet radiation than heterotrophic ones?

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Bettina; Summerer, Monika; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether mixotrophic ciliates are more resistant to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than heterotrophic ones because symbiotic algae can provide self-shading by cell matter absorption and eventually by direct UV screening from mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). Sensitivity of a natural assemblage to solar radiation was tested in experiments in the original lake and in a more UV transparent alpine lake after transplantation of the ciliates. In both lakes, the assemblage was exposed either to full sunlight, to photosynthetically active radiation only, or kept in the dark. In each lake, exposure was for 5 h at the surface and at the depth corresponding to the 10% attenuation depth at 320 nm. Overall, when the assemblage was exposed to surface UVR, only one out of four dominant mixotrophic ciliates, Vorticella chlorellata, was more resistant than heterotrophic species. The higher UV resistance in V. chlorellata was related to the presence of MAAs and the high percentage of ciliate volume occupied by algal symbionts. Our results indicate that effects of UVR were species-specific and depended on efficient screening of these wavelengths, but also on the depth preference of the ciliates and thus, on their previous exposure history to UVR.

  7. Are Freshwater Mixotrophic Ciliates Less Sensitive to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation than Heterotrophic Ones?1

    PubMed Central

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether mixotrophic ciliates are more resistant to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than heterotrophic ones because symbiotic algae can provide self-shading by cell matter absorption and eventually by direct UV screening from mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). Sensitivity of a natural assemblage to solar radiation was tested in experiments in the original lake and in a more UV transparent alpine lake after transplantation of the ciliates. In both lakes, the assemblage was exposed either to full sunlight, to photosynthetically active radiation only, or kept in the dark. In each lake, exposure was for 5 h at the surface and at the depth corresponding to the 10% attenuation depth at 320 nm. Overall, when the assemblage was exposed to surface UVR, only one out of four dominant mixotrophic ciliates, Vorticella chlorellata, was more resistant than heterotrophic species. The higher UV resistance in V. chlorellata was related to the presence of MAAs and the high percentage of ciliate volume occupied by algal symbionts. Our results indicate that effects of UVR were species-specific and depended on efficient screening of these wavelengths, but also on the depth preference of the ciliates and thus, on their previous exposure history to UVR. PMID:21414057

  8. MicroRNA-221 and -222 Regulate Radiation Sensitivity by Targeting the PTEN Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Wang Ping; Cao Yongzhen; Lv Zhonghong; Yu Shizhu; Wang Guangxiu; Zhang Anling; Jia Zhifan; Han Lei; Yang Chunying; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Teh, Bin S.; Xu Bo; Pu Peiyu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs inhibiting expression of numerous target genes by posttranscriptional regulation. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 (miRNA-221/-222) expression is elevated in radioresistant tumor cell lines; however, it is not known whether and how miRNAs control cellular responses to ionizing irradiation. Methods and Materials: We used bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, and genetic knockdown and biochemical assays to characterize the regulation pathways of miRNA-221/-222 in response to radiation treatment. Results: We identified the PTEN gene as a target of miRNA-221/-222. Furthermore, we found that knocking down miRNA-221/-222 by antisense oligonucleotides upregulated PTEN expression. Upregulated PTEN expression suppressed AKT activity and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Conclusions: miRNA-221/-222 control radiation sensitivity by regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and can be explored as novel targets for radiosensitization.

  9. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation using soft computing methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Danesh, Amir Seyed; Abdullah, Mohd Shahidan; Zamani, Mazdak

    2016-07-01

    Precise knowledge of solar radiation is indeed essential in different technological and scientific applications of solar energy. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation would be appealing owing to broad availability of measured air temperatures. In this study, the potentials of soft computing techniques are evaluated to estimate daily horizontal global solar radiation (DHGSR) from measured maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures ( T max, T min, and T avg) in an Iranian city. For this purpose, a comparative evaluation between three methodologies of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), radial basis function support vector regression (SVR-rbf), and polynomial basis function support vector regression (SVR-poly) is performed. Five combinations of T max, T min, and T avg are served as inputs to develop ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models. The attained results show that all ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models provide favorable accuracy. Based upon all techniques, the higher accuracies are achieved by models (5) using T max- T min and T max as inputs. According to the statistical results, SVR-rbf outperforms SVR-poly and ANFIS. For SVR-rbf (5), the mean absolute bias error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient are 1.1931 MJ/m2, 2.0716 MJ/m2, and 0.9380, respectively. The survey results approve that SVR-rbf can be used efficiently to estimate DHGSR from air temperatures.

  10. Global sensitivity of high-resolution estimates of crop water footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuninetti, Marta; Tamea, Stefania; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Most of the human appropriation of freshwater resources is for agriculture. Water availability is a major constraint to mankind's ability to produce food. The notion of virtual water content (VWC), also known as crop water footprint, provides an effective tool to investigate the linkage between food and water resources as a function of climate, soil, and agricultural practices. The spatial variability in the virtual water content of crops is here explored, disentangling its dependency on climate and crop yields and assessing the sensitivity of VWC estimates to parameter variability and uncertainty. Here we calculate the virtual water content of four staple crops (i.e., wheat, rice, maize, and soybean) for the entire world developing a high-resolution (5 × 5 arc min) model, and we evaluate the VWC sensitivity to input parameters. We find that food production almost entirely depends on green water (>90%), but, when applied, irrigation makes crop production more water efficient, thus requiring less water. The spatial variability of the VWC is mostly controlled by the spatial patterns of crop yields with an average correlation coefficient of 0.83. The results of the sensitivity analysis show that wheat is most sensitive to the length of the growing period, rice to reference evapotranspiration, maize and soybean to the crop planting date. The VWC sensitivity varies not only among crops, but also across the harvested areas of the world, even at the subnational scale.

  11. Statistical theory for estimating sampling errors of regional radiation averages based on satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Bess, T. D.; Minnis, P.

    1983-01-01

    The processes which determine the weather and climate are driven by the radiation received by the earth and the radiation subsequently emitted. A knowledge of the absorbed and emitted components of radiation is thus fundamental for the study of these processes. In connection with the desire to improve the quality of long-range forecasting, NASA is developing the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), consisting of a three-channel scanning radiometer and a package of nonscanning radiometers. A set of these instruments is to be flown on both the NOAA-F and NOAA-G spacecraft, in sun-synchronous orbits, and on an Earth Radiation Budget Satellite. The purpose of the scanning radiometer is to obtain measurements from which the average reflected solar radiant exitance and the average earth-emitted radiant exitance at a reference level can be established. The estimate of regional average exitance obtained will not exactly equal the true value of the regional average exitance, but will differ due to spatial sampling. A method is presented for evaluating this spatial sampling error.

  12. Biomarkers in Fasting Serum to Estimate Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, Allison B.; Gerwien, Robert W.; Kolberg, Janice A.; O’Shea, Sheila; Hamren, Sarah; Hein, Glenn P.; Xu, Xiaomei M.; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biomarkers for estimating reduced glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or impaired insulin secretion would be clinically useful, since these physiologic measures are important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 94 individuals, of whom 84 had 1 or more risk factors and 10 had no known risk factors for diabetes, underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. We measured 34 protein biomarkers associated with diabetes risk in 250-μL fasting serum samples. We applied multiple regression selection techniques to identify the most informative biomarkers and develop multivariate models to estimate glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. The ability of the glucose tolerance model to discriminate between diabetic individuals and those with impaired or normal glucose tolerance was evaluated by area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS Of the at-risk participants, 25 (30%) were found to have impaired glucose tolerance, and 11 (13%) diabetes. Using molecular counting technology, we assessed multiple biomarkers with high accuracy in small volume samples. Multivariate biomarker models derived from fasting samples correlated strongly with 2-h postload glucose tolerance (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001), composite insulin sensitivity index (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.0001), and insulin secretion (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the glucose tolerance model provided strong discrimination between diabetes vs impaired or normal glucose tolerance (AUC 0.89) and between diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance vs normal tolerance (AUC 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Biomarkers in fasting blood samples may be useful in estimating glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. PMID:21149503

  13. Accurate and quantitative polarization-sensitive OCT by unbiased birefringence estimator with noise-stochastic correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaragod, Deepa; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Ikuno, Yasushi; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Yamanari, Masahiro; Fukuda, Shinichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a functional extension of OCT that contrasts the polarization properties of tissues. It has been applied to ophthalmology, cardiology, etc. Proper quantitative imaging is required for a widespread clinical utility. However, the conventional method of averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast of the phase retardation (or birefringence) images introduce a noise bias offset from the true value. This bias reduces the effectiveness of birefringence contrast for a quantitative study. Although coherent averaging of Jones matrix tomography has been widely utilized and has improved the image quality, the fundamental limitation of nonlinear dependency of phase retardation and birefringence to the SNR was not overcome. So the birefringence obtained by PS-OCT was still not accurate for a quantitative imaging. The nonlinear effect of SNR to phase retardation and birefringence measurement was previously formulated in detail for a Jones matrix OCT (JM-OCT) [1]. Based on this, we had developed a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimator and quantitative birefringence imaging was demonstrated [2]. However, this first version of estimator had a theoretical shortcoming. It did not take into account the stochastic nature of SNR of OCT signal. In this paper, we present an improved version of the MAP estimator which takes into account the stochastic property of SNR. This estimator uses a probability distribution function (PDF) of true local retardation, which is proportional to birefringence, under a specific set of measurements of the birefringence and SNR. The PDF was pre-computed by a Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation based on the mathematical model of JM-OCT before the measurement. A comparison between this new MAP estimator, our previous MAP estimator [2], and the standard mean estimator is presented. The comparisons are performed both by numerical simulation and in vivo measurements of anterior and

  14. Effect of Aerosols on Surface Radiation and Air Quality in the Central American Region Estimated Using Satellite UV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface is reduced by both aerosol scattering and aerosol absorption. Over many parts of the world the latter effect can be as large or larger than the former effect, and small changes in the aerosol single scattering albedo can either cancel the former effect or enhance it. In addition, absorbing aerosols embedded in clouds can greatly reduce the amount of radiation reaching the surface by multiple scattering. Though the potential climatic effects of absorbing aerosols have received considerable attention lately, their effect on surface UV, photosynthesis, and photochemistry can be equally important for our environment and may affect human health and agricultural productivity. Absorption of all aerosols commonly found in the Earth's atmosphere becomes larger in the UV and blue wavelengths and has a relatively strong wavelength dependence. This is particularly true of mineral dust and organic aerosols. However, these effects have been very difficult to estimate on a global basis since the satellite instruments that operate in the visible are primarily sensitive to aerosol scattering. A notable exception is the UV Aerosol Index (AI), first produced using NASA's Nimbus-7 TOMS data. AI provides a direct measure of the effect of aerosol absorption on the backscattered UV radiation in both clear and cloudy conditions, as well as over snow/ice. Although many types of aerosols produce a distinct color cast in the visible images, and aerosols absorption over clouds and snow/ice could, in principle be detected from their color, so far this technique has worked well only in the UV. In this talk we will discuss what we have learned from the long-term record of AI produced from TOMS and Aura/OMI about the possible role of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality in the Central American region.

  15. Estimation of focal and extra-focal radiation profiles based on Gaussian modeling in medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Anai, Shigeo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Araki, Fujio; Matsuki, Takaomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Nobuo

    2011-07-01

    The X-ray source or focal radiation is one of the factors that can degrade the conformal field edge in stereotactic body radiotherapy. For that reason, it is very important to estimate the total focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators, which consists of X-ray focal-spot radiation and extra-focal radiation profiles. Our purpose in this study was to propose an experimental method for estimating the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators based on triple Gaussian functions. We measured the total X-ray focal radiation profiles of the accelerators by moving a slit in conjunction with a photon field p-type silicon diode. The slit width was changed so that the extra-focal radiation could be optimally included in the total focal radiation. The total focal radiation profiles of an accelerator at 4-MV and 10-MV energies were approximated with a combination of triple Gaussian functions, which correspond to the focal-spot radiation, extra-focal radiation, and radiation transmitted through the slit assembly. As a result, the ratios of the Gaussian peak value of the extra-focal radiation to that of the focal spot for 4 and 10 MV were 0.077 and 0.159, respectively. The peak widths of the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles were 0.57 and 25.0 mm for 4 MV, respectively, and 0.60 and 22.0 mm for 10 MV, respectively. We concluded that the proposed focal radiation profile model based on the triple Gaussian functions may be feasible for estimating the X-ray focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles.

  16. Estimation of green leaf area index of crops: Sensitivity of vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Gitelson, A. A.; Peng, Y.; Vina, A.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Rundquist, D.

    2011-12-01

    Green leaf area index (gLAI) is an important biophysical characteristic used in climate, ecological, and crop yield models. There is a need for a rapid and accurate estimation of gLAI on a global scale. Traditionally used vegetation indices (VIs) have shown to saturate at moderate-to-high gLAI (e.g. NDVI) or are less sensitive to gLAI at low-to-moderate values of gLAI. The goal of this study was to determine the best suitable VIs for use in a combined vegetation index for estimating gLAI in crops in the entire wide dynamic range of gLAI. The study area consisted of three fields in eastern Nebraska, USA under different management conditions for the years 2001-2008 for a total of 24 field-years. The dynamic range of maize was 0-6.5 m2/m2 and soybean was 0-5.5 m2/m2. NDVI-like indices were the most sensitive to gLAI below 3 m2/m2 while Simple Ratio (SR) and the Chlorophyll Indices (CI) were more sensitive to gLAI above 3 m2/m2. MTCI was the only VI that was equally sensitive to gLAI in the entire dynamic range; however, it was species-specific. Only Red Edge NDVI and CIred edge were not species-specific. In order to benefit from different sensitivities of the indices to low-to-moderate and moderate-to-high gLAI, this study suggests building relationships using VIs in specific dynamic ranges of maximal sensitivity to gLAI. We suggest using NDVI and Simple Ratio (maize: RMSE = 0.71 m2/m2; soybean: RMSE = 0.53 m2/m2) for MODIS data. We suggest the using non-species-specific VIs, Red Edge NDVI and CIred edge (RMSE = 0.63 m2/m2) for MERIS data. For users which prefer to use a single index, we suggest a scaled combined vegetation index using Red Edge NDVI and CIred edge (RMSE = 0.56 m2/m2); however, this approach reduces the sensitivity of the specific indices in the dynamic range of which they are most sensitive.

  17. A ΔdinB mutation that sensitizes Escherichia coli to the lethal effects of UV- and X-radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Chong W; Franco, Magdalena; Vargas, Doris M; Hudman, Deborah A; White, Steven J; Fowler, Robert G; Sargentini, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    The DinB (PolIV) protein of Escherichia coli participates in several cellular functions. We investigated a dinB mutation, Δ(dinB-yafN)883(::kan) [referred to as ΔdinB883], which strongly sensitized E. coli cells to both UV- and X-radiation killing. Earlier reports indicated dinB mutations had no obvious effect on UV radiation sensitivity which we confirmed by showing that normal UV radiation sensitivity is conferred by the ΔdinB749 allele. Compared to a wild-type strain, the ΔdinB883 mutant was most sensitive (160-fold) in early to mid-logarithmic growth phase and much less sensitive (twofold) in late log or stationary phases, thus showing a growth phase-dependence for UV radiation sensitivity. This sensitizing effect of ΔdinB883 is assumed to be completely dependent upon the presence of UmuDC protein; since the ΔdinB883 mutation did not sensitize the ΔumuDC strain to UV radiation killing throughout log phase and early stationary phase growth. The DNA damage checkpoint activity of UmuDC was clearly affected by ΔdinB883 as shown by testing a umuC104 ΔdinB883 double-mutant. The sensitivities of the ΔumuDC strain and the ΔdinB883 ΔumuDC double-mutant strain were significantly greater than for the ΔdinB883 strain, suggesting that the ΔdinB883 allele only partially suppresses UmuDC activity. The ΔdinB883 mutation partially sensitized (fivefold) uvrA and uvrB strains to UV radiation, but did not sensitize a ΔrecA strain. A comparison of the DNA sequences of the ΔdinB883 allele with the sequences of the Δ(dinB-yafN)882(::kan) and ΔdinB749 alleles, which do not sensitize cells to UV radiation, revealed ΔdinB883 is likely a "gain-of-function" mutation. The ΔdinB883 allele encodes the first 54 amino acids of wild-type DinB followed by 29 predicted residues resulting from the continuation of the dinB reading frame into an adjacent insertion fragment. The resulting polypeptide is proposed to interfere directly or indirectly with UmuDC function(s) involved

  18. Lung tumorigenic response of strain A mice exposed to hypoxic cell sensitizers alone and in combination with gamma-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, T.A.; Theiss, J.C.; Grdina, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of metronidazole, misonidazole, and desmethylmisonidazole on the induction of lung adenomas in the strain A mouse was examined. Two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rads of gamma-radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for 3 weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased (p less than 0.10) in the group receiving the higher dose (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from results for the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with that in the control group. Thus, under the experimental exposure conditions used in this investigation, which were somewhat similar to the exposure conditions occurring in clinical treatment, each of the hypoxic cell sensitizers tested failed to sensitize significantly the mice to the carcinogenic effects of gamma-radiation.

  19. Sensitivity of radiative properties of persistent contrails to the ice water path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez de León, R.; Krämer, M.; Lee, D. S.; Thelen, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The dependence of the radiative properties of persistent linear contrails on the variability of their ice water path is assessed in a two-stream radiative transfer model. It is assumed that the ice water content and the effective size of ice crystals in aged contrails do not differ from those observed in natural cirrus; the parameterization of these two variables, based on in situ observations, allows a more realistic representation than the common assumption of fixed values for the contrail optical depth and ice crystal effective radius. The results show that the large variability in ice water content that aged contrails may share with natural cirrus, together with an assumed contrail vertical thickness between 220 and 1000 m, translate into a wider range of radiative forcings from linear contrails (0.3 to 51.6 mW m-2) than that reported in previous studies, including IPCC's (3 to 30 mW m-2). The derivation of a best estimate within this range is complicated by the fact that the ice water contents measured in situ imply mean optical depths between 0.08 and 0.32, coinciding with the range commonly assumed in contrail studies, while optical depths derived from satellite ice water content retrievals are significantly larger (0.51-2.02). Further field and modelling studies of the temporal evolution of contrail properties will thus be needed to reduce the uncertainties associated with the values assumed in large scale contrail studies.

  20. Effect of ice-albedo feedback on global sensitivity in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Stone, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feedback between the ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. This ice-albedo feedback amplifies global sensitivity by 26 and 39%, respectively, for assumptions of fixed cloud altitude and fixed cloud temperature. The global sensitivity is not affected significantly if the latitudinal variations of mean solar zenith angle and cloud cover are included in the global model. The differences in global sensitivity between one-dimensional radiative-convective models and energy balance models are examined. It is shown that the models are in close agreement when the same feedback mechanisms are included. The one-dimensional radiative-convective model with ice-albedo feedback included is used to compute the equilibrium ice line as a function of solar constant.

  1. Gravitational wave radiation by LIGO-type detectors and its reciprocity relation with the detector's fundamental quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Belinda; Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    We relate the radiation of gravitational waves (GW) by a light interferometer with cavity arms (such as LIGO) to its quantum limited sensitivity as a detector of GW's, thereby demonstrating a reciprocity relation between the interferometer's function as a detector and emitter. We derive the pairwise interactions among the cavity optical field, the cavity end mirror, and the gravitational perturbation from the action principle. We quantize these degrees of freedom to calculate the GW's generated by a quantum object. We find that the rate of gravitational wave generation is related to the so-called quantum Cramer Rao bound of the detector, which is a general result from linear measurement theory that gives the fundamental limit to a detector's sensitivity. We show that increasing the maximal sensitivity for the interferometer also increases its GW radiation. This finding may point towards a new paradigm for improving detector sensitivity by maximizing GW radiator.

  2. The method of tailored sensitivity kernels for GRACE mass change estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Andreas; Horwath, Martin

    2016-04-01

    To infer mass changes (such as mass changes of an ice sheet) from time series of GRACE spherical harmonic solutions, two basic approaches (with many variants) exist: The regional integration approach (or direct approach) is based on surface mass changes (equivalent water height, EWH) from GRACE and integrates those with specific integration kernels. The forward modeling approach (or mascon approach, or inverse approach) prescribes a finite set of mass change patterns and adjusts the amplitudes of those patterns (in a least squares sense) to the GRACE gravity field changes. The present study reviews the theoretical framework of both approaches. We recall that forward modeling approaches ultimately estimate mass changes by linear functionals of the gravity field changes. Therefore, they implicitly apply sensitivity kernels and may be considered as special realizations of the regional integration approach. We show examples for sensitivity kernels intrinsic to forward modeling approaches. We then propose to directly tailor sensitivity kernels (or in other words: mass change estimators) by a formal optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of propagated GRACE solution errors and leakage errors. This approach involves the incorporation of information on the structure of GRACE errors and the structure of those mass change signals that are most relevant for leakage errors. We discuss the realization of this method, as applied within the ESA "Antarctic Ice Sheet CCI (Climate Change Initiative)" project. Finally, results for the Antarctic Ice Sheet in terms of time series of mass changes of individual drainage basins and time series of gridded EWH changes are presented.

  3. Bayesian methodology to estimate and update safety performance functions under limited data conditions: a sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Shahram; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Lord, Dominique; Fu, Liping

    2014-03-01

    In road safety studies, decision makers must often cope with limited data conditions. In such circumstances, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), which relies on asymptotic theory, is unreliable and prone to bias. Moreover, it has been reported in the literature that (a) Bayesian estimates might be significantly biased when using non-informative prior distributions under limited data conditions, and that (b) the calibration of limited data is plausible when existing evidence in the form of proper priors is introduced into analyses. Although the Highway Safety Manual (2010) (HSM) and other research studies provide calibration and updating procedures, the data requirements can be very taxing. This paper presents a practical and sound Bayesian method to estimate and/or update safety performance function (SPF) parameters combining the information available from limited data with the SPF parameters reported in the HSM. The proposed Bayesian updating approach has the advantage of requiring fewer observations to get reliable estimates. This paper documents this procedure. The adopted technique is validated by conducting a sensitivity analysis through an extensive simulation study with 15 different models, which include various prior combinations. This sensitivity analysis contributes to our understanding of the comparative aspects of a large number of prior distributions. Furthermore, the proposed method contributes to unification of the Bayesian updating process for SPFs. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the developed methodology. Therefore, the suggested approach offers considerable promise as a methodological tool to estimate and/or update baseline SPFs and to evaluate the efficacy of road safety countermeasures under limited data conditions.

  4. Modulation of DNA methylation levels sensitizes doxorubicin-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-02-05

    Chemoresistant tumors often fail to respond to other cytotoxic treatments such as radiation therapy. The mechanisms of chemo- and radiotherapy cross resistance are not fully understood and are believed to be epigenetic in nature. We hypothesize that MCF-7 cells and their doxorubicin-resistant variant MCF-7/DOX cells may exhibit different responses to ionizing radiation due to their dissimilar epigenetic status. Similar to previous studies, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells harbor much lower levels of global DNA methylation than MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells had lower background apoptosis levels and were less responsive to radiation than MCF-7 cells. Decreased radiation responsiveness correlated to significant global DNA hypomethylation in MCF-7/DOX cells. Here, for the first time, we show that the radiation resistance of MCF-7/DOX cells can be reversed by an epigenetic treatment - the application of methyl-donor SAM. SAM-mediated reversal of DNA methylation led to elevated radiation sensitivity in MCF-7/DOX cells. Contrarily, application of SAM on the radiation sensitive and higher methylated MCF-7 cells resulted in a decrease in their radiation responsiveness. This data suggests that a fine balance of DNA methylation is needed to insure proper radiation and drug responsiveness.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of point and parametric pedotransfer functions for estimating water retention of soils in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touil, Sami; Degre, Aurore; Nacer Chabaca, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Improving the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs) requires studying how prediction uncertainty can be apportioned to different sources of uncertainty in inputs. In this study, the question addressed was as follows: which variable input is the main or best complementary predictor of water retention, and at which water potential? Two approaches were adopted to generate PTFs: multiple linear regressions (MLRs) for point PTFs and multiple nonlinear regressions (MNLRs) for parametric PTFs. Reliability tests showed that point PTFs provided better estimates than parametric PTFs (root mean square error, RMSE: 0.0414 and 0.0444 cm3 cm-3, and 0.0613 and 0.0605 cm3 cm-3 at -33 and -1500 kPa, respectively). The local parametric PTFs provided better estimates than Rosetta PTFs at -33 kPa. No significant difference in accuracy, however, was found between the parametric PTFs and Rosetta H2 at -1500 kPa with RMSE values of 0.0605 cm3 cm-3 and 0.0636 cm3 cm-3, respectively. The results of global sensitivity analyses (GSAs) showed that the mathematical formalism of PTFs and their input variables reacted differently in terms of point pressure and texture. The point and parametric PTFs were sensitive mainly to the sand fraction in the fine- and medium-textural classes. The use of clay percentage (C %) and bulk density (BD) as inputs in the medium-textural class improved the estimation of PTFs at -33 kPa.

  6. Estimating price elasticities when there is smuggling: the sensitivity of smoking to price in Canada.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jonathan; Sen, Anindya; Stabile, Mark

    2003-09-01

    A central parameter for evaluating tax policies is the price elasticity of demand for cigarettes. But in many countries this parameter is difficult to estimate reliably due to widespread smuggling, which significantly biases estimates using legal sales data. An excellent example is Canada, where widespread smuggling in the early 1990s, in response to large tax increases, biases upwards the response of legal cigarette sales to price. We surmount this problem through two approaches: excluding the provinces and years where smuggling was greatest; and using household level expenditure data on smoking. These two approaches yield a tightly estimated elasticity in the range of -0.45 to -0.47. We also show that the sensitivity of smoking to price is much larger among lower income Canadians. In the context of recent behavioral models of smoking, whereby higher taxes reduce unwanted smoking among price sensitive populations, this finding suggests that cigarette taxes may not be as regressive as previously suggested. Finally, we show that price increases on cigarettes do not increase, and may actually decrease, consumption of alcohol; as a result, smuggling of cigarettes may have raised consumption of alcohol as well.

  7. Estimates of Surface Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation over North America from GOES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhavi, H. S.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.

    2006-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) rays have harmful effects on living organisms and plants. Information on UV radiation is also needed for modeling chemical processes in the atmosphere. Therefore, there is a wide interest in estimating UV flux reaching the earth surface. This led to the establishment of world-wide UV monitoring networks, yet, only satellites can provide large scale and homogeneous information. In addition to ozone, clouds and aerosols affect the surface UV radiation. These are highly variable in space and time which limits the applicability of point measurements to wider areas. Several algorithms have been developed for estimating UV flux from space-borne observations. These vary from simple parameterizations to full radiative transfer calculations. The most common limitations of these algorithms are related to their local dependence, satellite specific assumptions and/or large computational time requirement. We present an algorithm for estimating UV flux from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data. The methodology will utilize information derived from independent satellites such as ozone. It relies on transmission table based on the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The algorithm accounts for surface elevation variation, incorporates region dependent aerosol models and provides spectrally resolved output for UV flux at 5 nm interval. The algorithm is generic and can be adapted to different geographic regions. Initially, it will be implemented over North America for a period of about five years. The inferred UV values are being evaluated against ground observations as available from several networks over the United States and results will be presented at the meeting.

  8. Volcano deformation source parameters estimated from InSAR: Sensitivities to uncertainties in seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, Timothy; Donovan, Theodore; Feigl, Kurt L.; Haney, Matthew; Thurber, Clifford H.; Tung, Sui

    2016-04-01

    The eruption cycle of a volcano is controlled in part by the upward migration of magma. The characteristics of the magma flux produce a deformation signature at the Earth's surface. Inverse analyses use geodetic data to estimate strategic controlling parameters that describe the position and pressurization of a magma chamber at depth. The specific distribution of material properties controls how observed surface deformation translates to source parameter estimates. Seismic tomography models describe the spatial distributions of material properties that are necessary for accurate models of volcano deformation. This study investigates how uncertainties in seismic tomography models propagate into variations in the estimates of volcano deformation source parameters inverted from geodetic data. We conduct finite element model-based nonlinear inverse analyses of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example. We then analyze the estimated parameters and their uncertainties to characterize the magma chamber. Analyses are performed separately for models simulating a pressurized chamber embedded in a homogeneous domain as well as for a domain having a heterogeneous distribution of material properties according to seismic tomography. The estimated depth of the source is sensitive to the distribution of material properties. The estimated depths for the homogeneous and heterogeneous domains are 2666 ± 42 and 3527 ± 56 m below mean sea level, respectively (99% confidence). A Monte Carlo analysis indicates that uncertainties of the seismic tomography cannot account for this discrepancy at the 99% confidence level. Accounting for the spatial distribution of elastic properties according to seismic tomography significantly improves the fit of the deformation model predictions and significantly influences estimates for parameters that describe the location of a pressurized magma chamber.

  9. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  10. Estimating Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR) at the Earth's surface from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Current satellite algorithms to estimate photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) at the earth' s surface are reviewed. PAR is deduced either from an insolation estimate or obtained directly from top-of-atmosphere solar radiances. The characteristics of both approaches are contrasted and typical results are presented. The inaccuracies reported, about 10 percent and 6 percent on daily and monthly time scales, respectively, are useful to model oceanic and terrestrial primary productivity. At those time scales variability due to clouds in the ratio of PAR and insolation is reduced, making it possible to deduce PAR directly from insolation climatologies (satellite or other) that are currently available or being produced. Improvements, however, are needed in conditions of broken cloudiness and over ice/snow. If not addressed properly, calibration/validation issues may prevent quantitative use of the PAR estimates in studies of climatic change. The prospects are good for an accurate, long-term climatology of PAR over the globe.

  11. Photo detection process and power spectrum estimation of optical radiation by the multichannel resonant spectrum analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaletz, O. D.; Paraskun, A. S.; Vaganov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of receiving of an energy spectrum estimation of optical radiations in the new analyzer of optical signals is considered. It is the parallel resonant optical spectrum analyzer (SPECTRUM ANALYZER). Its resolving system is a set of narrow-band optical resonators in the form of interference filters. Each optical resonator is equivalent to a system with lumped parameters. This allows us to consider only oscillations of an optical field in the form of a scalar functions and adopt as a model of analyzed signal harmonized scalar random process. The photodetector operation and average of photocurrent using an integrator and integrating circuit is considered too. On the basis of the application prolate entire spheroidal wave function theory energy spectrum estimation by the integral of photocurrent is obtained. This energy spectrum estimation is consistent and asymptotically unbiased.

  12. Estimation of Eu(3+) in bulk uranium by ligand sensitized fluorescence in dimethyl sulphoxide.

    PubMed

    Maji, S; Kumar, Satendra; Sankaran, K

    2014-12-10

    Ligand sensitized fluorescence of europium ion using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as a sensitizing ligand and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) as a solvent is studied for the first time. TTA ligand enhances the fluorescence of Eu(3+) by a factor of 40000 in DMSO. Linearity is obtained for a concentration range of 0.076-7.6ng/mL of Eu(3+) with a detection limit of 7.6pg/mL. The quenching of Eu(3+)-TTA fluorescence by uranium matrix was studied in different solvents and found to be less in DMSO. Consequently, estimation of Eu(3+) in a large excess of uranium becomes a possibility without the need to separate uranium from the solution, which has been demonstrated in this paper. Satisfactory results are obtained when Eu(3+) is present at a concentration of 0.6μg/g in uranium.

  13. Confidence Interval Estimation for Sensitivity to the Early Diseased Stage Based on Empirical Likelihood.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tuochuan; Tian, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Many disease processes can be divided into three stages: the non-diseased stage: the early diseased stage, and the fully diseased stage. To assess the accuracy of diagnostic tests for such diseases, various summary indexes have been proposed, such as volume under the surface (VUS), partial volume under the surface (PVUS), and the sensitivity to the early diseased stage given specificity and the sensitivity to the fully diseased stage (P2). This paper focuses on confidence interval estimation for P2 based on empirical likelihood. Simulation studies are carried out to assess the performance of the new methods compared to the existing parametric and nonparametric ones. A real dataset from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is analyzed.

  14. An estimation of radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from sediments collected near a Canadian uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Liber, K

    2001-10-01

    A new method is described for calculating radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from radionuclide concentrations in freshwater sediment. Both internal and external radiation doses were estimated for all 14 principal radionuclides of the uranium-238 decay series. Sediments were collected from three sites downstream of a uranium mining operation in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Sediments from two sites, located approximately 1.6 and 4.4 km downstream from mining operations, yielded absorbed doses to both larval midges, Chironomus tentans, and adult amphipods, Hyalella azteca, of 59-60 and 19 mGy/year, respectively, compared to 3.2 mGy/year for a nearby control site. External beta radiation from protactinium-234 (234Pa) and alpha radiation from uranium (U) contributed most of the dose at the impacted sites, whereas polonium-210 (210Po) was most important at the control site. If a weighting factor of 20 was employed for the greater biological effect of alpha vs. beta and gamma radiation, then total equivalent doses rose to 540-560 mGy/year at the site closest to uranium operations. Such equivalent doses are above the 360-mGy/year no-observed-effect level for reproductive effects in vertebrates from gamma radiation exposure. Data are not available to determine the effect of such doses on benthic organisms, but they are high enough to warrant concern. Detrimental effects have been observed in H. azteca at similar uranium concentration in laboratory toxicity tests, but it remains unclear whether the radiotoxicity or the chemotoxicity of uranium is responsible for these effects.

  15. Dose to medium versus dose to water as an estimator of dose to sensitive skeletal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, B. R. B.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether dose to medium, Dm, or dose to water, Dw, provides a better estimate of the dose to the radiosensitive red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSC) in spongiosa, or cancellous bone. This is addressed in the larger context of the ongoing debate over whether Dm or Dw should be specified in Monte Carlo calculated radiotherapy treatment plans. The study uses voxelized, virtual human phantoms, FAX06/MAX06 (female/male), incorporated into an EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to perform Monte Carlo dose calculations during simulated irradiation by a 6 MV photon beam from an Elekta SL25 accelerator. Head and neck, chest and pelvis irradiations are studied. FAX06/MAX06 include precise modelling of spongiosa based on µCT images, allowing dose to RBM and BSC to be resolved from the dose to bone. Modifications to the FAX06/MAX06 user codes are required to score Dw and Dm in spongiosa. Dose uncertainties of ~1% (BSC, RBM) or ~0.5% (Dm, Dw) are obtained after up to 5 days of simulations on 88 CPUs. Clinically significant differences (>5%) between Dm and Dw are found only in cranial spongiosa, where the volume fraction of trabecular bone (TBVF) is high (55%). However, for spongiosa locations where there is any significant difference between Dm and Dw, comparisons of differential dose volume histograms (DVHs) and average doses show that Dw provides a better overall estimate of dose to RBM and BSC. For example, in cranial spongiosa the average Dm underestimates the average dose to sensitive tissue by at least 5%, while average Dw is within ~1% of the average dose to sensitive tissue. Thus, it is better to specify Dw than Dm in Monte Carlo treatment plans, since Dw provides a better estimate of dose to sensitive tissue in bone, the only location where the difference is likely to be clinically significant.

  16. Estimating the direct aerosol radiative effect over China using multi-sensor satellite remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Anu-Maija; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    The quantification of aerosol radiative effects is complex and large uncertainties still exist, mainly due to the high spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol concentration and mass as well as their relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere. In this work a multi-sensor satellite based approach is studied for defining the direct short wave aerosol radiative effect (ADRE) over China. ADRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is defined as the difference between the net solar flux with (F) and without (F0) aerosols. The negative values of ADRE correspond to increased outgoing radiation and planetary cooling, whereas positive values correspond to decreased outgoing radiation at TOA and increased atmospheric warming. To derive instantaneous ADRE from the satellite observations, the challenge is to estimate the value for F0. In this work F0 is derived using the colocated observations of CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radian Energy System) short wave broad band TOA-flux and MODIS (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Assuming that aerosol type does not change systematically within a 0.5 deg. grid cell over a month, a linear relationship is established between the TOA-flux and AOD when AOD < 2.0. Using the linear fit an estimate for F0 can be obtained and F is the monthly mean of CERES observations. However, there are several other parameters affecting the observed TOA flux than the aerosol loading and aerosol type, such as solar zenith angle, water vapour, land surface albedo and Earth-Sun distance. Changes in these parameters within a grid cell over a month inflect the correlation. To minimize the effect of zenith angle, water vapour, and Earth-Sun distance the CERES fluxes are normalized before the linear fitting using reference fluxes calculated with a radiative transfer code (Libradtran). The normalization, especially to a fixed zenith angle increases the correlation between TOA flux and AOD significantly. For a comparison theF0 is

  17. Methodologies for Estimating Future Climate Change Scenarios of Surface Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of methods are available to estimate future solar radiation (SR) scenarios at spatial scales that are appropriate for local climate change impact assessment, but no clear guidelines are available in the literature to decide which methodologies are most suitable for different applications. Three methodologies to guide the estimation of SR are discussed in this study. In Case 1, SR is measured; in Case 2, SR is measured but sparse; and in Case 3, SR is not measured. In Case 1, future SR scenarios are derived using several downscaling methodologies that transfer the large-scale information simulated by global climate models (GCM) to a local scale (measurements). In Case 2, SR is first estimated at the local scale for a longer time period using sparse measured records, then future scenarios are derived using several downscaling methodologies. In Case 3, SR is first estimated at a regional scale for a longer time-period using complete or sparse measured records of SR, from which SR at local scale is estimated. Finally, in Case 3 methodology, the future scenarios are derived using several downscaling methodologies. A lack of observed SR data, has hindered various climate change impact studies. So Case 3 methodology is elaborated using Support vector machine based downscaling. Future scenarios of SR were estimated monthly from simulations of the third-generation Canadian General Circulation Model (CGCM3) for various SRES emission scenarios (A1B, A2, B1, and COMMIT).

  18. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 131I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively. PMID:26770031

  19. Simple new methods to estimate global solar radiation based on meteorological data in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, Mossad

    2004-01-01

    Three simple methods to estimate global solar radiation are proposed in addition to (Solar Energy 63 (1998) 147). All were tested seasonally and at different sky conditions at seven locations in Egypt. The methods use ground-based measurements of maximum and minimum temperature, daily mean of cloud cover and extraterrestrial global radiation. Average of root mean square differences (RMSD) for a comparison between observed and estimated global radiation for all locations tested was around 10% for the new methods and 13% for Supit-Van Kappel method. The coefficient of determination R2 is higher for the new methods for all tested locations. Better results were obtained when applying the new methods to different seasons. The differences in root mean square error (RMSE) between the new methods and Ångstrom-Prescott method that is based on sunshine duration data were less than 1.0 MJ m -2 day -1 at all sites. On the whole, the performance statistics demonstrate that the new methods are better when compared by Ångstrom-Prescott method.

  20. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Ha, Wi-Ho; Seo, Songwon; Jin, Young Woo; Jeong, Kyu Hwan; Yoon, Hae-Jung; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (131)I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively.

  1. Sensitivity of contemporary sea level trends in a global ocean state estimate to effects of geothermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Heimbach, Patrick; Ponte, Rui M.; Forget, Gaël

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal fluxes constitute a sizable fraction of the present-day Earth net radiative imbalance and corresponding ocean heat uptake. Model simulations of contemporary sea level that impose a geothermal flux boundary condition are becoming increasingly common. To quantify the impact of geothermal fluxes on model estimates of contemporary (1993-2010) sea level changes, two ocean circulation model experiments are compared. The two simulations are based on a global ocean state estimate, produced by the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) consortium, and differ only with regard to whether geothermal forcing is applied as a boundary condition. Geothermal forcing raises the global-mean sea level trend by 0.11 mm yr-1 in the perturbation experiment by suppressing a cooling trend present in the baseline solution below 2000 m. The imposed forcing also affects regional sea level trends. The Southern Ocean is particularly sensitive. In this region, anomalous heat redistribution due to geothermal fluxes results in steric height trends of up to ± 1 mm yr-1 in the perturbation experiment relative to the baseline simulation. Analysis of a passive tracer experiment suggests that the geothermal input itself is transported by horizontal diffusion, resulting in more thermal expansion over deeper ocean basins. Thermal expansion in the perturbation simulation gives rise to bottom pressure increase over shallower regions and decrease over deeper areas relative to the baseline run, consistent with mass redistribution expected for deep ocean warming. These results elucidate the influence of geothermal fluxes on sea level rise and global heat budgets in model simulations of contemporary ocean circulation and climate.

  2. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis for a mathematical model with time delays of leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândea, Doina; Halanay, Andrei; Rǎdulescu, Rodica; Tǎlmaci, Rodica

    2017-01-01

    We consider a system of nonlinear delay differential equations that describes the interaction between three competing cell populations: healthy, leukemic and anti-leukemia T cells involved in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) under treatment with Imatinib. The aim of this work is to establish which model parameters are the most important in the success or failure of leukemia remission under treatment using a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters. For the most significant parameters of the model which affect the evolution of CML disease during Imatinib treatment we try to estimate the realistic values using some experimental data. For these parameters, steady states are calculated and their stability is analyzed and biologically interpreted.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of the add-on price estimate for the silicon web growth process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The web growth process, a silicon-sheet technology option, developed for the flat plate solar array (FSA) project, was examined. Base case data for the technical and cost parameters for the technical and commercial readiness phase of the FSA project are projected. The process add on price, using the base case data for cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials and utilities, and the production parameters such as growth rate and run length, using a computer program developed specifically to do the sensitivity analysis with improved price estimation are analyzed. Silicon price, sheet thickness and cell efficiency are also discussed.

  4. Sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to 100 years of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Ruud; Stagge, James; Tallaksen, Lena; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2015-04-01

    Evaporation from the vegetated surface is the largest loss term in many, if not the most, water balance studies on earth. As a consequence, an accurate representation of evaporation fluxes is required for appropriate quantification of surface runoff, the soil moisture budget, transpiration, recharge and groundwater processes. However, despite being a key component of the water balance, evaporation figures are usually associated with large uncertainties, as this term is difficult to measure or estimate by modeling. Many modeling frameworks have used the concept of potential evaporation, often estimated for different vegetation classes by multiplying the evaporation from a reference surface ('reference evaporation') with crop specific scaling factors ('crop factors'). Though this two-step potential evaporation approach undoubtedly has practical advantages, the empirical nature of both reference evaporation methods and crop factors limits its usability in extrapolations under non-stationary climatic conditions. We quantified the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates for different vegetation classes using the two-step approach when calibrated using a non-stationary climate. We used the past century's time series of observed climate, containing non-stationary signals of multi-decadal atmospheric oscillations, global warming, and global dimming/brightening, to evaluate the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to the choice and length of the calibration period. We show that using empirical coefficients outside their calibration range may lead to systematic differences between process-based and empirical reference evaporation methods, and systematic errors in estimated potential evaporation components. Our hydrological models are to varying extent regression models, which limits their general applicability, and the estimation of potential evaporation is closely linked to climate variability. With our analysis, we want to raise awareness and to provide a

  5. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81

  6. Climate sensitivity estimated from temperature reconstructions of the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Urban, Nathan M; Shakun, Jeremy D; Mahowald, Natalie M; Clark, Peter U; Bartlein, Patrick J; Mix, Alan C; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2011-12-09

    Assessing the impact of future anthropogenic carbon emissions is currently impeded by uncertainties in our knowledge of equilibrium climate sensitivity to atmospheric carbon dioxide doubling. Previous studies suggest 3 kelvin (K) as the best estimate, 2 to 4.5 K as the 66% probability range, and nonzero probabilities for much higher values, the latter implying a small chance of high-impact climate changes that would be difficult to avoid. Here, combining extensive sea and land surface temperature reconstructions from the Last Glacial Maximum with climate model simulations, we estimate a lower median (2.3 K) and reduced uncertainty (1.7 to 2.6 K as the 66% probability range, which can be widened using alternate assumptions or data subsets). Assuming that paleoclimatic constraints apply to the future, as predicted by our model, these results imply a lower probability of imminent extreme climatic change than previously thought.

  7. Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of Lassa, vaccinia, and Ebola viruses dried on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Lytle, C David

    2011-03-01

    Germicidal UV (also known as UVC) provides a means to decontaminate infected environments as well as a measure of viral sensitivity to sunlight. The present study determined UVC inactivation slopes (and derived D(37) values) of viruses dried onto nonporous (glass) surfaces. The data obtained indicate that the UV resistance of Lassa virus is higher than that of Ebola virus. The UV sensitivity of vaccinia virus (a surrogate for variola virus) appeared intermediate between that of the two virulent viruses studied. In addition, the three viruses dried on surfaces showed a relatively small but significant population of virions (from 3 to 10 % of virus in the inoculum) that appeared substantially more protected by their environment from the effect of UV than the majority of virions tested. The findings reported in this study should assist in estimating the threat posed by the persistence of virus in environments contaminated during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  8. Estimation of radiation effects in the front-end electronics of an ILC electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Targett-Adams, C.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.

    2008-08-01

    The front-end electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter of an International Linear Collider detector are situated in a radiation environment. This requires the effect of the radiation on the performance of the electronics, specifically FPGAs, to be examined. In this paper we study the flux, particle spectra and deposited doses at the front-end electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter of a detector at the ILC. We also study the occupancy of the electromagnetic calorimeter. These estimates are compared with measurements, e.g. of the radiation damage of FPGAs, done elsewhere. The outcome of the study shows that the radiation doses and the annual flux is low enough to allow today's FPGAs to operate. The Single Event Upset rate, however, lies between 14 min and 12 h depending on the FPGA used and therefore needs to be considered in the design of the data acquisition system of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The occupancy is about 0.002 per bunch train not taking into account the effect of noise which depends on the choice of the detector.

  9. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment.

  10. An examination of sources of sensitivity of consumer surplus estimates in travel cost models.

    PubMed

    Blaine, Thomas W; Lichtkoppler, Frank R; Bader, Timothy J; Hartman, Travis J; Lucente, Joseph E

    2015-03-15

    We examine sensitivity of estimates of recreation demand using the Travel Cost Method (TCM) to four factors. Three of the four have been routinely and widely discussed in the TCM literature: a) Poisson verses negative binomial regression; b) application of Englin correction to account for endogenous stratification; c) truncation of the data set to eliminate outliers. A fourth issue we address has not been widely modeled: the potential effect on recreation demand of the interaction between income and travel cost. We provide a straightforward comparison of all four factors, analyzing the impact of each on regression parameters and consumer surplus estimates. Truncation has a modest effect on estimates obtained from the Poisson models but a radical effect on the estimates obtained by way of the negative binomial. Inclusion of an income-travel cost interaction term generally produces a more conservative but not a statistically significantly different estimate of consumer surplus in both Poisson and negative binomial models. It also generates broader confidence intervals. Application of truncation, the Englin correction and the income-travel cost interaction produced the most conservative estimates of consumer surplus and eliminated the statistical difference between the Poisson and the negative binomial. Use of the income-travel cost interaction term reveals that for visitors who face relatively low travel costs, the relationship between income and travel demand is negative, while it is positive for those who face high travel costs. This provides an explanation of the ambiguities on the findings regarding the role of income widely observed in the TCM literature. Our results suggest that policies that reduce access to publicly owned resources inordinately impact local low income recreationists and are contrary to environmental justice.

  11. Reducing the effect of respiration in baroreflex sensitivity estimation with adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Tiinanen, Suvi; Tulppo, Mikko; Seppänen, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac baroreflex is described by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) from blood pressure and heart rate interval (RRi) fluctuations. However, respiration affects both blood pressure and RRi via mechanisms that are not necessarily of baroreflex origin. To separate the effects of baroreflex and respiration, metronome-guided breathing in a high frequency band (HF, 0.25-0.4 Hz) and a low frequency spectral band (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) have therefore been commonly used for BRS estimation. The controlled breathing may, however, change the natural functioning of the autonomic system and interfere BRS estimates. To enable usage of spontaneous breathing, we propose an adaptive LMS-based filter for removing the respiration effect from the BRS estimates. ECG, continuous blood pressure and respiration were measured during 5 min spontaneous and 5 min controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz in healthy males (n = 24, 33+/-7 years). BRS was calculated with spectral methods from the LF band with and without filtering. In those subjects whose spontaneous breathing rate was <0.15 Hz, the BRS(LF) values were overestimated, whereas the adaptive filtering reduced the bias significantly. As a conclusion, the adaptive filter reduces the distorting effect of respiration on BRS values, which enables more accurate estimation of BRS and the usage of spontaneous breathing as a measurement protocol.

  12. Locally Estimated Hemodynamic Response Function and Activation Detection Sensitivity in Heroin-Cue Reactivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Balajoo, Somayeh; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A fixed hemodynamic response function (HRF) is commonly used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis. However, HRF may vary from region to region and subject to subject. We investigated the effect of locally estimated HRF (in functionally homogenous parcels) on activation detection sensitivity in a heroin cue reactivity study. Methods: We proposed a novel exploratory method for brain parcellation based on a probabilistic model to segregate the brain into spatially connected and functionally homogeneous components. Then, we estimated HRF and detected activated regions in response to an experimental task in each parcel using a joint detection estimation (JDE) method. We compared the proposed JDE method with the general linear model (GLM) that uses a fixed HRF and is implemented in FEAT (as a part of FMRIB Software Library, version 4.1). Results: 1) Regions detected by JDE are larger than those detected by fixed HRF, 2) In group analysis, JDE found areas of activation not detected by fixed HRF. It detected drug craving a priori “regions-of-interest” in the limbic lobe (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC], posterior cingulate cortex [PCC] and cingulate gyrus), basal ganglia, especially striatum (putamen and head of caudate), and cerebellum in addition to the areas detected by the fixed HRF method, 3) JDE obtained higher Z-values of local maxima compared to those obtained by fixed HRF. Conclusion: In our study of heroin cue reactivity, our proposed method (that estimates HRF locally) outperformed the conventional GLM that uses a fixed HRF. PMID:27872691

  13. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy.

  14. Targeting Aurora Kinase A enhances radiation sensitivity of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sujatha; Alimova, Irina; Tello, Tiffany; Harris, Peter S; Knipstein, Jeffrey A; Donson, Andrew M; Foreman, Nicholas K; Liu, Arthur K; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are rare, highly malignant, embryonal CNS tumors with a poor prognosis. Therapy relies on highly toxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To improve outcomes and decrease morbidity, more targeted therapy is required. Gene expression analysis revealed elevated expression of multiple kinases in ATRT tissues. Aurora Kinase A was one of the candidate kinases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of Aurora Kinase A inhibition in ATRT cell lines. Our analysis revealed that inhibition of Aurora Kinase A induces cell death in ATRT cells and the small molecule inhibitor MLN 8237 sensitizes these cells to radiation. Furthermore, inhibition of Aurora Kinase A resulted in decreased activity of pro-proliferative signaling pathways. These data indicate that inhibition of Aurora Kinase A is a promising small molecule target for ATRT therapy.

  15. Radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens in meat byproducts with different packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Hae In; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Nam, Ki Chang; Kwon, Joong Ho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine radiation sensitivity of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in edible meat byproducts. Seven beef byproducts (heart, liver, lung, lumen, omasum, large intestine, and small intestine) and four pork byproducts (heart, large intestine, liver, and small intestine) were used. Electron beam irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of pathogenic microorganisms in meat byproducts and no viable cells were detected in both aerobically- and vacuum-packaged samples irradiated at 4 kGy. Meat byproducts packed under vacuum had higher D10 value than the ones packed aerobically. No significant difference was observed between the D10 values of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes inoculated in either aerobically or vacuum packaged samples. These results suggest that low-dose electron beam irradiation can significantly decrease microbial numbers and reduce the risk of meat byproduct contamination by the foodborne pathogens.

  16. Numerical forecasting of radiation fog. Part I: Numerical model and sensitivity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bergot, T.; Guedalia, D. )

    1994-06-01

    To improve the forecast of dense radiative fogs, a method has been developed using a one-dimensional model of the nocturnal boundary layer forced by the mesoscale fields provided by a 3D limited-area operational model. The 1D model involves a treatment of soil-atmosphere exchanges and a parameterization of turbulence in stable layers in order to correctly simulate the nocturnal atmospheric cooling. Various sensitivity tests have been carried out to evaluate the influence of the main input parameters of the model (geostrophic wind, horizontal advections, cloud cover, soil moisture, etc.) on the predicted fog characteristics. The principal result concerns the difficulty of obtaining accurate forecasts in the case of fog appearing in the middle or at the end of the night, when the local atmospheric cooling is weak. 33 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis on Fu-Liou-Gu Radiative Transfer Model for different lidar aerosol and cloud profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Madonna, Fabio; Rosoldi, Marco; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol and cloud impact on climate change is evaluated in terms of enhancement or reduction of the radiative energy, or heat, available in the atmosphere and at the Earth's surface, from the surface (SFC) to the Top Of the Atmosphere (TOA) covering a spectral range from the UV (extraterrestrial shortwave solar radiation) to the far-IR (outgoing terrestrial longwave radiation). Systematic Lidar network measurements from permanent observational sites across the globe are available from the beginning of this current millennium. From the retrieved lidar atmospheric extinction profiles, inputted in the Fu-Liou-Gu (FLG) Radiative Transfer code, it is possible to evaluate the net radiative effect and heating rate of the different aerosol species and clouds. Nevertheless, the lidar instruments may use different techniques (elastic lidar, Raman lidar, multi-wavelength lidar, etc) that translate into uncertainty of the lidar extinction retrieval. The goal of this study is to assess, applying a MonteCarlo technique and the FLG Radiative Transfer model, the sensitivity in calculating the net radiative effect and heating rate of aerosols and clouds for the different lidar techniques, using both synthetic and real lidar data. This sensitivity study is the first step to implement an automatic algorithm to retrieve the net radiative forcing effect of aerosols and clouds from the long records of aerosol measurements available in the frame of EARLINET and MPLNET lidar networks.

  18. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  19. Traversal of cells by radiation and absorbed fraction estimates for electrons and alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.; Taner, A.C.; Kerr, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration of the pathlength which radiation traverses in a cell is central to algorithms for estimating energy deposition on a cellular level. Distinct pathlength distributions occur for radionuclides: (1) uniformly distributed in space about the cell (referred to as -randomness); (2) uniformly distributed on the surface of the cell (S-randomness); and (3) uniformly distributed within the cell volume (I-randomness). For a spherical cell of diameter d, the mean pathlengths are 2/3d, 1/2d, and 3/4d, respectively, for these distributions. Algorithms for simulating the path of radiation through a cell are presented and the absorbed fraction in the cell and its nucleus are tabulated for low energy electrons and alpha particles emitted on the surface of spherical cells. The algorithms and absorbed fraction data should be of interest to those concerned with the dosimetry of radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

    2007-12-14

    This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

  1. Fetal radiation dose estimates for I-131 sodium iodide in cases where conception occurs after administration

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    After administration of I-131 to the female patient, the possibility of radiation exposure of the embryo/fetus exists if the patient becomes pregnant while radioiodine remains in the body. Fetal radiation dose estimates for such cases were calculated. Doses were calculated for various maternal thyroid uptakes and time intervals between administration and conception, including euthyroid and hyperthyroid cases. The maximum fetal dose calculating was about 9.8E-03 mGy/MBq, which occurred with 100% maternal thyroid uptake and a 1 week interval between administration and conception. Placental crossover of the small amount of radioiodine remaining 90 days after conception was also considered. Such crossover could result in an additional fetal dose of 9.8E-05 mGy/MBq and a maximum fetal thyroid self dose of 3.5E-04 mGy/MBq.

  2. Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) Modulates Oncogenic Features and Radiation Sensitivity in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsujiura, Masahiro; Mazack, Virginia; Sudol, Marius; Kaspar, Hanna G.; Nash, John; Carey, David J.; Gogoi, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    Background Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator and regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. We investigated the clinical and biological significance of YAP in endometrial cancer (EMCA). Methods YAP expression in 150 primary tumor tissues from patients with EMCA was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological data was assessed. The biological functions of YAP were determined in EMCA cell lines through knockdown/overexpression of YAP. The role of YAP in modulating radiation sensitivity was also investigated in EMCA cells. Results Increased nuclear YAP expression was significantly associated with higher grade, stage, lympho-vascular space invasion, postoperative recurrence/metastasis and overall survival in estrogen mediated EMCA, called type 1 cancer (p = 0.019,  = 0.028,  = 0.0008,  = 0.046 and  = 0.015, respectively). In multivariate analysis, nuclear YAP expression was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in type 1 EMCA. YAP knockdown by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.05), anchorage-dependent growth (p = 0.015) and migration/invasion (p<0.05), and a significant increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase (p = 0.002). Conversely, YAP overexpression promoted cell proliferation. Clonogenic assay demonstrated enhanced radiosensitivity by approximately 36% in YAP inhibited cells. Conclusions Since YAP functions as a transcriptional co-activator, its differential localization in the nucleus of cancer cells and subsequent impact on cell proliferation could have important consequences with respect to its role as an oncogene in EMCA. Nuclear YAP expression could be useful as a prognostic indicator or therapeutic target and predict radiation sensitivity in patients with EMCA. PMID:24972085

  3. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80-95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure which is uncoupled from its essential function in DSB repair. This could have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to radiosensitize tumors by affecting the DNA-PKcs function.

  4. Sensitivity of CAM5-simulated Arctic clouds and radiation to ice nucleation parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-06

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5, to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN concentration at all latitudes while changes in cloud amounts and properties are mainly seen at high- and midlatitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in midlevel clouds and a decrease in low-level clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path caused by the slowdown of the Bergeron–Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low-level cloud simulations over most of the Arctic but produces too many midlevel clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low-level clouds and their properties when compared with Arctic ground-based measurements. As a result, issues with the observations and the model–observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  5. Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN number concentrations at all latitudes while changes in cloud amount and cloud properties are mainly seen in high latitudes and middle latitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in mid-level clouds and a decrease in low clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and the large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path due to the slow-down of the Bergeron-Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low cloud simulations over most of the Arctic, but produces too many mid-level clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low clouds and their properties when compared to Arctic ground-based measurements. Issues with the observations and the model-observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  6. The sensitization of near-ultraviolet radiation killing of mammalian cells by the sunscreen agent para-aminobenzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Osgood, P.J.; Moss, S.H.; Davies, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    The wavelengths of sunlight considered to be responsible for erythema and skin cancer formation are in the range 290-340 nm. Formulated sunscreens usually contain an agent that absorbs in this wavelength region, and one of the most widely used is para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). Previous work has demonstrated the sensitization by PABA of the lethal and mutagenic effects of near-ultraviolet (UV) radiation in a model bacterial system. Experiments with the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line have now demonstrated sensitization by PABA of the lethal effect of near-UV radiation, the extent of which, after correction for absorption of UV radiation by PABA, bears a direct relationship to PABA concentration. The limitations of these results in predicting the response of human skin to the presence of PABA during exposure to UV radiation is emphasized.

  7. Thermal analysis of the Pioneer anomaly: A method to estimate radiative momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.; Francisco, F.; Gil, P. J. S.

    2008-11-15

    We present a methodology based on pointlike Lambertian sources that enables one to perform a reliable and comprehensive estimate of the overall thermally induced acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. We show, by developing a sensitivity analysis of the several parameters of the model, that one may achieve a valuable insight into the possible thermal origin of the so-called Pioneer anomaly.

  8. BEHAVIOR OF SENSITIVITIES IN THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL ADVECTION-DISPERSION EQUATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND SAMPLING DESIGN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of sensitivities has a significant impact on parameter estimation and sampling design for studies of solute transport in porous media. Physical insight into the behavior of sensitivities is offered through an analysis of analytically derived sensitivities for the one-dimensional form of the advection-dispersion equation. When parameters are estimated in regression models of one-dimensional transport, the spatial and temporal variability in sensitivities influences variance and covariance of parameter estimates. Several principles account for the observed influence of sensitivities on parameter uncertainty. (1) Information about a physical parameter may be most accurately gained at points in space and time. (2) As the distance of observation points from the upstream boundary increases, maximum sensitivity to velocity during passage of the solute front increases. (3) The frequency of sampling must be 'in phase' with the S shape of the dispersion sensitivity curve to yield the most information on dispersion. (4) The sensitivity to the dispersion coefficient is usually at least an order of magnitude less than the sensitivity to velocity. (5) The assumed probability distribution of random error in observations of solute concentration determines the form of the sensitivities. (6) If variance in random error in observations is large, trends in sensitivities of observation points may be obscured by noise. (7) Designs that minimize the variance of one parameter may not necessarily minimize the variance of other parameters.

  9. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone), a polyamine analogue, sensitized γ-radiation-induced cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells Sensitizing effect of MGBG on γ-radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Jin; Chung, Hai Won; Choi, Han; Paik, Sang Gi; Kim, In Gyu

    2006-09-01

    Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a polyamine analogue, has been known to inhibit the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are important in cell proliferation. We showed that MGBG treatment significantly affected γ-radiation-induced cell cycle transition (G(1)/G(0)→S→G(2)/M) and thus γ-radiation-induced cell death. As determined by micronuclei and comet assay, we showed that it sensitized the cytotoxic effect induced by γ-radiation. One of the reasons is that polyamine depletion by MGBG treatment did not effectively protect against the chemical (OH) or physical damage to DNA caused by γ-radiation. Through in vitro experiment, we confirmed that DNA strand breaks induced by γ-radiation was prevented more effectively in the presence of polyamines (spermine and spermidine) than in the absence of polyamines. MGBG also blocks the cell cycle transition caused by γ-radiation (G(2) arrest), which helps protect cells by allowing time for DNA repair before entry into mitosis or apoptosis, via the down regulation of cyclin D1, which mediates the transition from G(1) to S phase of cell cycle, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which is involved in the DNA sensing, repair and cell cycle check point. Therefore, the abrogation of G(2) arrest sensitizes cells to the effect of γ-radiation. As a result, γ-radiation-induced cell death increased by about 2.5-3.0-fold in cells treated with MGBG. However, exogenous spermidine supplement partially relieved this γ-radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. These findings suggest a potentially therapeutic strategy for increasing the cytotoxic efficacy of γ-radiation.

  10. Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David; Han, Boping

    2010-03-15

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E{sub 0}) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (E{sub c}) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54 W m{sup -2}). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E{sub 0}/E{sub c}) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model's good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation

  11. Estimating photosynthetically available radiation at the ocean surface from GOCI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert; McPherson, John

    2012-09-01

    A technique is presented to estimate photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) at the ocean surface from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data. The sensor is adapted to the problem, since it measures at visible wavelengths and does not saturate over clouds, and the hourly data provides adequate temporal sampling to describe diurnal variability of clouds. Instantaneous surface PAR is computed as the difference between the solar irradiance incident at the top of the atmosphere (known) and the solar irradiance reflected back to space (derived from GOCI radiance), taking into account absorption and scattering by the clear atmosphere (modeled). Knowledge of pixel composition is not required. Apart from planetary albedo and sun zenith angle, the model parameters are fixed at their climatological values. The instantaneous PAR estimates at hourly intervals are integrated over time to provide daily values. The technique is applied to GOCI imagery acquired on 5 April 2011, and the GOCI daily PAR estimates are compared with those obtained from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data. Agreement is good between the two types of estimates, with a coefficient of determination ( r 2) of 0.778, a bias of 0.23 Em-2d-1 (0.5% with higher GOCI values), and a root-mean-squared difference of 5.00 Em-2d-1 (11.2%). Differences in cloudy conditions are attributed to daily cloudiness changes not captured by the MODIS observations. The comparison statistics indicate that GOCI PAR estimates have acceptable accuracy for regional studies of aquatic photosynthesis.

  12. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  13. Estimation of risk based on multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, F. J.; Jin, Y.; Garte, S. J.; Hosselet, S.

    1994-10-01

    In the multistage theory of carcinogenesis, cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible, heritable genetic alterations or mutations. However data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that some part of an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to the following radiations: 1. an electron beam (LET = 0.34 keV/um, 2. a neon ion beam (LET = 25 keV/um and 3. an argon ion beam (LET = 125 keV/um. The latter 2 beams were generated by the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. About 6.0 cm2 of skin was irradiated per rat. The rats were observed every 6 weeks for at least 78 weeks and tumors were scored at first occurrence. Several histological types of cancer, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas, were induced. The cancer yield versus radiation dose was fitted by the quadratic equation (Y (D) = CLD + BD2), and the parameters C and B were estimated for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated in all tumors tested, although only a small proportion of neon-induced tumors showed similar activation. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable, linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage in the multistage model. The model, if validated, permits the direct calculation of cancer risk in rat skin in a way that can be subjected to experimental testing.

  14. An assessment of ozone levels, UV radiation and their occupational health hazard estimation during photocopying operation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra Pratap; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Deepak; Punia, Monika; Kumar, Krishan; Jain, Vinod Kumar

    2014-06-30

    This study investigates the levels of ozone concentration along with an ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectral radiation at eight photocopy centers in an academic institute, Delhi. Sampling was done in two types of locations, i.e., basement photocopy centers (BPC) and ground floor photocopy centers (GPC) for 8h. Measurements of levels of ozone, UV and visible radiation were done by ozone analyzer, UV radiometer and Field spectra instrument, respectively. Results show that the hourly mean concentration of ozone was observed to be in the range of 1.8-10.0 ppb and 5.3-45.8 ppb for BPC and GPC, respectively. In terms UV radiations, energy lies between 5.0×10(-3) and 7.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet A (UVA), 1.0×10(-3) and 2.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet B (UVB) and 6.0×10(-3) and 8.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet C (UVC). Correlation between the UV radiations and ozone production observed was statistically insignificant. To know the health hazard occurred to the workers, the standard erythema dose (SED) value was calculated for emitting UV radiation. The SED was estimated to be in the range of 0.02-0.04 and 0.02-0.32 for direct and indirect methods which is less than the guideline prescribed by Commission Internationale del' Eclairage (CIE). In nutshell, person involved in photocopy operation for their livelihood must be trained and should have knowledge for the long term gradual build up health problems due to ozone and UV production from photocopier. The manufactures should be ultimated with the significant ozone production, so that photocopier machine can be redesigned.

  15. Studies on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, and their use in estimating radiation risks.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, C R

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been conducted over many years. These studies have examined, inter alia, mortality and cancer incidence among the survivors. This paper summarises the form of the studies undertaken, outlines the main findings and describes how these results can be used in deriving estimates of radiation risks. In doing so, some areas of uncertainty and open issues are highlighted, such as the magnitude of lifetime cancer risks and the evidence for raised risks of non-cancer diseases at low doses. Continued follow-up of the survivors will be important in shedding further light on these issues.

  16. Estimation of photoneutron yield from beryllium target irradiated by variable energy microtron-based bremsstrahlung radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshwarappa, K. M.; Ganesh; Siddappa, K.; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sinha, Amar; Sarkar, P. S.; Godwal, B. K.

    2005-03-01

    The possibility of setting up microtron-based photoneutron source by utilizing bremsstrahlung radiation interaction with beryllium targets is critically examined. The bremsstrahlung yield for tantalum (Ta) target is obtained by EGS4 simulation. The neutron yield is estimated theoretically by MCNP simulation. The yield was measured experimentally by neutron irradiation of calibrated SSNTD CR-39 films. The total neutron yield is found to be of the order 10 10 n/s for 250 Hz PRR and 10 9 n/s for 50 Hz PRR. A detailed comparison shows good agreement between theoretical and experimentally measured yields.

  17. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  18. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; Bertone, G.; Bergstrom, L.; Bloom, E.; Bringmann, T.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Edmonds, Y.; Edsjo, J.; Godfrey, G.; Hughes, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.; Lionetto, A.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Nuss, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  19. Estimation of the individual slaughterhouse surveillance sensitivity for bovine tuberculosis in Catalonia (North-Eastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Saenz, A; Napp, S; Lopez, S; Casal, J; Allepuz, A

    2015-10-01

    The achievement of the Officially Tuberculosis Free (OTF) status in regions with low bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) herd prevalence, as is the case of North-Eastern Spain (Catalonia), might be a likely option in the medium term. In this context, risk-based approaches could be an alternative surveillance strategy to the costly current strategy. However, before any change in the system may be contemplated, a reliable estimate of the sensitivity of the different surveillance components is needed. In this study, we focused on the slaughterhouse component. The probability of detection of a bTB-infected cattle by the slaughterhouses in Catalonia was estimated as the product of three consecutive probabilities: (P1) the probability that a bTB-infected animal arrived at the slaughterhouse presenting Macroscopically Detectable Lesions (MDL); (P2) the probability that MDL were detected by the routine meat inspection process and (P3) the probability that the veterinary officer suspected bTB and sent the sample for laboratory confirmation. The first probability was obtained from data collected through the bTB eradication program carried out in Catalonia between 2005 and 2008, while the last two were obtained through the expert opinion of the veterinary officers working at the slaughterhouses who fulfilled a questionnaire administered during 2014. The bTB surveillance sensitivity of the different cattle slaughterhouses in Catalonia obtained in this study was 31.4% (CI 95%: 28.6-36.2), and there were important differences among them. The low bTB surveillance sensitivity was mainly related with the low probability that a bTB-infected animal arrived at the slaughterhouse presenting MDL (around 44.8%). The variability of the sensitivity among the different slaughterhouses could be explained by significant associations between some variables included in the survey and P2. For instance, factors like attendance to training courses, number of meat technicians and speed of the slaughter chain

  20. Interactions between mutations for sensitivity to psoralen photoaddition (PSO) and to radiation (rad) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.A.P.; Moustacchi, E.

    1981-10-01

    The mode of interaction in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae of two PSO mutations with each other and with rad mutations affected in their excision resynthesis (rad3), error-prone (rad6), and deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break (rad52) repair pathways was determined for various double mutant combinations. Survival data for 8-methoxypsoralen photoaddition, 254-nm ultraviolet light and gamma rays are presented. For 8-methoxypsoralen photoaddition, which induces both deoxyribonucleic acid interstrand cross-links and monoadditions, is synergistic to rad3. The PSO2 mutation, which is specifically sensitive to photoaddition of psoralens, is epistatic to rad3 and demonstrates a nonepistatic interaction with rad6 and rad52. rad3 and rad6, as well as rad6 and rad52, show synergistic interactions with each other, whereas rad3 is epistatic to rad52. Consequently, it is proposed that PSO1 and RAD3 genes govern steps in two independent pathways, the PSO1 activity leading to an intermediate which is repaired via the three independent pathways controlled by RAD6, RAD52, and PSO2 genes. Since pso1 interacts synergistically with rad3 and rad52 and epistatically with rad6 after uv radiation, the PSO1 gene appears to belong to the RAD6 group. For gamma ray sensitivity, pso1 is epistatic to rad6 and rad52, which suggests that this gene controls a step which is common to the two other independent pathways.

  1. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  2. Radiation sensitivity of bacteria and virus in porcine xenoskin for dressing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Eu-Ri; Jung, Pil-Mun; Choi, Jong-il; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    In this study, gamma irradiation sensitivities of bacteria and viruses in porcine skin were evaluated to establish the optimum sterilization condition for the dressing material and a xenoskin graft. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were used as model pathogens and inoculated at 106-107 log CFU/g. As model viruses, porcine parvovirus (PPV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and poliovirus were used and inoculated at 105-106 TCID50/g into porcine skin. The D10 value of E. coli was found to be 0.25±0.1 kGy. B. subtilis endospores produced under stressful environmental conditions showed lower radiation sensitivity as D10 was 3.88±0.3 kGy in porcine skin. The D10 values of PPV, BVDV, and poliovirus were found to be 1.73±0.2, 3.81±0.2, and 6.88±0.3 kGy, respectively. These results can offer the basic information required for inactivating pathogens by gamma irradiation and achieving dressing material and porcine skin grafts.

  3. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  4. Timing of Captopril Administration Determines Radiation Protection or Radiation Sensitization in a Murine Model of Total Body Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    captopril treatment relative to radiation exposure differentially affects the viability and repopulation capacity of spared hematopoietic stem cells and...captopril treatment relative to radiation exposure differentially affects the viability and repopulation capacity of spared hematopoietic stem cells and...increased proliferation and self- renewal of spared multilineage hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, positive results have also

  5. Timing of Captopril Administration Determines Radiation Protection or Radiation Sensitization in a Murine Model of Total Body Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    captopril treatment relative to radiation exposure differentially affects the viability and repopulation capacity of spared hematopoietic stem cells and...captopril treatment relative to radiation exposure differentially affects the viability and repopulation capacity of spared hematopoietic stem cells...through increased proliferation and self- renewal of spared multilineage hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, positive results have

  6. [Fluorescence used to investigate the sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Gang; Yang, Yun-Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-07-01

    A system for studying biological effect of radio frequency electromagnetic field was developed. The system can form an area where electromagnetic wave with large frequency range is well distributed. The strength of electromagnetic wave was measured easily. Electromagnetic wave in the system did not have effect on environment. The sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of 300 MHz under power density of 5 mW x cm(-2) was studied by the spectral analysis method of fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and the changes in chlorophyll a (Chla) fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane. The result showed that the position of spectrum of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane did not change, but the intensity of ANS fluorescence was obviously increased under the action of electromagnetic radiation with power density of 1-5 mW x cm(-2). There was an increase in the intensity of ANS fluorescence with the increase in electromagnetic radiation. The increase of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane showed that low level electromagnetic field induced the decrease in fluidity of chloroplast membrane compared with control experiment. The cause of the change in the fluidity could be related to the polarization of chloroplast membrane under the electromagnetic field. The analysis of Chla fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane indicated that low level electromagnetic field of 300 MHz made the fluorescence parameters F0 and F(VI/)F(V) decrease, and F(V)/Fo, Fv/F(m) and deltaF(V)/T increase. It was showed that low level electromagnetic field caused the change of non-active center of photosystem II of spinach chloroplast membrane to active center and the increase in potential active and photochemical efficiency of PSII, and promoted the transmit process of electron in photosynthesis of chloroplast membrane of photosynthesis cell in spinach leaf. The study confirmed

  7. S-phase cells are more sensitive to high-linear energy transfer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Naidu, M.; Liu, S.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.

    2009-07-15

    S-phase cells are more resistant to low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) than nonsynchronized and G{sub 1}-phase cells, because both nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the S phase. Although it was reported 3 decades ago that S-phase cells did not show more resistance to high-LET IR than cells in other phases, the mechanism remains unclear. We therefore attempted to study the phenotypes and elucidate the mechanism involved. Wild-type and NHEJ-deficient cell lines were synchronized using the double-thymidine approach. A clonogenic assay was used to detect the sensitivity of nonsynchronized, synchronized S-phase, and G{sub 2}-phase cells to high- and low-LET IR. The amounts of Ku bound to DSBs in the high- and low-LET-irradiated cells were also examined. S-phase wild-type cells (but not NHEJ-deficient cells) were more sensitive to high-LET IR than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells. In addition, S-phase wild-type cells showed less efficient Ku protein binding to DSBs than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells in response to high-LET IR, although all cells at all phases showed similarly efficient levels of Ku protein binding to DSBs in response to low-LET IR. S-phase cells are more sensitive to high-LET IR than nonsynchronized and G{sub 2}-phase cells, because of the following mechanism: it is more difficult for Ku protein to bind to high-LET IR-induced DNA DSBs in S-phase cells than in cells at other phases, which results in less efficient NHEJ.

  8. Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational radiation: Signal processing strategies and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce; Romano, Joseph D.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze the signal processing required for the optimal detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation using laser interferometric detectors. Starting with basic assumptions about the statistical properties of a stochastic gravity-wave background, we derive expressions for the optimal filter function and signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-correlation of the outputs of two gravity-wave detectors. Sensitivity levels required for detection are then calculated. Issues related to (i) calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for arbitrarily large stochastic backgrounds, (ii) performing the data analysis in the presence of nonstationary detector noise, (iii) combining data from multiple detector pairs to increase the sensitivity of a stochastic background search, (iv) correlating the outputs of 4 or more detectors, and (v) allowing for the possibility of correlated noise in the outputs of two detectors are discussed. We briefly describe a computer simulation that was used to ``experimentally'' verify the theoretical calculations derived in the paper, and which mimics the generation and detection of a simulated stochastic gravity-wave signal in the presence of simulated detector noise. Numerous graphs and tables of numerical data for the five major interferometers (LIGO-WA, LIGO-LA, VIRGO, GEO-600, and TAMA-300) are also given. This information consists of graphs of the noise power spectra, overlap reduction functions, and optimal filter functions; also included are tables of the signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity levels for cross-correlation measurements between different detector pairs. The treatment given in this paper should be accessible to both theorists involved in data analysis and experimentalists involved in detector design and data acquisition.

  9. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-07-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 on average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  10. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-03-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 in average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  11. Sensitivity of risk estimates to wildlife bioaccumulation factors in ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Karustis, C.G.; Brewer, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The concept of conservatism in risk assessment is well established. However, overly conservative assumptions may result in risk estimates that incorrectly predict remediation goals. Therefore, realistic assumptions should be applied in risk assessment whenever possible. A sensitivity analysis was performed on conservative (i.e. bioaccumulation factor = 1) and scientifically-derived wildlife bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) utilized to calculate risks during a terrestrial ecological risk assessment (ERA). In the first approach, 100% bioaccumulation of contaminants was assumed to estimate the transfer of contaminants through the terrestrial food chain. In the second approach, scientifically-derived BAFs were selected from the literature. For one of the measurement species selected, total risks calculated during the first approach were higher than those calculated during the second approach by two orders of magnitude. However, potential risks due to individual contaminants were not necessarily higher using the conservative approach. Potential risk due to contaminants with low actual bioaccumulation were exaggerated while potential risks due to contaminants with greater than 100% bioaccumulation were underestimated. Therefore, the use of a default of 100% bioaccumulation (BAF = 1) for all contaminants encountered during an ERA could result in cases where contaminants are incorrectly identified as risk drivers, and the calculation of incorrect ecological risk-based cleanup goals. The authors suggest using site-specific or literature-derived BAFs whenever possible and realistic BAF estimates, based upon factors such as log K{sub ow}, when BAFs are unavailable.

  12. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars sprint mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Qualls, Garry D.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flame environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  13. Spectral estimates of intercepted solar radiation by corn and soybean canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Brooks, C. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the development of methods for combining spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models which are capable of providing accurate estimates of crop condition and yields throughout the growing season. The present investigation is concerned with initial tests of these concepts using spectral and agronomic data acquired in controlled experiments. The data were acquired at the Purdue University Agronomy Farm, 10 km northwest of West Lafayette, Indiana. Data were obtained throughout several growing seasons for corn and soybeans. Five methods or models for predicting yields were examined. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data is a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models.

  14. A comparison to schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization and their impact on shortwave radiatation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Feng, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean covers 71% of the Earth's surface and plays a pivotal role in the earth radiation energy balance. The ocean surface albedo(OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation(ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. This study, on the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we evaluate the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. We got some conclusions: The SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. In the summer, the Northern Hemisphere(NH) is high ONSSR, but small deviations compared with Northern Hemisphere(SH),and contrary in the winter. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2 by the analysis of the ONSSR reanalysis dataset, the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).The simple scheme of Taylor and the more complicate schemes of Jin and Feng is very similar, and the scheme B and H is close to each other, the PM86 is more close to MERRA. We use the COVE ocean platform observation data to validate the several scheme result, and the RMSE is 10.96 w m-2, 5.24 w m-2, 12.88 w m-2, 6.52 w m-2, 6.33 w m-2, 6.30 w m-2 for B,T,H,J,PM86,F, respectively. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in

  15. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique for estimating aerosol radiative forcing from spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. In this study we look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurements along with an RT model is used to estimate radiative forcing. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and 3nm resolution for around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.1 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. All the measurements were made in the campus of Indian Institute of Science which is in the heart of Bangalore city. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux to change in the mass concentration of individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds -OPAC classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the region of influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves an iterative process where the mixture of aerosol species are changed in OPAC model and RT model is run as long as the mixture which mimics the measured spectral flux within 2-3% deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. The new method is limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive an optically equivalent aerosol mixture reduces when diffuse component of flux increases. Our analysis also showed that direct component of spectral flux is

  16. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Dey, H.M.; Siebyl, I.B.

    1994-05-01

    SPECT imaging of the brain with I-123 iomazenil has shown avid uptake of the radioligand in a distribution consistent with benzodiazepine receptor binding. It was desirable to radiolabel this compound with a positron emitting radionuclide so that quantitation of the receptor density could be assessed with PET imaging. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil were calculated prior to obtaining Institutional Review Board approval of this procedure. A previously published multicompartmental model was used as the biological model for estimating residence times associated with the C-11 labeled iomazenil. According to this model, 85-90% is excreted in the urine and 10-15% in the feces. A dynamic, voiding urinary bladder model was utilized for activity excreted renally and the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract kinetic model was used for activity excreted via the hepatobiliary system. Absorbed doses from C-11 (I-123) iomazenil to the urinary bladder were calculated to be 0.099 mGy/MBq (0.19 mGy/MBq) for a 4.8 hour bladder voiding interval. Shortening the bladder voiding interval to 2.0 hours had little effect on the bladder wall dose (0.095 mGy/MBq). However, a 30-minute void interval was estimated to lower the bladder wall dose substantially (0.045 mGy/MBq). Absorbed dose to the kidney was higher for C-11 iomazenil (0.054 vs 0.031 mGy/MBq) than for I-123 iomazenil due to rapid, early renal excretion of this very short-lived positron emitter. Doses to the gastrointestinal tract were estimated to be 4- to 20-fold lower for C-11 iomazenil compared to I-123 iomazenil. Overall, labeling iomazenil with C-11 rather than I-123 greatly reduces the radiation dose, per unit administered, to all organs except the kidneys.

  17. Estimate of the radiative effect of brown carbon using AERONET products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, M. R.; Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Lindfors, A. V.; Lehtinen, K. E.; Arola, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    The AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) provides aerosol size distributions and complex refractive index at four wavelengths (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm). This information is used in the method of Schuster et al. 2013 to retrieve the relative proportions of absorbing OC, BC, free iron and scattering host, separately for fine and coarse modes. The absorbing part of fine mode is initially assumed to consist of BC and BrC, but dust is added if necessary. Likewise, the absorbing coarse mode is initially assumed to consist of mineral dust, but BC and BrC are added if necessary. We estimated the direct radiative effect of absorbing OC (Brown Carbon, BrC) by using the volume fractions of BrC retrieved by Schuster et al. 2013 for all available AERONET sites. The volume fractions of BrC were used to form the refractive index and size distributions for aerosol composition without BrC. Then the effect by absorbing OC at TOA was estimated as the difference between net fluxes with and without BrC (i.e. all aerosols and non-BrC aerosols). We used radiative transfer package libRadtran, and the non-sphericity of mineral dust was taken into account using the spheroid model by Dubovik et al. (2006). Chung et al. 2012 also proposed a method to estimate the fraction of BrC from AERONET measurements, separating dust and carbonaceous aerosols based on AAE (Absorption Angstrom Exponent). However, Schuster et al. 2013 demonstrated that dust and biomass burning aerosols are well separated by imaginary refractive indices, but not by AAE. Therefore, we additionally applied the approach of Chung et al. 2012 to calculate the direct effect by BrC and compared with our estimates.

  18. A sensitivity function-based conjugate gradient method for optical tomography with the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Charette, André

    2007-03-01

    The Sensitivity Function-based Conjugate Gradient Method (SFCGM) is described. This method is used to solve the inverse problems of function estimation, such as the local maps of absorption and scattering coefficients, as applied to optical tomography for biomedical imaging. A highly scattering, absorbing, non-reflecting, non-emitting medium is considered here and simultaneous reconstructions of absorption and scattering coefficients inside the test medium are achieved with the proposed optimization technique, by using the exit intensity measured at boundary surfaces. The forward problem is solved with a discrete-ordinates finite-difference method on the framework of the frequency-domain full equation of radiative transfer. The modulation frequency is set to 600 MHz and the frequency data, obtained with the source modulation, is used as the input data. The inversion results demonstrate that the SFCGM can retrieve simultaneously the spatial distributions of optical properties inside the medium within a reasonable accuracy, by significantly reducing a cross-talk between inter-parameters. It is also observed that the closer-to-detector objects are better retrieved.

  19. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  20. Use of an Improved Radiation Amplification Factor to Estimate the Effect of Total Ozone Changes on Action Spectrum Weighted Irradiances and an Instrument Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone OMEGA, U(OMEGA/200)(sup -RAF), where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 run) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  1. Development of in vivo tooth EPR for individual radiation dose estimation and screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej; Burke, Greg; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David; Nicolalde, Roberto J; Sucheta, Artur; Lesniewski, Piotr; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    The development of in vivo EPR has made it feasible to perform tooth dosimetry measurements in situ, greatly expanding the potential for using this approach for immediate screening after radiation exposures. The ability of in vivo tooth dosimetry to provide estimates of absorbed dose has been established through a series of experiments using unirradiated volunteers with specifically irradiated molar teeth placed in situ within gaps in their dentition and in natural canine teeth of patients who have completed courses of radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. Multiple measurements in patients who have received radiation therapy demonstrate the expected heterogeneous dose distributions. Dose-response curves have been generated using both populations and, using the current methodology and instrument, the standard error of prediction based on single 4.5-min measurements is approximately 1.5 Gy for inserted molar teeth and between 2.0 and 2.5 Gy in the more irregularly shaped canine teeth. Averaging of independent measurements can reduce this error significantly to values near 1 Gy. Developments to reduce these errors are underway, focusing on geometric optimization of the resonators, detector positioning techniques, and optimal data averaging approaches. In summary, it seems plausible that the EPR dosimetry techniques will have an important role in retrospective dosimetry for exposures involving large numbers of individuals.

  2. Development of In Vivo Tooth EPR for Individual Radiation Dose Estimation and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej; Burke, Greg; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David; Nicolalde, Roberto J; Sucheta, Artur; Lesniewski, Piotr; Swartz, Harold M

    2009-01-01

    The development of in vivo EPR has made it feasible to perform tooth dosimetry measurements in situ, greatly expanding the potential for using this approach for immediate screening after radiation exposures. The ability of in vivo tooth dosimetry to provide estimates of absorbed dose has been established through a series of experiments using unirradiated volunteers with specifically irradiated molar teeth placed in situ within gaps in their dentition and in natural canine teeth of patients who have completed courses of radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. Multiple measurements in patients who have received radiation therapy demonstrate the expected heterogeneous dose distributions. Dose response curves have been generated using both populations and, using the current methodology and instrument, the standard error of prediction based on single 4.5 minute measurements is approximately 1.5 Gy for inserted molar teeth and between 2.0 and 2.5 Gy in the more irregularly shaped canine teeth. Averaging of independent measurements can reduce this error significantly to values near 1 Gy. Developments to reduce these errors are underway, focusing on geometric optimization of the resonators, detector positioning techniques, and optimal data averaging approaches. In summary, it seems plausible that the EPR dosimetry techniques will have an important role in retrospective dosimetry for exposures involving large numbers of individuals. PMID:20065702

  3. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  4. Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM): description and sensitivity to some estimated kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraborrelli, Domenico; Cabrera Perez, David; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Despite decades of reasearch, global atmospheric chemistry models still have significant biases compared to the estimated distribution and evolution of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical. The gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is acknowledged to play an important role among the processes affecting tropospheric ozone, methane lifetime and aerosol evolution. Thus, chemical mechanisms of very diverse complexity have been developed for the major VOCs. However, all mechanisms present shortcomings such as neglection or lumping of intermediates and estimate of many rate constants and product distributions. Here, we present a VOC oxidation mechanism of intermediate complexity called the Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM). With about 400 species and 1500 reactions, it represents the oxidation of about 20 primarily emitted VOCs comprising small alkanes and alkenes, isoprene, pinenes and monocyclic aromatic compounds. The development protocol significantly borrows from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). However, MOM distinguishes itself for a number of features. First, the structure activity relationship for estimating the rate constants involving hydroxyl radical is site-specific and dependent on temperature. Second, the alkyl nitrate yields are considered to be dependent on temperature, pressure and molecular structure. RO2 + HO2 reaction kinetics is consistent with the recent direct studies of \\chem{OH}-reformation. Isoprene chemistry includes the latest experimental advancements with respect to OH-recycling and alkyl nitrate chemistry. Pinenes chemistry is largely the one by the MCM but with some modifications according to the work of the Leuven's group. Finally, the chemistry of the aromatics is also borrowed from the MCM but with additional photolysis of ortho-nitrophenols leading to \\chem{HONO} formation. The sensitivity of the model to the temperature and pressure dependence of estimated \\chem{OH} rate constants and alkyl nitrate yields will

  5. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  6. A method for estimating occupational radiation dose to individuals, using weekly dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.J.; Ostrouchov, G.; Frome, E.L.; Kerr, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses. It is usually assumed that the annual dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. We propose the use of a probability distribution to describe an individual`s dose during a specific period of time. Statistical methods for estimating this dose distribution are developed. The methods take into account the ``measurement error`` that is produced by the dosimetry system, and the bias that was introduced by policies that lead to right censoring of small doses as zero. The method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The result of this evaluation raises serious questions about the validity of the historical personnel dosimetry data that is currently being used in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. In particular, it appears that there was a systematic underestimation of doses for ORNL workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors.

  7. Satellite estimation of photosynthetically active radiation in Southeast Asia: Impacts of smoke and cloud cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Hoyano, Akira; Aoki, Masatoshi; Komori, Daisuke; Boonyawat, Samakkee

    2004-02-01

    Since large-scale variations in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) influence the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks through the plant photosynthesis variations, large-scale evaluation of PAR is required. In the present study a simple PAR estimation model was developed for Southeast Asia, where large-scale forest fires occurred during El Niño years. The model considered the smoke aerosol released by forest fires using satellite-based smoke detection methods. A comparison study with ground-based solar radiation data for Malaysia and Thailand indicated that the current model could estimate monthly PAR with 10% (root-mean-square) accuracy and would successfully trace the seasonal and year-to-year variations in PAR, including the forest fire periods. During the peak-smoke month in Indonesia, September 1997, the reduction of PAR by smoke reached 63-75% in the center of the Kalimantan and Sumatra Islands. From the analyses of the smoke and cloud cover impacts on PAR in 1997-1999, annual PAR variations were found to be mostly regulated by smoke variations on the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and Kalimantan Islands and cloud cover variations on the Indo-China Peninsula. Thus annual variations in PAR changed with location. These variations did not simply correlate with year-to-year variations in cloud cover associated with the El Niño and La Niña cycle, but exhibited more complicated spatial variations due to the existence of smoke in Southeast Asia.

  8. Investigation of the modifying effects of vitamin A and hypoxic cell sensitizers in radiation carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of vitamin A (retinyl acetate) and three hypoxic cell sensitizers (metronidazole, misonidazole and desmethylmisonidazole) on lung tumor development in strain A mice exposed to radiation was assessed. In experiments involving vitamin A, two groups of mice were fed a low vitamin A diet (< 100 IU/100g diet) while the two other groups were fed a high vitamin A diet (800 IU/100 g diet). After two weeks one group maintained on the high vitamin A diet and one group maintained on the low vitamin A diet were given an acute dose of 500 rad of gamma radiation to the thoracic region. Mice were killed, their lungs were removed and the number of surface adenomas were counted. There was a significant increase in the number of mice bearing lung tumors and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse in the irradiated group maintained on the high vitamin A diet at 40 weeks post irradiation as compared to the irradiated group maintained on a low vitamin A diet. In the other experiment two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 mg/g and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rad of gamma radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for three weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased in the higher dose group (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with the control group.

  9. Position of cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for the space radiation exposure estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigiryova, Galina; Novitskaya, Natalia; Fedorenko, Boris

    The cytogenetic monitoring was carried out to evaluate of radiation induced stable and un-stable chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS (International Space Station). In the period of 1992 -2008 chromosome aberrations in 202 blood samples from 48 cosmonauts were analyzed using the conventional method. In addition 23 blood samples from 12 cosmonauts were analyzed using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) technique. Whole chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 1, 4 and 12 were used simultaneously with a pancentromeric probe. Samples taken before and after the flights were analyzed. Long-term space flights led to an increase of stable (FISH method) and unstable (conventional method) chromosome aber-ration frequencies. The frequencies of dicentrics and centric rings depend on the space flight duration and accumulated dose value. Extravehicular activity also adds to chromosome aber-ration frequency in blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts. Several years after the space flight the increased level of unstable chromosome aberrations is still apparent. The radiation load was decreased for cosmonauts after taking ISS over from MIR station. The cytogenetic results were in agreement with data of physical dosimetry. The dose interval after the first flight, estimated by the frequency of dicentrics, was 113-227 mSv for long-term flights (73 -199 days) and 53-107 mSv for short-term flights (1 -21 days). According to the frequency of FISH translocations, the average dose after the first long-term flight was 186 mSv, which is comparable with estimates made from the dicentric assay. Cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts, including analysis of dicentrics (conventional method) and translocations (FISH method) should find wider applica-tion to assessment of radiation effects associated with long-term space flights such as flights to Mars.

  10. Surface solar radiation and hydrological cycle in 20th century China: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    The world, and China in particular, has seen a tremendous population growth and industrialization in the 20th century. These changes were accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. Here we analyze these simulation data with particular focus on surface solar radiation, temperature, and the hydrological cycle in China. Physical mechanisms able to explain the results will be discussed. We generally find the strongest effects in the east of the country, where urbanization and industrialization is strongest and emissions increased most. The decrease of surface solar radiation (SSR) under clear sky conditions reaches up to around -8 W / m2 per decade from 1950 to 1990. Comparable values are found for all sky conditions. Dimming ceases in the second half of the 1990s, when we even see a renewed increase in SSR in some regions. Overall, these findings are in line with observation based estimates. Modeled surface temperatures reflect the decrease in SSR but carry also a substantial SST signature. After remaining roughly constant from 1870 to 1900, we find modeled surface temperatures to increase by about 1 degree Celsius till 1950, then decrease again by -0.2 to -1.2 degree Celsius till 1990, before a renewed increase sets in. Precipitation decreases in our model results from 1950 to 2000 by up to 10% or 150 mm per year

  11. Radiation risk estimation: Modelling approaches for “targeted” and “non-targeted” effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Alloni, Daniele; Facoetti, Angelica; Mairani, Andrea; Nano, Rosanna; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    The estimation of the risks from low doses of ionizing radiation - including heavy ions - is still a debated question. In particular, the action of heavy ions on biological targets needs further investigation. In this framework, we present a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo simulation code for the induction of different types of chromosome aberrations. The model, previously validated for gamma rays and light ions, has recently started to be extended to heavy ions such as Iron and Carbon, which are of interest both for space radiation protection and for hadrontherapy. Preliminary results were found to be in agreement with experimental dose-response curves for aberration yields observed following heavy-ion irradiation of human lymphocytes treated with the Premature Chromosome Condensation technique. During the last 10 years, the "Linear No Threshold" hypothesis has been challenged by a large number of observations on the so-called "non-targeted effects" including bystander effect, which consists of the induction of cytogenetic damage in cells not directly traversed by radiation, most likely as a response to molecular messengers released by directly irradiated cells. Although it is now clear that cellular communication plays a fundamental role, our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying bystander effects is still poor, and would largely benefit from further investigations including theoretical models and simulation codes. In the present paper we will review different modelling approaches, including one that is being developed at the University of Pavia, focusing on the assumptions adopted by the various authors and on their implications in terms of low-dose radiation risk, as well as on the identification of "critical" parameters that can modulate the model outcomes.

  12. Can we use photography to estimate radiation interception by a crop canopy?

    PubMed

    Chakwizira, E; Meenken, E D; George, M J; Fletcher, A L

    2015-03-01

    Accuracy of determining radiation interception, and hence radiation use efficiency, depends on the method of measuring photosynthetically active radiation intercepted. Methods vary, from expensive instruments such as Sunfleck ceptometers to simple methods such as digital photography. However, before universal use of digital photography there is need to determine its reliability and compare it with conventional, but expensive, methods. In a series of experiments at Lincoln, New Zealand, canopy development for barley, wheat, white clover and four forage brassica species was determined using both digital photographs and Sunfleck ceptometer. Values obtained were used to calculate conversion coefficient (Kf/Ki) ratios between the two methods. Digital photographs were taken at 45° and 90° for barley, wheat and white clover and at only 90° for brassicas. There was an interaction of effects of crop and cultivar for the cereal crops. Barley closed canopies earlier than wheat, and 'Emir' barley and 'Stettler' wheat had consistently higher canopy cover than 'Golden Promise' and 'HY459', respectively. Canopy cover was consistently larger at 45° than 90° for cereals. However, for white clover, the angle of digital photography was not important. There was also an interaction between effects of species and method of determining canopy cover for brassicas. Photographs gave higher cover values than ceptometer for forage rape and turnip, but the relationship was variable for forage kale and swede. Kf/Ki ratios of 1.0-1.10 for cereals, white clover and forage rape and turnip show that digital photographs can be used to estimated radiation interception, in place of Sunfleck ceptometer, for these crops.