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Sample records for radiation sickness chapter

  1. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... process so that they do not cause radiation injury to others. This may complicate the first aid and resuscitation process. Check the person's breathing and pulse. Start CPR , if necessary. Remove the person's clothing and place ...

  2. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  3. Prevention and treatment of the gastric symptoms of radiation sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Fiala, N.; Boward, C.A.; Bogo, V.

    1988-09-01

    Currently available treatments for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting either are ineffective or reduce performance. The new antiemetic and gastrokinetic agent zacopride was tested in rhesus monkeys to assess its behavioral toxicity and its ability to inhibit radiation-induced emesis. Zacopride (intragastric, 0.3 mg/kg) or a placebo was given blindly and randomly in the basal state and 15 min before a whole-body 800 cGy 60Co gamma-radiation dose (except for the legs which were partially protected to permit survival of some bone marrow). We determined (1) gastric emptying rates; (2) the presence and frequency of retching and vomiting; and (3) the effect of zacopride on the performance of a visual discrimination task in nonirradiated subjects. No vomiting, retching, or decreased performance was observed after either placebo or zacopride in the control state. Following irradiation plus placebo, 70 emeses were observed in 5 of 6 monkeys, and 353 retches were observed in all 6 monkeys. In contrast, only 1 emesis was observed in 1 of 6 monkeys and 173 retches were seen in 4 of 6 monkeys after irradiation plus zacopride (P less than 0.01). Zacopride also significantly inhibited radiation-induced suppression of gastric emptying. When given after the first vomiting episode in a separate group of irradiated monkeys, zacopride completely prevented any subsequent vomiting. The present results demonstrate that intragastric administration of zacopride significantly inhibited radiation-induced retching, vomiting, and suppression of gastric emptying in rhesus monkeys and did not cause detectable behavioral side effects when given to nonradiated monkeys. This observation has important implications in the treatment of radiation sickness.

  4. Clinical distinctions of radiation sickness with exposure of different parts of the human body to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nevskaya, G.F.; Abramova, G.M.; Volkova, M.A.; Kavlycheva, Y.V.; Skorik, A.S.; Yurogov, V.V.

    1982-01-12

    The clinical picture of radiation sickness of 139 radiological patients exposed to local irradition of the head, chest, and stomach with efficient doses of 210 rad was examined. It was found that at fractionated local irraditions the clinical symptom-complex of radiation sickness was identifical to that seen as a result of total-body irradiation. During head irradiation the major symptom was headache and during stomach irradiation nausea. The severity level of radiation damage measured with respect to the clinical symptom-complex as a whole with the aid of the bioinformation model was similar during irradiations of the head and stomach, much higher during irradiation of the chest. During head and stomach irradiations the severity level of radiation damage was proportional to the efficient dose. During chest irradiation there was no correlation between the severity level and the exposure to doses of 210 rad.

  5. Motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Golding, J F

    2016-01-01

    Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated. PMID:27638085

  6. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness

    PubMed Central

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung. PMID:24520532

  7. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-06-20

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung.

  8. A possible approach to large-scale laboratory testing for acute radiation sickness after a nuclear detonation.

    PubMed

    Adalja, Amesh A; Watson, Matthew; Wollner, Samuel; Toner, Eric

    2011-12-01

    After the detonation of an improvised nuclear device, several key actions will be necessary to save the greatest number of lives possible. Among these tasks, the identification of patients with impending acute radiation sickness is a critical problem that so far has lacked a clear solution in national planning. We present one possible solution: the formation of a public-private partnership to augment the capacity to identify those at risk for acute radiation sickness. PMID:21988186

  9. Prevention and treatment of the gastric symptoms of radiation sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Fiala, N.

    1988-01-01

    The new antiemetic and gastrokinetic agent zacopride was tested in rhesus monkeys to assess its behavioral toxicity and its ability to inhibit radiation-induced emesis. Zacopride (intragastric, 0.3 mg/kg) or a placebo was given blindly and randomly in the basal state and 15 min before a whole-body 800 cG Co-60 gamma radiation dose (except for the legs which were partially protected to permit survival of some bone marrow). The authors determined 1) gastric emptying rates; 2) the presence and frequency of retching and vomiting; and 3) the effect of zacopride on the performance of a visual discrimination task in nonirradiated subjects. When given after the first vomiting episode in a separate group of irradiated monkeys, zacopride completely prevented any subsequent vomiting. Results demonstrate that intragastric administration of zacopride significantly inhibited radiation-induced retching, vomiting, and suppression of gastric emptying in rhesus monkeys and did not cause detectable behavioral side effects when given to nonradiated monkeys.

  10. Serum sickness

    MedlinePlus

    Drug allergy - serum sickness; Allergic reaction - serum sickness; Allergy - serum sickness ... penicillin, cefaclor, and sulfa) can cause a similar reaction. Injected proteins such as antithymocyte globulin (used to ...

  11. Risk of Skin Cancer from Space Radiation. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; George, Kerry A.; Wu, Hong-Lu

    2003-01-01

    We review the methods for estimating the probability of increased incidence of skin cancers from space radiation exposure, and describe some of the individual factors that may contribute to risk projection models, including skin pigment, and synergistic effects of combined ionizing and UV exposure. The steep dose gradients from trapped electrons, protons, and heavy ions radiation during EVA and limitations in EVA dosimetry are important factors for projecting skin cancer risk of astronauts. We estimate that the probability of increased skin cancer risk varies more than 10-fold for individual astronauts and that the risk of skin cancer could exceed 1 % for future lunar base operations for astronauts with light skin color and hair. Limitations in physical dosimetry in estimating the distribution of dose at the skin suggest that new biodosimetry methods be developed for responding to accidental overexposure of the skin during future space missions.

  12. Chapter 1.12: Solar Radiation Resource Assessment for Renewable Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses measurements, modeling, and databases of solar energy potential that may serve as fuel for solar energy conversion systems. Developing innovative designs for capturing and converting solar radiation is only one part of the equation for solar system deployment. Identifying, locating, and prospecting for the appropriate quantity and quality of solar resources to fuel these systems is critical to system designers, investors, financial backers, utilities, governments, and owner/operators. This chapter addresses the fundamentals and state of the art for measuring, modeling, and applying solar radiation resource data to meet decision-making needs.

  13. Introduction to Radiation Issues for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Saganti, P. B.; Miller, J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    understanding of the current ISS space suits and provide insights into improved approaches for the design of future suits. This chapter begins with a summary of the dynamic ionizing radiation environment in LEO space and introduces the concepts and quantities used to quantify exposure to space radiation in LEO. The space suits used for EVA and the experimental partial human phantom are described. Subsequent chapters report results from measured charged particle fields before and after incident protons and secondary particles are transported through the space suits and into organs and tissues.

  14. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  15. Self-Study Manual on Optical Radiation Measurements: Part I--Concepts, Chapters 1 to 3. NBS Technical Note 910-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicodemus, Fred E., Ed.

    This is the initial publication of a series of self-study manuals on optical radiation measurement, and contains the first three chapters. Additional chapters will be published when completed. These chapters include: an introduction to optical radiation and the ray approach to its treatment; an introduction to the basic radiometric quantity…

  16. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  17. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  18. Emetic mechanism in acute radiation sickness. Technical report, 1 December 1982-30 November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Borison, H.L.

    1987-08-20

    A dose-response relationship was established in normal cats for the evocation of vomiting within 24 h after whole-body exposure to /sup 60/Co radiation with doses ranging from 7.5 to 60 Gy delivered at 1.0 Gy/min. Vomiting was recorded oscillographically. Radiation-induced vomiting was elicited unabatedly at the optimal dose of 45 Gy in chronically postremectomized cats. Radioemetic susceptibility was evaluated in normal cats after each of two doses of radiation, from 7.5 to 60 Gy, given on successive days. Occurrence of radioemetic protection against the second irradiation was manifested in direct relation to the magnitude of the first exposure, and complete protection for 24 h resulted after second radiation exposure at the highest dose level. Postremectomized cats were also fully protected against the radioemetic effect of a second exposure at 45 Gy. All normal cats vomited in response to an emetic drug injection during the state of radioemetic refractoriness after the second irradiation at 45 Gy. A neural origin of emetic signal generated by first radiation exposure was examined in postrema-intact cats.

  19. Prescriptions for Sick Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing insulation in schools as an energy-saving measure has given rise to the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), which afflicts roughly one-third of the nation's schools. This article examines asbestos, radon, electromagnetic radiation, and chemical pollutants and describes steps to make schools environmentally safe for students. School officials…

  20. Sleeping sickness

    MedlinePlus

    Human African trypanosomiasis ... Kirchoff LV. Agents of African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolan R, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ...

  1. Morning Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day What's happening in your area Find out about ... it's called morning sickness, it can last all day and happen any time of day. At least ...

  2. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  3. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  4. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  5. An initial radiation safety needs assessment of Costa Rica: the South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society's strategic planning appraisal for participation in the "Radiation Safety Without Borders" initiative.

    PubMed

    Emery, Robert J; Felknor, S A

    2002-05-01

    In response to the Health Physics Society's recent 'radiation safety without borders" initiative, the South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society selected Costa Rica as its partner country of choice. To develop an understanding of the radiation safety needs of this country, the fall 2001 University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity class was tasked with the assignment of assessing the possible radiation safety needs and concerns for this country. The assignment culminated in a class presentation to the membership of the South Texas Chapter during its annual fall meeting. Using library and web based resources, tile students reviewed a number of public health and radiation-related topics. Life expectancies were found to be equivalent to the United States, even though significant differences in per capita health expenditures were noted. Costa Rica exhibited lower population mortality rates from major causes such as cardiovascular diseases, neoplasms, and external sources. Maternal and infant mortality rates were found to be much higher in Costa Rica than in the United States. Naturally occurring radiation sources such as uranium deposits were not identified as apparent major radiation issues of concern, although ultraviolet radiation exposures are consistently high. Several recent events in the country and the region involving patient overexposures suggest that concerns are likely focused on ensuring the proper use and maintenance of healing arts radiation equipment. The lack of available information on radioactive waste disposal suggests that waste handling also may be an issue warranting attention. The exercise proved to be very educational for the students, and the information gathered will serve to focus the Chapter's efforts when technical exchanges are initiated. The importance of linking this initiative to other existing programs within the country is also discussed.

  6. Munchausen syndrome: Playing sick or sick player

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Das, R. C.; Srivastava, K.; Patra, P.; Khan, S. A.; Shashikumar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is rare factitious disorder which entails frequent hospitalization, pathological lying and intentional production of symptoms for sick role. Management requires collateral history taking, sound clinical approach, exclusion of organicity and addressing psychological issues. A case which presented with unusual symptoms of similar dimension is discussed here. The case brings out finer nuances in evaluation and management of this entity. PMID:25535450

  7. Munchausen syndrome: Playing sick or sick player.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jyoti; Das, R C; Srivastava, K; Patra, P; Khan, S A; Shashikumar, R

    2014-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is rare factitious disorder which entails frequent hospitalization, pathological lying and intentional production of symptoms for sick role. Management requires collateral history taking, sound clinical approach, exclusion of organicity and addressing psychological issues. A case which presented with unusual symptoms of similar dimension is discussed here. The case brings out finer nuances in evaluation and management of this entity. PMID:25535450

  8. [Therapeutic effect of rmIL-12 combined with G-CSF on acute radiation sickness produced by γ-ray irradiation in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhai, Rui-Ren; Pang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2012-08-01

    -CSF can significantly accelerate the recovery of hematopoietic function in mice with acute radiation sickness.

  9. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  10. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinus node or SA node. This keeps the heart beat steady and regular. Sick sinus syndrome is a ... Fatigue Dizziness or lightheadedness Sensation of feeling the heart beat ( palpitations ) Shortness of breath , possibly only with physical ...

  11. Got a Sick Fish?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Got a sick fish? Fish with disease can show a variety of signs. If you notice your pet fish having any unusual disease signs, contact your veterinarian ...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(4)-1 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or medical or hospitalization expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident... (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(4)-1 Payments on account of sickness or accident... employer to, or on behalf of, an employee on account of the employee's sickness or accident disability...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(4)-1 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or medical or hospitalization expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident... (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(4)-1 Payments on account of sickness or accident... employer to, or on behalf of, an employee on account of the employee's sickness or accident disability...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(4)-1 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or medical or hospitalization expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident... (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(4)-1 Payments on account of sickness or accident... employer to, or on behalf of, an employee on account of the employee's sickness or accident disability...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(4)-1 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or medical or hospitalization expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident... (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(4)-1 Payments on account of sickness or accident... employer to, or on behalf of, an employee on account of the employee's sickness or accident disability...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(4)-1 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or medical or hospitalization expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident... (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(4)-1 Payments on account of sickness or accident... employer to, or on behalf of, an employee on account of the employee's sickness or accident disability...

  17. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  18. New Clues to Sleeping Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161284.html New Clues to Sleeping Sickness Disease-causing parasites found ... people with no symptoms of the disease, a new study finds. Sleeping sickness affects 4,000 to ...

  19. Radiation Tests of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Space Suit for the International Space Station Using Energetic Protons. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements using silicon detectors to characterize the radiation transmitted through the EMU space suit and a human phantom have been performed using 155 and 250 MeV proton beams at LLUMC. The beams simulate radiation encountered in space, where trapped protons having kinetic energies on the order of 100 MeV are copious. Protons with 100 MeV kinetic energy and above can penetrate many centimeters of water or other light materials, so that astronauts exposed to such energetic particles will receive doses to their internal organs. This dose can be enhanced or reduced by shielding - either from the space suit or the self-shielding of the body - but minimization of the risk depends on details of the incident particle flux (in particular the energy spectrum) and on the dose responses of the various critical organs. Data were taken to characterize the beams and to calibrate the detectors using the beam in a treatment room at LLUPTF, in preparation for an experiment with the same beams incident on detectors placed in a human phantom within the EMU suit. Nuclear interactions of high-energy protons in various materials produce a small flux of highly ionizing, low-energy secondary radiation. Secondaries are of interest for their biological effects, since they cause doses and especially dose-equivalents to increase relative to the values expected simply from ionization energy loss along the Bragg curve. Because many secondaries have very short ranges, they are best measured in passive track detectors such as CR-39. The silicon detector data presented here are intended to supplement the CR-39 data in regions where silicon has greater sensitivity, in particular the portion of the LET spectrum below 5 keV/micron. The results obtained in this study suggest that optimizing the radiation shielding properties of space suits is a formidable task. The naive assumption that adding mass can reduce risk is not supported by the data, which show that reducing the dose delivered at or

  20. Diclectin for morning sickness

    PubMed Central

    Nulman, Irena; Koren, Gideon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Question A pregnant patient recently asked me whether using Diclectin for morning sickness might affect the development of her child. Answer Our recent large study does show such a trend, although the differences are not necessarily clinically significant. PMID:21642716

  1. The sick child's predicament.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C

    1985-06-01

    There is widespread criticism of medicine which contrasts with its manifest success in biotechnology. Medicine's failure to convince stems partly from the fact that its successful biotechnology distracts it from the mundane task of responding appropriately to components of commonplace sicknesses which do not stem from disease (things) or illness (symptoms) but from predicaments. Predicaments are painful social situations or circumstances, complex, unstable, morally charged and varying in their import in time and place, which are readily discernible from a good history. Predicaments are distinguished from environmental agents by being an aspect of social organisation rather than structures. Dangerous and excruciating predicaments are described as well as the predicaments of being sick, and being in hospital. Child psychiatrists are often presented with problems where diagnosis of disease or illness in the child is inappropriate and resolution of its predicament alleviates the distress that had been presented in the language of sickness. The model is capable of broader application in psychiatry and medicine. Doctors should be more concerned to know about the context and background of their patients' sickness, as patients give this information very freely if asked. If patients' complaints are misunderstood then medical responses, made in good faith, may be seen as dangerous intrusions leading to a loss of trust, anger, and litigiousness. PMID:3863603

  2. Characterization of the Radiation Shielding Properties of U.S. and Russian Extravehicular Activity Suits. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    Reported herein are results from the Eril Research, Inc. (ERI) participation in the JSC-sponsored study characterizing the radiation shielding properties of the two types of space suit that astronauts are wearing during the EVA on-orbit assembly of ISS. Measurements using passive detectors were carried out to assess the shielding properties of the U.S. EMU Suit and the Russian Orlan-M suit during irradiations of the suits and a tissue-equivalent phantom to monoenergetic proton and electron beams at LLUMC. During irradiations of 6 MeV electrons and 60 MeV protons, absorbed dose as a function of depth was measured using TLDs exposed behind swatches of the two suit materials and inside the two EVA helmets. Considerable reduction in electron dose was measured behind all suit materials in exposures to 6 MeV electrons. Slowing of the proton beam in the suit materials led to an increase in dose measured in exposures to 60 MeV protons. During 232 MeV proton irradiations, measurements were made with TLDs and CR-39 PNTDs at five organ locations inside a tissue-equivalent phantom, exposed both with and without the two EVA suits. The EVA helmets produce a 13% to 27% reduction in total dose and a 0% to 25% reduction in dose equivalent when compared to measurements made in the phantom head alone. Differences in dose and dose equivalent between the suit and non-suit irradiations for the lower portions of the two EVA suits tended to be smaller. Proton-induced target fragmentation was found to be a significant source of increased dose equivalent, especially within the two EVA helmets, and average quality factor inside the EMU and Orlan-M helmets was 2% to 14% greater than that measured in the bare phantom head.

  3. Sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wahls, S A

    1985-03-01

    Disease in the sinus node may cause bradyarrhythmias or tachyarrhythmias. Bradyarrhythmias occur because of impaired automaticity (with or without sinus arrest) or because of sinus node exit block. Reentrant or automatic rhythms may produce tachyarrhythmias. Symptoms and signs of sick sinus syndrome include lightheadedness, palpitation, syncope and peripheral or cerebral emboli. After diagnosis by Holter monitoring, symptomatic patients usually improve with placement of a permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:3976454

  4. When You're Sick

    MedlinePlus

    ... and can be life-threatening. Making a Sick-Day Plan Prepare a plan for sick days in advance. Work with your doctor, or a ... have had a fever for a couple of days and aren't getting better you've been ...

  5. African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    Zientara, S; Weyer, C T; Lecollinet, S

    2015-08-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a devastating disease of equids caused by an arthropod-borne virus belonging to the Reoviridae family, genus Orbivirus. It is considered a major health threat for horses in endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. African horse sickness virus (AHSV) repeatedly caused large epizootics in the Mediterranean region (North Africa and southern Europe in particular) as a result of trade in infected equids. The unexpected emergence of a closely related virus, the bluetongue virus, in northern Europe in 2006 has raised fears about AHSV introduction into Europe, and more specifically into AHSV-free regions that have reported the presence of AHSV vectors, e.g. Culicoides midges. North African and European countries should be prepared to face AHSV incursions in the future, especially since two AHSV serotypes (serotypes 2 and 7) have recently spread northwards to western (e.g. Senegal, Nigeria, Gambia) and eastern Africa (Ethiopia), where historically only serotype 9 had been isolated. The authors review key elements of AHS epidemiology, surveillance and prophylaxis. PMID:26601437

  6. Managing space motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R T

    1998-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a well-recognized problem for space flight and affects 73% of crewmembers on the first 2 or 3 days of their initial flight. Illness severity is variable, but over half of cases are categorized as moderate to severe. Management has included elimination of provocative activities and delay of critical performance-related procedures such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) or Shuttle landing during the first three days of missions. Pharmacological treatment strategies have had variable results, but intramuscular promethazine has been the most effective to date with a 90% initial response rate and important reduction in residual symptoms the next flight day. Oral prophylactic treatment of crewmembers with difficulty on prior flights has had mixed results. In order to accommodate more aggressive pharmacologic management, crew medical officers receive additional training in parenteral administration of medications. Preflight medication testing is accomplished to reduce the risk of unexpected performance decrements or idiosyncratic reactions. When possible, treatment is offered in the presleep period to mask potential treatment-related drowsiness. Another phenomenon noted by crewmembers and physicians as flights have lengthened is readaptation difficulty or motion sickness on return to Earth. These problems have included nausea, vomiting, and difficulty with locomotion or coordination upon early exposure to gravity. Since landing and egress are principal concerns during this portion of the flight, these deficits are of operational concern. Postflight therapy has been directed at nausea and vomiting, and meclizine and promethazine are the principal agents used. There has been no official attempt at prophylactic treatment prior to entry. Since there is considerable individual variation in postflight deficit and since adaptation from prior flights seems to persist, it has been recommended that commanders with prior shuttle landing experience be named to

  7. Neural mechanisms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, G. H.; Daunton, N. G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that there might be a neuro-homoral cerebrospinal fluid link in motion sickness was directly tested by blocking the flow of CSF from the third into the fourth ventricle in cats. Evidence obtained thus far is consistent with the hypothesis. Cats with demonstrably sound plugs did not vomit in response to an accelerative motion sickness stimulus, whereas cats with imperfect 'leaky' plugs vomited with little or no delay in latency. Althoough there are several putative candidates, the identification of a humoral motion sickness substance is a matter of conjecture.

  8. Treatment of severe motion sickness with antimotion sickness drug injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, Ashton; Lackner, James R.

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns the use of intramuscular injections of scopolamine, promethazine, and dramamine to treat severely motion sick individuals participating in parabolic flight experiments. The findings indicate that a majority of individuals received benefit from 50-mg injections of promethazine or 0.5 mg-injections of scopolamine. By contrast, 50-mg injections of dramamine and 25-mg injections of promethazine were nonbeneficial. The use of antimotion drug injections for treating space motion sickness is discussed.

  9. Looking into sick buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Scarry, R.L. )

    1994-07-01

    This article examines the effect of geographic location (humid vs dry climate) and indoor relative humidity on the potential for IAQ problems. Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) has been a problem for centuries. The more current interest surrounds the Legionella pneumophila epidemic of 1976. The Legionnaire's disease outbreak was the first recognized instance of a building related illness (BRI). Sick building syndrome (SBS) is a less well defined condition than BRI. In SBS, occupants of a building suffer ill health due to some obscure condition or conditions in the building. Additionally, the health condition appears to be self-resolving when the person leaves the premises. A complete listing of SBS variables has not been determined, but the general conditions have been identified. The primary groupings include irritants, allergens, and toxins. It should be noted that infectious agents were intentionally omitted as their involvement more specifically indicated a BRI. Additionally, some contaminants may be classified as more than a single type; e.g., Aspergillus sp. may be labeled both allergenic and toxigenic.

  10. Inner ear decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C; Thomas, W G; Youngblood, D G; Bennett, P B

    1976-09-01

    With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear injuries during such exposures have been encountered more frequently and noted during several phases of diving: during compression, at stable deep depths, with excessive noise exposure in diving, and during decompression. The pathophysiology of these injuries differs, depending upon the phase of diving in which the injuries occur. In this report, 23 cases of hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or vertigo occurring during or shortly after decompression are presented. Thirteen of these cases occurred in helium-oxygen dives involving a change to air during the latter stages of decompression. A significant correlation is present between prompt recompression treatment, relief of symptoms, and lack of residual deficits. Current knowledge indicates that the management of otologic decompression sickness should include: 1. prompt recompression to at least 99 feet deeper than the symptom onset depth; 2. recompression using the previous helium-oxygen mixture when the injuries occur during or shortly after a switch from helium-oxygen to air during the latter stages of decompression; 3. the use of parenteral diazepam for symptom relief and cyclic inhalations of oxygen enriched treatment gases; and 4. the avoidance of further diving by divers who exhibit permanent inner ear injuries after the acute symptoms have subsided.

  11. [Sick building syndrome].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram

    2008-07-01

    Over the past 50 years, a new man-made ecosystem has developed--the controlled indoor environment within the sealed exterior shells of modern non-industrial buildings. Emitted toxic volatile compounds from building materials, furnishings, and equipment, and inappropriate ventilation (resulting from the need to reduce expenses) contribute to reduce indoor air quality (IAQ), which has considerable potential to affect public health. Consequently, health problems related to this ecosystem have emerged. "Building-related illnesses" (BRI) refers to a group of illnesses with a fairly homogeneous clinical picture, objective abnormalities on clinical or laboratory evaluation, and one or more identifiable sources or agents known to cause infectious, immunologic, or allergic diseases. The term "sick building syndrome" (SBS) is used to refer to a heterogeneous group of work-related symptoms--including irritation of the skin and mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat, headache, fatigue, and difficulty concentrating. These are considered illnesses because of the occurrence of symptoms, even though affected workers do not have objective clinical or laboratory abnormalities and causative agents cannot be found. The clinical symptoms of SBS, although not life-threatening are disruptive: they reduce productivity and increase absenteeism from work. Noteworthy, the association of symptoms with psychosocial factors does not mean that "the problem is all in the workers' heads". The results of psychological testing of symptomatic and asymptomatic office workers are similar. To improve IAQ and reduce symptoms of SBS adequate ventilation and fresh air, which will reduce volatile compounds, maintaining thermal comfort (with humidity not exceeding 60%), and adequate lighting should be ensured.

  12. African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Philip Scott; Hamblin, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) causes a non-contagious, infectious insect-borne disease of equids and is endemic in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa and possibly Yemen in the Arabian Peninsula. However, periodically the virus makes excursions beyond its endemic areas and has at times extended as far as India and Pakistan in the east and Spain and Portugal in the west. The vectors are certain species of Culicoides biting midge the most important of which is the Afro-Asiatic species C. imicola. This paper describes the effects that AHSV has on its equid hosts, aspects of its epidemiology, and present and future prospects for control. The distribution of AHSV seems to be governed by a number of factors including the efficiency of control measures, the presence or absence of a long term vertebrate reservoir and, most importantly, the prevalence and seasonal incidence of the major vector which is controlled by climate. However, with the advent of climate-change the major vector, C. imicola, has now significantly extended its range northwards to include much of Portugal, Spain, Italy and Greece and has even been recorded from southern Switzerland. Furthermore, in many of these new locations the insect is present and active throughout the entire year. With the related bluetongue virus, which utilises the same vector species of Culicoides this has, since 1998, precipitated the worst outbreaks of bluetongue disease ever recorded with the virus extending further north in Europe than ever before and apparently becoming endemic in that continent. The prospects for similar changes in the epidemiology and distribution of AHSV are discussed.

  13. Simulator sickness during driving simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Johnell O; Goodenough, Richard R; Crisler, Matthew C; Klein, Nathan D; Alley, Rebecca L; Koon, Beatrice L; Logan, William C; Ogle, Jennifer H; Tyrrell, Richard A; Wills, Rebekkah F

    2010-05-01

    While driving simulators are a valuable tool for assessing multiple dimensions of driving performance under relatively safe conditions, researchers and practitioners must be prepared for participants that suffer from simulator sickness. This paper describes multiple theories of motion sickness and presents a method for assessing and reacting to simulator sickness symptoms. Results showed that this method identified individuals who were unable to complete a driving simulator study due to simulator sickness with greater than 90% accuracy and that older participants had a greater likelihood of simulator sickness than younger participants. Possible explanations for increased symptoms experienced by older participants are discussed as well as implications for research ethics and simulator sickness prevention.

  14. Sick sinus syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Michael; Gera, Jerome; Usman, Saif

    2013-05-15

    Sick sinus syndrome refers to a collection of disorders marked by the heart's inability to perform its pacemaking function. Predominantly affecting older adults, sick sinus syndrome comprises various arrhythmias, including bradyarrhythmias with or without accompanying tachyarrhythmias. At least 50 percent of patients with sick sinus syndrome develop alternating bradycardia and tachycardia, also known as tachy-brady syndrome. Sick sinus syndrome results from intrinsic causes, or may be exacerbated or mimicked by extrinsic factors. Intrinsic causes include degenerative fibrosis, ion channel dysfunction, and remodeling of the sinoatrial node. Extrinsic factors can be pharmacologic, metabolic, or autonomic. Signs and symptoms are often subtle early on and become more obvious as the disease progresses. They are commonly related to end-organ hypoperfusion. Cerebral hypoperfusion is most common, with syncope or near-fainting occurring in about one-half of patients. Diagnosis may be challenging, and is ultimately made by electrocardiographic identification of the arrhythmia in conjunction with the presence of symptoms. If electrocardiography does not yield a diagnosis, inpatient telemetry monitoring, outpatient Holter monitoring, event monitoring, or loop monitoring may be used. Electrophysiologic studies also may be used but are not routinely needed. Treatment of sick sinus syndrome includes removing extrinsic factors, when possible, and pacemaker placement. Pacemakers do not reduce mortality, but they can decrease symptoms and improve quality of life.

  15. [Simulator sickness and its measurement with Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ)].

    PubMed

    Biernacki, Marcin P; Kennedy, Robert S; Dziuda, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common methods for studying the simulator sickness issue is the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) (Kennedy et al., 1993). Despite the undoubted popularity of the SSQ, this questionnaire has not as yet been standardized and translated, which could allow us to use it in Poland for research purposes. The aim of our article is to introduce the SSQ to Polish readers, both researchers and practitioners. In the first part of this paper, the studies using the SSQ are discussed, whereas the second part consists of the description of the SSQ test procedure and the calculation method of sample results. Med Pr 2016;67(4):545-555. PMID:27623835

  16. Morning Sickness: Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Morning Sickness: Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Morning Sickness: Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy FAQ126, ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  17. 20 CFR 335.4 - Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits. 335.4 Section 335.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.4 Filing statement of sickness and claim...

  18. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  19. Psychophysiological aspects of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Murray, J B

    1997-12-01

    Motion sickness may occur during travel by sea, automobile, airplane, and space. Susceptibility changes with age and may be influenced by psychological factors. Susceptibility can be reduced in most people by medications that involve histamine or neurotransmitters acetylcholine and noradrenaline, and influence the vestibular system. PMID:9450266

  20. Psychophysiological aspects of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Murray, J B

    1997-12-01

    Motion sickness may occur during travel by sea, automobile, airplane, and space. Susceptibility changes with age and may be influenced by psychological factors. Susceptibility can be reduced in most people by medications that involve histamine or neurotransmitters acetylcholine and noradrenaline, and influence the vestibular system.

  1. Simulator sickness and HMD configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Jennifer A.

    1997-12-01

    The helmet-mounted display (HMD), often used in non-vehicle- based virtual environments (VEs), can be configured as either a stereoscopic or bi-ocular display. As a stereoscopic display the computer modeling the VE calculates two different views for each eye, based upon the views each eye normally receives due to their separation in the head. On the other hand, the same view can be presented to each eye, resulting in a bi- ocular display. The normally linked processes of accommodation and vergence must be decoupled when viewing through an HMD. This way of perceiving may lead to physiological problems. For example, a common problem with virtual environments (VE) is simulator sickness. Its symptoms are similar to those experienced in motion sickness, and include problems with eyestrain, disorientation, and nausea. A study was conducted in which both relative differences in simulator sickness and performance were examined for walking, tracking, distance estimation, and micromanipulation tasks. Using the self-report simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ), data revealed that the stereoscopic condition was more nauseogenic. In addition, post-experimental disorientation, oculomotor discomfort and total severity measures correlated significantly with completion time on a task that required more near-far focal transitions within a short period of time than any other task.

  2. Mechanisms of antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Wood, M. J.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Eight subjects, male and female, were rotated using the step method to progressively increase the speed of rotation (+2 rpm) after every 40 head movements to a maximum of 35 rpm. The end point for motion sickness was the Graybiel Malaise III total of symptoms short of frank nausea. The drug treatments were placebo, scopolamine 0.6 mg and 1 mg, scopolamine 0.6 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg, scopolamine 1 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg, and amphetamine 10 mg. Scopolamine increased tolerated head movements over placebo level by + 81; scopolamine 1 mg + 183; d-amphetamine by + 118; scopolamine 0.6/d-amphetamine by + 165; and scopolamine 1 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg by + 201. The drugs effective in preventing motion sickness are considered to be divided into those with central acetylcholine blocking activity and those which enhance norepinephrine activity. A combination of both of these actions produces the most effective antimotion sickness medications. It is concluded that the balance between the acetylcholine and norepinephrine activity in the CNS appears to be responsible for motion sickness.

  3. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  4. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  5. Theory of antimotion sickness drug mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. C.; Graybiel, A.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a series of antimotion sickness drug evaluations indicates that drugs with central anticholinergic actions and drugs that increase central sympathetic activity are effective against motion sickness. The combination of these actions produces a synergistic effect against motion sickness. The effect of these medications on central acetylcholine or on norepinephrine could alter a balance between the neurons in the vestibular and reticular areas which influence motion sickness and also sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions. It is suggested that this could be their mechanism of action in preventing motion sickness.

  6. Simulator sickness provoked by a human centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Voge, V M

    1991-10-01

    Simulator sickness is now a well-recognized entity. It is recognized as a form of motion sickness, having a higher incidence in the more sophisticated simulators. Human centrifuges (dynamic simulators) are the newest innovation in aircrew training devices. Simulator sickness has never been reported in human centrifuges. We are reporting on a case of delayed simulator sickness in a pilot-subject after a centrifuge experience. A review of the "psycho-physiological" problems routinely experienced by subjects on human centrifuges indicates such problems are due to simulator sickness, although they are not reported as such. In this paper, we give a brief overview of simulator sickness and briefly discuss simulator sickness, as related to the human centrifuge experience.

  7. Length of sick leave – Why not ask the sick-listed? Sick-listed individuals predict their length of sick leave more accurately than professionals

    PubMed Central

    Fleten, Nils; Johnsen, Roar; Førde, Olav Helge

    2004-01-01

    Background The knowledge of factors accurately predicting the long lasting sick leaves is sparse, but information on medical condition is believed to be necessary to identify persons at risk. Based on the current practice, with identifying sick-listed individuals at risk of long-lasting sick leaves, the objectives of this study were to inquire the diagnostic accuracy of length of sick leaves predicted in the Norwegian National Insurance Offices, and to compare their predictions with the self-predictions of the sick-listed. Methods Based on medical certificates, two National Insurance medical consultants and two National Insurance officers predicted, at day 14, the length of sick leave in 993 consecutive cases of sick leave, resulting from musculoskeletal or mental disorders, in this 1-year follow-up study. Two months later they reassessed 322 cases based on extended medical certificates. Self-predictions were obtained in 152 sick-listed subjects when their sick leave passed 14 days. Diagnostic accuracy of the predictions was analysed by ROC area, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio, and positive predictive value was included in the analyses of predictive validity. Results The sick-listed identified sick leave lasting 12 weeks or longer with an ROC area of 80.9% (95% CI 73.7–86.8), while the corresponding estimates for medical consultants and officers had ROC areas of 55.6% (95% CI 45.6–65.6%) and 56.0% (95% CI 46.6–65.4%), respectively. The predictions of sick-listed males were significantly better than those of female subjects, and older subjects predicted somewhat better than younger subjects. Neither formal medical competence, nor additional medical information, noticeably improved the diagnostic accuracy based on medical certificates. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the accuracy of a prognosis based on medical documentation in sickness absence forms, is lower than that of one based on direct communication with the sick-listed themselves

  8. Spaceflight Decompression Sickness Contingency Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the Decompression Sickness (DCS) Contingency Plan for manned spaceflight is shown. The topics include: 1) Approach; 2) DCS Contingency Plan Overview; 3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Cuff Classifications; 4) On-orbit Treatment Philosophy; 5) Long Form Malfunction Procedure (MAL); 6) Medical Checklist; 7) Flight Rules; 8) Crew Training; 9) Flight Surgeon / Biomedical Engineer (BME) Training; and 10) DCS Emergency Landing Site.

  9. Spacelab experiments on space motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Oman, C M

    1987-01-01

    Recent research results from ground and flight experiments on motion sickness and space sickness conducted by the Man Vehicle Laboratory are reviewed. New tools developed include a mathematical model for motion sickness, a method for quantitative measurements of skin pallor and blush in ambulatory subjects, and a magnitude estimation technique for ratio scaling of nausea or discomfort. These have been used to experimentally study the time course of skin pallor and subjective symptoms in laboratory motion sickness. In prolonged sickness, subjects become hypersensitive to nauseogenic stimuli. Results of a Spacelab-1 flight experiment are described in which four observers documented the stimulus factors for and the symptoms/signs of space sickness. The clinical character of space sickness differs somewhat from acute laboratory motion sickness. However SL-1 findings support the view that space sickness is fundamentally a motion sickness. Symptoms were subjectively alleviated by head movement restriction, maintenance of a familiar orientation with respect to the visual environment, and wedging between or strapping onto surfaces which provided broad contact cues confirming the absence of body motion.

  10. Spacelab experiments on space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent research results from ground and flight experiments on motion sickness and space sickness conducted by the Man Vehicle Laboratory are reviewed. New tools developed include a mathematical model for motion sickness, a method for quantitative measurement of skin pallor and blush in ambulatory subjects, and a magnitude estimation technique for ratio scaling of nausea or discomfort. These have been used to experimentally study the time course of skin pallor and subjective symptoms in laboratory motion sickness. In prolonged sickness, subjects become hypersensitive to nauseogenic stimuli. Results of a Spacelab-1 flight experiment are described in which 4 observers documented the stimulus factors for and the symptoms/signs of space sickness. The clinical character of space sickness differs somewhat from acute laboratory motion sickness. However SL-1 findings support the view that space sickness is fundamentally a motion sickness. Symptoms were subjectively alleviated by head movement restriction, maintenance of a familiar orientation with respect to the visual environment, and wedging between or strapping onto surfaces which provided broad contact cues confirming the absence of body motion.

  11. Spacelab experiments on space motion sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Charles M.

    Recent research results from ground and flight experiments on motion sickness and space sickness conducted by the Man Vehicle Laboratory are reviewed. New tools developed include a mathematical model for motion sickness, a method for quantitative measurement of skin pallor and blush in ambulatory subjects, and a magnitude estimation technique for ratio scaling of nausea or discomfort. These have been used to experimentally study the time course of skin pallor and subjective symptoms in laboratory motion sickness. In prolonged sickness, subjects become hypersensitive to nauseogenic stimuli. Results of a Spacelab-1 flight experiment are described in which four observers documented the stimulus factors for and the symptoms/signs of space sickness. The clinical character of space sickness differs somewhat from acute laboratory motion sickness. However SL-1 findings support the view that space sickness is fundamentally a motion sickness. Symptoms were subjectively alleviated by head movement restriction, maintenance of a familiar orientation with respect to the visual environment, and wedging between or strapping onto surfaces which provided broad contact cues confirming the absence of body motion.

  12. Spacelab experiments on space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent research results from ground and flight experiments on motion sickness and space sickness conducted by the Man Vehicle Laboratory are reviewed. New tools developed include a mathematical model for motion sickness, a method for quantitative measurements of skin pallor and blush in ambulatory subjects, and a magnitude estimation technique for ratio scaling of nausea or discomfort. These have been used to experimentally study the time course of skin pallor and subjective symptoms in laboratory motion sickness. In prolonged sickness, subjects become hypersensitive to nauseogenic stimuli. Results of a Spacelab-1 flight experiment are described in which four observers documented the stimulus factors for and the symptoms/signs of space sickness. The clinical character of space sickness differs somewhat from acute laboratory motion sickness. However SL-1 findings support the view that space sickness is fundamentally a motion sickness. Symptoms were subjectively alleviated by head movement restriction, maintenance of a familiar orientation with respect to the visual environment, and wedging between or strapping onto surfaces which provided broad contact cues confirming the absence of body motion.

  13. Sickness Behavior in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Klappenbach, Martín; Depino, Amaicha M; Locatelli, Fernando F

    2016-01-01

    During an infection, animals suffer several changes in their normal physiology and behavior which may include lethargy, appetite loss, and reduction in grooming and general movements. This set of alterations is known as sickness behavior and although it has been extensively believed to be orchestrated primarily by the immune system, a relevant role for the central nervous system has also been established. The aim of the present work is to develop a simple animal model to allow studying how the immune and the nervous systems interact coordinately during an infection. We administered a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the thorax of honey bees to mimic a bacterial infection, and then we evaluated a set of stereotyped behaviors of the animals that might be indicative of sickness behavior. First, we show that this immune challenge reduces the locomotor activity of the animals in a narrow time window after LPS injection. Furthermore, bees exhibit a loss of appetite 60 and 90 min after injection, but not 15 h later. We also demonstrate that LPS injection reduces spontaneous antennal movements in harnessed animals, which suggests a reduction in the motivational state of the bees. Finally, we show that the LPS injection diminishes the interaction between animals, a crucial behavior in social insects. To our knowledge these results represent the first systematic description of sickness behavior in honey bees and provide important groundwork for the study of the interaction between the immune and the neural systems in an insect model.

  14. Sickness Behavior in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Klappenbach, Martín; Depino, Amaicha M; Locatelli, Fernando F

    2016-01-01

    During an infection, animals suffer several changes in their normal physiology and behavior which may include lethargy, appetite loss, and reduction in grooming and general movements. This set of alterations is known as sickness behavior and although it has been extensively believed to be orchestrated primarily by the immune system, a relevant role for the central nervous system has also been established. The aim of the present work is to develop a simple animal model to allow studying how the immune and the nervous systems interact coordinately during an infection. We administered a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the thorax of honey bees to mimic a bacterial infection, and then we evaluated a set of stereotyped behaviors of the animals that might be indicative of sickness behavior. First, we show that this immune challenge reduces the locomotor activity of the animals in a narrow time window after LPS injection. Furthermore, bees exhibit a loss of appetite 60 and 90 min after injection, but not 15 h later. We also demonstrate that LPS injection reduces spontaneous antennal movements in harnessed animals, which suggests a reduction in the motivational state of the bees. Finally, we show that the LPS injection diminishes the interaction between animals, a crucial behavior in social insects. To our knowledge these results represent the first systematic description of sickness behavior in honey bees and provide important groundwork for the study of the interaction between the immune and the neural systems in an insect model. PMID:27445851

  15. Sickness Behavior in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Klappenbach, Martín; Depino, Amaicha M.; Locatelli, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    During an infection, animals suffer several changes in their normal physiology and behavior which may include lethargy, appetite loss, and reduction in grooming and general movements. This set of alterations is known as sickness behavior and although it has been extensively believed to be orchestrated primarily by the immune system, a relevant role for the central nervous system has also been established. The aim of the present work is to develop a simple animal model to allow studying how the immune and the nervous systems interact coordinately during an infection. We administered a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the thorax of honey bees to mimic a bacterial infection, and then we evaluated a set of stereotyped behaviors of the animals that might be indicative of sickness behavior. First, we show that this immune challenge reduces the locomotor activity of the animals in a narrow time window after LPS injection. Furthermore, bees exhibit a loss of appetite 60 and 90 min after injection, but not 15 h later. We also demonstrate that LPS injection reduces spontaneous antennal movements in harnessed animals, which suggests a reduction in the motivational state of the bees. Finally, we show that the LPS injection diminishes the interaction between animals, a crucial behavior in social insects. To our knowledge these results represent the first systematic description of sickness behavior in honey bees and provide important groundwork for the study of the interaction between the immune and the neural systems in an insect model. PMID:27445851

  16. Motion sickness: Can it be controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, David

    1988-01-01

    NASA is one of the few research centers concerned with motion sickness. Since the physiology of man has been developed in the one-gravity field Earth, the changes experienced by man in space are unique, and often result in symptoms that resemble motion sickness on Earth. NASA is concerned with motion sickness because it is very uncomfortable for the astronauts. Another concern of NASA is the possibility of a motion sickness astronaut regurgitating while he or she is sealed in an airtight space suit. This could be fatal. Motivated by these reasons, NASA spent thousands of dollars in research and development for a drug or technique for combating motion sickness. Several different treatments were developed for this disorder. Three of the most effective ways of combatting motion sickness are discussed.

  17. Animal models in motion sickness research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.

    1990-01-01

    Practical information on candidate animal models for motion sickness research and on methods used to elicit and detect motion sickness in these models is provided. Four good potential models for use in motion sickness experiments include the dog, cat, squirrel monkey, and rat. It is concluded that the appropriate use of the animal models, combined with exploitation of state-of-the-art biomedical techniques, should generate a great step forward in the understanding of motion sickness mechanisms and in the development of efficient and effective approaches to its prevention and treatment in humans.

  18. 20 CFR 335.4 - Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.4 Filing statement of sickness and claim for... employee mistakenly registered for unemployment benefits when he or she should have applied for sickness... office of the Board within a reasonable time after unemployment benefits were denied; or...

  19. 20 CFR 335.4 - Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.4 Filing statement of sickness and claim for... employee mistakenly registered for unemployment benefits when he or she should have applied for sickness... office of the Board within a reasonable time after unemployment benefits were denied; or...

  20. 20 CFR 335.4 - Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.4 Filing statement of sickness and claim for... employee mistakenly registered for unemployment benefits when he or she should have applied for sickness... office of the Board within a reasonable time after unemployment benefits were denied; or...

  1. Giving information to sick children.

    PubMed

    Rozsos, E

    1996-03-01

    This article describes a study carried out among 14-18-year-old nursing students in Hungary. The students were asked to consider an ethical problem. The parents of a sick child ask that she should not be told of a forthcoming operation. Are the nurses to agree to this demand or not? The author concluded from this study that nurses need more training in ethical decision-making, that they need to know about the rights of children in hospital, and that nursing training should start when students are older.

  2. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  3. Breast radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... during cancer treatment Eating extra calories when sick - adults Lymphedema - self-care Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor Safe eating during cancer treatment When you have diarrhea When you have nausea and vomiting Update Date ...

  4. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  5. Metals: In Sickness and in Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metals: In Sickness and in Health Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Metals: In Sickness and in Health ... Fats Do in the Body? This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  6. Predicting motion sickness during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are large individual differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Attempts to predict who will become motion sick have had limited success. In the present study, we examined gender differences in resting levels of salivary amylase and total protein, cardiac interbeat intervals (R-R intervals), and a sympathovagal index and evaluated their potential to correctly classify individuals into two motion sickness severity groups. METHODS: Sixteen subjects (10 men and 6 women) flew four sets of 10 parabolas aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Saliva samples for amylase and total protein were collected preflight on the day of the flight and motion sickness symptoms were recorded during each parabola. Cardiovascular parameters were collected in the supine position 1-5 days before the flight. RESULTS: There were no significant gender differences in sickness severity or any of the other variables mentioned above. Discriminant analysis using salivary amylase, R-R intervals and the sympathovagal index produced a significant Wilks' lambda coefficient of 0.36, p=0.006. The analysis correctly classified 87% of the subjects into the none-mild sickness or the moderate-severe sickness group. CONCLUSIONS: The linear combination of resting levels of salivary amylase, high-frequency R-R interval levels, and a sympathovagal index may be useful in predicting motion sickness severity.

  7. Predicting Motion Sickness During Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There are large individual differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Attempts to predict who will become motion sick have had limited success. In the present study we examined gender differences in resting levels of salivary amylase and total protein, cardiac interbeat intervals (R-R intervals), and a sympathovagal index and evaluated their potential to correctly classify individuals into two motion sickness severity groups. Methods: Sixteen subjects (10 men and 6 women) flew 4 sets of 10 parabolas aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Saliva samples for amylase and total protein were collected preflight on the day of the flight and motion sickness symptoms were recorded during each parabola. Cardiovascular parameters were collected in the supine position 1-5 days prior to the flight. Results: There were no significant gender differences in sickness severity or any of the other variables mentioned above. Discriminant analysis using salivary amylase, R-R intervals and the sympathovagal index produced a significant Wilks' lambda coefficient of 0.36, p= 0.006. The analysis correctly classified 87% of the subjects into the none-mild sickness or the moderate-severe sickness group. Conclusions: The linear combination of resting levels of salivary amylase, high frequency R-R interval levels, and a sympathovagal index may be useful in predicting motion sickness severity.

  8. Jet lag and motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A N; Pascoe, P A; Spencer, M B; Benson, A J

    1993-04-01

    Jet lag. Present day aircraft operating round northern and southern latitudes cross time zones at almost the same rate as the earth rotates, and it is these rapid transmeridian transitions that lead to the syndrome commonly referred to as jet lag. On arrival at their destination, individuals find themselves out of synchrony with the social and time cues of their new environment and, until they adapt, may experience symptoms such as malaise, gastrointestinal disturbance, loss of appetite, tiredness during the day and poor sleep. The severity and exact nature of the problems vary with the direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed, and some people react more unfavourably to intercontinental travel than others. Clearly, with increasing numbers of passengers undertaking such journeys, there is considerable interest in strategies to reduce the immediate effects of jet lag or to facilitate acclimatisation. Motion sickness is a generic term which embraces seasickness, airsickness, carsickness, space sickness etc, names that identify the provocative environment or vehicle. It is a normal reaction of humans to exposure to certain motion stimuli that occur during passive transportation.

  9. [Review of sick house syndrome].

    PubMed

    Seki, Akihiko; Takigawa, Tomoko; Kishi, Reiko; Sakabe, Kou; Torii, Shinpei; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Katoh, Takahiko; Kira, Shohei; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2007-09-01

    'Sick house syndrome' (SHS) is a health issue that closely resembles sick building syndrome (SBS) that had occurred in European countries. The aim of this review is to clarify the characteristics of SHS by reviewing previous reports rigorously. We propose the definition of SHS as "health impairments caused by indoor air pollution, regardless of the place, causative substance, or pathogenesis". Cases of SBS are reported to occur predominantly in offices and sometimes schools, whereas those of SHS are usually found in general dwellings. In many cases, SHS is caused by biologically and/or chemically polluted indoor air. Physical factors might affect the impairments of SHS in some cases. It is considered that symptoms of SHS develop through toxic, allergic and/or some unknown mechanisms. Psychological mechanisms might also affect the development of SHS. It is still unclear whether SBS and SHS are very close or identical clinical entities, mostly because a general agreement on a diagnostic standard for SHS has not been established. Previous research gradually clarified the etiology of SHS. Further advances in research, diagnosis, and treatment of SHS are warranted with the following measures. Firstly, a clinical diagnostic standard including both subjective and objective findings must be established. Secondly, a standard procedure for assessing indoor air contamination should be established. Lastly, as previous research indicated multiple causative factors for SHS, an interdisciplinary approach is needed to obtain the grand picture of the syndrome. PMID:17969320

  10. Preventing recurrence of severe morning sickness

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Gideon; Maltepe, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    QUESTION A recent Motherisk article showed that initiating antinauseants even before symptoms start could prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness. In the study described, however, different physicians used different drugs. How can one be sure which drugs work? ANSWER The study of 26 women who had had severe morning sickness during previous pregnancies showed that using antiemetics before symptoms of morning sickness started appeared to prevent recurrence of severe morning sickness in subsequent pregnancies. Physicians in the United States used various antinauseant drugs. Physicians in Canada administered only one drug, the combination of doxylamine-pyridoxine (Diclectin®), to 12 women. Subanalysis of these 12 women revealed that pre-emptive use of doxylamine-pyridoxine significantly decreased the likelihood that severe morning sickness would recur. PMID:17279232

  11. Endocrine correlates of susceptibility to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Motion sickness releases ACTH, epinerphrine, and norepinephrine. The endocrine responses to motion sickness, adaptive responses leading to the resolution of the syndrome, and the way in which antimotion-sickness drugs influence the endocrine responses were studied. Susceptible or insusceptible subjects were administered antimotion-sickness drugs prior to stressful stimulation. Insusceptible subjects displayed more pronounced elevations of ACTH, epinephrine, and norepinephrine after stressful motion. Predrug levels of ACTH were higher in insusceptible subjects (p less than 0.01). Acute blockade of hormone responses to stressful motion or alteration of levels of ACTH by drugs were not correlated with individual susceptibility. No correlation was apparent between epinephrine and ACTH release. These endocrine differences may represent neurochemical markers for susceptibility to motion, stress, or general adaptability, and it may be that the chronic modulation of their levels might be more effective in preventing motion sickness than the acute blockage or stimulation of specific receptors.

  12. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  13. Simulator sickness in an army simulator.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, M G; Braithwaite, B D

    1990-01-01

    Simulator sickness describes a symptom reported by aircrew during or after flight simulator training. Some features are common to motion sickness but others, which are unusual during real flight, are believed to result specifically from the simulator environment. This paper describes the results of a questionnaire study examining the incidence and factors influencing simulator sickness in any army training system. Case histories are described and conclusions drawn with respect to health and safety, training and the effect on flight operations. One hundred and fifteen aircrew were registered in the questionnaire study. Data were collected from a history questionnaire, a post-sortie report and a delayed report form. Sixty-nine per cent of aircrew gave a history of symptoms in the simulator and 59.9 per cent experienced at least one symptom during the study period although few symptoms were rated as being other than slight. Only 3.6 per cent of subjects reported symptoms of disequilibrium. Comparative analysis of the results was performed after scoring symptoms to produce a sickness rating. This showed: association between simulator-induced sickness and greater flying experience; adaptation to the simulator environment; a history of sea sickness may predict susceptibility to simulator sickness; and no association of crew role and simulator sickness. Although some authorities believe simulator sickness to be a potential flight safety hazard there was little evidence from this study. Guidelines for the prevention of the problem are presented now that many factors have been identified. A general policy to 'ground' aircrew for a period following simulator training is not necessary, but severe cases should be assessed individually.

  14. Simulator sickness: a problem for Army aviation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, J S

    1987-04-01

    "Simulator Sickness" describes a symptom complex frequently reported by pilots during or after flight simulator training. There were 112 helicopter pilots at a U.S. Army AH-1 Cobra Flight Weapons Simulator (FWS) who completed a symptom-oriented subjective questionnaire. Of these, 40% reported symptoms of dysequilibrium; pilots developing simulator sickness had significantly more total and AH-1 flight time. Adaptation to the syndrome occurred with increasing FWS experience. The history and aeromedical significance of simulator sickness are briefly reviewed, and a case report presented. A mandatory grounding policy in use locally is described. Potential treatment strategies are briefly discussed.

  15. Space motion sickness monitoring experiment - Spacelab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles M.; Lichtenberg, Byron K.; Money, Kenneth E.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed firsthand report on symptoms and signs of space motion sickness and fluid shift observed by four specially trained crewmembers during Shuttle/Spacelab 1, launched on November 28, 1983 is presented. Results show that three crewmen experienced persistent overall discomfort and vomited repeatedly. Symptom pattern was generally similar to that seen in the individuals preflight, except that prodromalnausea was brief or absent in some cases. Symptoms were clearly modulated by head movement, were exacerbated by unfamiliar visual cues, and could be reduced by physical restraint providing contact cues around the body. The results support the view that space sickness is a form of motion sickness.

  16. Illusory self motion and simulator sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a discussion of simulator sickness (with applications to motion sickness and space sickness) based on the notion of senses as perceptual systems, and the sensory conflict theory. Most forms of the sensory conflict theory unnecessarily propose the existence of a neural store. The neural store is thought to consist of a record of previous perceptual experiences against which currently experienced patterns of stimulation are compared. The authors seek to establish that in its most parsimonious form the sensory conflict theory does not require a construct such as the neural store. In its simpler form, the sensory conflict theory complements and extends Gibson's view of the senses as perceptual systems.

  17. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2... INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.2 Manner of claiming sickness benefits. (a) Forms required for claiming benefits. To claim sickness benefits for a period of inability to work due to an illness or...

  18. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  19. Eating extra calories when sick - children

    MedlinePlus

    Getting more calories - children; Chemotherapy - calories; Transplant - calories; Cancer treatment - calories ... When children are sick or undergoing cancer treatment, they may not feel like eating. But your child needs to ...

  20. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H., III; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility of decompression sickness (DCS).

  1. Cardiovascular dynamics during space sickness and deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Rigney, David R.

    1991-01-01

    We are currently funded by NASA for the project, 'Cardiovascular Dynamics During Space Sickness and Deconditioning.' NASA has given priority to the investigation of two problems encountered in the long-term space flights currently being planned: (1) space motion sickness; and (2) cardiovascular deconditioning. We have proposed to use spectral and nonlinear dynamical analysis of heart rate data to quantify the presence of these problems and to evaluate countermeasures against them.

  2. Airborne testing of three antimotion sickness preparations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. H.; Money, K. E.; Graybiel, A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen human volunteers were exposed to weekly flights in which standardized, steep turns were used to produce motion sickness. A combination of promethazine hydrochloride (25 mg) plus ephedrine sulphate (25 mg) was found to be equally as effective as the combination of 1-scopolamine hydrobromide (0.35 mg) plus d-amphetamine sulphate (5 mg). Droperidol (2.5 mg) was indistinguishable from the placebo. It was concluded that the treatment of choice for motion sickness is promethazine plus ephedrine.

  3. Salivary total protein and experimental Coriolis sickness.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; Reschke, M F; Henley, C; MacDonald, S; Kohl, R; Mizukoshi, K

    1993-01-01

    Symptomatic reporting has been used in quantifying the severity of motion sickness including Coriolis sickness. This study was designed to objectively examine if the dynamic changes of salivary protein concentration relate to the severity of Coriolis sickness. Healthy adults with normal vestibular function underwent a modified Coriolis Sickness Susceptibility Index (CSSI) test, utilizing a staircase profile. Salivary samples were obtained prior to stimulation, 15, 30, and 45 min following stimulus onset, and/or upon reaching "nausea-II" endpoint. Total protein concentration tended to rise over the initial 30 min of stimulation, and then level off or decline. A statistically significant difference was found between the pre-stimulation and 30 min samples. Although some variability existed among the subjects, the general pattern of changes along the time course was similar. An inverse correlation approaching statistical significance was found between control (non-stimulus) total protein levels, and minutes of Coriolis stimulation required to reach the "nausea-II" endpoint. Thus, baseline salivary total protein levels can be of use in predicting susceptibility of Coriolis sickness and other forms of motion sickness.

  4. Configural Scoring of Simulator Sickness, Cybersickness and Space Adaptation Syndrome: Similarities and Differences?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Drexler, Julie M.; Compton, Daniel E.; Stanney, Kay M.; Lanham, Susan; Harm, Deborah L.

    2001-01-01

    From a survey of ten U.S. Navy flight simulators a large number (N > 1,600 exposures) of self-reports of motion sickness symptomatology were obtained. Using these data, scoring algorithms were derived, which permit examination of groups of individuals that can be scored either for 1) their total sickness experience in a particular device; or, 2) according to three separable symptom clusters which emerged from a Factor Analysis. Scores from this total score are found to be proportional to other global motion sickness symptom checklist scores with which they correlate (r = 0.82). The factors that surfaced from the analysis include clusters of symptoms referable as nausea, oculomotor disturbances, and disorientation (N, 0, and D). The factor scores may have utility in differentiating the source of symptoms in different devices. The present chapter describes our experience with the use of both of these types of scores and illustrates their use with examples from flight simulators, space sickness and virtual environments.

  5. Prognosis for a sick planet.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark

    2008-12-01

    Global warming is the most important science issue of the 21st century, challenging the very structure of our global society. The study of past climate has shown that the current global climate system is extremely sensitive to human-induced climate change. The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the industrial revolution has already caused changes with clear evidence for a 0.75 degrees C rise in global temperatures and 22 cm rise in sea level during the 20th century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change synthesis report (2007) predicts that global temperatures by 2100 could rise by between 1.1 degrees C and 6.4 degrees C. Sea level could rise by between 28 cm and 79 cm, more if the melting of the polar ice caps accelerates. In addition, weather patterns will become less predictable and the occurrence of extreme climate events, such as storms, floods, heat waves and droughts, will increase. The potential effects of global warming on human society are devastating. We do, however, already have many of the technological solutions to cure our sick planet.

  6. [Severe decompression sickness in divers].

    PubMed

    Beuster, W; van Laak, U

    1999-01-01

    The term "decompression illness (DCI)" is a disorder which arises from the presence of ectopic gas bubbles following decompression. Scuba diving poses the risk of two typically clinical syndromes: decompression sickness (DCS) and arterial gas embolism (AGE). DCS results from the formation of gas bubbles in the tissues of the body and in the blood due to rapid reduction of the environmental pressure. AGE is caused by pulmonary overinflation if the breathing gas cannot be exhaled adequately during the ascent. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms of these two disorders are quite different, both of them lead to the same result: inert gas bubbles that may cause impairment of vital functions due to hypoxia. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of DCI is the first step of the therapy. The emergency treatment contains: basic life support, advanced life support--if necessary, horizontal positioning of the victim, administration of 100% normobaric oxygen via face mask or endotracheal tube, rehydration, rapid transportation to the nearest emergency department/hyperbaric facility for definitive treatment in order to prevent serious neurological sequelae.

  7. [The sick building syndrome (SBS)].

    PubMed

    Ezratty, Véronique

    2003-10-11

    AN INCREASINGLY COMMON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROBLEM: Complaints related to indoor environment represent one of the most frequent problems that environmental health practitioners are confronted with. Hence the incidence of the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) has been increasing since the Seventies. DIFFERING DEFINITIONS AND CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS: The WHO defines SBS as an excess of complaints and symptoms occurring in certain occupants of non-industrial buildings. The syndrome can only be evoked after elimination in the person concerned of a disease related to the building, the aetiological agent of which is identifiable. The symptoms described during SBS (headaches, concentration problems, asthenia, irritation of the skin or nasal mucosa, of the eyes and upper respiratory tract.) are non specific and frequently observed in the general population. AN UNKNOWN CASE, BUT NUMEROUS AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS SUSPECTED: There is no unanimously accepted definition nor physio-pathological theory to explain the occurrence of SBS in a particular building. Many favouring factors, including the type and rate of ventilation, volatile organic compounds, particles and humidity have been suspected. TECHNICAL, SOCIAL, AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT IS REQUIRED: Although the symptoms are benign, they can be uncomfortable or even handicapping and prevent the functioning of workplaces. The SBS, the social and economical costs of which are high, requires multidisciplinary management. PMID:14576597

  8. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  9. 20 CFR 335.4 - Filing statement of sickness and claim for sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.4 Filing statement of sickness and claim for... defined in section 3 of the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act or has exhausted his or her rights to... employee mistakenly registered for unemployment benefits when he or she should have applied for...

  10. Stroboscopic Vision as a Treatment Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, J. T.; Ford, G.; Krnavek, J. M.; Hwang, E. y.; Kornilova, L. N.; Leigh, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Results obtained from space flight indicate that most space crews will experience some symptoms of motion sickness causing significant impact on the operational objectives that must be accomplished to assure mission success. Based on the initial work of Melvill-Jones, we have evaluated stroboscopic vision as a method of preventing motion sickness. Methods: Nineteen subjects read text while making +/-20deg head movements in the horizontal plane at 0.2 Hz while wearing left-right reversing prisms during exposure to 4 Hz stroboscopic or normal room illumination. Testing was repeated using LCD shutter glasses as the stroboscopic source with an additional 19 subjects. Results: With Strobe, motion sickness was significantly lower than with normal room illumination. Results with the LCD shutter glasses were analogous to those observed with environmental strobe. Conclusions: Stroboscopic illumination appears to be effective where retinal slip is a factor in eliciting motion sickness. Additional research is evaluating the glasses efficacy for, carsickness, sickness in parabolic flight and seasickness. There is evidence from pilot studies showing that the glasses reduce saccade velocity to visually presented targets by approximately half of the normal values. It is interesting to note that adaptation to space flight may also slow saccade velocity.

  11. Reliability of sickness certificates in detecting potential sick leave reduction by modifying working conditions: a clinical epidemiology study

    PubMed Central

    Fleten, Nils; Johnsen, Roar; Østrem, Bente Skipenes

    2004-01-01

    Background Medical sickness certificates are generally the main source for information when scrutinizing the need for aimed intervention strategies to avoid or reduce the individual and community side effects of sick leave. This study explored the value of medical sickness certificates related to daily work in Norwegian National Insurance Offices to identify sick-listed persons, where modified working conditions might reduce the ongoing sick leave. Methods The potential for reducing the ongoing sick leave by modifying working conditions was individually assessed on routine sickness certificates in 999 consecutive sick leave episodes by four Norwegian National Insurance collaborators, two with and two without formal medical competence. The study took place in Northern Norway in 1997 and 1998. Agreement analysed with differences against mean, kappa, and proportional-agreement analysis within and between groups of assessors was used in the judgement. Agreements between the assessors and the self-assessment of sick-listed subjects were additionally analysed in 159 sick-leave episodes. Results Both sick-listed subjects and National Insurance collaborators anticipated a potential reduction in sick leave in 20–30% of cases, and in another 20% the potential was assessed as possible. The chance corrected agreements, however, were poor (k < 0.20) within and between groups of National Insurance collaborators. The agreement between National Insurance collaborators and the sick-listed subjects was no better than chance. Neither extended medical information nor formal medical competence increased agreement in cases where modified working conditions might have reduced sick leave. Conclusion Information in medical sickness certificates proved ineffective in detecting cases where modified working conditions may reduce sick leave, and focusing on medical certificates may prevent identification of needed interventions. Strategies on how to communicate directly with sick

  12. Chapter 4: Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay

    2008-10-01

    This chapter is basically divided into 2 parts. In the first part, the important properties of the solar magnetic field are summarized. The discussion begins with a simple introduction to solar magneto hydrodynamics. This introduction will be sufficient to understand the current status of the solar dynamo theory that follows. Some very curious and interesting results on force free fields are then presented in very basic terms. Finally, the application of this theoretical framework to the problems of coronal heating, solar flares and coronal mass ejections are developed in a simple unified scheme, based on a hierarchy of physical conditions. The second part consists of a tutorial on magnetographs. It begins with a description of polarization of light from very fundamental notions of coherence of light. This is followed by simple but comprehensive explanations of the Zeeman and Hanle effects along with the necessary basic ideas of quantum physics of scattering of light. Then the working of a few important magnetographs is outlined, with special emphasis on a solar vector magnetograph developed for USO, to provide a ''hands on" perspective. The article concludes with a few brief remarks on the possible future directions for research in the domain of solar magnetism...

  13. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  14. Synthesis: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Geiser, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Driscoll, C.T.; Goodale, C.L.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J. S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a substantial increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and deposition (Galloway et al. 2003). Because of past, and, in some regions, continuing increases in emissions (Lehmann et al. 2005, Nilles and Conley 2001), this N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations and damage in many ecosystems across the United States. In some ecoregions, the impact of N deposition has been severe and has changed the biotic community structure and composition of ecosystems. In the Mediterranean California ecoregion, for example (see Chapter 13), replacement of native by exotic invasive vegetation is accelerated because exotic species are often more productive under elevated N deposition than native species in some California grasslands, coastal sage scrub, and desert scrub (Fenn et al. 2010, Rao and Allen 2010, Rao et al. 2010, Weiss 1999, Yoshida and Allen 2004). Such shifts in plant community composition and species richness can have consequences beyond changes in ecosystem structure: shifts may lead to overall losses in biodiversity and further impair particular threatened or endangered species (Stevens et al. 2004). Th e extirpation of the endangered checkerspot butterfl y (Euphydryas editha bayensis), because the host plant for the larval stage disappears in N-enriched ecosystems (Fenn et al. 2010, Weiss 1999), is just one example of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition.

  15. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  16. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association. PMID:23539263

  17. Validation of sick leave measures: self-reported sick leave and sickness benefit data from a Danish national register compared to multiple workplace-registered sick leave spells in a Danish municipality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous validation studies of sick leave measures have focused on self-reports. Register-based sick leave data are considered to be valid; however methodological problems may be associated with such data. A Danish national register on sickness benefit (DREAM) has been widely used in sick leave research. On the basis of sick leave records from 3,554 and 2,311 eldercare workers in 14 different workplaces, the aim of this study was to: 1) validate registered sickness benefit data from DREAM against workplace-registered sick leave spells of at least 15 days; 2) validate self-reported sick leave days during one year against workplace-registered sick leave. Methods Agreement between workplace-registered sick leave and DREAM-registered sickness benefit was reported as sensitivities, specificities and positive predictive values. A receiver-operating characteristic curve and a Bland-Altman plot were used to study the concordance with sick leave duration of the first spell. By means of an analysis of agreement between self-reported and workplace-registered sick leave sensitivity and specificity was calculated. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (95% CI) were used. Results The probability that registered DREAM data on sickness benefit agrees with workplace-registered sick leave of at least 15 days was 96.7% (95% CI: 95.6-97.6). Specificity was close to 100% (95% CI: 98.3-100). The registered DREAM data on sickness benefit overestimated the duration of sick leave spells by an average of 1.4 (SD: 3.9) weeks. Separate analysis on pregnancy-related sick leave revealed a maximum sensitivity of 20% (95% CI: 4.3-48.1). The sensitivity of self-reporting at least one or at least 56 sick leave day/s was 94.5 (95% CI: 93.4 – 95.5) % and 58.5 (95% CI: 51.1 – 65.6) % respectively. The corresponding specificities were 85.3 (95% CI: 81.4 – 88.6) % and 98.9 (95% CI: 98.3 – 99.3) %. Conclusions The DREAM register offered valid measures of sick leave spells of at

  18. Does a motion base prevent simulator sickness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, Thomas J.; Mccauley, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of high-fidelity motion cues to reduce the discrepancy between visually implied motion and actual motion is tested experimentally using the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Ten pilot subjects use the VMS to fly simulated S-turns and sawtooths which generate a high incidence of motion sickness. The subjects fly the maneuvers on separate days both with and without use of a motion base provided by the VMS, and data are collected regarding symptoms, dark focus, and postural equilibrium. The motion-base condition is shown to be practically irrelevant with respect to the incidence and severity of motion sickness. It is suggested that the data-collection procedure cannot detect differences in sickness levels, and the false cues of the motion condition are theorized to have an adverse impact approximately equivalent to the absence of cues in a fixed-base condition.

  19. Coriolis effects and motion sickness modelling.

    PubMed

    Bles, W

    1998-11-15

    Coriolis effects are notorious in relation to disorientation and motion sickness in aircrew. A review is provided of experimental data on these Coriolis effects, including the modulatory effects of adding visual or somatosensory rotatory motion information. A vector analysis of the consequences of head movements during somatosensory, visual and/or vestibular rotatory motion stimulation revealed that the more the sensed angular velocity vector after the head movements is aligned with the gravitoinertial force vector, the less nauseating effects are experienced. It is demonstrated that this is a special case of the subjective vertical conflict theory on motion sickness that assumes that motion sickness may be provoked if a discrepancy is detected between the subjective vertical and the sensed vertical as determined on the basis of incoming sensory information.

  20. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  1. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  2. Do lower vertebrates suffer from motion sickness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychakov, Dmitri

    The poster presents literature data and results of the author’s studies with the goal to find out whether the lower animals are susceptible to motion sickness (Lychakov, 2012). In our studies, fish and amphibians were tested for 2 h and more by using a rotating device (f = 0.24 Hz, a _{centrifugal} = 0.144 g) and a parallel swing (f = 0.2 Hz, a _{horizontal} = 0.059 g). The performed studies did not revealed in 4 fish species and in toads any characteristic reactions of the motion sickness (sopite syndrome, prodromal preparatory behavior, vomiting). At the same time, in toads there appeared characteristic stress reactions (escape response, an increase of the number of urinations, inhibition of appetite), as well as some other reactions not associated with motion sickness (regular head movements, eye retractions). In trout fry the used stimulation promoted division of the individuals into the groups differing by locomotor reaction to stress, as well as the individuals with the well-expressed compensatory reaction that we called the otolithotropic reaction. Analysis of results obtained by other authors confirms our conclusions. Thus, the lower vertebrates, unlike mammals, are immune to motion sickness either under the land conditions or under conditions of weightlessness. On the basis of available experimental data and theoretical concepts of mechanisms of development the motion sickness, formulated in several hypotheses (mismatch hypothesis, Traisman‘ s hypothesis, resonance hypothesis), there presented the synthetic hypothesis of motion sickness that has the conceptual significance. According to the hypothesis, the unusual stimulation producing sensor-motor or sensor-sensor conflict or an action of vestibular and visual stimuli of frequency of about 0.2 Hz is perceived by CNS as poisoning and causes the corresponding reactions. The motion sickness actually is a byproduct of technical evolution. It is suggested that in the lower vertebrates, unlike mammals

  3. Gastrointestinal motility in space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Linder, Barry J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1987-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in space motion sickness (SMS) are significantly different from those in ordinary motion sickness (MS). Recording and tabulation of sounds was the only technique that could be used as a measure of motility during spaceflight operations. There were 17 subjects, six unaffected by SMS, who made ambulatory recordings preflight and inflight. With one exception, all those affected had sharply reduced sounds, while those unaffected had increases or moderate reductions. The mechanism of vomiting in SMS appears to be secondary to this ileus, in contrast to vomiting in ordinary MS, where the emesis center is thought to be directly triggered by the vestibular system.

  4. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H. III; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) is identified by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space, as defined in the HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD). This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility that decompression sickness may occur.

  5. Paid Sick Leave and Job Stability.

    PubMed

    Hill, Heather D

    2013-05-01

    A compelling, but unsubstantiated, argument for paid sick leave legislation is that workers with leave are better able to address own and family member health needs without risking a voluntary or involuntary job separation. This study tests that claim using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and regression models controlling for a large set of worker and job characteristics, as well as with propensity score techniques. Results suggest that paid sick leave decreases the probability of job separation by at least 2.5 percentage points, or 25%. The association is strongest for workers without paid vacation leave and for mothers. PMID:24235780

  6. Decompression Sickness in Sport Scuba Diving.

    PubMed

    Davis, J C; Bracker, M D

    1988-02-01

    In brief: Sport scuba diving in inland bodies of water has gained in popularity, and travelers to remote areas can fly home soon after a diving trip. Thus it is not unusual to see a case of decompression sickness in an emergency care facility, regardless of its location. Symptoms of decompression sickness may occur minutes or hours after diving with compressed gas. They include marked fatigue, pruritic mottled skin lesions, pain (joints, back, abdomen), weakness or paralysis of isolated or regional muscle groups, paresthesia, urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter control, dyspnea, coughing, vertigo, and substernal pain. Most patients respond quickly to prompt treatment in hyperbaric chambers, and the symptoms resolve completely.

  7. Neurohumoral mechanism of space motion sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, A. I.; Egorov, A. D.; Nichiporuk, I. A.

    This paper reviews existing hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of adaptation of the vestibular apparatus and related somatosensory systems to microgravity with reference to the flight data. Having in view theoretical concepts and experimental data accumulated in space flights, a conceptual model of the development of a functional system responsible for the termination of vestibular dysfunction and space motion sickness manifestations is presented. It is also shown that changes in the hormonal status during motion sickness induced by vestibular stimulation give evidence that endocrine regulation of certain functions can be involved in adaptive responses.

  8. Paid Sick Leave and Job Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    A compelling, but unsubstantiated, argument for paid sick leave legislation is that workers with leave are better able to address own and family member health needs without risking a voluntary or involuntary job separation. This study tests that claim using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and regression models controlling for a large set of worker and job characteristics, as well as with propensity score techniques. Results suggest that paid sick leave decreases the probability of job separation by at least 2.5 percentage points, or 25%. The association is strongest for workers without paid vacation leave and for mothers. PMID:24235780

  9. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end.

  10. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  11. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  12. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2 Section 335.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.2 Manner of claiming sickness benefits. (a) Forms required...

  13. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2 Section 335.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.2 Manner of claiming sickness benefits. (a) Forms required...

  14. 20 CFR 335.6 - Payment of sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Payment of sickness benefits. 335.6 Section 335.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.6 Payment of sickness benefits. (a) General rule. Except as...

  15. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2 Section 335.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.2 Manner of claiming sickness benefits. (a) Forms required...

  16. 20 CFR 335.6 - Payment of sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Payment of sickness benefits. 335.6 Section 335.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.6 Payment of sickness benefits. (a) General rule. Except as...

  17. 20 CFR 335.6 - Payment of sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payment of sickness benefits. 335.6 Section 335.6 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.6 Payment of sickness benefits. (a) General rule. Except as...

  18. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2 Section 335.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT SICKNESS BENEFITS § 335.2 Manner of claiming sickness benefits. (a) Forms required...

  19. 20 CFR 335.6 - Payment of sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fourth consecutive day of sickness in a period of continuing sickness, as defined in § 335.1(c), but... an initial period of continuing sickness from June 14 through July 25, and all days in that period... her subsequent registration period covers June 28 to July 11, and July 12 to July 25. In the...

  20. 20 CFR 335.6 - Payment of sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fourth consecutive day of sickness in a period of continuing sickness, as defined in § 335.1(c), but... an initial period of continuing sickness from June 14 through July 25, and all days in that period... her subsequent registration period covers June 28 to July 11, and July 12 to July 25. In the...

  1. 20 CFR 336.3 - Duration of normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of normal sickness benefits. 336.3... INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Normal Benefits § 336.3 Duration of normal sickness benefits. The duration of normal sickness benefits is the same as the duration of normal...

  2. 20 CFR 336.3 - Duration of normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of normal sickness benefits. 336.3... INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Normal Benefits § 336.3 Duration of normal sickness benefits. The duration of normal sickness benefits is the same as the duration of normal...

  3. 20 CFR 336.3 - Duration of normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Duration of normal sickness benefits. 336.3... INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Normal Benefits § 336.3 Duration of normal sickness benefits. The duration of normal sickness benefits is the same as the duration of normal...

  4. 20 CFR 336.3 - Duration of normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duration of normal sickness benefits. 336.3... INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Normal Benefits § 336.3 Duration of normal sickness benefits. The duration of normal sickness benefits is the same as the duration of normal...

  5. 20 CFR 336.3 - Duration of normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Duration of normal sickness benefits. 336.3... INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Normal Benefits § 336.3 Duration of normal sickness benefits. The duration of normal sickness benefits is the same as the duration of normal...

  6. Eating extra calories when sick - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Getting more calories - adults; Chemotherapy - calories; Transplant - calories; Cancer treatment - calories ... If you are sick or undergoing cancer treatment, you may not feel like eating. But it is important to get enough protein and calories so you do not lose too ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 65. The incidence of this condition increases with age. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics ... adults, sick sinus syndrome is often associated with age-related changes in the heart. Over time, the SA node may ... Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene ...

  8. [Decompression sickness after diving and following flying].

    PubMed

    Laursen, S B; Grønfeldt, W; Jacobsen, E

    1999-07-26

    A case of delayed symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) after diving and flying is reported. The diver presented with classical signs of type 2 DCS, probably caused by air travel 16 hours after SCUBA diving. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in a decompression chamber was successful. Guidelines to prevent DCS for recreational divers who plan to fly after diving are presented.

  9. Sensory neurobiology: demystifying the sick sense.

    PubMed

    Bozza, Thomas

    2015-02-16

    The vomeronasal organ, a sensory structure within the olfactory system, detects chemical signals that affect social and sexual behaviors and that elicit responses to predator odors. A recent study demonstrates that innate avoidance of sick conspecifics requires an intact vomeronasal organ, expanding the repertoire of biological functions known to be mediated by this olfactory subsystem.

  10. Sensory neurobiology: demystifying the sick sense.

    PubMed

    Bozza, Thomas

    2015-02-16

    The vomeronasal organ, a sensory structure within the olfactory system, detects chemical signals that affect social and sexual behaviors and that elicit responses to predator odors. A recent study demonstrates that innate avoidance of sick conspecifics requires an intact vomeronasal organ, expanding the repertoire of biological functions known to be mediated by this olfactory subsystem. PMID:25689911

  11. [23andMe and motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-05-01

    A Genome Wide Association Study on propensity to motion sickness published by 23andMe gives interesting results, shows validity for self-reported phenotypic information and underlines the value of the model developed by the company for customer participation in genetic studies. PMID:27225928

  12. Stroboscopic Goggles for Reduction of Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    A device built around a pair of electronic shutters has been demonstrated to be effective as a prototype of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses for preventing or reducing motion sickness. The momentary opening of the shutters helps to suppress a phenomenon that is known in the art as retinal slip and is described more fully below. While a number of different environmental factors can induce motion sickness, a common factor associated with every known motion environment is sensory confusion or sensory mismatch. Motion sickness is a product of misinformation arriving at a central point in the nervous system from the senses from which one determines one s spatial orientation. When information from the eyes, ears, joints, and pressure receptors are all in agreement as to one s orientation, there is no motion sickness. When one or more sensory input(s) to the brain is not expected, or conflicts with what is anticipated, the end product is motion sickness. Normally, an observer s eye moves, compensating for the anticipated effect of motion, in such a manner that the image of an object moving relatively to an observer is held stationary on the retina. In almost every known environment that induces motion sickness, a change in the gain (in the signal-processing sense of gain ) of the vestibular system causes the motion of the eye to fail to hold images stationary on the retina, and the resulting motion of the images is termed retinal slip. The present concept of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses (see figure) is based on the proposition that prevention of retinal slip, and hence, the prevention of sensory mismatch, can be expected to reduce the tendency toward motion sickness. A device according to this concept helps to prevent retinal slip by providing snapshots of the visual environment through electronic shutters that are brief enough that each snapshot freezes the image on each retina. The exposure time for each snapshot is less than 5 ms. In the event that a higher

  13. Promoting certification: the chapter's role.

    PubMed

    Staul, Luann

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses focuses on providing nurses with expert knowledge to promote delivery of excellent, safe, quality care to acutely and critically ill patients and their families. Chapters consist of professional leaders in a community who carry on the mission work of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses at the local level. Chapters can emphasize the value of certification and continuing education, because they offer a wide spectrum of opportunities to meet the learning and developmental needs of nurses as they advance in their professional careers. This article will highlight strategies that can be implemented by local chapters to facilitate and promote certification.

  14. Influenza in workplaces: transmission, workers’ adherence to sick leave advice and European sick leave recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tomba, Gianpaolo Scalia; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about influenza transmission in the workplace and whether staying home from work when experiencing influenza-like illness can reduce the spread of influenza is crucial for the design of efficient public health initiatives. Aim: This review synthesizes current literature on sickness presenteeism and influenza transmission in the workplace and provides an overview of sick leave recommendations in Europe for influenza. Methods: A search was performed on Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, Web of Science, Scopus and SweMed to identify studies related to workplace contacts, -transmission, -interventions and compliance with recommendations to take sick leave. A web-based survey on national recommendations and policies for sick leave during influenza was issued to 31 European countries. Results: Twenty-two articles (9 surveys; 13 modelling articles) were eligible for this review. Results from social mixing studies suggest that 20–25% of weekly contacts are made in the workplace, while modelling studies suggest that on average 16% (range 9–33%) of influenza transmission occurs in the workplace. The effectiveness of interventions to reduce workplace presenteeism is largely unknown. Finally, estimates from studies reporting expected compliance with sick leave recommendations ranged from 71 to 95%. Overall, 18 countries participated in the survey of which nine (50%) had issued recommendations encouraging sick employees to stay at home during the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, while only one country had official recommendations for seasonal influenza. Conclusions: During the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, many European countries recommended ill employees to take sick leave. Further research is warranted to quantify the effect of reduced presenteeism during influenza illness. PMID:27060594

  15. [Sick building syndrome: three case reports].

    PubMed

    Bogacka, E

    1999-05-01

    SBS--sick building syndrome--is a set multi-organ symptoms related to long-term staying in "sick buildings". These are modern, energy saving, air tight buildings with reduced ventilation. As a result of such construction, harmful, air-borne substances issued by interior decoration materials, air-conditioning systems and working people are cumulated. The study presents three cases of allergic patients whose original allergic illnesses got aggravated as an effect of: 1) staying in a freshly redecorated room, 2) staying in a fully air-conditioned room, 3) long-term exposition to bacteria and fungi allergens developing in old, used up filters of a car air-condition system.

  16. African horse sickness and African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K A; Kat, P W; House, J; House, C; O'Brien, S J; Laurenson, M K; McNutt, J W; Osburn, B I

    1995-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a disease that affects equids, and is principally transmitted by Culicoides spp. that are biological vectors of AHS viruses (AHSV). The repeated spread of AHSV from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East, northern Africa and the Iberian peninsula indicate that a better understanding of AHS epizootiology is needed. African horse sickness has long been known to infect and cause mortality among domestic dogs that ingest virus contaminated meat, but it is uncertain what role carnivores play in transmission of the virus. We present evidence of widespread natural AHS infection among a diversity of African carnivore species. We hypothesize that such infection resulted from ingestion of meat and organs from AHS-infected prey species. The effect of AHS on the carnivores is unknown, as is their role in the maintenance cycle of the disease.

  17. Sick sinus syndrome: a family study.

    PubMed

    Rogińska, Natalia; Bieganowska, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    A case of related individuals affected by sick sinus syndrome is presented in this study. The clinical and electrocardiographic signs of sinus node dysfunction and the most common causes of this disease are presented. Subsequently, the article includes descriptions of sinus node disease in three related children as well as details of the disease in their relatives. A literature review of the genetics of familial sinus node dysfunction concludes the study.

  18. [Genetic predictors of sick sinus node syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chernova, A A; Nikulina, S Iu; Tret'iakova, S S

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the role of heredity in development of the sick sinus node syndrome (SSNS). We have examined 14 probands and 110 their relatives from families with idiopathic SSNS and established the role in development of hereditary SSNS of polymorphisms of the following genes: -2-adrenoreceptor, enzyme endothelial NO synthase, protein connexin 40, voltage dependent cardiac sodium channels, cardiac myosin heavy chains. We also revealed associations of clinical variants of idiopathic SSNS with genotypes of the studied genes.

  19. Sickness at high altitude: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, G

    2002-03-01

    When some individuals spend just a few hours at low atmospheric pressure above 1,500 m (5,000 ft)--such as when climbing a mountain or flying in a plane at high altitude--they become ill. Altitude sickness studies originally concentrated on life-threatening illnesses which beset determined and athletic climbers at extreme altitudes. In recent years, however, research attention is moving towards milder forms of sickness reported by a significant proportion of the growing number of visitors to mountain and ski resorts at more moderate altitude. Some of this research is also relevant in understanding the problems experienced by passengers in newer planes that fly at a significantly higher equivalent cabin altitude, i.e. 2,440 m (8,000 ft), than earlier designs. Engineering solutions--such as enriched oxygen in enclosed spaces at altitude, or in the case of aircraft, lower cabin altitudes--are possible, but for an economic assessment to be realistic an engineer needs to identify the scale of the problem and to understand the factors determining susceptibility. This review concentrates on the problems of mountain sickness in the ordinary population at altitudes of around 3,000 m (10,000 ft); this is a problem of growing concern as ski resorts develop, mountain trekking increases in popularity, and as higher altitude cabin pressures are achieved in aircraft.

  20. Integrated management of the sick child.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhoea, pneumonia, measles, malaria and malnutrition account for more than 70% of deaths and health facility visits among children under 5 years of age in developing countries. A number of programmes in WHO and UNICEF have developed an approach to the integrated management of the sick child, which is being coordinated by WHO's Division for the Control of Diarrhoeal and Acute Respiratory Disease. Integrated clinical guidelines have been developed and a training course for health workers in outpatient (first level) health facilities has been completed. In addition to case management of these diseases, the course incorporates significant prevention of disease through promotion of breast-feeding, counselling to solve feeding problems, and immunization of sick children. Other materials to train and support health workers are also being developed: an inpatient case management training course, medical school curricular materials, a drug supply management course, and materials to support monitoring and reinforcement of skills after training. A planning guide for interventions to improve household management of childhood illness is also being developed. Since management of the sick child is a cost-effective health intervention, which has been estimated to have a large impact on the global burden of disease in developing countries, the completion of these materials and their wide implementation should have a substantial impact on child mortality.

  1. History of Sleeping Sickness in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hide, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    The history of human sleeping sickness in East Africa is characterized by the appearance of disease epidemics interspersed by long periods of endemicity. Despite the presence of the tsetse fly in large areas of East Africa, these epidemics tend to occur multiply in specific regions or foci rather than spreading over vast areas. Many theories have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but recent molecular approaches and detailed analyses of epidemics have highlighted the stability of human-infective trypanosome strains within these foci. The new molecular data, taken alongside the history and biology of human sleeping sickness, are beginning to highlight the important factors involved in the generation of epidemics. Specific, human-infective trypanosome strains may be associated with each focus, which, in the presence of the right conditions, can be responsible for the generation of an epidemic. Changes in agricultural practice, favoring the presence of tsetse flies, and the important contribution of domestic animals as a reservoir for the parasite are key factors in the maintenance of such epidemics. This review examines the contribution of molecular and genetic data to our understanding of the epidemiology and history of human sleeping sickness in East Africa. PMID:9880477

  2. A Countermeasure for Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, J. T.; Leigh, R. J.; Jones, G. Melvill

    2006-01-01

    Overall, the results obtained in both the U.S. and the Russian space programs indicate that most space crews will experience some symptoms of motion sickness (MS) causing significant impact on the operational objectives that must be accomplished to assure mission success. At this time the primary countermeasure for MS requires the administration of Promethazine. Promethazine is not a benign drug, and is most frequently administered just prior to the sleep cycle to prevent its side effects from further compromising mission objectives. Clearly other countermeasures for SMS must be developed. Currently the primary focus is on two different technologies: (1) developing new and different pharmacological compounds with less significant side effects, (2) preflight training. The primary problem with all of these methods for controlling MS is time. New drugs that may be beneficial are years from testing and development, and preflight training requires a significant investment of crew time during an already intensive pre-launch schedule. Granted, motion sickness symptoms can be minimized with either of the two methods detailed above, however, it may be possible to develop a countermeasure that does not require either extensive adaptation time or exposure to motion sickness. Approximately 25 years ago Professor Geoffrey Melvill Jones presented his work on adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) using optically reversed vision (left-right prisms) during head rotations in the horizontal plane. It was of no surprise that most subjects experienced motion sickness while wearing the optically reversing prisms. However, a serendipitous finding emerged during this research showing that the same subjects did not experience motion sickness symptoms when wearing the reversing prisms under stroboscopic illumination. The mechanism, by which this side-effect was believed to have occurred, is not clearly understood. However, the fact that no motion sickness was ever noted, suggests

  3. Transfer of sick children by air.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, N N; Aggarwal, S

    2000-08-01

    The annual growth rate of air traffic is increasing at the rate of about 7% all over the world. Children and adolescents make a significant chunk of travelling population. Some of the neonates too take to civil air and travel under various circumstances. Others travel for the reasons of medical air evacuation and better treatment at some specialized tertiary care centers, within India or abroad or simply as medical emergency. With the increasing availability of air taxis and air ambulances, it has become necessary for the pediatricians to know the consequences and potential hazards of transfer of the sick by air, lest they lose their patients unintentionally despite professional proficiency. Air evacuation of sick child is a highly specialized job, much different from an evacuation by any fast car ambulance. The paper discusses the general impact of aviation stresses in civil aviation with special reference to sick neonates, children and adolescents, and provides general guidelines, which could be applied to any particular clinical condition with knowledge of underlying physiological processes and anticipated alterations in cabin environment. It also brings out the issues of proper pre-flight assessment, fitness to undertake air transfer, general handling of patient under transfer, desirable onboard procedures, do s and don ts during air transfer, limitations of conventional neonatal/child resuscitation kits, available medical support in aircraft cabins, proper use of hardware including physiology monitoring systems, permissible specialized medical aids, and the requirement and use of equipment during air evacuation. The importance of high awareness and preventive measures is reiterated.

  4. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  5. Reliability of provocative tests of motion sickness susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Calkins, D S; Reschke, M F; Kennedy, R S; Dunlop, W P

    1987-09-01

    Accurate prediction of space motion sickness is dependent, in part, upon the reliability of terrestrial-based motion sickness susceptibility tests. In the present study, test-retest reliability values were derived from motion sickness susceptibility scores obtained from two successive exposures to each of three tests: 1) Coriolis Sickness Sensitivity Index (CSSI); 2) Staircase Velocity Movement Test (SVMT); and 3) Parabolic Flight Static Chair Test (PSCT). The reliability of the three tests ranged from 0.70 to 0.88. Normalizing values from predictors with skewed distributions improved the reliability. The apparent inconsistency between our finding of high reliability of predictive tests, and previous reports of low correlations between ground-based predictors and space motion sickness may be due to unreliability in assessment of the sickness criterion. Issues of reliability and validity of predictor and criterion measures, and their implications for future development of ground-based predictive tests are discussed in some detail.

  6. Serum levels of eleven steroid hormones following motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Stalla, G K; Doerr, H G; Bidlingmaier, F; Sippel, W G; von Restorff, W

    1985-10-01

    In order to grade motion sickness objectively, the following 11 adrenal hormones were investigated in subjects with different motion sickness susceptibility: Aldosterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, progesterone, 17-OH-progesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, cortisol, cortisone, testosterone, androstendione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Motion sickness was induced by the coriolis effect on a rotary chair. Both severe kinetosis after short rotation time and mild motion sickness after 30 min of rotation occurred together with small hormonal changes. Androstendione and 11-deoxycortisol appear to be sensitive indicators of motion sickness if the rotation time is taken into consideration. A significant increase of all hormones except progesterone, cortisone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate was observed when pronounced malaise had come after a long rotation stress (24.6 min). The changes in plasma aldosterone concentration appeared to correlate with time only. The present study demonstrates that hormonal analysis can be helpful in estimating the degree of motion sickness.

  7. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  8. A stimulator for laboratory studies of motion sickness in cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, G. H.; Lucot, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A motion sickness device is described which produces motion sickness in about 40 percent of an unselected population of unrestrained female cats during a 30-min exposure at 0.28 Hz. The apparatus provides a gentle wave stimulus, similar to that provided by an amusement park Ferris Wheel. Two cats may be tested at the same time. This device is useful for studies of putative antimotion sickness drugs or the biochemical basis of the emetic response to motion.

  9. A stimulator for laboratory studies of motion sickness in cats.

    PubMed

    Crampton, G H; Lucot, J B

    1985-05-01

    A motion sickness device is described which produces motion sickness in about 40% of an unselected population of unrestrained female cats during a 30-min exposure at 0.28 Hz. The apparatus provides a gentle wave stimulus, similar to that provided by an amusement park Ferris Wheel. Two cats may be tested at the same time. This device is useful for studies of putative antimotion sickness drugs or the biochemical basis of the emetic response to motion.

  10. "Unusually Successful": Pittsfield Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiminski, James A.

    The United States Education Department recognizes projects that effectively meet the special needs of educationally deprived students. In 1992, the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Chapter 1 preschool program earned national validation as an "unusually successful" compensatory education program. The program has served as a statewide model, and has…

  11. Chinese hyper-susceptibility to vection-induced motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Leblanc, Ree; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that control individual differences in susceptible to motion sickness. A serendipitous observation in our laboratory that most Chinese subjects become motion sick prompted this study. We used a rotating optokinetic drum to provoke motion sickness and compared gastric responses and symptom reports of Chinese, European-American, and African-American subjects. There was no difference in the responses of European-American and African-American subjects; however, Chinese subjects showed significantly greater disturbances in gastric activity and reported significantly more severe symptoms. We suggest that this hypersusceptibility presents a natural model for the study of physiological mechanisms of nausea and other symptoms of motion sickness.

  12. Chapter 13. Exploring Use of the Reserved Core

    SciTech Connect

    Holmen, John; Humphrey, Alan; Berzins, Martin

    2015-07-29

    In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThread. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run configurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly oversubscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management technique for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.

  13. Therapeutic effects of antimotion sickness medications on the secondary symptoms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Stewart, J. J.; Wood, M. J.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    In addition to nausea and vomiting, motion sickness involves slowing of brain waves, loss of performance, inhibition of gastric motility and the Sopite Syndrome. The therapeutic effects of antimotion sickness drugs on these reactions were evaluated. The subjects were rotated to the M-III end-point of motion sickness. Intramuscular (IM) medications were then administered. Side effects before and after rotation were reported on the Cornell Medical Index. Brain waves were recorded on a Grass Model 6 Electroencephalograph (EEG), and gastric emptying was studied after an oral dose of 1 mCi Technetium 99m DTPA in 10 oz. isotonic saline. An increase in dizziness and drowsiness was reported with placebo after rotation. This was not prevented by IM scopolamine 0.1 mg or ephedrine 25 mg. EEG recordings indicated a slowing of alpha waves with some thea and delta waves from the frontal areas after rotation. IM ephedine and dimenhydrinate counteracted the slowing while 0.3 mg scopolamine had an additive effect. Alterations of performance on the pursuit meter correlated with the brain wave changes. Gastric emptying was restored by IM metoclopramide. Ephedrine IM but not scopolamine is effective for some of the secondary effects of motion sickness after it is established.

  14. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:24209920

  15. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. Venus 3 Book: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F.; Svedhem, H.; Head, J.

    2014-04-01

    This will be the first chapter in the planned 'Venus 3' book, which will present the latest knowledge about all aspects of the planet Venus. Chapter 1 will include: 1. Brief history of Venus observations, from telescopic studies up to and including early space missions (Venera, Mariner) 2. Overview of key results from more recent groundbased observations and space missions, including Pioneer Venus, the later Veneras, Vega, Magellan, Akatsuki and Venus Express 3. Summary of current knowledge, in three main sections: a. Surface and interior b. Atmosphere and climate c. Thermosphere, exosphere and magnetosphere 4. Outstanding scientific questions remaining, and future mission concepts providing background, introduction and an overview to the rest of the book.

  17. Systematic review of active workplace interventions to reduce sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The workplace is used as a setting for interventions to prevent and reduce sickness absence, regardless of the specific medical conditions and diagnoses. Aims To give an overview of the general effectiveness of active workplace interventions aimed at preventing and reducing sickness absence. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Psych-info, and ISI web of knowledge on 27 December 2011. Inclusion criteria were (i) participants over 18 years old with an active role in the intervention, (ii) intervention done partly or fully at the workplace or at the initiative of the workplace and (iii) sickness absence reported. Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was used. Results We identified 2036 articles of which, 93 were assessed in full text. Seventeen articles were included (2 with low and 15 with medium risk of bias), with a total of 24 comparisons. Five interventions from four articles significantly reduced sickness absence. We found moderate evidence that graded activity reduced sickness absence and limited evidence that the Sheerbrooke model (a comprehensive multidisciplinary intervention) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) reduced sickness absence. There was moderate evidence that workplace education and physical exercise did not reduce sickness absence. For other interventions, the evidence was insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions The review found limited evidence that active workplace interventions were not generally effective in reducing sickness absence, but there was moderate evidence of effect for graded activity and limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Sheerbrooke model and CBT. PMID:23223750

  18. Xylazine emesis, yohimbine and motion sickness susceptibility in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible role of the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in xylazine-induced vomiting and in motion sickness was investigated. Cats were divided into two groups according to motion sickness susceptibility and were observed after s.c. injections of xylazine. The incidence of vomiting increased with the dose, and at each dose the high susceptibility group had a greater emetic incidence than the low susceptibility group. In another experiment with cats divided into two groups according to motion sickness susceptibility, s.c. administration of yohimbine effectively antagonized the xylazine-induced emesis in both susceptibility groups. The cats in the latter experiment were then challenged with a motion sickness stimulus after s.c. pretreatment with yohimbine. Yohimbine failed to prevent motion sickness but did occasion an unexplained variability in the incidence of vomiting. These findings suggest that the emetic effect of xylazine results from stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors but that these receptors are not fundamental to feline motion sickness. The fact that susceptibilities to xylazine-induced emesis and to motion sickness are correlated suggests a point of interaction other than the area postrema, which is known to be essential for xylazine-induced vomiting but not for motion sickness in the cat.

  19. [Sickness absence certification from the medical perspective].

    PubMed

    Echevarría-Zuno, Santiago; Mar-Obeso, Alvaro Julián; Borja-Aburto, Víctor Hugo; Méndez-Bueno, Francisco Javier; Aguilar-Sánchez, Leticia; Rascón-Pacheco, Ramón Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Sickness absence certification is a medical task with important clinical, social, occupational and ethical implications, in addition to economic consequences for the worker, the employers and social security institutions. In 2007, IMSS affiliated workers received certifications for 65,384,690 days of absence, with cash benefits for 8.1 billion pesos. The duration of return to work depends on the efficiency of health care team as well as factors associated to the worker and the occupational environment. The correct management of sickness absence certification requires adequate disease diagnosis, regulatory knowledge and adequate communication with the patient. The purpose of control and auditing is to make sure that the certification is adequate in the indication and the optimal length, in order to warrant a responsible and sustainable management of this resource of social protection. If expenditure reduction is not possible, the objective is to avoid inefficient or irrational management. Treating physicians, with proper information, can contribute to optimize the provision of this benefit to those who need it.

  20. Motion sickness elicited by passive rotation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Current theory and recent evidence suggest that motion sickness occurs under conditions of sensory input in which the normal motor programs for producing eye, head, and body movements are not functionally effective, i.e. under conditions in which there are difficulties in maintaining posture and controlling eye movements. Conditions involving conflicting or inconsistent visual-vestibular (VV) stimulation should thus result in greater sickness rates since the existing motor programs do not produce effective control of eye-head-body movements under such conditions. It is felt that the relationship of postural control to motion sickness is an important one and one often overlooked. The results are reported which showed that when postural requirements were minimized by fully restraining squirrel monkeys during hypogravity parabolic flight, no animals became motion sick, but over 80 percent of the same 11 animals became sick if they were unrestrained and maintained control of their posture.

  1. Neuronal mechanisms and the treatment of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Schmäl, F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the physiological basis, clinical picture and treatment options for motion sickness. Motion sickness is a well-known nausea and vomiting syndrome in otherwise healthy people. The physical signs of motion sickness occur in both humans and animals during travel by sea, automobile or airplane and in space. Furthermore, some other special situations, such as simulators, the cinema and video games, have been described as causing pseudomotion sickness. Children between 2 and 12 years old are most susceptible to motion sickness, and women are more frequently affected than men. Predisposing factors include menstruation, pregnancy, migraines and possibly a side difference in the mass of otoconia in the vestibular organs. Therapy is directed towards decreasing conflicting sensory input, accelerating the process of adaptation and controlling nausea and vomiting. To control these vegetative symptoms, scopolamine and antihistamines are the most effective drugs.

  2. Stroboscopic Vision as a Treatment for Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Ford, George; Krnavek, Jody M.

    2007-01-01

    Results obtained from space flight indicate that most space crews will experience some symptoms of motion sickness causing significant impact on the operational objectives that must be accomplished to assure mission success. Based on the initial work of Melvill Jones we have evaluated stroboscopic vision as a method of preventing motion sickness. Given that the data presented by professor Melvill Jones were primarily post hoc results following a study not designed to investigate motion sickness, it is unclear how motion sickness results were actually determined. Building on these original results, we undertook a three part study that was designed to investigate the effect of stroboscopic vision (either with a strobe light or LCD shutter glasses) on motion sickness using: (1) visual field reversal, (2) Reading while riding in a car (with or without external vision present), and (3) making large pitch head movements during parabolic flight.

  3. Recurrence of sickness absence due to common mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bültmann, Ute; Roelen, Corné A. M.; Hoedeman, Rob; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Common mental disorders (CMDs) are an important cause of work disability. Although CMDs are known to have high recurrence rates, little is known about the recurrence of sickness absence due to CMDs. This study examines the recurrence risk of sickness absence due to CMDs. Methods A cohort of 9,904 employees with a sickness absence due to CMDs, working in the Dutch Post or Telecommunication company, was studied over a 7-year period. Recurrence was defined as the start of at least one new episode of sickness absence with CMDs after complete return to work for at least 28 days. The recurrence density (RD) of sickness absence with CMDs was calculated per 1,000 person-years. Results Of the 9,904 employees with a first absence due to CMDs 1,925 (19%) had a recurrence, 90% of recurrences occurred within 3 years. The RD of sickness absence due to CMDs was 84.5 employees per 1,000 person-years (95% CI = 80.7–88.3). The RD of sickness absence due to CMDs was similar in women and in men. In men, depressive symptoms were related to higher recurrence of sickness absence due to CMDs than distress symptoms and adjustment disorders. In women, no difference by diagnostic category was found. Conclusions Employees with a previous episode of sickness absence with CMDs are at increased risk of recurrent sickness absence with CMDs. Relapse prevention consultations are recommended for a period of 3 years after return to work. PMID:20449605

  4. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  5. Objectives and Overview. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    The RTO Task Group AVT-113 "Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft" was established in April 2003. Two facets of the group, "Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI)" and "Vortex Flow Experiment-2 (VFE-2)", worked closely together. However, because of the different requirements of each part, the CAWAPI facet concluded its work earlier (December 2006) than the VFE-2 facet (December 2007). In this first chapter of the Final Report of the Task Group an overview on its work is given, and the objectives for the Task Group are described.

  6. Chapter 3. Public health resources

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    The resource requirements of the public health services are discussed in terms of their three main components: manpower, physical resources, and finances in relation to population. The observational data from the Republic of Korea provide an illustration of the problems of resource availability and utilization, with special reference to tuberculosis control. A calculation of resource and population constraints and estimates of the basic inputs required by tuberculosis control technology are presented. Data on the 1965 level of Korean health resources are given in the Annex to this chapter. PMID:20604424

  7. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  8. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendixes to Chapter V Money... CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Ch. V, Nt. Appendixes to Chapter V—Note Notes: The alphabetical lists... blocked vessel in the underlying transaction. See § 501.604(b)(1) of this chapter. Financial...

  9. Motion Sickness Treatment Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F. (Inventor); Somers, Jeffrey T. (Inventor); Ford, George A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for treating motion sickness. In a preferred embodiment a method of the invention comprises operating eyewear having shutter lenses to open said shutter lenses at a selected operating frequency ranging from within about 3 Hz to about 50 Hz. The shutter lenses are opened for a short duration at the selected operating frequency wherein the duration is selected to prevent retinal slip. The shutter lenses may be operated at a relatively slow frequency of about 4 Hz when the user is in passive activity such as riding in a boat or car or in limited motion situations in a spacecraft. The shutter lenses may be operated at faster frequencies related to motion of the user's head when the user is active.

  10. Bronchitis—Sickness Absence in London Transport

    PubMed Central

    Cornwall, C. J.; Raffle, P. A. B.

    1961-01-01

    This study is based on the records of sickness absence of four days or longer attributed to bronchitis among nearly 60,000 London Transport employees during the years 1952 to 1956. The figures support previous observations that there is a close association between the incidence of bronchitis and the occurrence of fog in any year. The bronchitis experience of employees living and working in the north-eastern sector of London is shown to be worse than in other areas of London. The experience of employees in the country belt round London, particularly in the southern sector, is better than in London itself. With the possible exception of conductors, the figures do not suggest that there are occupational factors in the transport industry causing bronchitis. PMID:13695613

  11. Vasopressin and motion sickness in cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. A.; Keil, L. C.; Daunton, N. G.; Crampton, G. H.; Lucot, J.

    1987-01-01

    Levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured in cats under several motion-sickness-inducing conditions. Plasma AVP increased significantly in both susceptible and resistant animals exposed to motion. When vomiting occurred, levels of plasma AVP were drmatically elevated (up to 27 times resting levels). There was no difference in resting levels of AVP of susceptible and resistant cats. Levels of CSF-AVP were not elevated immediately after vomiting, but the testing levels of CSF-AVP were lower in animals that vomited during motion than in those animals which did not vomit during motion. The results of these experiments show that changes in systemic AVP are directly related to vomiting induced by motion, however, CSF-AVP apparently does not change in association with vomiting. CSF-AVP does appear to be lower in animals that reach frank vomiting during motion stimulation than in animals which do not vomit.

  12. Side effects of antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.; Wood, M. D.; Vekovius, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects on operational proficiency of the antimotion sickness drugs scopolamine, promethazine and d-amphetamine are tested using a computerized pursuit meter. Proficiency is not significantly affected by oral doses of 0.25 mg or 0.50 mg scopolamine but is descreased by oral or I.M. doses of 25 mg promethazine. The performance decrement associated with 25 mg oral promethazine is prevented when combined with 10 mg oral d-amphetamine. The combination of 25 mg I.M. promethazine, 25 mg oral promethazine and 10 mg d-amphetamine produces less performance decrement than oral or I.M. doses of promethazine alone, though more performance decrement than a placebo. I.M. promethazine is adsorbed slowly and consequently may provoke drowsiness.

  13. Pathology: whales, sonar and decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Thalmann, Edward D

    2004-04-15

    We do not yet know why whales occasionally strand after sonar has been deployed nearby, but such information is important for both naval undersea activities and the protection of marine mammals. Jepson et al. suggest that a peculiar gas-forming disease afflicting some stranded cetaceans could be a type of decompression sickness (DCS) resulting from exposure to mid-range sonar. However, neither decompression theory nor observation support the existence of a naturally occurring DCS in whales that is characterized by encapsulated, gas-filled cavities in the liver. Although gas-bubble formation may be aggravated by acoustic energy, more rigorous investigation is needed before sonar can be firmly linked to bubble formation in whales.

  14. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  15. Advances in Pharmacotherapeutics of Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi

    2006-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is common occurrence in the U.S. manned space flight program and nearly 2/3 of Shuttle crewmembers experience SMS. Several drugs have been prescribed for therapeutic management of SMS. Typically, orally-administered SMS medications (scopolamine, promethazine) have poor bioavailability and often have detrimental neurocognitive side effects at recommended doses. Intramuscularly administered promethazine (PMZ) is perceived to have optimal efficacy with minimal side effects in space. However, intramuscular injections are painful and the sedating neurocognitive side effects of promethazine, significant in controlled ground testing, may be masked in orbit because injections are usually given prior to crew sleep. Currently, EVAs cannot be performed by symptomatic crew or prior to flight day three due to the lack of a consistently efficacious drug, concern about neurocognitive side effects, and because an in-suit vomiting episode is potentially fatal. NASA has long sought a fast acting, consistently effective anti-motion sickness medication which has only minor neurocognitive side effects. Development of intranasal formulations of scopolamine and promethazine, the two commonly used SMS drugs at NASA for both space and reduced gravity environment medical operations, appears to be a logical alternative to current treatment modalities for SMS. The advantages are expected to be fast absorption, reliable and high bioavailability, and probably reduced neurocognitive side effects owing to dose reduction. Results from clinical trials with intranasal scopolamine gel formulation and pre-clinical testing of a prototype microcapsule intranasal gel dosage form of PMZ (INPMZ) will be discussed. These formulations are expected to offer a dependable and effective noninvasive treatment option for SMS.

  16. Low back pain predict sickness absence among power plant workers

    PubMed Central

    Murtezani, Ardiana; Hundozi, Hajrije; Orovcanec, Nikola; Berisha, Merita; Meka, Vjollca

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) remains the predominant occupational health problem in most industrialized countries and low-income countries. Both work characteristics and individual factors have been identified as risk factors. More knowledge about the predictors of sickness absence from LBP in the industry will be valuable in determining strategies for prevention. Objectives: The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate whether individual, work-related physical risk factors were involved in the occurrence of LBP sickness absence. Methods: A follow-up study was conducted among 489 workers, aged 18–65 years, at Kosovo Energetic Corporation in Kosovo. This cross-sectional study used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data on individual and work-related risk factors and the occurrence of LBP sickness absence. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations between risk factors and the occurrence of sickness absence due to LBP. Results: Individual factors did not influence sickness absence, whereas work-related physical factors showed strong associations with sickness absence. The main risk factors for sickness absence due to LBP among production workers were extreme trunk flexion (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.05–2.78) as well as very extreme trunk flexion (OR = 6.04, 95% CI = 1.12–32.49) and exposure to whole-body vibration (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.04–2.95). Conclusion: Reducing sickness absence from LBP among power plant workers requires focusing on the working conditions of blue-collar workers and risk factors for LBP. Increasing social support in the work environment may have effects in reducing sickness absence from LBP. PMID:21120081

  17. GPs’ negotiation strategies regarding sick leave for subjective health complaints

    PubMed Central

    Malterud, Kirsti; Werner, Erik L; Maeland, Silje; Magnussen, Liv Heide

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. To explore general practitioners’ (GPs’) specific negotiation strategies regarding sick-leave issues with patients suffering from subjective health complaints. Design. Focus-group study. Setting. Nine focus-group interviews in three cities in different regions of Norway. Participants. 48 GPs (31 men, 17 women; age 32–65), participating in a course dealing with diagnostic practice and assessment of sickness certificates related to patients with subjective health complaints. Results. The GPs identified some specific strategies that they claimed to apply when dealing with the question of sick leave for patients with subjective health complaints. The first step would be to build an alliance with the patient by complying with the wish for sick leave, and at the same time searching for information to acquire the patient's perspective. This position would become the basis for the main goal: motivating the patient for a rapid return to work by pointing out the positive effects of staying at work, making legal and moral arguments, and warning against long-term sick leave. Additional solutions might also be applied, such as involving other stakeholders in this process to provide alternatives to sick leave. Conclusions and implications. GPs seem to have a conscious approach to negotiations of sickness certification, as they report applying specific strategies to limit the duration of sick leave due to subjective health complaints. This give-and-take way of handling sick-leave negotiations has been suggested by others to enhance return to work, and should be further encouraged. However, specific effectiveness of this strategy is yet to be proven, and further investigation into the actual dealings between doctor and patients in these complex encounters is needed. PMID:25602364

  18. [Assistance and care of the sick in early Christianity].

    PubMed

    Maritano, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Christianity presents a new vision of man (personalistic anthropology) and refers to the example and words of Jesus, highlighting the inseparable relationship between the love of God and the love of man. The article describes the assistance and care of the sick in the East and West in the early Christian centuries; the 'places of care'- nosokomia for the sicks, gerontokomia for the olders, brephotropia for abandoned children, orphanage structures; the managers of hospitals, ecclesistical dignitaries, lay personnel, monks, operators and employees. Christianity gave dignity to the sick and opportunity to serve humanity to the healthy.

  19. Neural Circuitry Engaged by Prostaglandins during the Sickness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    During illnesses caused by infectious disease or other sources of inflammation, a suite of brain-mediated responses called the “sickness syndrome” occurs, including fever, anorexia, sleepiness, hyperalgesia, and elevated corticosteroid secretion. Much of the sickness syndrome is mediated by prostaglandins acting on the brain, and can be prevented by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, that block prostaglandin synthesis. By examining which prostaglandins are produced at which sites and how they interact with the nervous system, researchers have identified specific neural circuits that underlie the sickness syndrome. PMID:22837039

  20. Investigating motion sickness using the conditioned taste aversion paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) to study motion sickness is reviewed. The use of CTA to measure motion sickness is supported by studies showing that an intact vestibular system is essential for the production of CTA when motion is the unconditioned stimulus. The magnitude of CTA is assessed at a time removed from exposure to motion, and therefore is not affected by residual effects of motion. Since the magnitude of CTA is assessed as volume or weight of flood or fluid, the degree of sickness is reflected in a continuous measure rather than in the discrete, all-or-none fashion characteristic of vomiting.

  1. Pharmacological and neurophysiological aspects of space/motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1991-01-01

    A motorized motion testing device modeled after a Ferris wheel was constructed to perform motion sickness tests on cats. Details of the testing are presented, and some of the topics covered include the following: xylazine-induced emesis; analysis of the constituents of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during motion sickness; evaluation of serotonin-1A (5-HT sub 1A) agonists; other 5HT receptors; antimuscarinic mechanisms; and antihistaminergic mechanisms. The ability of the following drugs to reduce motion sickness in the cats was examined: amphetamines, adenosinergic drugs, opioid antagonists, peptides, cannabinoids, cognitive enhancers (nootropics), dextromethorphan/sigma ligands, scopolamine, and diphenhydramine.

  2. 20 CFR 341.8 - Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Termination of sickness benefits due to a... UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.8 Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement. (a) Sickness benefits payable to an eligible employee shall be paid...

  3. 20 CFR 341.8 - Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Termination of sickness benefits due to a... UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.8 Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement. (a) Sickness benefits payable to an eligible employee shall be paid...

  4. 20 CFR 341.8 - Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Termination of sickness benefits due to a... UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.8 Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement. (a) Sickness benefits payable to an eligible employee shall be paid...

  5. 20 CFR 341.8 - Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Termination of sickness benefits due to a... UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.8 Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement. (a) Sickness benefits payable to an eligible employee shall be paid...

  6. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  7. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computer and Programs. Teacher's Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The teacher's guide for the eleventh unit in this SMSG series covers the chapter on rigid motions and vectors and the chapter on computers and programs. The overall purpose for each of the chapters is described, the prerequisite knowledge needed by students is specified, the mathematical development of each chapter is detailed, behavioral…

  8. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  9. Sociality and Sickness: Have Cytokines Evolved to Serve Social Functions beyond Times of Pathogen Exposure?

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; Deak, Terrence; Schiml, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    During pathogen exposure or some forms of stress, proinflammatory processes induce an array of motivated and behavioral adjustments termed “sickness behaviors”. Although withdrawal from social interactions is a commonly observed sickness behavior, the relation between social behavior and sickness is much more complex. Sickness can suppress or stimulate social behavior. Sickness can serve as a social cue. Stressors that are social in nature can induce sickness behaviors, and sickness behavior can be readily suppressed by meaningful social stimuli. The nature, context, and timing of these effects together suggest that cytokine-induced behavior may play a role in mediating social interactions in various non-pathological conditions. PMID:24184399

  10. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work. PMID:27135116

  11. Chapter 14: Cancer Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Miguel; de la Torre, Victor; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Although there is great promise in the benefits to be obtained by analyzing cancer genomes, numerous challenges hinder different stages of the process, from the problem of sample preparation and the validation of the experimental techniques, to the interpretation of the results. This chapter specifically focuses on the technical issues associated with the bioinformatics analysis of cancer genome data. The main issues addressed are the use of database and software resources, the use of analysis workflows and the presentation of clinically relevant action items. We attempt to aid new developers in the field by describing the different stages of analysis and discussing current approaches, as well as by providing practical advice on how to access and use resources, and how to implement recommendations. Real cases from cancer genome projects are used as examples. PMID:23300415

  12. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  13. Beyond Chapter 4.7.

    PubMed

    Bandler, Lilon Gretl

    2015-12-01

    Chapter 4.7 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research refers specifically to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It lays out the points at which researchers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders must consider their approach, and the engagement with individuals, communities or groups who are involved in or affected by their research. History, of Australia and of research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, has informed this approach. The response to that history has been a rational, institutionalised, systematic demand for a different perception of what should direct research and research processes to ensure engagement with and service to the community with whom the researchers wish to do the work. This paper considers whether these principles could inform the approach to other research work.

  14. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  15. Chinese hyper-susceptibility to vection-induced motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Stern, R M; Hu, S; LeBlanc, R; Koch, K L

    1993-09-01

    Little is known about the factors that control individual differences in susceptible to motion sickness. A serendipitous observation in our laboratory that most Chinese subjects become motion sick prompted this study. We used a rotating optokinetic drum to provoke motion sickness and compared gastric responses and symptom reports of Chinese, European-American, and African-American subjects. There was no difference in the responses of European-American and African-American subjects; however, Chinese subjects showed significantly greater disturbances in gastric activity and reported significantly more severe symptoms. We suggest that this hyper-susceptibility presents a natural model for the study of physiological mechanisms of nausea and other symptoms of motion sickness.

  16. Sickness absence, moral hazard, and the business cycle.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The procyclical nature of sickness absence has been documented by many scholars in literature. So far, explanations have been based on labor force composition and reduced moral hazard caused by fear of job loss during recessions. In this paper, we propose and test a third mechanism caused by reduced moral hazard during booms and infections. We suggest that the workload is higher during economic booms and thus employees have to go to work despite being sick. In a theoretical model focusing on infectious diseases, we show that this will provoke infections of coworkers leading to overall higher sickness absence during economic upturns. Using state-level aggregated data from 112 German public health insurance funds (out of 145 in total), we find that sickness absence due to infectious diseases shows the largest procyclical pattern, as predicted by our theoretical model. PMID:24737552

  17. Diclectin for morning sickness: Long-term neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Nulman, Irena; Koren, Gideon

    2011-02-01

    Question A pregnant patient recently asked me whether using Diclectin for morning sickness might affect the development of her child. Answer Our recent large study does show such a trend, although the differences are not necessarily clinically significant.

  18. Is Your School Sick? Five Threats to Healthy Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Deborah; Diamantes, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Examines the five major threats to healthy school buildings: sick building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and general indoor air quality. Discusses ways to assess and address them. (SR)

  19. The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness was investigated using test conditions that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness in squirrel monkeys. Ten male rhesus monkeys and ten male Bolivian squirrel monkeys were rotated in the vertical axis at 150 deg/s for a maximum duration of 45 min. Each animal was tested in two conditions, continuous rotation and intermittent rotation. None of the rhesus monkeys vomited during the motion tests but all of the squirrel monkeys did. Differences were observed between the species in the amount of activity that occurred during motion test, with the squirrel monkeys being significantly more active than the rhesus monkeys. These results, while substantiating anecdotal reports of the resistance of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness, should be interpreted with caution because of the documented differences that exist between various species with regard to stimuli that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness.

  20. Adaptation to vection-induced symptoms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Vasey, Michael W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of repeated exposures to a rotating circular vection drum on the symptoms of motion sickness and tachygastria in humans were investigated. Subjects were sitting in a drum and were exposed to 15 min baseline (no rotation), followed by 15 min drum rotation at 60 deg/s, and, then, by 15 min recovery. Gastric myoelectric activity was continuously recorded with the electrogastrogram. Subjects who were exposed to the drum three times with intervals of 4-24 days all showed symptoms of tachygastria and failed to show an amelioration of motion sickness symptoms. On the other hand subjects who had only 48 h between the three sessions of drum exposure, experienced a reduction in motion-sickness symptoms and in tachygastsria upon repeated exposure to the drum, indicating that training effected a symptomatic and physiological adaptation. It is suggested that preflight adaptation to visual-vestibular sensory mismatch may reduce motion sickness in astronauts.

  1. Acute Mountain Sickness and Hemoconcentration in Next Generation Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the threat astronauts face from acute mountain sickness (AMS). It includes information about the symptoms of AMS, the potential threat to astronauts, and future efforts to mitigate the AMS threat.

  2. Decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism in sports scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Gorman, D F

    1989-07-01

    Diving underwater with breathing apparatus is an increasingly popular sport. Consequently, the number of diving-related accidents, including both decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism, have increased. Though both involve bubbles, decompression sickness is a disease which involves gas bubbles forming in tissues and venous blood, while arterial gas embolism results from the introduction of gas bubbles directly into the arterial circulation. Although the pathologies and natural histories of decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism are different, the treatment of these conditions is essentially the same. Compression in a recompression chamber is the definitive treatment of both decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism, and any delay before treatment must be minimised if a good outcome is desired.

  3. Flu: What to Do If You Get Sick

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Virus Images Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters The Flu: What To Do If You Get Sick Language: ...

  4. 31 CFR 29.332 - Unused sick leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.332 Unused sick leave. (a) For employees separated for retirement as of June... the applicable plan. (b) For employees separated for retirement after June 30, 1997, no unused...

  5. Sick building syndrome, work factors and occupational stress.

    PubMed

    Crawford, J O; Bolas, S M

    1996-08-01

    The sick building syndrome has been associated with certain buildings and environmental characteristics and is estimated to affect up to 30% of new or renovated buildings. Investigations have concentrated on physical factors, and it is only recently that psychological factors have been examined. Work and personal factors have also been considered. Occupational stress has been found to be correlated with symptoms of the sick building syndrome, but much of the research has been of a cross-sectional nature, and it does not indicate whether stress is an active element or an outcome. There is a clear need for further research in this area to examine stress, personality and physical factors associated with the sick building syndrome longitudinally. There is also a clear need to assess the validity of the historical and self-report methods used to assess the sick building syndrome. PMID:8881012

  6. Stroboscopic Vision as a Treatment for Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, J.T.; Ford, G.; Krnavek, J.M.; Hwang, E.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Stroboscopic illumination reduces the severity of motion sickness symptoms, and shutter glasses with a flash frequency of 4 Hz are as effective as a strobe light. Stroboscopic illumination appears to be an effective countermeasure where retinal slip is a significant factor in eliciting motion sickness. Additional research is currently underway to evaluate the stroboscopic glasses efficacy in a variety of different motion environments. Specifically, carsickness, sickness during the microgravity periods of parabolic flight and sea sickness. Possible mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of the glasses are also being investigated. There is evidence from pilot studies showing that the glasses, when strobed at the 4 Hz frequency, reduce saccade velocity to visually presented targets is reduced by approximately half of the normal values. It is interesting to note that adaptation to space flight may also slow saccade velocity.

  7. Research opportunities in space motion sickness, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Space and motion sickness, the current and projected NASA research program, and the conclusions and suggestions of the ad hoc Working Group are summarized. The frame of reference for the report is ground-based research.

  8. [Adverse reaction to cefonicid analogous to serum sickness].

    PubMed

    Ortega Calvo, M; Méndez Mora, J L; Soriano Crespo, E; Fernández Martínez, D; Torello Iserte, J; Castillo Ferrando, J R

    1995-06-01

    We report a case of a male who was treated with cephonicid because of a surgical complication. Serum-sickness like symptoms were diagnosed two weeks later. Medical references are discussed. PMID:7548647

  9. Focus Group Study Exploring Factors Related to Frequent Sickness Absence

    PubMed Central

    van Rhenen, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Research investigating frequent sickness absence (3 or more episodes per year) is scarce and qualitative research from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves is lacking. The aim of the current study is to explore awareness, determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves. Methods We performed a qualitative study of 3 focus group discussions involving a total of 15 frequent absentees. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Results were analyzed with the Graneheim method using the Job Demands Resources (JD–R) model as theoretical framework. Results Many participants were not aware of their frequent sickness absence and the risk of future long-term sickness absence. As determinants, participants mentioned job demands, job resources, home demands, poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Managing these factors and improving communication (skills) were regarded as solutions to reduce frequent sickness absence. Conclusions The JD–R model provided a framework for determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence. Additional determinants were poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Frequent sickness absence should be regarded as a signal that something is wrong. Managers, supervisors, and occupational health care providers should advise and support frequent absentees to accommodate job demands, increase both job and personal resources, and improve health rather than express disapproval of frequent sickness absence and apply pressure regarding work attendance. PMID:26872050

  10. Space Motion Sickness and Stress Training Simulator using Electrophysiological Biofeedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudeau, C.; Golding, J. F.; Thevot, F.; Lucas, Y.; Bobola, P.; Thouvenot, J.

    2005-06-01

    An important problem in manned spaceflight is the nausea that typically appears during the first 3 days and then disappears after 5 days. Methods of detecting changes in electrophysiological signals are being studied in order to reduce susceptibility to space motion sickness through biofeedback training, and for the early detection of nausea during EVA. A simulator would allow subjects to control their body functions and to use biofeedback to control space motion sickness and stress.

  11. Cases from the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G N

    2000-12-01

    Decompression sickness is an uncommon but serious risk associated with flying and SCUBA diving with potential for significant morbidity and mortality. It can occur in both novice and experienced individuals. This case illustrates an atypical presentation of decompression sickness in an experienced amateur SCUBA diver. Clinical suspicion must be high, since the presenting symptoms can be nonspecific as in this case. Early recognition and treatment are important for maximum recovery.

  12. Heliox treatment for spinal decompression sickness following air dives.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J D; Robinson, C

    1988-07-01

    Enforced delay in treatment of spinal decompression sickness following scuba diving can result in paraplegia. Poor response from initial recompression to 18 m presents the clinician with a difficult management problem. Theoretical objections have been raised to the use of He-O2 as treatment regimen. We report 3 cases that show He-O2 to be an excellent method of treatment in spinal decompression sickness after air diving.

  13. [Scuba diving: barotrauma, decompression sickness, pulmonary contra-indications].

    PubMed

    Héritier, F; Russi, E

    1993-02-01

    The practice of scuba diving is associated with two specific medical problems: barotrauma directly related to changes in ambient pressure, and decompression sickness related to the uptake and the release of inert gases by the body. Neurological symptoms are frequent in severe diving accidents. They may arise following either barotrauma or decompression sickness, and often require urgent treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and spontaneous pneumothorax increase the risk of lung barotrauma and represent contraindications to diving.

  14. [Effectiveness of the preparation Gavinton in preventing motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Bodo, D; Kotovskaia, A R; Galle, R R; Gavrilova, L N; Gusakova, G A

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Hungarian drug kavinton used to prevent motion sickness was assessed. During the study 8 motion sickness susceptible test subjects were kept in a chamber rotating at a rate of 6 rpm for 5 hours. The effectiveness of the drug taken regularly during the exposure was compared with that of scopolamine and placebo taken as a single dose. The results obtained are suggestive of a positive effect of kavinton as an antimotion drug.

  15. Introduction to MODIS Cloud Products. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The Earth's radiative energy balance and hydrological cycle are fundamentally coupled with the distribution and properties of clouds. Therefore, the ability to remotely infer cloud properties and their variation in space and time is crucial for establishing climatologies as a reference for validation of present-day climate models and in assessing future climate change. Remote cloud observations also provide data sets useful for testing and improving cloud model physics, and for assimilation into numerical weather prediction models. The MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagers on the Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms provide the capability for globally retrieving these properties using passive solar reflectance and infrared techniques. In addition to providing measurements similar to those offered on a suite of historical operational weather platforms such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), MODIS provides additional spectral and/or spatial resolution in key atmospheric bands, along with on-board calibration, to expand the capability for global cloud property retrievals. The core MODIS operational cloud products include cloud top pressure, thermodynamic phase, optical thickness, particle size, and water path, and are derived globally at spatial resolutions of either 1- or 5-km (referred to as Level-2 or pixel-level products). In addition, the MODIS atmosphere team (collectively providing cloud, aerosol, and clear sky products) produces a combined gridded product (referred to as Level-3) aggregated to a 1 equal-angle grid, available for daily, eight-day, and monthly time periods. The wealth of information available from these products provides critical information for climate studies as well as the continuation and improved understanding of existing satellite-based cloud climatologies

  16. Space sickness predictors suggest fluid shift involvement and possible countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Moseley, E. C.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Preflight data from 64 first time Shuttle crew members were examined retrospectively to predict space sickness severity (NONE, MILD, MODERATE, or SEVERE) by discriminant analysis. From 9 input variables relating to fluid, electrolyte, and cardiovascular status, 8 variables were chosen by discriminant analysis that correctly predicted space sickness severity with 59 pct. success by one method of cross validation on the original sample and 67 pct. by another method. The 8 variables in order of their importance for predicting space sickness severity are sitting systolic blood pressure, serum uric acid, calculated blood volume, serum phosphate, urine osmolality, environmental temperature at the launch site, red cell count, and serum chloride. These results suggest the presence of predisposing physiologic factors to space sickness that implicate a fluid shift etiology. Addition of a 10th input variable, hours spent in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF), improved the prediction of space sickness severity to 66 pct. success by the first method of cross validation on the original sample and to 71 pct. by the second method. The data suggest that WETF training may reduce space sickness severity.

  17. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  18. Motion sickness, nausea and thermoregulation: The “toxic” hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Rudd, John A; So, Richard HY

    2014-01-01

    Principal symptoms of motion sickness in humans include facial pallor, nausea and vomiting, and sweating. It is less known that motion sickness also affects thermoregulation, and the purpose of this review is to present and discuss existing data related to this subject. Hypothermia during seasickness was firstly noted nearly 150 years ago, but detailed studies of this phenomenon were conducted only during the last 2 decades. Motion sickness-induced hypothermia is philogenetically quite broadly expressed as besides humans, it has been reported in rats, musk shrews and mice. Evidence from human and animal experiments indicates that the physiological mechanisms responsible for the motion sickness-induced hypothermia include cutaneous vasodilation and sweating (leading to an increase of heat loss) and reduced thermogenesis. Together, these results suggest that motion sickness triggers highly coordinated physiological response aiming to reduce body temperature. Finally, we describe potential adaptive role of this response, and describe the benefits of using it as an objective measure of motion sickness-induced nausea.

  19. Towards an integrative picture of human sickness behavior.

    PubMed

    Shattuck, Eric C; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Sickness behavior, a coordinated set of behavioral changes during infection and elicited by the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), is well studied in non-human animals. Over the last two decades, several papers have expanded this research to include humans. However, these studies use a variety of research designs, and typically focus on a single cytokine and only a few of the many behavioral changes constituting sickness behavior. Therefore, our understanding of human sickness behavior remains equivocal. To generate a more holistic, integrative picture of this phenomenon, a meta-analysis of the human sickness behavior literature was conducted. Full model results show that both IL-6 and IL-1β have significant relationships with sickness behavior, and the strength of these relationships is affected by a number of study parameters, such as type of immune stimulus and inclusion of controls. In addition to research design heterogeneity, other issues to address in future studies include an unequal focus on different cytokines and different sickness behaviors. PMID:27165989

  20. A turning cabin simulator to reduce simulator sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourant, Ronald R.; Yin, Zhishuai

    2010-01-01

    A long time problem associated with driving simulators is simulator sickness. A possible cause of simulator sickness is that the optical flow experienced in driving simulators is much different from that experienced in real world driving. With the potential to reduce simulator sickness, a turning cabin driving simulator, whose cabin rotates around the yaw axis was built. In the multi-projector display system, algorithms were implemented to calibrate both geometric distortions and photometric distortions via software to produce a seamless high-resolution display on a cylindrical screen. An automotive seat was mounted on an AC servo actuator at the center of the cylindrical screen. The force feedback steering wheel, and gas and brake pedals, were connected to the simulator's computer. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of optical flow patterns on simulator sickness. Results suggested that the optical flow perceived by drivers in the fixed base simulator was greater than that in the turning cabin simulator. Also, drivers reported a higher degree of simulator sickness in the fixed base simulator. The lower amount of optical flow perceived in the turning cabin simulator is believed to be a positive factor in reducing simulator sickness.

  1. Acute mountain sickness: controversies and advances.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Peter; Bailey, Damian M; Berger, Marc M; Knauth, Michael; Baumgartner, Ralf W

    2004-01-01

    This review discusses the impact of recent publications on pathophysiologic concepts and on practical aspects of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Magnetic resonance imaging studies do not provide evidence of total brain volume increase nor edema within the first 6 to 10 h of exposure to hypoxia despite symptoms of AMS. After 16 to 32 h at about 4500 m, brain volume increases by 0.8% to 2.7%, but morphological changes do not clearly correlate with symptoms of AMS, and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure was unchanged from normoxic values in individuals with AMS. These data do not support the prevailing hypothesis that AMS is caused by cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Direct measurement of increased oxygen radicals in hypoxia and a first study reducing AMS when lowering oxygen radicals by antioxidants suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of AMS. Placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that theophylline significantly attenuates periodic breathing without improving arterial oxygen saturation during sleep. Its effects on AMS are marginal and clearly inferior to acetazolamide. A most recent large trial with Ginkgo biloba clearly showed that this drug does not prevent AMS in a low-risk setting in which acetazolamide in a low dose of 2 x 125 mg was effective. Therefore, acetazolamide remains the drug of choice for prevention and the recommended dose remains 2 x 250 mg daily until a lower dose has been tested in a high-risk setting and larger clinical trials with antioxidants have been performed.

  2. Outbreaks of equine grass sickness in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, B; Brunthaler, R; Hahn, C; van den Hoven, R

    2012-01-21

    Equine grass sickness (EGS) occurs mainly in Great Britain, but has once been reported in Hungary. The stud which was affected by EGS in 2001 had no new cases until 2009/10, when 11 of 60 and five of 12 one- to three-year-old colts died or were euthanased due to EGS. Following a few hours in the high-risk field during the winter of 2010/11 further four cases of acute EGS were noted among these horses. The affected horses showed somewhat different clinical signs compared with the cases reported in Great Britain. Histopathological findings in these horses were consistent with EGS. In most examined cases carbofuran, a carbamate was found in the liver by toxicological examination, and it is postulated that carbofuran may influence the immune system and therefore predispose the horses to develop EGS. Carbamates are thought to cause a delayed neurotoxicity in human beings. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential role of carbamates in EGS.

  3. Health and ecological dilemmas. Sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Hausner, D S

    1992-01-01

    Although trypanosomiasis is one of the major parasitic diseases facing African people, blind efforts to control the disease may cause greater human suffering by damaging the environment. Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as sleeping sickness, is spread by the bite of the tsetse fly and affects both humans and cattle. The disease usually causes wasting and emaciation; the human or animal wants to sleep all the time, and death may occur within a few months or years. The tsetse fly inhabits an area of 10-11 million sq. km of tropical savannah and dense forest along the same water sources used by humans. The savannahs make excellent grazing land--except for the presence of the tsetse fly. Many pastoralists chose to graze their cattle in arid areas outside the "tsetse belt." But the growth of the cattle population results in overgrazing, environmental degradation, and desertification. Population growth among farmers also limits the land available for grazing, further increasing the likelihood of overgrazing. Methods for controlling trypanosome and the tsetse fly include trypanocidal drugs for preventive and curative therapy, insecticides, traps, and land clearing--all of which possess limitations. Drugs are expensive, difficult to administer and monitor, and unpopular. Traps are effective only in their immediate setting, and insecticides and land clearing affect the environment. Trypanosomiasis control also results in increased population growth and further environmental degradation. Instead of controlling trypanosomiasis blindly, countries need to examine the problem contextually. Not doing so would result in land degradation, desertification, and land-use struggles. PMID:12159268

  4. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  5. Sick sinus syndrome: strategies for reducing mortality.

    PubMed

    Cosín, J; Hernandiz, A; Solaz, J; Andres, F; Olagüe, J

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of sick sinus syndrome is slow, and its clinical and electrocardiographic manifestations are intermittent. A-V and I-V conduction disturbances often arise, but incidence of defects with clinical consequences is too low. Death rate, when large groups are considered, is slightly higher than that of the general population of the same age and with similar pathologies. Mortality depends on concomitant pathologies, on the development of congestive heart failure, on the arterial thromboembolism and on the type of sinus disease. The use of ventricular pacemakers (VVI) did not reduce mortality. Atrial pacing (AAI) gives the auricles electrical stability preventing fibrillation and systemic embolism. The hemodynamic role of the auricles is also preserved. As a consequence, death rate is reduced when AAI is used. In cases with a-v conduction disturbances or with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, dual chamber pacing (DDD) is preferable because it permits ventricular pacing to be continued even if a-v block or paroxysmal or chronic atrial fibrillation appears. When using ventricular pacing and in cases in which pacing is not considered, warfarin or aspirin can prevent strokes and systemic embolism. In bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome requiring treatment of arrhythmias dual chamber pacemaker must be implanted. PMID:1304454

  6. Molds, mycotoxins, and sick building syndrome.

    PubMed

    Straus, David C

    2009-01-01

    The following is a review of some of the work we have done since 2004 regarding the importance of molds and their mycotoxins in the phenomenon of sick building syndrome (SBS). In these studies we showed that the macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins (MTM) of Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) are easily dissociated from the surface of the organism as it grows and could therefore be consequently spread in buildings as the fungus experiences additional water events. We then showed that SC and Penicillium chrysogenum (PC) colonies remain viable long after a water source has been removed, and the MTM produced by SC remain toxic over extended periods of time. We next showed that PC when inhaled, can release in vivo, a protease allergen that can cause a significant allergic inflammatory reaction in the lungs of mice. We then showed, in a laboratory study, that the MTM of SC can become airborne attached to spores or SC particulates smaller than spores. Following that study, we next showed that the same phenomenon actually occurred in SC infested buildings where people were complaining of health problems potentially associated with SBS. Finally, we were able to demonstrate the presence of MTM in the sera of individuals who had been exposed to SC in indoor environments. This last study was done with enough mold exposed individuals to allow for the statistical significance of SC exposure to be evaluated. PMID:19854820

  7. The genetic basis of chronic mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Roy; Zhou, Dan; Bafna, Vineet; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is a disease that affects many high-altitude dwellers, particularly in the Andean Mountains in South America. The hallmark symptom of CMS is polycythemia, which causes increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke (among other symptoms). A prevailing hypothesis in high-altitude medicine is that CMS results from a population-specific "maladaptation" to the hypoxic conditions at high altitude. In contrast, the prevalence of CMS is very low in other high-altitude populations (e.g., Tibetans and Ethiopians), which are seemingly well adapted to hypoxia. In recent years, concurrent with the advent of genomic technologies, several studies have investigated the genetic basis of adaptation to altitude. These studies have identified several candidate genes that may underlie the adaptation, or maladaptation. Interestingly, some of these genes are targeted by known drugs, raising the possibility of new treatments for CMS and other ischemic diseases. We review recent discoveries, alongside the methodologies used to obtain them, and outline some of the challenges remaining in the field.

  8. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production.

  9. From inflammation to sickness: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Plytycz, Barbara; Seljelid, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the four cardinal signs of acute inflammation comes from antiquity as rubor et tumor cum calore et dolore, (redness and swelling with heat and pain) extended later by functio laesa (loss of function). The contemporary understanding of this process we owe to 19th-century milestone discoveries by Rudolph Virchow, Julius Cohnheim and Elie Metchnikoff. In the 20th century, the development of potent technological tools allowed the rapid expansion of knowledge of the cells and mediators of inflammatory processes, as well as the molecular mechanisms of their interactions. It turned out that some mediators of inflammation have both local and distant targets, among them the liver (responding by the production of several acute phase reactants) and neurohormonal centers. In the last decades it has become clear that the immune system shares mediators and their receptors with the neurohormonal system of the body; thus, they form a common homeostatic entity. Such an integrative view, introduced by J. Edwin Blalock, when combined with Hans Selye's concept of stress, led to the contemporary understanding of sickness behavior, defined by Robert Dantzer as a highly organized strategy of the organism to fight infections and to respond to other environmental stressors.

  10. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  11. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  12. Actively Controlled Components. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W.; Hiller, S.-J.; Pfoertner, H.; Schadow, K.; Rosenfeld, T.; Garg, S.

    2009-01-01

    Active Control can help to meet future engine requirements by an active improvement of the component characteristics. The concept is based on an intelligent control logic, which senses actual operating conditions and reacts with adequate actuator action. This approach can directly improve engine characteristics as performance, operability, durability and emissions on the one hand. On the other hand active control addresses the design constrains imposed by unsteady phenomena like inlet distortion, compressor surge, combustion instability, flow separations, vibration and noise, which only occur during exceptional operating conditions. The feasibility and effectiveness of active control technologies have been demonstrated in lab-scale tests. This chapter describes a broad range of promising applications for each engine component. Significant efforts in research and development remain to implement these technologies in engine rig and finally production engines and to demonstrate today s engine generation airworthiness, safety, reliability, and durability requirements. Active control applications are in particular limited by the gap between available and advanced sensors and actuators, which allow an operation in the harsh environment in an aero engine. The operating and performance requirements for actuators and sensors are outlined for each of the gas turbine sections from inlet to nozzle.

  13. Chapter 12: Human microbiome analysis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease.

  14. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  15. Chapter 12: Human Microbiome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Xochitl C.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease. PMID:23300406

  16. Motion sickness potentiates core cooling during immersion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Tipton, Michael J; Gennser, Mikael; Eiken, Ola

    2001-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that motion sickness affects thermoregulatory responses to cooling in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent three separate head-out immersions in 28 °C water after different preparatory procedures. In the ‘control’ procedure immersion was preceded by a rest period. In the ‘motion sickness’ procedure immersion was preceded by provocation of motion sickness in a human centrifuge. This comprised rapid and repeated alterations of the gravitational (G-) stress in the head-to-foot direction, plus a standardized regimen of head movements at increased G-stress. In the ‘G-control’ procedure, the subjects were exposed to similar G-stress, but without the motion sickness provocation. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and 3rd digit of the right hand (ΔTforearm-fingertip), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception, thermal comfort and level of motion sickness discomfort at regular intervals. No differences were observed in any of the variables between control and G-control procedures. In the motion sickness procedure, the ΔTforearm-fingertip response was significantly attenuated, indicating a blunted vasoconstrictor response, and rectal temperature decreased at a faster rate. No other differences were observed. Motion sickness attenuates the vasoconstrictor response to skin and core cooling, thereby enhancing heat loss and the magnitude of the fall in deep body temperature. Motion sickness may predispose individuals to hypothermia, and have significant implications for survival time in maritime accidents. PMID:11533150

  17. Prediction of sickness absence: development of a screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Duijts, S F A; Kant, IJ; Landeweerd, J A; Swaen, G M H

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To develop a concise screening instrument for early identification of employees at risk for sickness absence due to psychosocial health complaints. Methods Data from the Maastricht Cohort Study on “Fatigue at Work” were used to identify items to be associated with an increased risk of sickness absence. The analytical procedures univariate logistic regression, backward stepwise linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were successively applied. For both men and women, sum scores were calculated, and sensitivity and specificity rates of different cut‐off points on the screening instrument were defined. Results In women, results suggested that feeling depressed, having a burnout, being tired, being less interested in work, experiencing obligatory change in working days, and living alone, were strong predictors of sickness absence due to psychosocial health complaints. In men, statistically significant predictors were having a history of sickness absence, compulsive thinking, being mentally fatigued, finding it hard to relax, lack of supervisor support, and having no hobbies. A potential cut‐off point of 10 on the screening instrument resulted in a sensitivity score of 41.7% for women and 38.9% for men, and a specificity score of 91.3% for women and 90.6% for men. Conclusions This study shows that it is possible to identify predictive factors for sickness absence and to develop an instrument for early identification of employees at risk for sickness absence. The results of this study increase the possibility for both employers and policymakers to implement interventions directed at the prevention of sickness absence. PMID:16698807

  18. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  19. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  20. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  1. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  2. Atrioventricular conduction in sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carisma, M B; Manalo, J M; Chua, W T

    1988-11-01

    With the increasing recognition of the pacemaker syndrome and with the availability of newer methods of pacing therapy, the status of the atrioventricular (AV) conduction in patients with Sick Sinus Syndrome (SSS) becomes crucial in the choice of mode of pacing. At the Philippine Heart Center, from April 1983 to November 1986, the sinus and AV node function studies of 46 patients who, by electrophysiological studies had sinus node dysfunction (SND)-SN recovery time (SNRT) greater than 1400 msec, were reviewed. These were arbitrarily classified according to duration of SNRT into: Group A--borderline SND, SNRT from 1,401 to 1,499 msec (n = 4); Group B--mild SND, SNRT from 1,500 to 2,499 msec (n = 25); Group C--moderate SND, SNRT from 2,500 to 3499 msec (n = 6); Group D--severe SND, SNRT of 3,500 m and above (n = 11). Out of the 46, 14 (30%) had concomittant AVN dysfunction (AVND)--antegrade block rate less than 130 beats per minute (BPM). The percentage occurrence of AVND was noted as follows: Group A--25% (1/4); Group B--28% (7/25); Group C--50% (3/6); Group D--27% (3/11). Out of the 14 patients with concomittant AVND, 5(35%) had antegrade block rate less than 100 BPM, 3 in Group B and 2 in Group D. The study shows that AVND occurs in only 30% of SSS patients. Its occurrence and severity has no bearing on the degree of SND. In these, antegrade block was at a rate higher than 100 BPM in the majority of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Decompression sickness ('the bends') in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    García-Párraga, D; Crespo-Picazo, J L; de Quirós, Y Bernaldo; Cervera, V; Martí-Bonmati, L; Díaz-Delgado, J; Arbelo, M; Moore, M J; Jepson, P D; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-10-16

    Decompression sickness (DCS), as clinically diagnosed by reversal of symptoms with recompression, has never been reported in aquatic breath-hold diving vertebrates despite the occurrence of tissue gas tensions sufficient for bubble formation and injury in terrestrial animals. Similarly to diving mammals, sea turtles manage gas exchange and decompression through anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations. In the former group, DCS-like lesions have been observed on necropsies following behavioral disturbance such as high-powered acoustic sources (e.g. active sonar) and in bycaught animals. In sea turtles, in spite of abundant literature on diving physiology and bycatch interference, this is the first report of DCS-like symptoms and lesions. We diagnosed a clinico-pathological condition consistent with DCS in 29 gas-embolized loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta from a sample of 67. Fifty-nine were recovered alive and 8 had recently died following bycatch in trawls and gillnets of local fisheries from the east coast of Spain. Gas embolization and distribution in vital organs were evaluated through conventional radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Additionally, positive response following repressurization was clinically observed in 2 live affected turtles. Gas embolism was also observed postmortem in carcasses and tissues as described in cetaceans and human divers. Compositional gas analysis of intravascular bubbles was consistent with DCS. Definitive diagnosis of DCS in sea turtles opens a new era for research in sea turtle diving physiology, conservation, and bycatch impact mitigation, as well as for comparative studies in other air-breathing marine vertebrates and human divers.

  4. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  5. Speech motor control and acute mountain sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cymerman, Allen; Lieberman, Philip; Hochstadt, Jesse; Rock, Paul B.; Butterfield, Gail E.; Moore, Lorna G.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An objective method that accurately quantifies the severity of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) symptoms is needed to enable more reliable evaluation of altitude acclimatization and testing of potentially beneficial interventions. HYPOTHESIS: Changes in human articulation, as quantified by timed variations in acoustic waveforms of specific spoken words (voice onset time; VOT), are correlated with the severity of AMS. METHODS: Fifteen volunteers were exposed to a simulated altitude of 4300 m (446 mm Hg) in a hypobaric chamber for 48 h. Speech motor control was determined from digitally recorded and analyzed timing patterns of 30 different monosyllabic words characterized as voiced and unvoiced, and as labial, alveolar, or velar. The Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire (ESQ) was used to assess AMS. RESULTS: Significant AMS symptoms occurred after 4 h, peaked at 16 h, and returned toward baseline after 48 h. Labial VOTs were shorter after 4 and 39 h of exposure; velar VOTs were altered only after 4 h; and there were no changes in alveolar VOTs. The duration of vowel sounds was increased after 4 h of exposure and returned to normal thereafter. Only 1 of 15 subjects did not increase vowel time after 4 h of exposure. The 39-h labial (p = 0.009) and velar (p = 0.037) voiced-unvoiced timed separations consonants and the symptoms of AMS were significantly correlated. CONCLUSIONS: Two objective measures of speech production were affected by exposure to 4300 m altitude and correlated with AMS severity. Alterations in speech production may represent an objective measure of AMS and central vulnerability to hypoxia.

  6. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  7. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  8. Shiftwork and Sickness Absence Among Police Officers: The BCOPS Study

    PubMed Central

    Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Hartley, Tara A.; Andrew, Michael E.; Charles, Luenda E.; Tinney-Zara, Cathy A.; Violanti, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Shiftwork, regarded as a significant occupational stressor, has become increasingly prevalent across a wide range of occupations. The adverse health outcomes associated with shiftwork are well documented. Shiftwork is an integral part of law enforcement, a high-stress occupation with elevated risks of chronic disease and mortality. Sickness absence is an important source of productivity loss and may also serve as an indirect measure of workers’ morbidity. Prior studies of shiftwork and sickness absenteeism have yielded varying results and the association has not been examined specifically among police officers. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence rate of sick leave (any, ≥3 consecutive days) among day-, afternoon-, and night-shift workers in a cohort of police officers and also examine the role of lifestyle factors as potential moderators of the association. Participants (N = 464) from the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress (BCOPS) study examined between 2004 and 2009 were used. Daily work history records that included the shift schedule, number of hours worked, and occurrence of sick leave were available for up to 15 yrs starting in 1994 to the date of the BCOPS study examination for each officer. Poisson regression analysis for ungrouped data was used to estimate incidence rates (IRs) of sick leave by shift, and comparison of IRs across shifts were made by computing incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Sick leave occurred at a higher rate on the night shift (4.37 per 10 000 person-hours) compared with either day (1.55 per 10000 person-hours) or afternoon (1.96 per 10000 person-hours) shifts. The association between shiftwork and sickness absence depended on body mass index (BMI). For overweight individuals (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), the covariate-adjusted incidence rate of sick leave (≥1 day) was twice as large for night-shift officers compared with those working on the day (IRR = 2.29, 95% CI

  9. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  10. Role of orientation reference selection in motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this proposal is to understand the relationship between human orientation control and motion sickness susceptibility. Three areas related to orientation control will be investigated. These three areas are (1) reflexes associated with the control of eye movements and posture, (2) the perception of body rotation and position with respect to gravity, and (3) the strategies used to resolve sensory conflict situations which arise when different sensory systems provide orientation cues which are not consistent with one another or with previous experience. Of particular interest is the possibility that a subject may be able to ignore an inaccurate sensory modality in favor of one or more other sensory modalities which do provide accurate orientation reference information. We refer to this process as sensory selection. This proposal will attempt to quantify subjects' sensory selection abilities and determine if this ability confers some immunity to the development of motion sickness symptoms. Measurements of reflexes, motion perception, sensory selection abilities, and motion sickness susceptibility will concentrate on pitch and roll motions since these seem most relevant to the space motion sickness problem. Vestibulo-ocular (VOR) and oculomotor reflexes will be measured using a unique two-axis rotation device developed in our laboratory over the last seven years. Posture control reflexes will be measured using a movable posture platform capable of independently altering proprioceptive and visual orientation cues. Motion perception will be quantified using closed loop feedback technique developed by Zacharias and Young (Exp Brain Res, 1981). This technique requires a subject to null out motions induced by the experimenter while being exposed to various confounding sensory orientation cues. A subject's sensory selection abilities will be measured by the magnitude and timing of his reactions to changes in sensory environments. Motion sickness

  11. 26 CFR 31.3503-1 - Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax under chapter 21 or 22 paid under wrong chapter. 31.3503-1 Section 31.3503-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... TAX AT SOURCE General Provisions Relating to Employment Taxes (Chapter 25, Internal Revenue Code...

  12. Simulator sickness in U.S. Navy flight simulators.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R S; Lilienthal, M G; Berbaum, K S; Baltzley, D R; McCauley, M E

    1989-01-01

    Flight simulators have become a major factor in pilot training. A general finding from Navy research on simulator design is that equipment features that offer faithful representation improve pilot performance and promote pilot acceptance. To the extent that an aircraft produces motion sickness, its simulator should induce the same result. However, reports of simulator sickness appear to be increasing and a shortcoming in simulation is implied when these effects occur in simulators during maneuvers that do not occasion them in the aircraft. This article presents incidence data from surveys of the 10 simulators at 6 different Naval/Marine Corps Air Stations. Approximately 1,200 simulator flights were recorded. Some severe motion sickness symptoms were recorded and some simulators induced unsteadiness afterwards. Individuals experiencing effects may be at risk if they drive themselves home or return to demanding activities at work. The simulators which exhibited the highest incidences of sickness were helicopter simulators with cathode ray tube (CRT) infinity optics and six-degrees-of-freedom moving base systems. Of those studied, fixed-wing, fixed-base, dome displays had relatively low incidence of simulator sickness. PMID:2923588

  13. What Is Being Done to Control Motion Sickness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    AFT (Autogenic Feedback Training) involves practicing a series of mental exercises to speed up or slow down the control of autonomic activity. This produces a reduced tendency for autonomic activity levels to diverge from baseline (at rest) under stressful motion-sickness-inducing conditions. Subjects conditions. Subjects engaged in applying AFT exercises are required to closely monitor their own bodily sensations during motion-sickness-eliciting tests. These tests include the Coriolis Sickness Susceptibility Index (CSSI), which consists of sitting a subject into a rotating chair that moves at various speeds while a visual background turns at differing speeds and directions, and the Vertical Acceleration Rotation Device (VARD) test, which involves the placing of a subject in a drum that moves in an upward and downward motion until he or she is sick, while simultaneously monitoring the subject's vital signs. These tests provide investigators with evidence of slight changes in autonomic activities such as increases in heart rate, skin temperature, and sweat. All of these symptoms occur in subjects that experience bodily weakness or discomfort with the onset of motion sickness.

  14. Sensory conflict in motion sickness: An observer theory approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    Motion sickness is the general term describing a group of common nausea syndromes originally attributed to motion-induced cerebral ischemia, stimulation of abdominal organ afferent, or overstimulation of the vestibular organs of the inner ear. Sea-, car-, and airsicknesses are the most commonly experienced examples. However, the discovery of other variants such as Cinerama-, flight simulator-, spectacle-, and space sickness in which the physical motion of the head and body is normal or absent has led to a succession of sensory conflict theories which offer a more comprehensive etiologic perspective. Implicit in the conflict theory is the hypothesis that neutral and/or humoral signals originate in regions of the brain subversing spatial orientation, and that these signals somehow traverse to other centers mediating sickness symptoms. Unfortunately, the present understanding of the neurophysiological basis of motion sickness is far from complete. No sensory conflict neuron or process has yet been physiologically identified. To what extent can the existing theory be reconciled with current knowledge of the physiology and pharmacology of nausea and vomiting. The stimuli which causes sickness, synthesizes a contemporary Observer Theory view of the Sensory Conflict hypothesis are reviewed, and a revised model for the dynamic coupling between the putative conflict signals and nausea magnitude estimates is presented. The use of quantitative models for sensory conflict offers a possible new approach to improving the design of visual and motion systems for flight simulators and other virtual environment display systems.

  15. Neurochemical background and approaches in the understanding of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The problems and nature of space motion sickness were defined. The neurochemical and neurophysiological bases of vestibular system function and of the expression of motion sickness wre reviewed. Emphasis was given to the elucidation of the neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of scopolamine and amphetamine on motion sickness. Characterization of the ascending reticular activating system and the limbic system provided clues to the etiology of the side effects of scopolamine. The interrelationship between central cholinergic pathways and the peripheral (autonomic) expression of motion sickness was described. A correlation between the stress of excessive motion and a variety of hormonal responses to that stress was also detailed. The cholinergic system is involved in the efferent modulation of the vestibular hair cells, as an afferent modulator of the vestibular nuclei, in the activation of cortical and limbic structures, in the expression of motion sickness symptoms and most likely underscores a number of the hormonal changes that occur in stressful motion environments. The role of lecithin in the regulation of the levels of neurotransmitters was characterized as a possible means by which cholinergic neurochemistry can be modulated.

  16. Simulator sickness in U.S. Navy flight simulators.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R S; Lilienthal, M G; Berbaum, K S; Baltzley, D R; McCauley, M E

    1989-01-01

    Flight simulators have become a major factor in pilot training. A general finding from Navy research on simulator design is that equipment features that offer faithful representation improve pilot performance and promote pilot acceptance. To the extent that an aircraft produces motion sickness, its simulator should induce the same result. However, reports of simulator sickness appear to be increasing and a shortcoming in simulation is implied when these effects occur in simulators during maneuvers that do not occasion them in the aircraft. This article presents incidence data from surveys of the 10 simulators at 6 different Naval/Marine Corps Air Stations. Approximately 1,200 simulator flights were recorded. Some severe motion sickness symptoms were recorded and some simulators induced unsteadiness afterwards. Individuals experiencing effects may be at risk if they drive themselves home or return to demanding activities at work. The simulators which exhibited the highest incidences of sickness were helicopter simulators with cathode ray tube (CRT) infinity optics and six-degrees-of-freedom moving base systems. Of those studied, fixed-wing, fixed-base, dome displays had relatively low incidence of simulator sickness.

  17. DCIS, cytokeratins, and the theory of the sick lobe.

    PubMed

    Tot, Tibor

    2005-07-01

    We postulate that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and consequently breast carcinoma in general, is a lobar disease, as the simultaneously or asynchronously appearing, often multiple, in situ tumor foci are localized within a single lobe. Although the whole lobe is sick, carrying some form of genetic instability, the malignant transformation of the epithelial cells may appear localized to a part or different parts of the sick lobe at the same time or with varying time difference. It may be confined to terminal ductal lobular units (TDLUs), to ducts or both. The malignant transformation is often associated with aberrant branching and/or aberrant lobularization within the sick lobe. Involvement of a single individual TDLU or of a group of adjacent TDLUs generates a unifocal lesion. Multifocal lesions appear if distant TDLUs are involved. Diffuse growth pattern in DCIS indicates involvement of the larger ducts. The extent of the involved area in multifocal or diffuse cases varies considerably. Diffuse growth pattern with or without evidence of aberrant arborisation within the sick lobe seems to characterize a subgroup of DCIS with unfavourable prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the anatomical, embryological and pathological background of the theory of the sick lobe and present supporting evidence from modern radiological breast imaging, long-term follow-up studies and from our own series of 108 DCIS cases.

  18. Effects of scopolamine on autonomic profiles underlying motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, Sebastian H. J.; Stern, Robert M.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of scopolamine on the physiological patterns occurring prior to and during motion sickness stimulation. In addition, the use of physiological profiles in the prediction of motion sickness was evaluated. Sixty subjects ingested either 0.6 mg scopolamine, 2.5 mg methoscopolamine, or a placebo. Heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an index of vagal tone), and electrogastrograms were measured prior to and during the exposure to a rotating optokinetic drum. Compared to the other groups, the scopolamine group reported fewer motion sickness symptoms, and displayed lower HR, higher vagal tone, enhanced normal gastric myoelectric activity, and depressed gastric dysrhythmias before and during motion sickness induction. Distinct physiological profiles prior to drum rotation could reliably differentiate individuals who would develop gastric discomfort from those who would not. Symptom-free subjects were characterized by high levels of vagal tone and low HR across conditions, and by maintaining normal (3 cpm) electrogastrographic activity during drum rotation. It was concluded that scopolamine offered motion sickness protection by initiating a pattern of increased vagal tone and gastric myoelectric stability.

  19. The menstrual cycle and susceptibility to coriolis-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Heskin, R; Hofer, K; Gagnon, M

    2001-01-01

    Survey studies on motion sickness susceptibility suggest that females tend to report greater severity in illness and higher incidence of vomiting than males. Menstruation is said to be a contributing factor. A recent study suggested that females were least susceptible to seasickness during ovulation in a "round the world" yacht race. Sixteen subjects (18-36 years old) were exposed to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation in the laboratory. They were tested once during permenstruation (Day 1-5), ovulation (Day 12-15) and premenstruation (Day 24-28), based on a normalized 28-day cycle, in a randomised design. Physiological measurements of motion sickness included forearm and calf cutaneous blood flow. Subjective evaluation of sickness symptoms was based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria and Golding's rating method. Our results indicated that under controlled laboratory conditions, different phases of the menstrual cycle appear to have no influence on subjective symptoms of motion sickness or on cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf. The lack of commonality between the types and levels of hormones that are released during motion sickness and those that are involved in different menstrual phases appears to support our findings.

  20. Pleasant music as a countermeasure against visually induced motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Behrang; Hecht, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known side-effect in virtual environments or simulators. However, effective behavioral countermeasures against VIMS are still sparse. In this study, we tested whether music can reduce the severity of VIMS. Ninety-three volunteers were immersed in an approximately 14-minute-long video taken during a bicycle ride. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups, either including relaxing music, neutral music, stressful music, or no music. Sickness scores were collected using the Fast Motion Sickness Scale and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. Results showed an overall trend for relaxing music to reduce the severity of VIMS. When factoring in the subjective pleasantness of the music, a significant reduction of VIMS occurred only when the presented music was perceived as pleasant, regardless of the music type. In addition, we found a gender effect with women reporting more sickness than men. We assume that the presentation of pleasant music can be an effective, low-cost, and easy-to-administer method to reduce VIMS.

  1. Sick leave and workers' compensation for police officers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Robert

    2010-05-01

    In Australia it has been necessary to enact specific provisions into industrial and employment laws to ensure workplace protection and coverage of police officers because at common law police officers have not been regarded as employees. Police unions in Australia have emerged as strong industrial players and have secured a range of terms and conditions of employment which do not apply to the broader workforce. However, the battle in relation to workers' compensation coverage and extended sick leave seems to be ongoing, particularly in Western Australia. The area of interaction between workers' compensation laws and sick leave entitlements is often neglected against the background of other industrial matters concerning police. This article investigates the entitlements of Australian police officers to these benefits against the historical background of industrial laws. It concludes that there is no uniformity in coverage for workers' compensation and sick leave and that the publicly available data in relation to absence from work of police officers due to sickness are generally incomplete and present challenges for cross-jurisdictional comparisons. The article points to future areas of research into police sick leave. PMID:20552944

  2. Aerothermodynamics of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Borrelli, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the aerothermodynamic phenomena of blunt body entry vehicles are discussed. Four topics will be considered that present challenges to current computational modeling techniques for blunt body environments: turbulent flow, non-equilibrium flow, rarefied flow, and radiation transport. Examples of comparisons between computational tools to ground and flight-test data will be presented in order to illustrate the challenges existing in the numerical modeling of each of these phenomena and to provide test cases for evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions.

  3. Efficacy of phosphatidylcholine in the modulation of motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Ryan, P.; Homick, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological doses of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) in the modulation of motion sickness induced by exposure to coriolis stimulation in a rotating chair. Subjects received daily dietary supplements of 25 grams of lecithin (90 percent phosphatidylcholine) and were tested for their susceptibility to motion sickness after 4 h, 2 d, and 21 d. A small but statistically significant increase in susceptibility (+15 percent) was noted 4 h after supplemental phosphatidylcholine, with four of nine subjects demonstrating a marked increase in susceptibility. This finding was attributed to choline's stimulatory action on cholinergic systems, an action which opposes that of the classical antimotion sickness drug scopolamine. Chronic lecithin loading revealed a trend towards reduced susceptibility, possibly indicating the occurrence of adaptive mechanisms such as receptor down-regulation. Withdrawal from lecithin loading, perhaps coupled with anticholinergic treatment, might prove to be a potent prophylactic regimen and ought to be tested.

  4. PROFILE OF PATIENTS ON SICK LEAVE WITH CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Judson Welber Veríssimo; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Nascimento, Valdênia das Graças; de Paiva, Henver Ribeiro; Viecili, Leandro; Rocha, Murilo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report clinical and epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) on sick leave admitted in a University Hospital. Methods: This is a transversal study conducted with patients admitted sequentially over 18 years of age, without distinction of gender and race in the period between September and November 2014. Patients answered a questionnaire and underwent physical examination carried out by the authors. Results: Twenty-five patients were admitted within three months, all females, the mean age was 50.24 years old (standard deviation 10,39) . Among the professions they performed, general and cleaning services were the most prevalent. Most patients featured obesity, followed by depression and systemic arterial hypertension. Approximately half of them were on sick leave. Sleep disorders were also a frequent complaint. Conclusion: CTS is a frequent cause of sick leave and it is related to obesity, dyslipidemia and depression. Level of Evidence IV, Series of Cases. PMID:26981030

  5. Comparison of treatment strategies for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Jennings, R. T.; Beck, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    Treatment strategies for space motion sickness were compared using the results of postflight oral debriefings. Standardized questionnaires were administered to all crewmembers immediately following Space Shuttle flights by NASA flight surgeons. Cases of space motion sickness were graded as mild, moderate, or severe based on published criteria, and medication effectiveness was judged based on subjective reports of symptom relief. Since October 1989, medication effectiveness is reported inflight through private medical conferences with the crew. A symptom matrix was analyzed for nineteen crewmembers treated with an oral combination of scopolomine and dextroamphetamine (scopdex) and fifteen crewmembers treated with promethazine delivered by intramuscular or suppository routes. Scopdex has been given preflight as prophylaxis for space motion sickness but analysis showed delayed symptom presentation in nine crewmembers or failed to prevent symptoms in seven.

  6. Treatment of motion sickness in parabolic flight with buccal scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.; Degioanni, Joseph J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Bungo, Michael W.; Kutyna, Frank A.; Homick, Jerry L.; Calkins, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of acute motion sickness induced by parabolic flight with a preparation of scopolamine placed in the buccal pouch was investigated. Twenty-one subjects flew aboard a KC-135 aircraft operated by NASA which performed parabolic maneuvers resulting in periods of 0-g, 1-g, and 1.8-g. Each subject flew once with a tablet containing scopolamine and once with a placebo in a random order, crossover design. Signs and symptoms of motion sickness were systematically recorded during each parabola by an investigator who was blind to the content of the tablet. Compared with flights using placebo, flights with buccal scopolamine resulted in significantly lower scores for nausea (31-35 percent reduction) and vomiting (50 percent reduction in number of parabolas with vomiting). Side effects of the drug during flight were negligible. It is concluded that buccal scopolamine is more effective than a placebo in treating ongoing motion sickness.

  7. Mechanisms underlying spinal cord damage in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, J M; Bove, A A; Elliott, D H

    1975-04-01

    Decompression sickness, which damaged the spinal cord, was produced in anesthetized dogs using a compression chamber. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and several intravascular and intracardiac pressures were monitored during the course of the simulated dives. Manometric responses to forcible lung inflation and abdominal compression were measured both predive and postdive after signs of spinal cord damage were evident. Cinevenography of the epidural vertebral venous system was performed both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of paretic animals were carried out. The results indicate that the epidural vertebral venous system becomes obstructed during spinal cord damaging decompression sickness and strongly suggests that spinal cord infarction in decompression sickness is caused by obstruction of cord venous drainage at the level of the epidural vertebral venous system. PMID:1168317

  8. When is it socially acceptable to feel sick?

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Disease is a ubiquitous and powerful evolutionary force. Hosts have evolved behavioural and physiological responses to disease that are associated with increased survival. Behavioural modifications, known as ‘sickness behaviours’, frequently involve symptoms such as lethargy, somnolence and anorexia. Current research has demonstrated that the social environment is a potent modulator of these behaviours: when conflicting social opportunities arise, animals can decrease or entirely forgo experiencing sickness symptoms. Here, I review how different social contexts, such as the presence of mates, caring for offspring, competing for territories or maintaining social status, affect the expression of sickness behaviours. Exploiting the circumstances that promote this behavioural plasticity will provide new insights into the evolutionary ecology of social behaviours. A deeper understanding of when and how this modulation takes place may lead to better tools to treat symptoms of infection and be relevant for the development of more efficient disease control programmes. PMID:24943375

  9. Cash benefits for short-term sickness, 1948--76.

    PubMed

    Price, D N

    1978-10-01

    National income-maintenance programs provide cash benefits when workers become unemployed, retire, are injured on the job, have a long-term disability, or die. For short-term sickness, however, only five States, one other jurisdiction, and a single industry require wage-replacement protection. Voluntary plans cover a substantial number of additional workers, including many whose protection was established through labor-management negotiations. In this annual update of estimates on the extent of protection provided, many of the historical statistics have been revised back to 1967 as a result of new information on the amount of sick-leave benefits paid to employees of the Federal Government. The effects of the new data on the benefit series are examined, as are trends in the provision of sickness benefits for maternity--an issue subject to considerable recent controversy. PMID:715639

  10. [Sick day management in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    A bad cold, the flu or a serious illness can make blood glucose too high in elderly person with diabetes. Gastrointestinal illnesses may cause hypoglycemia for individuals treated with insulin, sulfonylureas or glitinides. When the persons with diabetes discontinue insulin or diabetes medications because of appetite loss and reduced food intake, they may fall into diabetic crises, such as ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The elderly patients need to take extra precautions on sick days to avoid diabetic crises or hypoglycemia. Key principles of sick day management are (1) maintaining hydration and carbohydrate intake, (2) monitoring blood glucose and ketone levels, (3) adjusting diabetes medications according to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose and ketone levels. In Japan, the numbers of frail elderly diabetic patients is markedly increased, effective and efficient sick day management for frail elderly diabetic patients is requested.

  11. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  12. Misinterpretations of United States pharmacopeia chapter <797>.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2012-01-01

    By now, all compounding pharmacists should be aware that United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> has been revised. However, the revisions are tedious to read and may be misinterpreted. This article discusses some of the misinterpreted revisions of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and clarifies the revisions on the topics of Terminology, The Compounder, Facilities and Environment, Personnel Cleansing and Garbing, Assigning Beyond-use Dates, and Testing. Compounders need to take a firm stand with these misinterpretations of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and educate those who are not thoroughly familiar with the document. Compounders need to be diligent in following these standards to prevent harm to the patients.

  13. [Sick leave benefits for workers in the Brazilian meat and fish industries in 2008].

    PubMed

    Jakobi, Heinz Roland; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh; Bueno, Luis Fernando; Ferreira, Ricardo de Godoi Mattos; Camargo, Luís Marcelo Aranha

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyze factors associated with sick leave rates among workers in the meat, fish, and seafood industries in Brazil. The study analyzed all sick leave benefits granted by the country's social security system to workers in these industries in 2008. Incidence of sick leave per 10 thousand jobs was stratified by sex, age, diagnosis, job position, State, and nature and length of benefits. The study analyzed 31,913 sick leaves, with an annual incidence of 788.7. Meat processing and packaging showed the highest incidence, and fish and seafood processing and packaging showed the longest mean length of sick leave. Women showed a higher sick leave incidence, while men received longer average sick leaves. Injuries, musculoskeletal disorders, and mental disorders accounted for 67.2% of sick leaves. The most common diagnoses were lower back pain, first-trimester bleeding in pregnancy, and depression. The data suggest poor job protection and adverse working conditions in these industries.

  14. Autogenic feedback training experiment: A preventative method for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a disorder which produces symptoms similar to those of motion sickness on Earth. This syndrome has affected approximately 50 percent of all astronauts and cosmonauts exposed to microgravity in space, but it differs from what is commonly known as motion sickness in a number of critical ways. There is currently no ground-based method for predicting susceptibility to motion sickness in space. Antimotion sickness drugs have had limited success in preventing or counteracting symptoms in space, and frequently caused debilitating side effects. The objectives were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of Autogenic-Feedback Training as a countermeasure for space motion sickness; (2) to compare physiological data and in-flight symptom reports to ground-based motion sickness data; and (3) to predict susceptibility to space motion sickness based on pre-flight data of each treatment group crew member.

  15. Early modern green sickness and pre-Freudian hysteria.

    PubMed

    Schleiner, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    In early modern medicine, both green sickness (or chlorosis) and hysteria were understood to be gendered diseases, diseases of women. Green sickness, a disease of young women, was considered so serious that John Graunt, the father of English statistics, thought that in his time dozens of women died of it in London every year. One of the symptoms of hysteria was that women fell unconscious. The force of etymology and medical tradition was so strong that in one instance the gender of the patient seems to have been changed by the recorder to make the case fit medical theory.

  16. Electrogastrograms during motion sickness in fasted and fed subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, John J.; Wood, Mary J.; Wood, Charles D.

    1989-01-01

    Seven human volunteers were subjected to stressful Coriolis stimulation (rotating chair) either during the fasted state or following the ingestion of yogurt (6 oz). Subjects tested after yogurt reached a malaise-III (M-III) endpoint of motion sickness after significantly (p smaller than 0.01) fewer head movements than subjects tested in the fasted state. Surface electrogastrogram (EGG) recordings at M-III were similar for both dietary stats and consisted of a brief period of tachygastria, followed by a period of low-amplitude EGG waves. Ingestion of yogurt enhanced susceptibility to motion sickness but did not affect the associated pattern of EGG.

  17. Vection and visually induced motion sickness: how are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz, Behrang; Riecke, Bernhard E.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Campos, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of visually induced motion sickness has been frequently linked to the sensation of illusory self-motion (vection), however, the precise nature of this relationship is still not fully understood. To date, it is still a matter of debate as to whether vection is a necessary prerequisite for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). That is, can there be VIMS without any sensation of self-motion? In this paper, we will describe the possible nature of this relationship, review the literature that addresses this relationship (including theoretical accounts of vection and VIMS), and offer suggestions with respect to operationally defining and reporting these phenomena in future. PMID:25941509

  18. Treatment efficacy of intramuscular promethazine for Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Jennings, Richard T.; Beck, Bradley G.; Bagian, James P.

    1993-01-01

    Intramuscular promethazine and its efficacy in the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS) were evaluated using standardized questions administered during postflight debriefings to crewmembers immediately after their first Shuttle flight. The comparison showed that 25 percent of crewmembers treated with IM promethazine were 'sick' on flight day 2, compared to 50 percent of crewmembers who did not receive promethazine, 90 percent reported immediate symptom relief as well. Untreated crewmembers typically have slow symptom resolution over 72-96 h, and those treated with oral scopolamine/dextroamphetamine show delayed symptom development. This study suggests that intramuscular promethazine is an effective treatment for SMS and merits continued use and further controlled investigations.

  19. Migraine headache confounding the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Karle, Francis J; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with a history of migraine headache attempted to hike from Lukla, Nepal, to Mount Everest Base Camp. On the sixth day of hiking, he had a migraine headache. After achieving resolution with typical therapies and rest, he ascended higher. Another headache developed that was interpreted to be a migraine. The headache was treated, and he ascended higher, after which severe symptoms of acute mountain sickness developed, necessitating his evacuation by helicopter. Persons with headaches in daily life may present challenges to diagnosis when traveling to high altitude. Careful evaluation and decision making are needed to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:24462763

  20. Gene-environment mismatch in decompression sickness and air embolism.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Joe; Brainard, Andrew H

    2010-08-01

    Decompression sickness causes injury and death in SCUBA divers when air bubbles obstruct the flow of blood. Platelets aggregate in response to gas and promote inflammation. Inflammation in decompression sickness may have its origin in the innate immune system's response to pathogens. Bubbles are often found in tissues during gas-forming infections and in infection-prone states. In these diseases, intravascular gas offers a signal of infection to immune cells. Platelet activation by gas may often accompany a beneficial immune response to pathogens. Pathologic bubble-platelet interaction in decompression illness may be an example of gene-environment mismatch.

  1. Spinal Cord Decompression Sickness in a Sport Scuba Diver.

    PubMed

    Zwingelberg, K M

    1981-10-01

    In brief: A 26-year-old diver suffered spinal cord decompression sickness even though he did not exceed the time and depth limits set in standard US Navy diving tables. This case shows that when dives are strenuous and almost reach time and depth limits they may exceed the parameters of the tables. The case also illustrates the importance of rapid diagnosis and hyperbaric oxygen treatment of pressure-related diving casualties. The author says optimum treatment of decompression sickness depends on a high level of suspicion, an accurate diving history, and prompt treatment with hyperbaric oxygen.

  2. Inner ear decompression sickness following a shallow scuba dive.

    PubMed

    Reissman, P; Shupak, A; Nachum, Z; Melamed, Y

    1990-06-01

    Inner Ear Decompression Sickness (IEDCS)--manifested by tinnitus, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and hearing loss--is usually associated with deep air or mixed gas dives, and accompanied by other CNS symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Early recompression treatment is required in order to avoid permanent inner ear damage. We present an unusual case of a scuba diver suffering from IEDCS as the only manifestation of DCS following a short shallow scuba dive, successfully treated by U.S. Navy treatment table 6 and tranquilizers. This case suggests that diving medical personnel should be more aware of the possible occurrence of IEDCS among the wide population of sport scuba divers.

  3. Immersed false vertical room. A new motion sickness model.

    PubMed

    Coats, A C; Norfleet, W T

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated a new model of motion sickness--an enclosure decorated with visual cues to upright which was immersed either inverted or "front"-wall down, in Johnson Space Center's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) pool. This "WETF False Vertical Room" (WFVR) was tested with 19 male and 3 female SCUBA diver subjects, aged 23 to 57, who alternately set clocks mounted near the room's 8 corners and made exaggerated pitch head movements. We found that (1) the WFVR test runs produced motion sickness symptoms in 56% and 36% of subjects in the room-inverted and room-front-down positions, respectively. (2) Pitch head movements were the most provocative acts, followed closely by setting the clocks--particularly when a clock face filled the visual field. (3) When measured with a self-ranking questionnaire, terrestrial motion sickness susceptibility correlated strongly (P < 0.005) with WFVR sickness susceptibility. (4) Standing instability, measured with a modified Fregly-Graybiel floor battery, also correlated strongly (P < 0.005) with WFVR sickness susceptibility. This result may reflect a relationship between visual dominance and WFVR sickness. (5) A control study demonstrated that the inverted and front-down positions produced WFVR sickness, but the upright position did not, and that adaptation may have occurred in some subjects with repeated exposure. The WFVR could become a useful terrestrial model of space motion sickness (SMS) because it duplicates the nature of the gravity-dependent sensory conflicts created by microgravity (visual and otolith inputs conflict while somatosensory gravity cues are minimized), and it also duplicates the nature of the provocative stimulus (sensory environment "rule change" versus application of motion to passive subject) more closely than any other proposed terrestrial SMS model. Also, unlike any other proposed terrestrial SMS model, the WFVR incorporates whole-body movement in all three spatial dimensions. However, the WFVR

  4. Pathophysiology and treatment of decompression sickness and gas embolism.

    PubMed

    Loewenherz, J W

    1992-09-01

    Decompression sickness and cerebral gas embolism can present as dramatic and profound sudden onset injuries in patients engaged in tunnel work and compressed gas diving, including scuba. The history and management of these illnesses span centuries. The pathophysiology relates to occurrence of gas bubbles in extrapulmonic sites. Decompression sickness is due to supersaturation of the tissue with dissolved gas and subsequent evolution of gas bubbles. Gas embolism results from the direct transit of molecular gas from a pulmonary or intravascular origin into the arterial circulation causing occlusion of a distal locus. Treatment relates to increasing hydrostatic pressure, thus maximizing the gradient for gas reabsorption and dissolution and subsequently gas excretion via the lungs.

  5. Certificated sickness absence in industrial employees threatened with redundancy.

    PubMed

    Beale, N; Nethercott, S

    1988-05-28

    The proposition that workers take less sick leave when threatened by redundancy was examined in a longitudinal, controlled study using information from case records in a general practice. The hypothesis was only partly supported--certificated sickness absence dropped only in employees under the age of 40. Workers fearing job loss reported more illness, and their periods of absence were significantly longer, especially for men and for workers who had previously consulted their general practitioner infrequently. This study provides further evidence that the fear of mass redundancy is stressful to workers so threatened and costly to a society experiencing rising unemployment.

  6. Infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool to indicate sick-house-syndrome: a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1996-03-01

    Every third child and many adults in Sweden have allergic reactions caused by indoor environmental problems. A lot of buildings constructed during the building-boom period of 1950 - 1990 expose the sick-house-syndrome, due to built-in moisture problems and poor ventilation performance of the building. Leaky building construction, transport of humid air condensing on thermal bridges within the construction gives rise to a humid environment, and forms a base for a microbial deterioration process of organic materials, with emissions hazardous for human health. So far there are no universal and cost efficient techniques or methods developed which could be used to reveal the sick-house-syndrome. In this paper we present the results of a case-study of the sick-house-syndrome, and an investigation concept with a combination of different techniques and methods to detect and to map underlying factors that form the base for microbial activities. The concept includes mobile and indoor thermography, functional control of ventilation systems, tracer gas techniques for measurement of air flow exchange rate in different rooms, microbial investigation of emissions, field inspections within the building construction and the building envelope, and medical investigation of the health status of the people working in the building. Mobile thermography of the exterior facades has been performed with a longwave AGEMA THV 900, respectively THV 1000 infrared system, during the period December 1994 - June 1995, at different and similar weather and radiation conditions, and with the building pressurized at one accession. Indoor thermography has been performed with a shortwave AGEMA THV 470 system, for a selection of objects/surfaces with thermal deviations, indicated in thermograms from the different mobile thermographic surveys. Functional control was performed for the ventilation systems, and air flow rates were measured using tracer gas technique for a selection of rooms with different

  7. Summary of proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Mccauley, Michael E.; Cook, Anthony E.; Voorhees, James W.

    1989-01-01

    A program of research to investigate simulator induced sickness has recently been initiated under the sponsorship of NASA Ames Research Center to coordinate efforts to investigate and eventually eliminate the problem of simulator sickness. As part of this program, a Simulator Sickness Steering Committee has been assembled, comprised of eighteen representatives from the Army, Air Force, Navy, NASA, NATO, academia, and industry. The proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee are summarized and discussed.

  8. Motion sickness in cats - A symptom rating scale used in laboratory and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suri, K. B.; Daunton, N. G.; Crampton, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The cat is proposed as a model for the study of motion and space sickness. Development of a scale for rating the motion sickness severity in the cat is described. The scale is used to evaluate an antimotion sickness drug, d-amphetamine plus scopolamine, and to determine whether it is possible to predict sickness susceptibility during parabolic flight, including zero-G maneuvers, from scores obtained during ground based trials.

  9. What you thought you knew about motion sickness isn't necessarily so

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Malmstrom, F. V.

    1984-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms, stimuli, and drug therapy are discussed. Autogenic feedback training (AFT) methods of preventing motion sickness are explained. Research with AFT indicates that participants who had AFT could withstand longer periods of Coriolis acceleration, participants with high or low susceptibility to motion sickness could control their symptoms with AFT, AFT for Coriolis acceleration is transferable to other motion sickness stimuli, and most people can learn AFT, though with varying rates of learning.

  10. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  11. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  12. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  13. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  14. Ultraviolet radiation changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Richard L.; Frederick, John E.; Ilyas, Mohammad; Filyushkin, V.; Wahner, Andreas; Stamnes, K.; Muthusubramanian, P.; Blumthaler, M.; Roy, Colin E.; Madronich, Sasha

    1991-01-01

    A major consequence of ozone depletion is an increase in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the Earth's surface. This chapter discusses advances that were made since the previous assessment (World Meteorological Organization (WMO)) to our understanding of UV radiation. The impacts of these changes in UV on the biosphere are not included, because they are discussed in the effects assessment.

  15. Radiation: Doses, Effects, Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lean, Geoffrey, Ed.

    Few scientific issues arouse as much public controversy as the effects of radiation. This booklet is an attempt to summarize what is known about radiation and provide a basis for further discussion and debate. The first four chapters of the booklet are based on the most recent reports to the United Nations' General Assembly by the United Nations…

  16. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  17. 48 CFR 9900.000 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of chapter. 9900.000... PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET SCOPE OF CHAPTER 9900.000 Scope of chapter. This chapter... and subcontracts. This chapter does not apply to sealed bid contracts or to any contract with a...

  18. 1 CFR 21.8 - Chapters and subchapters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chapters and subchapters. 21.8 Section 21.8... Chapters and subchapters. (a) The normal divisions of a title are chapters, assigned to the various...) Subchapters may be used to group related parts within a chapter. (c) Chapter and subchapter assignments...

  19. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  20. 20 CFR 341.8 - Termination of sickness benefits due to a settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT STATUTORY LIEN WHERE SICKNESS BENEFITS PAID § 341.8 Termination of sickness benefits... settlement shall be made to the Sickness and Unemployment Benefits Section and shall include the information... Unemployment Benefits Section shall take steps within five additional working days to verify whether there...

  1. 20 CFR 323.2 - Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... unemployment or sickness insurance. 323.2 Section 323.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT NONGOVERNMENTAL PLANS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT OR SICKNESS INSURANCE § 323.2 Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance....

  2. 20 CFR 323.2 - Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... unemployment or sickness insurance. 323.2 Section 323.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT NONGOVERNMENTAL PLANS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT OR SICKNESS INSURANCE § 323.2 Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance....

  3. 20 CFR 323.2 - Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... unemployment or sickness insurance. 323.2 Section 323.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT NONGOVERNMENTAL PLANS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT OR SICKNESS INSURANCE § 323.2 Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance....

  4. 20 CFR 323.2 - Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... unemployment or sickness insurance. 323.2 Section 323.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT NONGOVERNMENTAL PLANS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT OR SICKNESS INSURANCE § 323.2 Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance....

  5. 20 CFR 323.2 - Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... unemployment or sickness insurance. 323.2 Section 323.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT NONGOVERNMENTAL PLANS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT OR SICKNESS INSURANCE § 323.2 Definition of nongovernmental plan for unemployment or sickness insurance....

  6. Benefits and Harms of Sick Leave: Lack of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelsson, Inge; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to try to identify those randomized controlled trials that compare sick leave with no sick leave or a different duration or degree of sick leave. A comprehensive, systematic, electronic search of Clinical Evidence, the Cochrane Library and PubMed, and a manual search of the Campbell Library and a journal supplement was…

  7. 20 CFR 336.12 - Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness... Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits. For the purposes of this part, the Board considers that an employee has exhausted his or her current rights to normal benefits for days of sickness if: (a)...

  8. 20 CFR 336.12 - Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness... Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits. For the purposes of this part, the Board considers that an employee has exhausted his or her current rights to normal benefits for days of sickness if: (a)...

  9. 26 CFR 1.104-1 - Compensation for injuries or sickness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Compensation for injuries or sickness. 1.104-1... Compensation for injuries or sickness. (a) In general. Section 104(a) provides an exclusion from gross income... are received for personal injuries or sickness, except to the extent that such amounts...

  10. 20 CFR 336.12 - Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness... Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits. For the purposes of this part, the Board considers that an employee has exhausted his or her current rights to normal benefits for days of sickness if: (a)...

  11. 26 CFR 1.104-1 - Compensation for injuries or sickness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation for injuries or sickness. 1.104-1... Compensation for injuries or sickness. (a) In general. Section 104(a) provides an exclusion from gross income... are received for personal injuries or sickness, except to the extent that such amounts...

  12. 20 CFR 336.12 - Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness... Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits. For the purposes of this part, the Board considers that an employee has exhausted his or her current rights to normal benefits for days of sickness if: (a)...

  13. 20 CFR 336.12 - Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness... Exhaustion of rights to normal sickness benefits. For the purposes of this part, the Board considers that an employee has exhausted his or her current rights to normal benefits for days of sickness if: (a)...

  14. Care for Sick Children as a Proxy for Gender Equality in the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Rickard; Nermo, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Swedish parents are entitled to government paid benefits to take care of sick children. In this paper we show that the gender distribution of paid care for sick children is a good proxy for the gender division of household work. Using two examples we show that registry data on care for sick children is a useful data source for studies on gender…

  15. Head movements in low and high gravitoinertial force environments elicit motion sickness - Implications for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; Graybiel, Ashton

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts report that head movements in flight tend to bring on symptoms of space motion sickness (SMS). The effects of head movements in pitch, yaw, and roll (made both with normal vision and with eyes occluded) on susceptibility to motion sickness in the zero G phase of parabolic flight maneuvers were evaluated. The findings are clear-cut: pitch head movements are most provocative, yaw least provocative, and roll intermediate. These experiments suggest that SMS is not a unique nosological entity, but is the consequence of exposure to nonterrestrial force levels. Head movements during departures in either direction from 1 G elicit symptoms.

  16. Chapter IV - Safety During Payload Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; Dollberg, John; Trinchero, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical hazards that can be expected to be encountered when processing payloads on the ground. Also described are some of the more common controls for these hazards. Many of these controls are based on hard requirements but they are also based on specific lessons learned. This chapter uses the term Flight Hardware (F/H) for all payloads regardless of size.

  17. Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from published studies were combined and analyzed to develop best-fit equations and curves quantifying the change in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptom prevalence in office workers with ventilation rate. For each study, slopes were calculated, representing the fractional...

  18. Psychosocial work factors and long sickness absence in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Slany, Corinna; Schütte, Stefanie; Chastang, Jean-François; Parent-Thirion, Agnès; Vermeylen, Greet; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies exploring a wide range of psychosocial work factors separately and together in association with long sickness absence are still lacking. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore the associations between psychosocial work factors measured following a comprehensive instrument (Copenhagen psychosocial questionnaire, COPSOQ) and long sickness absence (>7 days/year) in European employees of 34 countries. An additional objective was to study the differences in these associations according to gender and countries. Methods: The study population consisted of 16 120 male and 16 588 female employees from the 2010 European working conditions survey. Twenty-five psychosocial work factors were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using multilevel logistic regression models and interaction testing. Results: When studied together in the same model, factors related to job demands (quantitative demands and demands for hiding emotions), possibilities for development, social relationships (role conflicts, quality of leadership, social support, and sense of community), workplace violence (physical violence, bullying, and discrimination), shift work, and job promotion were associated with long sickness absence. Almost no difference was observed according to gender and country. Conclusions: Comprehensive prevention policies oriented to psychosocial work factors may be useful to prevent long sickness absence at European level. PMID:24176393

  19. Is Your Sick Leave Bank in Good Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Sick leave banks are a common staple of teacher contracts. Although these banks may benefit employees, they expose school districts to a variety of complications and unintended consequences, including administrative complexity, potential cash flow implications, cost disparities, increased absenteeism, instructional instability, privacy issues, and…

  20. Sickness absence in Pertamina E.P. directorate

    SciTech Connect

    Harjono, P.T.; Arief, N.

    1996-12-31

    Pertamina is the only one state oil enterprise in the country has a strategic position in the national development, mainly in terms of foreign exchange and domestic ID energy supply. Hence human factor in the company productivity is very important. Workday loss by sickness in the last 4 years was 2.00{per_thousand} up to 3.00{per_thousand} and 0.88 days up to 1.12 days loss per worker annually. Workday loss by sickness was 96.86 % up to 99.12 % of total workday loss and the rest by work injuries, These relative low sickness absence figures achieved by multidisiplinary efforts in the company mainly by health department. All sickness absence certificate even for one day off should be signed by company medical doctor. Health department conduct comprehensive health care including occupational health programme. Health & safety issues solved by multidisiplinary approach. Beside health department also organize employee assistance programme (counseling) mainly for healthy life style and psychosocial problems. The low workday loss is one of the basic important factors to support discipline and human productivity mainly since mostly oil reserve discoveries located in the remote areas inland as well as offshore.

  1. Development of a neural net paradigm that predicts simulator sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.

    1993-03-01

    A disease exists that affects pilots and aircrew members who use Navy Operational Flight Training Systems. This malady, commonly referred to as simulator sickness and whose symptomatology closely aligns with that of motion sickness, can compromise the use of these systems because of a reduced utilization factor, negative transfer of training, and reduction in combat readiness. A report is submitted that develops an artificial neural network (ANN) and behavioral model that predicts the onset and level of simulator sickness in the pilots and aircrews who sue these systems. It is proposed that the paradigm could be implemented in real time as a biofeedback monitor to reduce the risk to users of these systems. The model captures the neurophysiological impact of use (human-machine interaction) by developing a structure that maps the associative and nonassociative behavioral patterns (learned expectations) and vestibular (otolith and semicircular canals of the inner ear) and tactile interaction, derived from system acceleration profiles, onto an abstract space that predicts simulator sickness for a given training flight.

  2. 75 FR 75363 - Absence and Leave; Sick Leave

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... regulations are in response to only a portion of OPM's proposed regulations (74 FR 43064) issued on August 26... covered servicemember undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, for a serious injury or... regulations (75 FR 33491) amending the definition of family member for sick leave purposes to now...

  3. Occupational rewards relate to sickness absence frequency but not duration.

    PubMed

    Roelen, C A M; Koopmans, P C; Groothoff, J W

    2009-01-01

    Work stress is an important problem that shifted sickness absence research to the psychosocial work environment at the expense of physical or chemical hazards. Most studies investigated the psychosocial work environment using the Demand-Control model. However, this model does not consider coping styles which are important in absenteeism. The Effort-Reward Imbalance model takes coping into account. Little is known about occupational rewards and their relationship with sickness absence. This study investigated the relations between occupational rewards and the frequency and duration of sickness absence among 366 workers. The data of 326 employees (89%) were suitable for statistical analysis. Rewards in terms of job esteem (OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.47-0.87) and job perspectives (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.57-0.84) were negatively related to the absence frequency in men. Satisfaction with income (OR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35-0.81) was negatively related to the absence frequency in women. Occupational rewards were not associated with the mean duration of absence episodes. The associations we found warrant more attention for occupational rewards in sickness absence research.

  4. The Living Arrangement Dynamics of Sick, Elderly Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostie, Benoit; Leger, Pierre Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics associated with living-arrangement decisions of sick elderly individuals. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics? Parental Health Supplement, we construct the complete living-arrangement histories of elderly individuals in need of care. We use a simultaneous random-effects competing-risks model to analyze the impact of…

  5. Air embolism and decompression sickness in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Whitcraft, D D; Karas, S

    1976-05-01

    The recognition and prompt treatment of air embolism and decompression sickness by the emergency physician can do much to reverse the unfavorable outcome of these two medical emergencies. Recognition depends on the physician maintaining a high index of suspicion. While the primary treatment for these disorders is recompression, other forms of therapy are outlined which must be instituted promptly.

  6. Reliability of psychophysiological responses across multiple motion sickness stimulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, C. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Cowings, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Although there is general agreement that a high degree of variability exists between subjects in their autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness stimulation, very little evidence exists that examines the reproducibility of autonomic responses within subjects during motion sickness stimulation. Our objectives were to examine the reliability of autonomic responses and symptom levels across five testing occasions using the (1) final minute of testing, (2) change in autonomic response and the change in symptom level, and (3) strength of the relationship between the change in symptom level and the change in autonomic responses across the entire motion sickness test. The results indicate that, based on the final minute of testing, the autonomic responses of heart rate, blood volume pulse, and respiration rate are moderately stable across multiple tests. Changes in heart rate, blood volume pulse, respiration rate, and symptoms throughout the test duration are less stable across the tests. Finally, autonomic responses and symptom levels are significantly related across the entire motion sickness test.

  7. [A Roman soap opera: Justus' wife and love sickness].

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fiction rather than a story. Galen is called to visit Justus' wife, ill with a mysterious disease. The narrative of love sickness that afflicts her allows the author to draw an interesting picture of the social status of Roman women, the issues of reproduction and maritalbe trayal, and to shed light on magic practices for obtaining or preventing love affairs.

  8. Clinical features of serum sickness after Australian snake antivenom.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicole M; Downes, Michael A; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2015-12-15

    Serum sickness is a delayed immune reaction in which the immune system responds to a protein in antiserum as a potentially harmful substance and mounts an IgG-mediated antibody response. A 32 year-old female patient had systemic envenoming following a bite by a red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus). She was treated with Tiger snake antivenom and recovered over 24 h and did not develop myotoxicity. She then presented with local pain, itching and swelling, which was partially treated with antihistamines. Eleven days after the bite she presented again with symptoms of worsening serum sickness including rash on the upper legs, joint and muscle pain in arms, ankles and knees, and nausea. The patient was prescribed five days of prednisone 50 mg/day, antihistamine 10 mg/day and analgesia 1000 mg/day and improved over 2 days. She had no further problems on follow up at 4 months. This case highlights that serum sickness can cause significant effects after the treatment of snake envenoming. It develops 5-14 days after antivenom administration and has characteristic clinical and laboratory features. Severe cases of serum sickness can result in morbidity but it appears to respond well to corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26525657

  9. Evaluation of putative neurochemical intermediaries in space/motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: the emetic stimuli used on the cats in the study; analysis of the constituents of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) during motion sickness; evaluation of serotonin-1A agonists; other 5-HT receptors; and additional studies and activities.

  10. Longitudinal associations of active commuting with wellbeing and sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    Mytton, Oliver Tristan; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to explore longitudinal associations of active commuting (cycling to work and walking to work) with physical wellbeing (PCS-8), mental wellbeing (MCS-8) and sickness absence. Method We used data from the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (2009 to 2012; n = 801) to test associations between: a) maintenance of cycling (or walking) to work over a one year period and indices of wellbeing at the end of that one year period; and b) associations between change in cycling (or walking) to work and change in indices of wellbeing. Linear regression was used for testing associations with PCS-8 and MCS-8, and negative binomial regression for sickness absence. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, physical activity and physical limitation, those who maintained cycle commuting reported lower sickness absence (0.46, 95% CI: 0.14–0.80; equivalent to one less day per year) and higher MCS-8 scores (1.50, 0.10–2.10) than those who did not cycle to work. The association for sickness absence persisted after adjustment for baseline sickness absence. No significant associations were observed for PCS-8. Associations between change in cycle commuting and change in indices of wellbeing were not significant. No significant associations were observed for walking. Conclusions This work provides some evidence of the value of cycle commuting in improving or maintaining the health and wellbeing of adults of working age. This may be important in engaging employers in the promotion of active travel and communicating the benefits of active travel to employees. PMID:26740344

  11. General practitioners' management of the long-term sick role.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Angela; Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we use qualitative research techniques to examine the role of general practitioners in the management of the long-term sickness absence. In order to uncover the perspectives of all the main agents affected by the actions of general practitioners, a case study approach focussing on one particular employment sector, the public health service, is adopted. The role of family physicians is viewed from the perspectives of health service managers, occupational health physicians, employees/patients, and general practitioners. Our argument is theoretically framed by Talcott Parsons's model of the medical contribution to the sick role, along with subsequent conceptualisations of the social role and position of physicians. Sixty one semi-structured interviews and three focus group interviews were conducted in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. There was a consensus among respondents that general practitioners put far more weight on the preferences and needs of their patients than they did on the requirements of employing organisations. This was explained by respondents in terms of the propinquity and longevity of relationships between doctors and their patients, and by the ideology of holistic care and patient advocacy that general practitioners viewed as providing the foundations of their approach to patients. The approach of general practitioners was viewed negatively by managers and occupational health physicians, and more positively by general practitioners and patients. However, there is some evidence that general practitioners would be prepared to forfeit their role as validators of sick leave. Given the imperatives of both state and capital to reduce the financial burden of long-term sickness, this preparedness puts into doubt the continued role of general practitioners as gatekeepers to legitimate long-term sickness absence.

  12. General practitioners' management of the long-term sick role.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Angela; Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we use qualitative research techniques to examine the role of general practitioners in the management of the long-term sickness absence. In order to uncover the perspectives of all the main agents affected by the actions of general practitioners, a case study approach focussing on one particular employment sector, the public health service, is adopted. The role of family physicians is viewed from the perspectives of health service managers, occupational health physicians, employees/patients, and general practitioners. Our argument is theoretically framed by Talcott Parsons's model of the medical contribution to the sick role, along with subsequent conceptualisations of the social role and position of physicians. Sixty one semi-structured interviews and three focus group interviews were conducted in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. There was a consensus among respondents that general practitioners put far more weight on the preferences and needs of their patients than they did on the requirements of employing organisations. This was explained by respondents in terms of the propinquity and longevity of relationships between doctors and their patients, and by the ideology of holistic care and patient advocacy that general practitioners viewed as providing the foundations of their approach to patients. The approach of general practitioners was viewed negatively by managers and occupational health physicians, and more positively by general practitioners and patients. However, there is some evidence that general practitioners would be prepared to forfeit their role as validators of sick leave. Given the imperatives of both state and capital to reduce the financial burden of long-term sickness, this preparedness puts into doubt the continued role of general practitioners as gatekeepers to legitimate long-term sickness absence. PMID:24607666

  13. The Glomerulus and Serum Sickness in Experimental Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Spear, G. S.; Kihara, I.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of prolonged continuous hypoxia with polycythaemia on the rabbit glomerulus was studied by light microscopy and their effect on experimental serum sickness in rabbits was studied by light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Engorgement and enlargement were the principal effects on the glomerulus of hypoxia and polycythaemia, but prominence of the mesangium and focal segmental sclerosis and hypercellularity sometimes occurred. The results of the studies on serum sickness suggested that prolonged hypoxia with polycythaemia did not diminish antibody formation, reactivity of antibody with antigen, or rapid antigen clearance; in fact antigen was cleared more rapidly in hypoxic animals. Chronic hypoxia and polycythaemia did not prevent acute serum sickness including acute glomerulonephritis. The incidence and severity of acute glomerulonephritis, however, may have been diminished whereas the incidence and severity of other visceral involvement by acute serum sickness was not. Although the experimental groups were not large, the possible implications of the data are important. Focal segmental glomerular sclerosis and hypercellularity, and mesangial prominence, to our knowledge have not previously been reported in association with chronic experimental hypoxia and polycythaemia. These lesions resembled some glomerular lesions of cyanotic congenital heart disease. Decrease in glomerulonephritis under conditions in which hydrostatic pressure in the glomerulus is presumably elevated and the glomerulus is subject to injury in some respects would be contrary to expectation. Finally, selective decrease in the glomerulonephritic but not the other lesions of acute serum sickness by altering non-immunological general experimental conditions would be highly unusual. More extensive studies are indicated. ImagesFigs. 1-5Figs. 6-12 PMID:5055712

  14. Comparison of treatment strategies for Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Jennings, R. T.; Beck, B. G.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment strategies for Space Motion Sickness were compared using the results of postflight oral debriefings. Standardized questionnaires were administered to all crewmembers immediately following Space Shuttle flights by NASA flight surgeons. Cases of Space Motion Sickness were graded as mild, moderate or severe based on published criteria, and medication effectiveness was judged based on subjective reports of symptom relief. Since October 1989, medication effectiveness is reported inflight through Private Medical Conferences with the crew. A symptom matrix was analyzed for 19 crewmembers treated with an oral combination of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine (scopdex) and 15 crewmembers treated with promethazine delivered by intramuscular (IM) or suppository routes. Scopdex has been given preflight as prophaxis for Space Motion Sickness but analysis showed delayed symptom presentation in 9 crewmembers or failed to prevent symptoms in 7. Only three crewmembers who took scopdex had no symptoms inflight. Fourteen out of 15 crewmembers treated with IM promethazine and 6 of 8 treated with promethazine suppositories after symptom development had immediate (within 12 h) symptom relief and required no additional medication. There were no cases of delayed symptom presentation in the crewmembers treated with promethazine. This response is in contrast to untreated crewmembers who typically have slow symptom resolution over 72-96 h. We conclude that promethazine is an effective treatment of Space Motion Sickness symptoms inflight. NASA policy currently recommends treating crewmembers with Space Motion Sickness after symptom development, and no longer recommends prophylaxis with scopdex due to delayed symptom development and apparent variable absorption of oral medications during early flight days.

  15. Increasing accuracy in the assessment of motion sickness: A construct methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Cynthia S.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce a new methodology that should improve the accuracy of the assessment of motion sickness. This construct methodology utilizes both subjective reports of motion sickness and objective measures of physiological correlates to assess motion sickness. Current techniques and methods used in the framework of a construct methodology are inadequate. Current assessment techniques for diagnosing motion sickness and space motion sickness are reviewed, and attention is called to the problems with the current methods. Further, principles of psychophysiology that when applied will probably resolve some of these problems are described in detail.

  16. Head movements in non-terrestrial force environments elicit motion sickness - Implications for the etiology of space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1986-01-01

    Space motion sickness has become an operational concern in manned space flight. Considerable evidence exists that head movements in free fall, especially pitch movements, are provocative until adaptation occurs. The question arises whether space motion sickness is an unique nosological entity or is due to body movements in a nonterrestrial force environment, a force environment for which the body's dynamic sensory-motor adaptions to 1 G are no longer appropriate. To evaluate this issue, subjects were asked to make controlled head movements during exposure to high gravitoinertial force levels, 1.8-2.0 G, in parabolic flight maneuvers. Head movements in pitch with eyes open were most evocative of motion sickness, yaw movements with eyes covered were least provocative. This pattern is identical to that which occurs when the same types of head movements are made in the free fall phase of parabolic maneuvers. It appears that space motion sickness is the consequence of prolonged exposure to a nonterrestrial force background rather than of exposure to free fall per se.

  17. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Spacewalk Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS. METHODS Four experiments will replicate the CEVIS exercise-enhanced oxygen prebreathe protocol, each with a different exception. The first of these is currently underway. Experiment 1 - Subjects complete controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining nonambulatory throughout. Experiment 2 - Subjects remain non-ambulatory during the preflight period and ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 3 - Subjects ambulate during the preflight period and remain non-ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 4 - The order of heavy and light exercise employed in the CEVIS protocol is

  18. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh annual review of the econamic and scientific work of the U.S. Geological Survey. As in previous years the purpose of the volume is to make available promptly to the public the highlights of Survey investigations. This year the volume consists of 4 chapters (A through D) of Professional Paper 550. Chapter A contains a summary of significant results, and the remaining chapters are made up of collections of short technical papers. Many of the results summarized in chapter A are discussed in greater detail in the short papers or in reports listed in 'Publications in Fiscal Year 1966,' beginning on page A265. The tables of contents for chapters B through D are listed on pages A259-A264. Numerous Federal, State, county, and municipal agencies listed on pages A211-A215 cooperated financially with the Geological Survey during fiscal 1966 and have contributed significantly to the results reported here. They are identified where appropriate in the short technical papers that have appeared in Geological Survey Research and in papers published cooperatively, but generally are not identified in the brief statements in chapter A. Many individuals on the staff of the Geological Survey have contributed to 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' Reference is made to only a few. Frank W. Trainer, Water Resources Division, was responsible for organizing and assembling chapter A and for critical review of papers in chapters B-D, assisted by Louis Pavlides, Geologic Division. Marston S. Chase, Publications Division, was in charge of production aspects of the series, assisted by Jesse R. Upperco in technical editing, and William H. Elliott and James R. Hamilton in planning and preparing illustrations. The volume for next year, 'Geological Survey Research 1967,' will be published as chapters af Professional Paper 5715. Previous volumes are listed below, with their series designations. Gealagical Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Gealagical

  19. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  20. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  1. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 21, Rigid Motions and Vectors, Chapter 22, Computers and Programs. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    Transformation geometry topics are covered in one chapter of Unit 11 of this SMSG series. Work with translations, reflections, rotations, and composition of motions is included; vectors are briefly discussed. The chapter on computers and programming deals with recent history and uses of of the computer, organization of a digital computer, an…

  2. [Biennial Survey of Education, 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1930, No. 16. Chapter I - Chapter XX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    This document contains the first twenty chapters of the Biennial Survey of Education document, covering the years 1926-1928. The following chapters are included in this document: (1) Higher education (Arthur J. Klein); (2) Medical education (N. P. Colwell); (3) Legal education (Alfred Z. Reed); (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W.…

  3. Report of the Chapter 1 Sustained Effects Study. Elementary and Secondary Education Act--Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, William S.

    School districts receiving Chapter 1 funds are to conduct a study of sustained effects once every 3 years and to use the results for planning future Chapter 1 programs. As part of this effort, the Columbus (Ohio) public schools conducted pretest-to-posttest, posttest-to-sustained effect, and pretest-to-sustained effect studies of 4,031 students in…

  4. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 13, Perpendiculars and Parallels (I), Chapter 14, Similarity. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter of the seventh unit in this SMSG series discusses perpendiculars and parallels; topics covered include the relationship between parallelism and perpendicularity, rectangles, transversals, parallelograms, general triangles, and measurement of the circumference of the earth. The second chapter, on similarity, discusses scale…

  5. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 27, Logic, Chapter 28, Applications of Probability and Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    One chapter in the fourteenth unit of this SMSG series deals with logic; simple and compound statements, truth tables, logical equivalence, rules of a logical argument, proof, quantifiers, and negations are the topics covered. The second chapter of the unit discusses applications of probability and statistics, including random sampling,…

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 17, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), Chapter 18, Coordinate Geometry. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter, Perpendiculars and Parallels (II), of the ninth unit in this SMSG series includes a discussion of the properties of triangles, circles and perpendiculars, parallels in space, perpendicular lines and planes, and parallel planes. The next chapter, on coordinate geometry, covers distance; midpoints; algebraic descriptions of…

  7. Changes in plasma vasopressin during motion sickness in cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert; Keil, L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Thomsen, D.; Dictor, M.; Chee, O.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in levels of plasma vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol (C) have been shown to be correlated with motion sickness and nausea in man. As part of the research aimed at validation of the cat as an appropriate animal model for motion sickness research, levels of these hormones were investigated in the cat during motion sickness elicited by vertical linear acceleration of approximately 0.6 Hz and 1 +/- 0.6 G. In Study 1, 15 cats previously screened for susceptibility to motion sickness were prepared with indwelling jugular catheters to permit withdrawl of blood with minimal disruption of the stimulus and minimum stress to the animal. AVP and C were measured in blood samples obtained during exposure to vertical linear acceleration and during control sessions in which the animals were placed in the stationary apparatus. 10 min and 1 min prior to duration; 1, 5, 10, and 20 min after start of motion. Total duration of exposure to motion was 20 min. The data indicate that both AVP and C are elevated during exposure to motion if emesis occurs. AVP reaches maximum levels during or about the same time as emesis, while C increases gradually throughout the period of vertical acceleration. In Study 2, four cats were prepared with indwelling catheters and AVP was measured in blood withdrawn during exposure to the vertical linear acceleration. A single pre-motion sample consisting of three samples drawn 5 min prior to motion onset. Two series of samples consisting of three samples drawn at 3-min intervals were obtained during motion. The first series was initiated at emesis, and the second 25 min after emesis. Results show that levels of circulating AVP were elevated (2 to 27 times the control and pre-motion levels) in the samples taken during emesis and decreased, but remained 1 to 6 times above the pre-motion or control levels within 25 min. The results of these two studies indicate that AVP is elevated during motion-produced emesis than is C. These findings are in general

  8. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... stools or diarrhea? How long after I start radiation treatment might these problems start? What can I do if I am sick to my stomach or have diarrhea often? What should I be eating to keep my weight and strength up? Are there any foods I should avoid? ...

  9. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  10. Pregnancy in sick sinus syndrome with pacemaker - two cases.

    PubMed

    Parveen, T; Begum, F; Akhter, N; Sharmin, F

    2013-04-01

    Sick sinus syndrome is a generalized abnormality of cardiac impulse formation that may be caused by extrinsic causes or by intrinsic disease of the sinus node making it unable to perform pace making function. It can be manifested for the first time in pregnancy. First case was diagnosed as sick sinus syndrome at 8 weeks of gestation having Mobitz type I heart block (Wenckebach block), and needed temporary pacemaker during caesarean section. Second case was diagnosed at 24 weeks of gestation having complete heart block and needed permanent pacemaker at 38 weeks of gestation due to exaggeration of the symptoms. Both the cases were dealt successfully by caesarean section under general anesthesia in close collaboration with cardiologists and anesthesiologists.

  11. The neurochemical and neuropharmacological basis of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for producing motion sickness in laboratory animals and constructed at the university is herein described. The apparatus is a modified version of that previously described by Fox and Daunton. It consists of a 66-inch steel arm anchored at the center to a wooden platform and attached to a motor that makes the arm move in a see-saw fashion. At each end of the steel arm is mounted an aluminum disc that can be rotated by a motorized device. Detachable cages are mounted on each disc for animal holding. The animal can then be exposed to rotational motion by rotation of the aluminum disc, or to see-saw motion simultaneously (Cross-coupled). The apparatus is presently being used in our laboratory to study the neuropharmacological basis of motion sickness in the rat. The device can be adapted for use with other animal species by modifying the cage mounted on the aluminum discs.

  12. Space motion sickness and vestibular adaptation to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Theories of space motion sickness are discussed together with near future vestibular experiments for three Spacelab missions. The sensory conflict theory is covered, as well as theories involving unequal otolith masses, semicircular canals, cardiovascular adaptation and fluid shift toward the head, and extra-labyrinthine effects. Experiments will test the hypothesis that the sensitivity of the otolith organ response is shifted during weightlessness and that this shift carries over to the post-flight experience. Visual-vestibular-tactile interaction, vestibulo-ocular reflexes, ocular counterrolling, awareness of body position, otolith-spinal reflexes, and motion sickness susceptibility are among the parameters to be studied. Preflight and postflight tests will emphasize evaluation of any residual effects of the seven day weightless exposure on vestibulo-spinal and vestibulo-ocular pathways.

  13. Predictive modeling of altitude decompression sickness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, D. J.; Hamilton, R. W., Jr.; Colley, I. A.; Schreiner, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The coding of data on 2,565 individual human altitude chamber tests is reported as part of a selection procedure designed to eliminate individuals who are highly susceptible to decompression sickness, individual aircrew members were exposed to the pressure equivalent of 37,000 feet and observed for one hour. Many entries refer to subjects who have been tested two or three times. This data contains a substantial body of statistical information important to the understanding of the mechanisms of altitude decompression sickness and for the computation of improved high altitude operating procedures. Appropriate computer formats and encoding procedures were developed and all 2,565 entries have been converted to these formats and stored on magnetic tape. A gas loading file was produced.

  14. [Inner ear decompression sickness following a scuba dive].

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Kitahara, S; Inouye, T; Ikeda, T

    1992-04-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS) is one form of Type II decompression sickness. Most cases of IEDCS have been associated with saturation dives, so there are very few reports of occurrence following shallow scuba dives. We present here the case of a diver who suffered from IEDCS following a shallow scuba dive (30m), and was successfully treated by the protocol outlined in U.S. Navy treatment table 6. This case suggests that there is the possibility of occurrence of IEDCS, even following a shallow scuba dive, if proper decompression procedures are not adhered to. In addition, detailed analysis of diving profiles should be used to distinguish the inner ear dysfunction seen in some divers from inner ear barotrauma which may be attributable to IEDCS.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the antimotion sickness effects of psychostimulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.; Lewis, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Data related to the mechanism responsible for the antimotion sickness effects of psychostimulants such as amphetamine are examined. From the analysis of current literature and new evidence, the following three hypotheses are suggested: (1) selective enhancement of dopaminergic, but not noradrenergic, transmission is sufficient to account for amphetamine-induced resistance and, perhaps, for natural resistance to motion sickness; (2) the site of this enhanced dopaminergic transmission is probably within the basal ganglia; and (3) the neuropharmacology of the basal ganglia, but not of the brain-stem vestibular areas, can account for the therapeutic synergism of scopolamine and amphetamine. The therapeutic action of psychostimulants may be dissociable from some of their side effects, particularly cardiovascular effects related to peripheral norepinephrine release.

  16. Doppler bubble detection and decompression sickness: a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G; Hunt, W S; Johanson, D C; Flynn, E T; Weathersby, P K

    1985-09-01

    Decompression sickness in human beings exposed to high ambient pressure is thought to follow from gas bubble formation and growth in the body during return to low pressure. Detection of Doppler-shifted ultrasonic reflections in major blood vessels has been promoted as a noninvasive and sensitive indicator of the imminence of decompression sickness. We have conducted a double-blind, prospective clinical trial of Doppler ultrasonic bubble detection in simulated diving using 83 men, of whom 8 were stricken and treated for the clinical disease. Diagnosis based only on the Doppler signals had no correlation with clinical diagnosis. Bubble scores were only slightly higher in the stricken group. The Doppler technique does not appear to be of diagnostic value in the absence of other clinical information.

  17. Prevention of decompression sickness during a simulated space docking mission.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J P; Bollinger, R R; Richardson, B

    1975-07-01

    This study has shown that repetitive exchanges between the American Apollo space vehicle atmosphere of 100% oxygen at 5 psia (258 torr) and the Russian Soyuz spacecraft atmosphere of 30% oxygen-70% nitrogen at 10 psia (523 torr), as simulated in altitude chambers, will not likely result in any form of decompression sickness. This conclusion is based upon the absence of any form of bends in seven crewmen who participated in 11 tests distributed over three 24-h periods. During each period, three transfers from the 5 to the 10 psia environments were performed by simulating passage through a docking module which served as an airlock where astronauts and cosmonauts first adapted to each other's cabin gases and pressures before transfer. Biochemical tests, subjective fatigue scores, and the complete absence of any form of pain were also indicative that decompression sickness should not be expected if this spacecraft transfer schedule is followed.

  18. [Reducing problematic sickness absence: of importance to every general practitioner].

    PubMed

    Wind, H; Opstelten, W; Hendriks, A C

    2016-01-01

    Problematic sickness absence is an issue that concerns not only occupational health physicians, but all physicians. More collaboration between occupational health and treating physicians, plus improved alignment of symptom treatment and reintegration counselling, can help avoid long-term sickness absence of employees. Achieving this goal presupposes mutual knowledge of each other's professions. Medical practice guidelines are a tool par excellence to share knowledge and bring this into practice. Treating physicians should not refrain from posing work-related and return-to-work questions, even if the overall responsibility lies with the occupational health physicians in terms of reintegration efforts. The patient's interest should be the leading principle for all physicians involved. This means not only provision of good care, aimed at patient recovery, but also adequate reintegration in the labour market. Occupational health physicians, general practitioners and consultant specialists should share this common goal. PMID:27299497

  19. Mechanisms of selective attention and space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The neural mismatch theory of space motion sickness asserts that the central and peripheral autonomic sequelae of discordant sensory input arise from central integrative processes falling to reconcile patterns of incoming sensory information with existing memory. Stated differently, perceived novelty reaches a stress level as integrative mechanisms fail to return a sense of control to the individual in the new environment. Based on evidence summarized here, the severity of the neural mismatch may be dependent upon the relative amount of attention selectively afforded to each sensory input competing for control of behavior. Components of the limbic system may play important roles in match-mismatch operations, be therapeutically modulated by antimotion sickness drugs, and be optimally positioned to control autonomic output.

  20. African horse sickness in naturally infected, immunised horses.

    PubMed

    Weyer, C T; Quan, M; Joone, C; Lourens, C W; MacLachlan, N J; Guthrie, A J

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether subclinical cases, together with clinical cases, of African horse sickness (AHS) occur in immunised horses in field conditions, whole blood samples were collected and rectal temperatures recorded weekly from 50 Nooitgedacht ponies resident in open camps at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, during 2008-2010. The samples were tested for the presence of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) RNA by a recently developed real-time RT-PCR. It was shown that 16% of immunised horses in an AHS endemic area were infected with AHSV over a 2 year period, with half of these (8%) being subclinically infected. The potential impact of such cases on the epidemiology of AHS warrants further investigation.

  1. Pharmacology in space. Part 2. Controlling motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    In this second article in the two-part series on pharmacology in space, Claire Lathers and colleagues discuss the pharmacology of drugs used to control motion sickness in space and note that the pharmacology of the 'ideal' agent has yet to be worked out. That motion sickness may impair the pharmacological action of a drug by interfering with its absorption and distribution because of alteration of physiology is a problem unique to pharmacology in space. The authors comment on the problem of designing suitable ground-based studies to evaluate the pharmacological effect of drugs to be used in space and discuss the use of salivary samples collected during space flight to allow pharmacokinetic evaluations necessary for non-invasive clinical drug monitoring.

  2. Current prevention and management of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed Central

    Bia, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness was known to the Chinese in ancient times, as they traversed mountain passes between the Great Headache and Little Headache mountains into present-day Afghanistan. The Jesuit priest, Father Joseph Acosta, lived in Peru during the sixteenth century; he described both this syndrome and deaths which occurred in the high Andes. The incidence of high-altitude illness will rise as previously remote sites become more accessible to trekkers and skiers. Prevention and treatment are important concerns for those physicians who wish to advise their more adventuresome patients properly. This article incorporates a selected review of pertinent investigations, in the English-language literature over the past five years, into material previously presented at travel symposia for clinicians managing the prophylaxis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:1290275

  3. [Evaluation of Motion Sickness Induced by 3D Video Clips].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereoscopic images has been spreading rapidly. Nowadays, stereoscopic movies are nothing new to people. Stereoscopic systems date back to 280 A.D. when Euclid first recognized the concept of depth perception by humans. Despite the increase in the production of three-dimensional (3D) display products and many studies on stereoscopic vision, the effect of stereoscopic vision on the human body has been insufficiently understood. However, symptoms such as eye fatigue and 3D sickness have been the concerns when viewing 3D films for a prolonged period of time; therefore, it is important to consider the safety of viewing virtual 3D contents as a contribution to society. It is generally explained to the public that accommodation and convergence are mismatched during stereoscopic vision and that this is the main reason for the visual fatigue and visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) during 3D viewing. We have devised a method to simultaneously measure lens accommodation and convergence. We used this simultaneous measurement device to characterize 3D vision. Fixation distance was compared between accommodation and convergence during the viewing of 3D films with repeated measurements. Time courses of these fixation distances and their distributions were compared in subjects who viewed 2D and 3D video clips. The results indicated that after 90 s of continuously viewing 3D images, the accommodative power does not correspond to the distance of convergence. In this paper, remarks on methods to measure the severity of motion sickness induced by viewing 3D films are also given. From the epidemiological viewpoint, it is useful to obtain novel knowledge for reduction and/or prevention of VIMS. We should accumulate empirical data on motion sickness, which may contribute to the development of relevant fields in science and technology.

  4. IEQ and the impact on employee sick leave

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

    2002-08-01

    When selecting minimum ventilation rates, employers should balance the well-recognized energy costs of providing higher minimum ventilation rates with the expected, but less well quantified, health benefits from a higher ventilation rate. This is a summary of the paper by Milton, et al. that found low employee sick leave associated with high ventilation rates in a set of buildings located in Massachusetts. A simple cost-benefit analysis also is presented.

  5. Investigating motion sickness using the conditioned taste aversion paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The avoidance of foods which are associated with uncomfortable or aversive internal states has long been recognized. Many people are aware, either directly or via anecdotal reports, of individuals who avoid foods which were eaten just before the onset of sickness. Awareness of this phenomenon can be traced to the writings of John Locke. The disruption of diet during cancer therapy is sometimes ascribed to the attribution of an unpleasant quality to foods eaten preceding the sickness induced by therapy itself. In addition, it has long been recognized by the manufacturers of rodent poisons that animals avoid the injection of food treated with nonlethal doses of poison. An important part of the laboratory study of this phenomenon was directed toward studying the role learning plays in this type of avoidance behavior. Following the lead of Garcia and his associates, this avoidance has come to be interpreted as arising from a form of classical conditioning. In typical laboratory studies of this bahavior, a novel food is ingested just prior to exposure to some stimulus, commonly poisoning or irradiation, which produces illness. Following the terminology of classical conditioning, it is common to describe this procedure as one of 'pairing' a conditioned stimulus (CS), the novel food, with an unconditioned stimulus (US), the illness induced by toxicosis or irradiation. Avoidance of the food in succeeding feeding opportunities is viewed as a learned response or a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Garcia et al. asserted that motion sickness could produce 'gustatory' aversions, but passive motion was first reported as an US to establish CTA by Green and Rachlin. The purpose is to review the manner in which CTA has been used to study motion sickness. Numerous reviews concentrating on other aspects of CTA are available in the existing literature. Readers are encouraged to consult the various papers and edited books for extensive information on other aspects of this literature.

  6. Should MA plans try to attract the sick?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M Orry

    2015-11-01

    Although attracting a mixture of well and sick patients provides a good risk mix for managed care plans, bringing in more high-risk enrollees may mean a higher reward for both patients and providers. Data systems and analytics have improved, allowing hospitals and health systems to better mitigate the risks associated with sicker patients. These new technologies and capabilities can enable these provider organizations to better manage care for patients who require treatment for multiple chronic conditions.

  7. Postural activity and motion sickness during video game play in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Tseng, Li-Ya; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2012-03-01

    Research has confirmed that console video games give rise to motion sickness in many adults. During exposure to console video games, there are differences in postural activity (movement of the head and torso) between participants who later experience motion sickness and those who do not, confirming a prediction of the postural instability theory of motion sickness. Previous research has not addressed relations between video games, movement and motion sickness in children. We evaluated the nauseogenic properties of a commercially available console video game in both adults and 10-year-old children. Individuals played the game for up to 50 min and were instructed to discontinue immediately if they experienced any symptoms of motion sickness, however mild. During game play, we monitored movement of the head and torso. Motion sickness was reported by 67% of adults and by 56% of children; these rates did not differ. As a group, children moved more than adults. Across age groups, the positional variability of the head and torso increased over time during game play. In addition, we found differences in movement between participants who later reported motion sickness and those who did not. Some of these differences were general across age groups but we also found significant differences between the movement of adults and children who later reported motion sickness. The results confirm that console video games can induce motion sickness in children and demonstrate that changes in postural activity precede the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness in children.

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MODELING (CHAPTER 58)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discussses indoor air quality (IAQ) modeling. Such modeling provides a way to investigate many IAQ problems without the expense of large field experiments. Where experiments are planned, IAQ models can be used to help design experiments by providing information on exp...

  9. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  10. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  11. Chapter 12: spatial or area repellents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial repellents a three-dimensional zone of protection around a host from attacks by biting arthropods. This chapter reviews current knowledge and outlines future directions for utilization of spatial repellents. Current knowledge includes the kinds of products, both active and passive devices,...

  12. The Chapter I Challenge: Colorado's Contribution 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Janice Rose

    Chapter I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the largest federally-funded program designed to provide services to elementary and secondary students to meet the special needs of educationally deprived students who reside in areas with high concentrations of low-income families. The 1994-95 school year is the last year of…

  13. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  14. Chapter Five: Language Learning and Discursive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is framed by the three questions related to learning in Practice Theory posed by Johannes Wagner (2008): (1) What is learned?; (2) Who is learning?; and (3) Who is participating in the learning? These questions are addressed in two learning theories: Language Socialization and Situated Learning theory. In Language Socialization, the…

  15. Chapter 7: Principles of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Mary; Deglau, Dena

    2006-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the 4-year-long PEP professional development (PD) initiative in terms of current perspectives on teacher learning and PD, shares lessons learned about the design and delivery of high-quality PD, and presents some principles to guide the development of future PD efforts. The first section reviews the definition and…

  16. EEG-based learning system for online motion sickness level estimation in a dynamic vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Shu-Fang; Ko, Li-Wei

    2013-10-01

    Motion sickness is a common experience for many people. Several previous researches indicated that motion sickness has a negative effect on driving performance and sometimes leads to serious traffic accidents because of a decline in a person's ability to maintain self-control. This safety issue has motivated us to find a way to prevent vehicle accidents. Our target was to determine a set of valid motion sickness indicators that would predict the occurrence of a person's motion sickness as soon as possible. A successful method for the early detection of motion sickness will help us to construct a cognitive monitoring system. Such a monitoring system can alert people before they become sick and prevent them from being distracted by various motion sickness symptoms while driving or riding in a car. In our past researches, we investigated the physiological changes that occur during the transition of a passenger's cognitive state using electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum analysis, and we found that the EEG power responses in the left and right motors, parietal, lateral occipital, and occipital midline brain areas were more highly correlated to subjective sickness levels than other brain areas. In this paper, we propose the use of a self-organizing neural fuzzy inference network (SONFIN) to estimate a driver's/passenger's sickness level based on EEG features that have been extracted online from five motion sickness-related brain areas, while either in real or virtual vehicle environments. The results show that our proposed learning system is capable of extracting a set of valid motion sickness indicators that originated from EEG dynamics, and through SONFIN, a neuro-fuzzy prediction model, we successfully translated the set of motion sickness indicators into motion sickness levels. The overall performance of this proposed EEG-based learning system can achieve an average prediction accuracy of ~82%.

  17. EEG-based learning system for online motion sickness level estimation in a dynamic vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Shu-Fang; Ko, Li-Wei

    2013-10-01

    Motion sickness is a common experience for many people. Several previous researches indicated that motion sickness has a negative effect on driving performance and sometimes leads to serious traffic accidents because of a decline in a person's ability to maintain self-control. This safety issue has motivated us to find a way to prevent vehicle accidents. Our target was to determine a set of valid motion sickness indicators that would predict the occurrence of a person's motion sickness as soon as possible. A successful method for the early detection of motion sickness will help us to construct a cognitive monitoring system. Such a monitoring system can alert people before they become sick and prevent them from being distracted by various motion sickness symptoms while driving or riding in a car. In our past researches, we investigated the physiological changes that occur during the transition of a passenger's cognitive state using electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum analysis, and we found that the EEG power responses in the left and right motors, parietal, lateral occipital, and occipital midline brain areas were more highly correlated to subjective sickness levels than other brain areas. In this paper, we propose the use of a self-organizing neural fuzzy inference network (SONFIN) to estimate a driver's/passenger's sickness level based on EEG features that have been extracted online from five motion sickness-related brain areas, while either in real or virtual vehicle environments. The results show that our proposed learning system is capable of extracting a set of valid motion sickness indicators that originated from EEG dynamics, and through SONFIN, a neuro-fuzzy prediction model, we successfully translated the set of motion sickness indicators into motion sickness levels. The overall performance of this proposed EEG-based learning system can achieve an average prediction accuracy of ~82%. PMID:24808604

  18. Modeling sensory conflict and motion sickness in artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Paul Z.; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence R.

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to characterize the vestibular response associated with head movements for various centrifuge rotation rates if one is to explore short-radius centrifugation as a viable form of artificial gravity for future spaceflights. An existing motion sickness model was modified to design an adaptation protocol to facilitate head movements at a centrifuge speed of 30 rpm. Modification involved addition of a quantitative sensory conflict model to serve as the input to the motion sickness model. Sensory conflict in this context was based on the dynamics of head movements during centrifugation as well as a previously developed transfer function relating angular accelerations to semicircular canal firing rates. Additionally, an adaptation parameter based on comparison between model predictions and previous experimental results was added. A 3-day incremental adaptation protocol was conducted in which 16 subjects successfully made 30 yaw head movements during rotation at 30 rpm on day 3. Motion sickness results showed good agreement with model predictions and demonstrated the feasibility of adaptation to increasingly high rotation rates.

  19. Role of orientation reference selection in motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen

    1988-01-01

    Previous experiments with moving platform posturography have shown that different people have varying abilities to resolve conflicts among vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive sensory signals used to control upright posture. In particular, there is one class of subjects with a vestibular disorder known as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) who often are particularly sensitive to inaccurate visual information. That is, they will use visual sensory information for the control of their posture even when that visual information is inaccurate and is in conflict with accurate proprioceptive and vestibular sensory signals. BPPV has been associated with disorders of both posterior semicircular canal function and possibly otolith function. The present proposal hopes to take advantage of the similarities between the space motion sickness problem and the sensory orientation reference selection problems associated with the BPPV syndrome. These similarities include both etiology related to abnormal vertical canal-otolith function, and motion sickness initiating events provoked by pitch and roll head movements. The objectives of this proposal are to explore and quantify the orientation reference selection abilities of subjects and the relation of this selection to motion sickness in humans.

  20. Electrical acustimulation relieves vection-induced motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of electrical acustimulation on gastric myoelectric activity and severity of symptoms of motion sickness. In experiment 1, 16 Chinese subjects received electrical acustimulation in one of two sessions. In experiment 2, 45 white and black American subjects were randomly divided into three groups: acustimulation, sham acustimulation, and control. Each subject sat in an optokinetic drum for 15 minutes baseline and 15 minutes of drum rotation. Subjects' electrogastrograms and subjective symptoms of motion sickness were obtained. In experiment 1, the mean symptom score and tachyarrhythmia during acustimulation sessions were significantly lower than during no-acustimulation sessions. In experiment 2, the mean symptom score of the acustimulation group was significantly lower than that of the sham-stimulation group and the control group; tachyarrhythmia in the acustimulation group was significantly less than that of the control group but not the sham-stimulation group. In conclusion, electrical acustimulation reduces the severity of symptoms of motion sickness and appears to decrease gastric tachyarrhythmia.

  1. Relative efficacy of the proposed Space Shuttle antimotion sickness medications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordinsky, J. R.; Schwartz, E.; Beier, J.; Martin, J.; Aust, G.

    1982-07-01

    Space motion sickness has been estimated as affecting between 1/3 and 1/2 of all space flight participants. NASA has at the moment proposed a combination of promethazine and ephedrine ( P/E) and one of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine ( S/D), both given orally, as well as a transdermally applied scopolamine (TAS), as preventive and ameliorative measures. The reported double-blind study tests the early phase actions and efficacy of the transdermal scopolamine (Transderm ™-V of ALZA Corporation) and compares these in detail to the oral medications. Motion sickness resistance was tested by standardized head movements while accelerating at 0.2°/sec 2 to a maximum rotation of 240°/sec, with an intermediate plateau of 10 min at 180°/sec. To permit weighting motion sickness protection against other system influences, cardiovascular, psychological (subjective and objective), and visual parameter changes were documented for the three therapeutic modes. The relative impact of the various modalities on operational and experimental components of space missions is discussed. A comparison to intramuscularly administered promethazine (a backup therapeutic mode suggested for Space Shuttle use) is also included.

  2. Motion sickness and proprioceptive aftereffects following virtual environment exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanney, K. M.; Kennedy, R. S.; Drexler, J. M.; Harm, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    To study the potential aftereffects of virtual environments (VE), tests of visually guided behavior and felt limb position (pointing with eyes open and closed) along with self-reports of motion sickness-like discomfort were administered before and after 30 min exposure of 34 subjects. When post- discomfort was compared to a pre-baseline, the participants reported more sickness afterward (p < 0.03). The change in felt limb position resulted in subjects pointing higher (p < 0.038) and slightly to the left, although the latter difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.08). When findings from a second study using a different VE system were compared, they essentially replicated the results of the first study with higher sickness afterward (p < 0.001) and post- pointing errors were also up (p < 0.001) and to the left (p < 0.001). While alternative explanations (e.g. learning, fatigue, boredom, habituation, etc.) of these outcomes cannot be ruled out, the consistency of the post- effects on felt limb position changes in the two VE implies that these recalibrations may linger once interaction with the VE has concluded, rendering users potentially physiologically maladapted for the real world when they return. This suggests there may be safety concerns following VE exposures until pre-exposure functioning has been regained. The results of this study emphasize the need for developing and using objective measures of post-VE exposure aftereffects in order to systematically determine under what conditions these effects may occur.

  3. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  4. Absence from work and the medical sickness certificate.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Salesi, M; Sarra, M V; Ricci, S

    2013-03-01

    Internet and dematerialization have greatly facilitated the medical profession. Contractual physicians and national health service doctors now have efficient tools for the electronic management of their routine administrative workload. A recent innovation is the medical sickness certificate issued by primary care providers and national health service physicians. Following postponements and uncertainties, procedures for the electronic completion and online transmission of the sickness certificate are now complete. The changes introduced by the so-called "Brunetta decree", however, have made its application difficult and continuous improvement to the system is needed, considering also the severe penalties imposed for violations. In the light of serious legal repercussions for health care professionals, this article examines various critical issues, highlighting the pitfalls and the network's enormous potential for ascertaining evidence of irregularities. The overheated debate on absenteeism due to illness, the diverse roles of national health physicians and self-employed doctors responsible for issuing a sickness certificate, and problems related to circumstances in which a doctor operates, are the key topics in this discussion. Computerization is an effective tool for optimizing public resources; however, it also seeks to ferret out, through the traceability of certification, abuse of medical certification, with severe penalties applied if certificates are discovered to contain misleading or untrue information.

  5. Sick leave among home-care personnel: a longitudinal study of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Horneij, Eva L; Jensen, Irene B; Holmström, Eva B; Ekdahl, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    Background Sick leave due to neck, shoulder and back disorders (NSBD) is higher among health-care workers, especially nursing aides/assistant nurses, compared with employees in other occupations. More information is needed about predictors of sick leave among health care workers. The aim of the study was to assess whether self-reported factors related to health, work and leisure time could predict: 1) future certified sick leave due to any cause, in nursing aides/assistant nurses (Study group I) and 2) future self-reported sick leave due to NSBD in nursing aides/assistant nurses (Study group II). Methods Study group I, comprised 443 female nursing aides/assistant nurses, not on sick leave at baseline when a questionnaire was completed. Data on certified sick leave were collected after 18 months. Study group II comprised 274 of the women, who at baseline reported no sick leave during the preceding year due to NSBD and who participated at the 18 month follow-up. Data on sick leave due to NSBD were collected from the questionnaire at 18 months. The associations between future sick leave and factors related to health, work and leisure time were tested by logistic regression analyses. Results Health-related factors such as previous low back disorders (OR: 1.89; 95% CI 1.20–2.97) and previous sick leave (OR 6.40; 95%CI 3.97–10.31), were associated with a higher risk of future sick leave due to any cause. Factors related to health, work and leisure time, i.e. previous low back disorders (OR: 4.45; 95% CI 1.27–15.77) previous sick leave, not due to NSBD (OR 3.30; 95%CI 1.33–8.17), high strain work (OR 2.34; 95%CI 1.05–5.23) and high perceived physical exertion in domestic work (OR 2.56; 95%CI 1.12–5.86) were associated with a higher risk of future sick leave due to NSBD. In the final analyses, previous low back disorders and previous sick leave remained significant in both study groups. Conclusion The results suggest a focus on previous low back disorders and

  6. Metrology of Large Parts. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    As discussed in the first chapter of this book, there are many different methods to measure a part using optical technology. Chapter 2 discussed the use of machine vision to measure macroscopic features such as length and position, which was extended to the use of interferometry as a linear measurement tool in chapter 3, and laser or other trackers to find the relation of key points on large parts in chapter 4. This chapter looks at measuring large parts to optical tolerances in the sub-micron range using interferometry, ranging, and optical tools discussed in the previous chapters. The purpose of this chapter is not to discuss specific metrology tools (such as interferometers or gauges), but to describe a systems engineering approach to testing large parts. Issues such as material warpage and temperature drifts that may be insignificant when measuring a part to micron levels under a microscope, as will be discussed in later chapters, can prove to be very important when making the same measurement over a larger part. In this chapter, we will define a set of guiding principles for successfully overcoming these challenges and illustrate the application of these principles with real world examples. While these examples are drawn from specific large optical testing applications, they inform the problems associated with testing any large part to optical tolerances. Manufacturing today relies on micrometer level part performance. Fields such as energy and transportation are demanding higher tolerances to provide increased efficiencies and fuel savings. By looking at how the optics industry approaches sub-micrometer metrology, one can gain a better understanding of the metrology challenges for any larger part specified to micrometer tolerances. Testing large parts, whether optical components or precision structures, to optical tolerances is just like testing small parts, only harder. Identical with what one does for small parts, a metrologist tests large parts and optics

  7. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  8. Use of physical culture to increase resistance of sailors to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salanin, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    From 50% to 70% of sailors are exposed to motion sickness in storms. A program of physical exercises is described and tested for effectiveness in preventing this problem. In comparing the results of tests of susceptibility to motion sickness given to groups before and after a program of exercises and to a control group, it is found that physical education can strengthen the vestibulary apparatus and help prevent motion sickness.

  9. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  10. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  11. Managing atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: chapter 2.

    PubMed

    Nester, Carla M

    2015-05-01

    Licht et al. present the 2-year follow-up data of the landmark trials studying the efficacy of eculizumab in the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). They report sustained improvements in hematologic parameters, continued safety, and additional improvements in kidney function with extended treatment. This report adds a layer of comfort to our care of patients with this rare disease; however, it is unlikely to be the final chapter in the treatment of aHUS.

  12. Spatial orientation, adaptation, and motion sickness in real and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Reason and Brand (1975) noted that motion sickness occurs in many situations involving either passive body motion or active interaction with the world via indirect sensorimotor interfaces (e.g., prism spectacles). As might be expected, motion sickness is being reported in VEs that involve apparent self-motion through space, the best known examples being flight simulators (Kennedy et al., 1990). The goals of this paper are to introduce the motion-sickness symptomatology; to outline some concepts that are central to theories of motion sickness, spatial orientation, and adaptation; and to discuss the implications of some trends in VE research and development.

  13. Cinnarizine for Sea Sickness During a Remote Pacific Ocean Rescue Mission.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Regan F; Rush, Stephen C; Roland, J Thomas; Jethanamest, Daniel; Schwan, Christopher P; Kharon, Chetan U

    2015-01-01

    Motion sickness can be a limiting factor for sea and air missions. We report the experience of a Pararescue (PJ) team on a Pacific Ocean rescue mission in which motion sickness was prevalent. Cinnarizine, an antagonist of H1-histamine receptors, was used to treat affected PJs. We also report findings of a survey of PJs regarding motion sickness. A family of four on a disabled sailboat 900 miles off the coast of Mexico sent out a distress call because their 1-year-old daughter became severely ill with fever and diarrhea. Four PJs were deployed on a C-130, performed a free-fall parachute insertion into the ocean, and boarded the sailboat. All four PJs experienced onset of motion sickness at some point during the early part of the mission and symptoms persisted through the first 24 hours. Three PJs experienced ongoing nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sensory imbalances. The captain of the sailboat offered the three sick PJs approximately 18mg of cinnarizine two or three times a day with relief of symptoms and improvement on operational effectiveness. A new, anonymous, voluntary survey of Air National Guard PJs and combat rescue officers revealed that 78.4% of Operators have experienced motion sickness at sea. We discuss the current theories on motion sickness, the effect of motion sickness on operational effectiveness, and research on treatment of motion sickness, including the medication cinnarizine.

  14. Cinnarizine for Sea Sickness During a Remote Pacific Ocean Rescue Mission.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Regan F; Rush, Stephen C; Roland, J Thomas; Jethanamest, Daniel; Schwan, Christopher P; Kharon, Chetan U

    2015-01-01

    Motion sickness can be a limiting factor for sea and air missions. We report the experience of a Pararescue (PJ) team on a Pacific Ocean rescue mission in which motion sickness was prevalent. Cinnarizine, an antagonist of H1-histamine receptors, was used to treat affected PJs. We also report findings of a survey of PJs regarding motion sickness. A family of four on a disabled sailboat 900 miles off the coast of Mexico sent out a distress call because their 1-year-old daughter became severely ill with fever and diarrhea. Four PJs were deployed on a C-130, performed a free-fall parachute insertion into the ocean, and boarded the sailboat. All four PJs experienced onset of motion sickness at some point during the early part of the mission and symptoms persisted through the first 24 hours. Three PJs experienced ongoing nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sensory imbalances. The captain of the sailboat offered the three sick PJs approximately 18mg of cinnarizine two or three times a day with relief of symptoms and improvement on operational effectiveness. A new, anonymous, voluntary survey of Air National Guard PJs and combat rescue officers revealed that 78.4% of Operators have experienced motion sickness at sea. We discuss the current theories on motion sickness, the effect of motion sickness on operational effectiveness, and research on treatment of motion sickness, including the medication cinnarizine. PMID:26125158

  15. Chapter A9. Safety in Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Susan L.; Ray, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses topics related to personal safety to be used in the collection of water-quality data, including: policies and general regulations on field safety; transportation of people and equipment; implementation of surface-water and ground-water activities; procedures for handling chemicals; and information on potentially hazardous environmental conditions, animals, and plants. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/ index.html.

  16. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on the friction and wear properties of selected solid lubricating films to aid users in choosing the best lubricant, deposition conditions, and operational variables. For simplicity, discussion of the tribological properties of concern is separated into two parts. The first part of the chapter discusses the different solid lubricating films selected for study including commercially developed solid film lubricants: (1) bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), (2) magnetron-sputtered MoS2, (3) ion-plated silver, (4) ion-plated lead, (5) magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC), and (6) plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DEC) films. Marked differences in the friction and wear properties of the different films resulted from the different environmental conditions (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, and dry nitrogen) and the solid film lubricant materials. The second part of the chapter discusses the physical and chemical characteristics, friction behavior, and endurance life of the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The role of interface species and the effects of applied load, film thickness, oxygen pressure, environment, and temperature on the friction and wear properties are considered.

  17. A Survey of Geologic Resources. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonson, Jennifer; Rickman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the resources available from the Moon itself: regolith, geologically concentrated materials, and lunar physical features that will enable habitation and generation of power on the surface. This chapter briefly covers the formation of the Moon and thus the formation of the crust of the Moon, as well as the evolution of the regolith. The characteristics of the regolith are provided in some detail, including its mineralogy and lithology. The location of high concentrations of specific minerals or rocks is noted. Other ideal locations for in situ resource utilization technology and lunar habitation are presented. This chapter is intended to be a brief review of current knowledge, and to serve as a foundational source for further study. Each concept presented here has a wealth of literature associated with it; the reader is therefore directed to that literature with each discussion. With great interest in possible manned lunar landings and continued study of the Moon by multiple satellites, the available information changes regularly.

  18. Sickness and sickness absence of remaining employees in a time of economic crisis: a study among employees of municipalities in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigursteinsdóttir, Hjördís; Rafnsdóttir, Gudbjörg Linda

    2015-05-01

    This article focuses on sickness and sickness absence among employees of 20 municipalities in Iceland who remained at work after the economic crisis in October 2008. The aim was to examine the impact of economic crisis on sickness and sickness absence of "survivors" working within the educational system (primary school teachers and kindergarten teachers) and the care services (elderly care and care of disabled people) operated by the municipalities. The study was based on mixed methods research comprising a balanced panel data set and focus groups. An online survey conducted three times among 2356 employees of 20 municipalities and seven focus group interviews in two municipalities (39 participants). The generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the quantitative data, and focused coding was used to analyze the qualitative data. The main finding showed that the economic crisis had negative health implications for the municipal employees. The negative effects grew stronger over time. Employee sickness and sickness absence increased substantially in both downsized and non-downsized workplaces. However, employees of downsized workplaces were more likely to be sick. Sickness and sickness absence were more common among younger than older employees, but no gender differences were observed. The study demonstrates the importance of protecting the health and well-being of all employees in the wake of an economic crisis, not only those who lose their jobs or work in downsized workplaces. This is important in the immediate aftermath of a crisis, but also for a significant time thereafter. This is of practical relevance for those responsible for occupational health and safety, as most Western countries periodically go through economic crises, resulting in strains on employees.

  19. Sickness and sickness absence of remaining employees in a time of economic crisis: a study among employees of municipalities in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigursteinsdóttir, Hjördís; Rafnsdóttir, Gudbjörg Linda

    2015-05-01

    This article focuses on sickness and sickness absence among employees of 20 municipalities in Iceland who remained at work after the economic crisis in October 2008. The aim was to examine the impact of economic crisis on sickness and sickness absence of "survivors" working within the educational system (primary school teachers and kindergarten teachers) and the care services (elderly care and care of disabled people) operated by the municipalities. The study was based on mixed methods research comprising a balanced panel data set and focus groups. An online survey conducted three times among 2356 employees of 20 municipalities and seven focus group interviews in two municipalities (39 participants). The generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the quantitative data, and focused coding was used to analyze the qualitative data. The main finding showed that the economic crisis had negative health implications for the municipal employees. The negative effects grew stronger over time. Employee sickness and sickness absence increased substantially in both downsized and non-downsized workplaces. However, employees of downsized workplaces were more likely to be sick. Sickness and sickness absence were more common among younger than older employees, but no gender differences were observed. The study demonstrates the importance of protecting the health and well-being of all employees in the wake of an economic crisis, not only those who lose their jobs or work in downsized workplaces. This is important in the immediate aftermath of a crisis, but also for a significant time thereafter. This is of practical relevance for those responsible for occupational health and safety, as most Western countries periodically go through economic crises, resulting in strains on employees. PMID:25795993

  20. The effect of cinnarizine and cocculus indicus on simulator sickness.

    PubMed

    Lucertini, Marco; Mirante, Nadia; Casagrande, Maria; Trivelloni, Pierandrea; Lugli, Vittoria

    2007-05-16

    Pensacola Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) is a valuable method to analyse symptoms evoked by exposure to a flight simulator environment that can also be adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive tools, aiming at reducing simulator sickness (SS). In this study we analysed SSQ data in subjects undergoing a standard ground based spatial disorientation training inside a flight simulator, in order to evaluate the SS prevention obtained with two different pharmacological tools. Twelve males volunteers participated to an experimental design based on a double-blind, balanced administration of either 30 mg cinnarizine (CIN), or Cocculus Indicus 6CH (COC), or placebo (PLC) before one trial of about one hour spent inside a spatial disorientation trainer. All subjects underwent the three different conditions (CIN, COC, PLC) during 3 non-consecutive days separated by at least 2 weeks. During each experimental day, all subjects filled in SSQ. In addition, both postural instability (with the use of a static stabilometric platform), and sleepiness symptoms were evaluated. All the tests were performed before and after the simulated flight, at different times, in one-and-half-hour intervals. Results indicated a strong increase of sickness after flight simulation that linearly decreased, showing pre-simulator scores after 1.30 hours. In contrast to both PLC and COC, CIN showed significant side effects immediately following flight simulation, with no benefit at the simultaneous SSQ scores. Globally, no highly significant differences between COC and PLC were observed, although a minor degree of postural instability could be detected after COC administration. As far as the present exposure to a simulator environment is concerned, none of the pharmacological tools administered in this study resulted effective in reducing SS symptoms as detected by the SSQ. Moreover, CIN significantly increased sleepiness and postural instability in most subjects. PMID:17434541

  1. Estimating and Mapping the Population at Risk of Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Franco, José R.; Paone, Massimo; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Ruiz-Postigo, José Antonio; Fèvre, Eric M.; Mattioli, Raffaele C.; Jannin, Jean G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, persists as a public health problem in several sub-Saharan countries. Evidence-based, spatially explicit estimates of population at risk are needed to inform planning and implementation of field interventions, monitor disease trends, raise awareness and support advocacy. Comprehensive, geo-referenced epidemiological records from HAT-affected countries were combined with human population layers to map five categories of risk, ranging from “very high” to “very low,” and to estimate the corresponding at-risk population. Results Approximately 70 million people distributed over a surface of 1.55 million km2 are estimated to be at different levels of risk of contracting HAT. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 82.2% of the population at risk, the remaining 17.8% being at risk of infection from T. b. rhodesiense. Twenty-one million people live in areas classified as moderate to very high risk, where more than 1 HAT case per 10,000 inhabitants per annum is reported. Discussion Updated estimates of the population at risk of sleeping sickness were made, based on quantitative information on the reported cases and the geographic distribution of human population. Due to substantial methodological differences, it is not possible to make direct comparisons with previous figures for at-risk population. By contrast, it will be possible to explore trends in the future. The presented maps of different HAT risk levels will help to develop site-specific strategies for control and surveillance, and to monitor progress achieved by ongoing efforts aimed at the elimination of sleeping sickness. PMID:23145192

  2. The effect of cinnarizine and cocculus indicus on simulator sickness.

    PubMed

    Lucertini, Marco; Mirante, Nadia; Casagrande, Maria; Trivelloni, Pierandrea; Lugli, Vittoria

    2007-05-16

    Pensacola Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) is a valuable method to analyse symptoms evoked by exposure to a flight simulator environment that can also be adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive tools, aiming at reducing simulator sickness (SS). In this study we analysed SSQ data in subjects undergoing a standard ground based spatial disorientation training inside a flight simulator, in order to evaluate the SS prevention obtained with two different pharmacological tools. Twelve males volunteers participated to an experimental design based on a double-blind, balanced administration of either 30 mg cinnarizine (CIN), or Cocculus Indicus 6CH (COC), or placebo (PLC) before one trial of about one hour spent inside a spatial disorientation trainer. All subjects underwent the three different conditions (CIN, COC, PLC) during 3 non-consecutive days separated by at least 2 weeks. During each experimental day, all subjects filled in SSQ. In addition, both postural instability (with the use of a static stabilometric platform), and sleepiness symptoms were evaluated. All the tests were performed before and after the simulated flight, at different times, in one-and-half-hour intervals. Results indicated a strong increase of sickness after flight simulation that linearly decreased, showing pre-simulator scores after 1.30 hours. In contrast to both PLC and COC, CIN showed significant side effects immediately following flight simulation, with no benefit at the simultaneous SSQ scores. Globally, no highly significant differences between COC and PLC were observed, although a minor degree of postural instability could be detected after COC administration. As far as the present exposure to a simulator environment is concerned, none of the pharmacological tools administered in this study resulted effective in reducing SS symptoms as detected by the SSQ. Moreover, CIN significantly increased sleepiness and postural instability in most subjects.

  3. Family-centered Care for Sick Newborns: A Thumbnail View

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Arti; Dasgupta, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) for sick newborns is emerging as a paradigmatic shift in the practice of facility-based newborn care. It seeks to transforming a provider-centered model into a client-centered one and thus build a new therapeutic alliance. FCC is the cornerstone of continuum of care, imparting caregiving competencies to parents/caregivers both within institutions as well as after the discharge. This has potential gains for the newborn, family members, and facility-level staff. The initial model piloted in tertiary-care settings is now undergoing translation at five sites across the country; the outcomes are keenly awaited. PMID:26917867

  4. From sick role to narrative subject: An analytic memoir.

    PubMed

    Frank, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Questions of illness experience and identity are discussed, based on the analysis of a story told by the breast-cancer activist Audre Lorde. Displacing Parsons' conceptualization of illness as a sick role, I understand the ill person as a narrative subject, defined by discursive possibilities. Three discourses of illness are proposed: the medical institutional discourse, the discourse of illness experience, and the pink-ribbon discourse. Each has its preferred narratives. These discourses overlap and mutually affect each other. Problems with the Foucauldian conceptualization of the subject are considered, and a dialogical imagination of relations of governmentality is proposed. PMID:26582351

  5. [Sleeping sickness: one hundred years of control strategy evolution].

    PubMed

    Louis, F J; Simarro, P P; Lucas, P

    2002-12-01

    Sleeping sickness has been known since the fifteenth century but the real progress in the knowledge of the disease occurred in the nineteenth century with the development of microscopy. From 1841 to 1901 the parasites and their vectors have been identified, the symptomatology and the epidemiology have been described. However, due to absence of any effective cure, the campaign against the disease was still based on the isolation of the patients and the transfer of exposed populations. The discovery of atoxyl in 1905 provided doctors with their first therapeutic weapon and, in 1910, the first action of vector control was undertaken with success in the Island of Principe. Between the two world conflicts, Jamot published the rules to fight against major outbreaks. Their application in Oubangui-Chari, in Cameroon and in French Occidental Africa brought tremendous results and signed the triumph of the mobile unit concept. Success which will not be denied until the sixties when the disease was believed to be eradicated. From the sixties to the nineties, the concept of the integration of prevention and care added to the exclusion of any vertical system will result in a progressive reniewed outbreak of the sleeping sickness in the known foci. As a paradox, it is a time rich in discovery as regards diagnosis, treatment and entomology. In 1994, the World Health Organisation got concerned with the situation of the disease in Central Africa where the outbreak of the disease reinforced. A second paradox appeared; it is the next to total disinterest from the politics and fund raisers which will save the disease. Today, sleeping sickness is the typical example of the orphan disease, a show case brandished by all the good souls. In 2001, an agreement between the WHO and the pharmaceutical industry brings back the financial funds required to fight the disease. Basically, it is a matter of resuming the action by using what is still existing and by creating new strategies considering

  6. Excessive erythrocytosis, chronic mountain sickness, and serum cobalt levels.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Pando, Jacqueline; Tapia, Rosario; Swenson, Erik R; Prchal, Josef; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    In a subset of high-altitude dwellers, the appropriate erythrocytotic response becomes excessive and can result in chronic mountain sickness. We studied men with (study group) and without excessive erythrocytosis (packed-cell volume >65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m), and compared them with controls living in Lima, Peru (at sea-level). Toxic serum cobalt concentrations were detected in 11 of 21 (52%) study participants with excessive erythrocytosis, but were undetectable in high altitude or sea-level controls. In the mining community of Cerro de Pasco, cobalt toxicity might be an important contributor to excessive erythrocytosis.

  7. Excessive erythrocytosis, chronic mountain sickness, and serum cobalt levels.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Pando, Jacqueline; Tapia, Rosario; Swenson, Erik R; Prchal, Josef; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    In a subset of high-altitude dwellers, the appropriate erythrocytotic response becomes excessive and can result in chronic mountain sickness. We studied men with (study group) and without excessive erythrocytosis (packed-cell volume >65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m), and compared them with controls living in Lima, Peru (at sea-level). Toxic serum cobalt concentrations were detected in 11 of 21 (52%) study participants with excessive erythrocytosis, but were undetectable in high altitude or sea-level controls. In the mining community of Cerro de Pasco, cobalt toxicity might be an important contributor to excessive erythrocytosis. PMID:11844517

  8. [Disability evaluation in decompression sickness treated with hyperbaric therapy].

    PubMed

    Zannini, D; Chiozza, G; Formai, C; Oltracqua, S

    1981-12-30

    The Authors report 41 cases of decompression sickness following air scuba diving observed during the last three years at the Istituto di Medicina del Lavoro of the University of Genoa and discuss about consequent injuries and damages (period of hospitalization, temporary and permanent disability). The Authors say that in 12 cases remain permanent disability with limitation more or less serious of the working capacity. They, at last, emphasize that neurological symptoms are getting better during several months so to be necessary to wait for two years at least before estimating definitively advise.

  9. Family-centered Care for Sick Newborns: A Thumbnail View.

    PubMed

    Maria, Arti; Dasgupta, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) for sick newborns is emerging as a paradigmatic shift in the practice of facility-based newborn care. It seeks to transforming a provider-centered model into a client-centered one and thus build a new therapeutic alliance. FCC is the cornerstone of continuum of care, imparting caregiving competencies to parents/caregivers both within institutions as well as after the discharge. This has potential gains for the newborn, family members, and facility-level staff. The initial model piloted in tertiary-care settings is now undergoing translation at five sites across the country; the outcomes are keenly awaited. PMID:26917867

  10. Motion sickness susceptibility related to ACTH, ADH and TSH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Leach, C.; Homick, J. L.; Larochelle, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that endogenous levels of certain hormones might be indicative of an individual's susceptibility to stressful motion is tested in a comparison of subjects classified as less prone to motion sickness with those of higher susceptibility. The levels of ACTH and vasopressin measured before exposure to stressful motion were twice as high in the less-suceptible group. No significant differences were noted in the levels of angiotensin, aldosterone, or TSH. The differences between the two groups were greater for a given hormone than for any of the changes induced by exposure to stressful motion.

  11. Space motion sickness medications - Interference with biomedical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Leach, C. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that drugs administered to Skylab 3 and 4 crewmen for space motion sickness may have interfered with their biomedical evaluation in space is investigated. The mixture of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine produced changes which allow a more valid interpretation of the early biomedical changes ocurring in weightlessness. There is no doubt that the dramatic increase in aldosterone excretion is not attributable to the drug, while the drug could have contributed to the in-flight changes observed in cortisol, epinephrine, heart rate and possibly urine volume.

  12. Palivizumab and respiratory syncytial virus disease: selling sickness for future?

    PubMed

    Yudina, Ekaterina V; Ziganshina, Liliya E

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades Russia has gone through dramatic "democratic" changes resulting in unprecedented deterioration of health, loss of lives and extinction of population. The health system turned into a ridiculous monster of poorly organized business exploiting reminiscent social values of the past to build profits on selling sickness-for-all in consumer culture. We present facts and conclude that introduction of palivizumab into clinical practice for the most vulnerable patient category was done without confirmation of efficacy, without pharmacoeconomics evaluations, without any precautionary measures in a country with undeveloped pharmacovigilance system. The situation calls for immediate action of responsible authorities and the society as a whole.

  13. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, D. A.

    In this chapter we review a new and rapidly growing area of research in high-energy plasma astrophysics—radiative magnetic reconnection, defined here as a regime of reconnection where radiation reaction has an important influence on the reconnection dynamics, energetics, and/or nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a variety of radiative effects that are critical in many high-energy astrophysical applications. The most notable radiative effects in astrophysical reconnection include radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. The self-consistent inclusion of these effects into magnetic reconnection theory and modeling sometimes calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool available for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical conditions in a reconnecting system to observable radiative signatures. This chapter presents an overview of our recent theoretical progress in developing basic physical understanding of radiative magnetic reconnection, with a special emphasis on astrophysically most important radiation mechanisms like synchrotron, curvature, and inverse-Compton. The chapter also offers a broad review of key high-energy astrophysical applications of radiative reconnection, illustrated by multiple examples such as: pulsar wind nebulae, pulsar magnetospheres, black-hole accretion-disk coronae and hot accretion flows in X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei and their relativistic jets, magnetospheres of magnetars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, this chapter discusses the most critical

  14. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  15. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  16. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  17. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  18. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  19. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2...

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  1. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  2. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  3. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  4. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  5. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  6. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 4 (Chapters 34-38)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-04-01

    Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Why can one rainbow or two rainbows be seen in the sky but never three rainbows? 33-1 What Is Physics? 33-2 Maxwell's Rainbow. 33-3 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Qualitatively. 33-4 The Traveling Electromagnetic Wave, Quantitatively. 33-5 Energy Transport and the Poynting Vector. 33-6 Radiation Pressure. 33-7 Polarization. 33-8 Reflection and Refraction. 33-9 Total Internal Reflection. 33-10 Polarization by Reflection. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 34. Images. What creates the illusion of hallways in a mirror maze? 34-1 What Is Physics? 34-2 Two Types of Images. 34-3 Plane Mirrors. 34-4 Spherical Mirrors. 34-5 Images from Spherical Mirrors. 34-6 Spherical Refracting Surfaces. 34-7 Thin Lenses. 34-8 Optical Instruments. 34-9 Three Proofs. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 35. Interference. How do color-shifting inks on paper currency shift colors? 35-1 What Is Physics? 35-2 Light as a Wave. 35-3 Diffraction. 35-4 Young's Interference Experiment. 35-5 Coherence. 35-6 Intensity in Double-Slit Interference. 35-7 Interference from Thin Films. 35-8 Michelson's Interferometer. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 36. Diffraction. How were variable displays on credit cards made bright and counterfeit-proof? 36-1 What Is Physics? 36-2 Diffraction and the Wave Theory of Light. 36-3 Diffraction by a Single Slit: Locating the Minima. 36-4 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Qualitatively. 36-5 Intensity in Single-Slit Diffraction, Quantitatively. 36-6 Diffraction by a Circular Aperture. 36-7 Diffraction by a Double Slit. 36-8 Diffraction Gratings. 36-9 Gratings: Dispersion and Resolving Power. 36-10 X-Ray Diffraction. Review & Summary Questions. Problems. Chapter 37. Relativity. How can we determine what lurks at the center of the galaxy M87, 50 million light-years away? 37-1 What Is Physics? 37-2 The Postulates. 37-3 Measuring an Event. 37-4 The Relativity of Simultaneity. 37-5 The Relativity

  7. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All Colombians."…

  8. 38 CFR 21.6380 - Additional applicable Chapter 31 regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chapter 31 regulations. 21.6380 Section 21.6380 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... applicable Chapter 31 regulations. The following regulations are applicable to veterans pursuing the vocational training under this program in the same manner as they apply to 38 U.S.C. chapter 31: §...

  9. 24 CFR 300.1 - Scope of chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of chapter. 300.1 Section 300.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... of chapter. This chapter consists of general information and does not purport to set forth all of...

  10. Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle in Chapter Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Eley, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Student-led chapter presentations provide an excellent opportunity for instructors to evaluate a student's comprehension of the assigned chapter, as well as the student's ability to present and convey information in a public forum. Although several instructors realize the benefits of requiring students to complete chapter presentations either as…

  11. The impact of effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation on teachers' sickness absence.

    PubMed

    Derycke, Hanne; Vlerick, Peter; Van de Ven, Bart; Rots, Isabel; Clays, Els

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of the effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation on sickness absence duration and sickness absence frequency among beginning teachers in Flanders (Belgium). A total of 603 teachers, who recently graduated, participated in this study. Effort-reward imbalance and learning motivation were assessed by means of self-administered questionnaires. Prospective data of registered sickness absence during 12 months follow-up were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. An imbalance between high efforts and low rewards (extrinsic hypothesis) was associated with longer sickness absence duration and more frequent absences. A low level of learning motivation (intrinsic hypothesis) was not associated with longer sickness absence duration but was significantly positively associated with sickness absence frequency. No significant results were obtained for the interaction hypothesis between imbalance and learning motivation. Further research is needed to deepen our understanding of the impact of psychosocial work conditions and personal resources on both sickness absence duration and frequency. Specifically, attention could be given to optimizing or reducing efforts spent at work, increasing rewards and stimulating learning motivation to influence sickness absence. PMID:22337584

  12. [Polymorphism of connexin 40 gene-- a novel genetic marker of the sick sinus node syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chernova, A A; Nikulina, S Iu; Shul'man, V A; Kukushkina, T S; Voevoda, M I; Maksimov, V N

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have demonstrated for the first time on the clinico-genetic material association between hereditary sick sinus node syndrome and connexin 40 gene polymorphism. We have revealed that heterozygous variant of connexin 40 gene variant is more frequent among patients with sick sinus node syndrome and their healthy relatives than in persons of control group.

  13. Are Colombian Sickness Funds Cream Skimming Enrollees? An Analysis with Suggestions for Policy Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Antonio J.; McCalla, Dawn C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of Colombian social health insurance reform was to increase competition among for-profit insurers. Unfortunately, the flat capitated formula creates an opportunity for sickness funds to maximize reimbursement gains by "cream skimming"--selecting against unhealthy individuals. This paper explores sickness fund…

  14. 26 CFR 31.3402(o)-3 - Extension of withholding to sick pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(o)-3 Extension of withholding to sick pay... withhold income tax with respect to payments of sick pay made on or after May 1, 1981. If such a request...

  15. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  16. 26 CFR 31.3402(o)-3 - Extension of withholding to sick pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extension of withholding to sick pay. 31.3402(o)-3 Section 31.3402(o)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(o)-3 Extension of withholding to sick...

  17. The relationship between motion sickness experience and vestibular tests in pilots and nonpilots.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Stewart, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The contribution of the vestibular system to motion sickness experience is studied by means of an attempt to determine the relationship between five subjective tests of vestibular function and reports of motion sickness experiences by pilots and nonpilots. The experimental procedure is described and the obtained results are discussed.

  18. Console video games, postural activity, and motion sickness during passive restraint.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    We examined the influence of passive restraint on postural activity and motion sickness in individuals who actively controlled a potentially nauseogenic visual motion stimulus (a driving video game). Twenty-four adults (20.09 ± 1.56 years; 167.80 ± 7.94 cm; 59.02 ± 9.18 kg) were recruited as participants. Using elastic bands, standing participants were passively restrained at the head, shoulders, hips, and knees. During restraint, participants played (i.e., controlled) a driving video game (a motorcycle race), for 50 min. During game play, we recorded the movement of the head and torso, using a magnetic tracking system. Following game play, participants answered a forced choice, yes/no question about whether they were motion sick, and were assigned to sick and well groups on this basis. In addition, before and after game play, participants completed the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire, which provided numerical ratings of the severity of individual symptoms. Five of 24 participants (20.83 %) reported motion sickness. Participants moved despite being passively restrained. Both the magnitude and the temporal dynamics of movement differed between the sick and well groups. The results show that passive restraint of the body can reduce motion sickness when the nauseogenic visual stimulus is under participants' active control and confirm that motion sickness is preceded by distinct patterns of postural activity even during passive restraint.

  19. Vestibular system and neural correlates of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1986-01-01

    Initial studies re-examine the role of certain central nervous system structures in the production of vestibular-induced vomiting and vomiting in general. All experiments were conducted using cats. Since these studies demonstrated that the essential role of various central structures in vestibular-induced vomiting is only poorly understood, efforts were re-directed to study the control of the effector muscles (diaphragm and abdominal muscles) that produce the pressure changes responsible for vomiting, with the goal of determining how this control mechanism is engaged during motion sickness. Experiments were conducted to localize the motoneurons that innervate the individual abdominal muscles and the portion of the diaphragm that surrounds the esophagus. A central question regarding respiratory muscle control during vomiting is whether these muscles are activated via the same brain stem pre-motor neurons that provide descending respiratory drive and/or by other descending input(s). In other experiments, the use of a combination of pitch and roll motions to produce motion sickness in unrestrained cats was evaluated. This stimulus combination can produce vomiting in only the most susceptible cats and is thus not as provacative a stimulus for cats as vertical linear acceleration.

  20. 2014 Decompression Sickness/Extravehicular Activity Risks Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Decompression Sickness (DCS)/Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risks Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on November 4 - 5, 2014. The SRP reviewed the updated Evidence Reports for The Risk of Decompression Sickness (from here on referred to as the 2014 DCS Evidence Report) and the Risk of Injury and Compromised Performance due to EVA Operations (from here on referred to as the 2014 EVA Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plans for these Risks. The SRP appreciated the time and effort that the DCS and EVA disciplines put into their review documents and presentations. The SRP felt that the 2014 DCS Evidence Report and the 2014 EVA Evidence Reports were very thorough and addressed the majority of the known DCS and EVA issues. The researchers at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) have the knowledge base to deal with the DCS and EVA issues. Overall, the SRP thinks the DCS and EVA research teams have compiled excellent reports which address the majority of the literature and background information.

  1. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Corante, Noemí

    2016-06-01

    Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61-69, 2016.-Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment.

  2. Motion sickness susceptibility in parabolic flight and velocity storage activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In parabolic flight experiments, postrotary nystagmus is as found to be differentially suppressed in free fall (G) and in a high gravitoinertial force (1.8 G) background relative to 1 G. In addition, the influence of postrotary head movements on nystagmus suppression was found to be contingent on G-dependency of the velocity storage and dumping mechanisms. Here, susceptibility to motion sickness during head movements in 0 G and 1.8 G was rank-correlated with the following: (1) the decay time constant of the slow phase velocity of postrotary nystagmus under 1 G, no head movement, baseline conditions, (2) the extent of time constant reduction elicited in 0 G and 1.8 G; (3) the extent of time constant reduction elicited by head tilts in 1 G; and (4) changes in the extent of time constants reduction in 0 G and 1.8 G over repeated tests. Susceptibility was significantly correlated with the extent to which a head movement reduced the time constant in 1 G, was weakly correlated with the baseline time constant, but was not correlated with the extent of reduction in 0 G or 1.8 G. This pattern suggests a link between mechanisms evoking symptoms of space motion sickness and the mechanisms of velocity storage and dumping. Experimental means of evaluating this link are described.

  3. Effectiveness and duration of intramuscular antimotion sickness medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Stewart, J. J.; Wood, M. J.; Mims, M.

    1992-01-01

    Motion sickness inhibits gastric motility, making the oral route ineffective for medications. The intramuscular route is an effective alternative. The rotating chair was used to produce the M 111 level of motion sickness on the Graybiel Symptom Scale. The intramuscular medications given 30 minutes before rotation were compared with placebo (saline, 1 mL) for effectiveness and duration in increasing the number of tolerated head movements. Average placebo number of head movements was 294. Promethazine 25 mg increased head movements by 78% (P < .05), with a duration of 12 hours. Scopolamine 0.2 mg increased head movements by 91% (P < .05), with a duration of 4 hours. The effect of caffeine 250 mg and ephedrine 25 mg was not significant. When combined with scopolamine, ephedrine produced an 32% additive effect. Scopolamine 0.08 mg, 0.1 mg, and 0.2 mg and also promethazine 12.5 mg and 25 mg were significant (P < .05). Promethazine appears to be the drug of choice for intramuscular use because of a longer duration and a high level of effectiveness. Scopolamine was of high effectiveness, but had a duration of 4 hours. It was eight times as potent by the intramuscular as by the oral route.

  4. Sick man walking: Perception of health status from body motion.

    PubMed

    Sundelin, T; Karshikoff, B; Axelsson, E; Höglund, C Olgart; Lekander, M; Axelsson, J

    2015-08-01

    An ability to detect subtle signs of sickness in others would be highly beneficial, as it would allow for behaviors that help us avoid contagious pathogens. Recent findings suggest that both animals and humans are able to detect distinctive odor signals of individuals with activated innate immune responses. This study tested whether an innate immune response affects a person's walking speed and whether other people perceive that person as less healthy. 43 subjects watched films of persons who were experiencing experimental immune activation, and rated the walking individuals in the films with respect to health, tiredness, and sadness. Furthermore, the walking speed in the films was analyzed. After LPS injections, participants walked more slowly and were perceived as less healthy and more tired as compared to when injected with placebo. There was also a trend for the subjects to look sadder after LPS injection than after placebo. Furthermore, there were strong associations between walking speed and the appearance of health, tiredness, and sadness. These findings support the notion that walking speed is affected by an activated immune response, and that humans may be able to detect very early signs of sickness in others by merely observing their gait. This ability is likely to aid both a "behavioral immune system", by providing more opportunities for adaptive behaviors such as avoidance, and the anticipatory priming of biochemical immune responses. PMID:25801061

  5. Neural Origins of Human Sickness in Interoceptive Responses to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Brydon, Lena; Walker, Cicely; Gray, Marcus A.; Steptoe, Andrew; Dolan, Raymond J.; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammation is associated with psychological, emotional, and behavioral disturbance, known as sickness behavior. Inflammatory cytokines are implicated in coordinating this central motivational reorientation accompanying peripheral immunologic responses to pathogens. Studies in rodents suggest an afferent interoceptive neural mechanism, although comparable data in humans are lacking. Methods In a double-blind, randomized crossover study, 16 healthy male volunteers received typhoid vaccination or saline (placebo) injection in two experimental sessions. Profile of Mood State questionnaires were completed at baseline and at 2 and 3 hours. Two hours after injection, participants performed a high-demand color word Stroop task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blood samples were performed at baseline and immediately after scanning. Results Typhoid but not placebo injection produced a robust inflammatory response indexed by increased circulating interleukin-6 accompanied by a significant increase in fatigue, confusion, and impaired concentration at 3 hours. Performance of the Stroop task under inflammation activated brain regions encoding representations of internal bodily state. Spatial and temporal characteristics of this response are consistent with interoceptive information flow via afferent autonomic fibers. During performance of this task, activity within interoceptive brain regions also predicted individual differences in inflammation-associated but not placebo-associated fatigue and confusion. Maintenance of cognitive performance, despite inflammation-associated fatigue, led to recruitment of additional prefrontal cortical regions. Conclusions These findings suggest that peripheral infection selectively influences central nervous system function to generate core symptoms of sickness and reorient basic motivational states. PMID:19409533

  6. Comparison of efficacy of ginger with various antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Wood, M. J.; Manno, B. R.; Mims, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Ginger and several other medications were compared with scopolamine and d-amphetamine for effectiveness in prevention of motion sickness. Methods: Double-blind techniques were used. The subjects were given the medications two hours before they were rotated in a chair making head movements until a symptom total short of vomiting was reached. Standardized N.A.S.A. techniques were used for speed of rotation and end-point of motion sickness. Results: The three doses of ginger were all at the placebo level of efficacy. Amitriptyline, ethopropazine and trihexyphenidyl increased the tolerated head movements but the increase was not statistically significant. Significant levels of protection were produced by dimenhydrinate, promethazine, scopolamine and d-amphetamine. Protection was further increased by combination of these latter drugs with d-amphetamine. Efficacy was greatest as the dose was increased. Conclusions: The medication of choice in this study was scopolamine 0.6 mg with d-amphetamine 10 mg. This combination provided good protection with acceptable side effects.

  7. Visually induced motion sickness can be alleviated by pleasant odors.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Behrang; Stelzmann, Daniela; Paillard, Aurore; Hecht, Heiko

    2015-05-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a common side effect in virtual environments and simulators. Several countermeasures against VIMS exist, but a reliable method to prevent or ease VIMS is unfortunately still missing. In the present study, we tested whether olfactory cues can alleviate VIMS. Sixty-two participants were exposed to a 15-min-long video showing a first-person-view bicycle ride that had successfully induced VIMS in previous studies. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups; the first group was exposed to a pleasant odor (rose) while watching the video, the second group was exposed to an unpleasant odor (leather), and the third group was not exposed to any odor. VIMS was measured using a verbal rating scale (0-20) and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. Results showed that only half of the participants who were exposed to the odor did notice it (n = 21), whereas the other half failed to detect the odor. However, among those participants who did notice the odor, the rose scent significantly reduced the severity of VIMS compared to the group that did not notice the odor. A moderate positive correlation between odor sensitivity and VIMS showed that participants with higher odor sensitivity also reported stronger VIMS. Our results demonstrate that olfaction can modulate VIMS and that a pleasant odor can potentially reduce VIMS. The relationship between olfactory perception, olfactory sensibility, and VIMS is discussed.

  8. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Corante, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61–69, 2016.—Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. PMID:27218284

  9. Synthesis of empty african horse sickness virus particles.

    PubMed

    Maree, Sonja; Maree, Francois F; Putterill, John F; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Huismans, Henk; Theron, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    As a means to develop African horse sickness (AHS) vaccines that are safe and DIVA compliant, we investigated the synthesis of empty African horse sickness virus (AHSV) particles. The emphasis of this study was on the assembly of the major viral core (VP3 and VP7) and outer capsid proteins (VP2 and VP5) into architecturally complex, heteromultimeric nanosized particles. The production of fully assembled core-like particles (CLPs) was accomplished in vivo by baculovirus-mediated co-synthesis of VP3 and VP7. The two different outer capsid proteins were capable of associating independently of each other with preformed cores to yield partial virus-like particles (VLPs). Complete VLPs were synthesized, albeit with a low yield. Crystalline formation of AHSV VP7 trimers is thought to impede high-level CLP production. Consequently, we engineered and co-synthesized VP3 with a more hydrophilic mutant VP7, resulting in an increase in the turnover of CLPs. PMID:26686484

  10. Preflight Adaptation Training for Spatial Orientation and Space Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Parker, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Two part-task preflight adaptation trainers (PATs) are being developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center to preadapt astronauts to novel sensory stimulus conditions similar to those present in microgravity to facilitate adaptation to microgravity and readaptation to Earth. This activity is a major component of a general effort to develop countermeasures aimed at minimizing sensory and sensorimotor disturbances and Space Motion Sickness (SMS) associated with adaptation to microgravity and readaptation to Earth. Design principles for the development of the two trainers are discussed, along with a detailed description of both devices. In addition, a summary of four ground-based investigations using one of the trainers to determine the extent to which various novel sensory stimulus conditions produce changes in compensatory eye movement responses, postural equilibrium, motion sickness symptoms, and electrogastric responses are presented. Finally, a brief description of the general concept of dual-adopted states that underly the development of the PATs, and ongoing and future operational and basic research activities are presented.

  11. Space motion sickness: The sensory motor controls and cardiovascular correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvestre, Philippe A.; Blaber, Andrew P.; Landrock, Clinton K.

    Background and PurposeSpace motion sickness (SMS) and related symptoms remain a major limiting factor in Space operations. A recent comprehensive literature review [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y] concluded that SMS does not represent a unique diagnostic entity, and there is no adequate predictor of SMS' susceptibility and severity. No countermeasure has been found reliable to prevent or treat SMS symptoms onset. Recent neurophysiological findings on sensory-motor controls monitoring [P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] and heart-rate variability (HRV) measurements relationship could explain post-flight orthostatic intolerance (PFOI) in astronauts [A.P. Blaber, R.L. Bondar, M.S. Kassam, Heart rate variability and short duration space flight: relationship to post-flight orthostatic intolerance, BMC Physiology 4 (2004) 6]. These two methodologies are generally overlooked in SMS' analysis. In this paper we present the case for a strong relationship between sensory-motor controls related symptoms, including orthostatic intolerance (OI) and SMS symptoms. MethodsThis paper expands on several previously published papers [J.R. Lackner, Z. DiZio, Space motion sickness, Experimental Brain Research 175 (2006) 377-399, doi 10.1007/s00221-006-0697-y; P.A. Souvestre, C. Landrock, Biomedical-performance monitoring and assessment of astronauts by means of an ocular vestibular monitoring system, Acta Astronautica, 60 (4-7) (2007) 313-321, doi:10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.08.013] along with an updated literature review. An analysis of a 10-year period clinical data from trauma patients experiencing postural deficiency syndrome (PDS) show assessment and monitoring techniques which successfully identify trauma

  12. Sickness absence in the private sector of Greece: comparing shipyard industry and national insurance data.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999-2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute's annual statistical reports for the period 1987-2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14-2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991-1997 and an increase in 1998-2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  13. Sickness Absence in the Private Sector of Greece: Comparing Shipyard Industry and National Insurance Data

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C.; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999–2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute’s annual statistical reports for the period 1987–2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14–2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991–1997 and an increase in 1998–2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  14. Sickness absence in the private sector of Greece: comparing shipyard industry and national insurance data.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999-2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute's annual statistical reports for the period 1987-2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14-2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991-1997 and an increase in 1998-2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  15. Methods of assessing responses of trees, stands, and ecosystems to air pollution (Chapter 7). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, K.W.; Duriscoe, D.M.; Cook, E.R.; Cline, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter focuses on three main types of assessments of pollution effects used in the case studies chronicled in Chapter 8 through 12 (Regional Studies of conifer forests in the west). These are measures of crown condition of individual trees; impacts on populations and communities; and temporal patterns in radial growth. The concepts behind the development of each approach are introduced with references to previous work, leading to a discussion of the state of science. The importance of quality assurance techniques to the success of any assessment of air pollution effects is also discussed.

  16. Motion sickness and otolith sensitivity - A pilot study of habituation to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potvin, A. R.; Sadoff, M.; Billingham, J.

    1977-01-01

    Astronauts, particularly in Skylab flights, experienced varying degrees of motion sickness lasting 3-5 days. One possible mechanism for this motion sickness adaptation is believed to be a reduction in otolith sensitivity with an attendant reduction in sensory conflict. In an attempt to determine if this hypothesis is valid, a ground-based pilot study was conducted on a vertical linear accelerator. The extent of habituation to accelerations which initially produced motion sickness was evaluated, along with the possible value of habituation training to minimize the space motion sickness problem. Results showed that habituation occurred for 6 of the 8 subjects tested. However, in tests designed to measure dynamic and static otolith function, no significant differences between pre- and post-habituation tests were observed. Cross habituation effects to a standard Coriolis acceleration test were not significant. It is unlikely that ground-based pre-habituation to linear accelerations of the type examined would alter susceptibility to space motion sickness.

  17. Sickness: From the focus on cytokines, prostaglandins, and complement factors to the perspectives of neurons.

    PubMed

    Poon, David Chun-Hei; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Chiu, Kin; Wong, Hoi-Lam; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Systemic inflammation leads to a variety of physiological (e.g. fever) and behavioral (e.g. anorexia, immobility, social withdrawal, depressed mood, disturbed sleep) responses that are collectively known as sickness. While these phenomena have been studied for the past few decades, the neurobiological mechanisms by which sickness occurs remain unclear. In this review, we first revisit how the body senses and responds to infections and injuries by eliciting systemic inflammation. Next, we focus on how peripheral inflammatory molecules such as cytokines, prostaglandins, and activated complement factors communicate with the brain to trigger neuroinflammation and sickness. Since depression also involves inflammation, we further elaborate on the interrelationship between sickness and depression. Finally, we discuss how immune activation can modulate neurons in the brain, and suggest future perspectives to help unravel how changes in neuronal functions relate to sickness responses. PMID:26363665

  18. An appraisal of the value of vitamin B12 in the prevention of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Lacey, C. L.; Homick, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin B12 given by intramuscular injection can significantly reduce the occurrence of motion sickness in susceptible individuals (Banks, 1980). Since it is known that B12 influences the metabolism of histidine and choline, dietary precursors to neurotransmitters with established roles in motion sickness, an experimental evaluation has been undertaken of the efficacy of B12 in the prevention of motion sickness induced by controlled coriolis simulation. Subjects executed standardized head movements at successively higher rpm until a malaise III endpoint was reached. Following two baseline tests with this motion stressor, subjects received a B12 injection, a second injection two weeks later, and a final motion sickness test three weeks later. No significant differences in the susceptibility to motion sickness were noted after B12.

  19. Physical and mental fatigue as predictors of sickness absence among Norwegian nurses.

    PubMed

    Roelen, Corné A M; Bültmann, Ute; Groothoff, Johan; van Rhenen, Willem; Magerøy, Nils; Moen, Bente E; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether fatigue can be used to screen nursing populations for risk of sickness absence. Data were available from a prospective cohort study of 2,059 Norwegian nurses working in hospital care, psychiatric care, and nursing home/home care settings. Physical and mental fatigue were measured at baseline with Chalder's Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ). Self-rated sickness absence at 1-year follow-up was considered high if nurses reported >30 sick days in the past year. Physical fatigue accurately predicted high sickness absence and adequately discriminated between high- and low-risk nurses in nursing home/home care settings. Mental fatigue was not predictive in any setting. The FQ is suitable for screening specific nursing populations for the risk of high sickness absence. PMID:23970440

  20. Sickness absence due to occupational dermatoses in a prefabrication construction factory.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L

    1986-07-01

    In a study of sickness absence due to occupational dermatoses among 360 construction workers in a prefabrication construction factory in 1984, we found 3 workers with allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement who required medical leave. There were 5 sickness absence spells due to occupational dermatoses and the number of days lost due to occupational dermatoses was 53 days for the year. This averaged out at 0.01 spells per worker per year, 0.15 days per worker per year and 15 days per spell. It appeared that the number of workers requiring sickness absence from occupational dermatoses was low, but that those with the condition required about 2 weeks of sickness absence. Allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement appeared to be the only occupational dermatosis causing sickness absence in the factory.

  1. A preliminary study of MR sickness evaluation using visual motion aftereffect for advanced driver assistance systems.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sawako; Ino, Shuichi; Ifukube, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    Mixed Reality (MR) technologies have recently been explored in many areas of Human-Machine Interface (HMI) such as medicine, manufacturing, entertainment and education. However MR sickness, a kind of motion sickness is caused by sensory conflicts between the real world and virtual world. The purpose of this paper is to find out a new evaluation method of motion and MR sickness. This paper investigates a relationship between the whole-body vibration related to MR technologies and the motion aftereffect (MAE) phenomenon in the human visual system. This MR environment is modeled after advanced driver assistance systems in near-future vehicles. The seated subjects in the MR simulator were shaken in the pitch direction ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 Hz. Results show that MAE is useful for evaluation of MR sickness incidence. In addition, a method to reduce the MR sickness by auditory stimulation is proposed.

  2. Universal Sensor and Actuator Requirements. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Taylor; Webster, John; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The previous chapters have focused on the requirements for sensors and actuators for "More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines" from the perspective of performance and operating environment. Even if a technology is available, which meets these performance requirements, there are still various hurdles to be overcome for the technology to transition into a real engine. Such requirements relate to TRL (Technology Readiness Level), durability, reliability, volume, weight, cost, etc. This chapter provides an overview of such universal requirements which any sensor or actuator technology will have to meet before it can be implemented on a product. The objective here is to help educate the researchers or technology developers on the extensive process that the technology has to go through beyond just meeting performance requirements. The hope is that such knowledge will help the technology developers as well as decision makers to prevent wasteful investment in developing solutions to performance requirements, which have no potential to meet the "universal" requirements. These "universal" requirements can be divided into 2 broad areas: 1) Technology value proposition; and 2) Technology maturation. These requirements are briefly discussed in the following.

  3. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  4. How primary health care physicians make sick listing decisions: The impact of medical factors and functioning

    PubMed Central

    Norrmén, Gunilla; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Andersson, Dan KG

    2008-01-01

    Background The decision to issue sickness certification in Sweden for a patient should be based on the physician's assessment of the reduction of the patient's work capacity due to a disease or injury, not on psychosocial factors, in spite of the fact that they are known as risk factors for sickness absence. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of medical factors and functioning on sick listing probability. Methods Four hundred and seventy-four patient-physician consultations, where sick listing could be an option, in general practice in Örebro county, central Sweden, were documented using physician and patient questionnaires. Information sought was the physicians' assessments of causes and consequences of the patients' complaints, potential to recover, diagnoses and prescriptions on sick leave, and the patients' view of their family and work situation and functioning as well as data on the patients' former and present health situation. The outcome measure was whether or not a sickness certificate was issued. Multivariate analyses were performed. Results Complaints entirely or mainly somatic as assessed by the physician decreased the risk of sick listing, and complaints resulting in severe limitation of occupational work capacity, as assessed by the patient as well as the physician, increased the risk of sick listing, as did appointments for locomotor complaints. The results for patients with infectious diseases or musculoskeletal diseases were partly similar to those for all diseases. Conclusion The strongest predictors for sickness certification were patient's and GP's assessment of reduced work capacity, with a striking concordance between physician and patient on this assessment. When patient's complaints were judged to be non-somatic the risk of sickness certification was enhanced. PMID:18208594

  5. 20 CFR 404.1051 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or related medical or hospitalization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident..., Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1051 Payments on account of sickness or... payment that an employer makes to you, or on your behalf, on account of your sickness or...

  6. 26 CFR 32.2 - Railroad retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... payments on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.2 Section 32.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule..., made to, or on behalf of, an employee or any of his dependents on account of sickness or...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1051 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or related medical or hospitalization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident..., Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1051 Payments on account of sickness or... payment that an employer makes to you, or on your behalf, on account of your sickness or...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1051 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or related medical or hospitalization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident..., Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1051 Payments on account of sickness or... payment that an employer makes to you, or on your behalf, on account of your sickness or...

  9. 26 CFR 32.2 - Railroad retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... payments on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.2 Section 32.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule..., made to, or on behalf of, an employee or any of his dependents on account of sickness or...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1051 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or related medical or hospitalization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident..., Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1051 Payments on account of sickness or... payment that an employer makes to you, or on your behalf, on account of your sickness or...

  11. 26 CFR 32.1 - Social security taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.1 Section 32.1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... security taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule... his dependents on account of sickness or accident disability is not excluded from the term wages...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1051 - Payments on account of sickness or accident disability, or related medical or hospitalization...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Payments on account of sickness or accident..., Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1051 Payments on account of sickness or... payment that an employer makes to you, or on your behalf, on account of your sickness or...

  13. 26 CFR 32.2 - Railroad retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... payments on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.2 Section 32.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule..., made to, or on behalf of, an employee or any of his dependents on account of sickness or...

  14. 26 CFR 32.1 - Social security taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.1 Section 32.1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... security taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule... his dependents on account of sickness or accident disability is not excluded from the term wages...

  15. 26 CFR 32.2 - Railroad retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... payments on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.2 Section 32.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule..., made to, or on behalf of, an employee or any of his dependents on account of sickness or...

  16. 26 CFR 32.2 - Railroad retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... payments on account of sickness or accident disability. 32.2 Section 32.2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... retirement taxes with respect to payments on account of sickness or accident disability. (a) General rule..., made to, or on behalf of, an employee or any of his dependents on account of sickness or...

  17. 26 CFR 31.6051-3 - Statements required in case of sick pay paid by third parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shall furnish to the employer of the payee of the sick pay a written statement. The written statement... sections 6051(a) (relating to written statements for employees) and 6041 (relating to information returns... statement under paragraph (a) from a payor of sick pay shall furnish to each payee of sick pay a...

  18. Chapter 2: Stand-alone Applications - TOPCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables or TOPCAT is a graphical viewer for table data. It offers a variety of ways to work with data tables, including a browser for the cell data, viewers for information about table and column metadata, dataset visualization, and even analysis. We discuss a small subset of TOPCAT's functionalities in this chapter. TOPCAT was originally developed as part of the Starlink program in the United Kingdom. It is now maintained by AstroGrid. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public License. It is available for download and a version is included in the software distribution accompanying this book. TOPCAT is a GUI interface on top of the STIL library. A command line interface to this library, STILTS, described in Chapter 21 provides scriptable access to many of the capabilities described here. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an overview of TOPCAT to the novice user. The best place to look for and learn about TOPCAT is the web page maintained by Mark B. Taylor. There, TOPCAT documentation is provided in HTML, PDF, via screen shots, etc. In this chapter we take the user through a few examples that give the general idea of how TOPCAT works. The majority of the functionality of TOPCAT is not included in this short tutorial. Our goal in this tutorial is to lead the reader through an exercise that would result in a publication quality figure (e.g. for a journal article). Specifically, we will use TOPCAT to show how the color-magnitude relation of a galaxy cluster compares to that of all galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al. 2000). This diagnostic is used not only in cluster finding, but its linear fit can provide insight into the age and/or metallicity of the oldest galaxies in galaxy clusters (which are some of the oldest galaxies in the Universe). The data we need for this exercise are: 1) the entire spectroscopic galaxy catalog from the SDSS, with galaxy positions, galaxy

  19. Views on sick-listing practice among Swedish General Practitioners – a phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    Swartling, Malin; Peterson, Stefan; Wahlström, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Background The number of people on sick-leave started to increase in Sweden and several other European countries towards the end of the 20th century. Physicians play an important role in the sickness insurance system by acting as gate-keepers. Our aim was to explore how General Practitioners (GPs) view their sick-listing commission and sick-listing practice. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs in 17 Primary Health Care settings in four mid-Sweden counties. Interview transcripts were analysed with phenomenographic approach aiming to uncover the variation in existing views regarding the respondents' sick-listing commission and practice. Results We found large qualitative differences in the GPs' views on sick-listing. The sick-listing commission was experienced to come either from society or from patients, with no responsibility for societal interests, or as an integration of these two views. All the GPs were aware of a possible conflict between the interests of society and patients. While some expressed feelings of strong conflict, others seemed to have solved the conflict, at least partly, between these two loyalties. Some GPs experienced carrying the full responsibility to decide whether a patient would get monetary sick-leave benefits or not and they were not comfortable with this situation. Views on the physician's and the patient's responsibility in sick-listing and rehabilitation varied from a passive to an empowering role of the physician. GPs expressing a combination of less inclusive views of the different aspects of sick-listing experienced strong conflict and appeared to feel distressed in their sick-listing role. Some GPs described how they had changed from less to more inclusive views. Conclusion The clearer understanding of the different views on sick-listing generated in this study can be used in educational efforts to improve physicians' sick-listing practices, benefiting GPs' work situation as well as their patients' well-being. The GP

  20. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.