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Sample records for radiation standards complex

  1. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  2. Radiation protection standards in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Warren K.

    Radiation protection standards for the individual exposed to ionizing radiation in his/her daily work have evolved over more than 50 years since the first recommendations on limits by the NCRP and the ICRP. Initial standards were based on the absence of observable harm, notably skin erythema, but have since been modified as other concerns, such as leukemia and genetic effects, became more important. More recently, the general carcinogenic effect of radiation has become the principal concern at low doses. Genetic effects are also of concern in the younger individual. Modern radiation protection practices take both of these risks into account. Quantification of these risks improves as new information emerges. The study of the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs continues to yield new information and the recent revisions in the dosimetry are about to be completed. The special circumstances of space travel suggest approaches to limits not unlike those for radiation workers on the ground. One approach is to derive a career limit based on the risks of accident faced by many nonradiation workers in a lifetime. The career limit can be apportioned according to the type of mission. The NCRP is considering this and other approaches to the specification of radiation standards in space.

  3. Provisional standards of radiation safety during flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Radiation effects during space flights are discussed in the context of the sources and dangers of such radiation and the radiobiological prerequisites for establishing safe levels of radiation dosage. Standard safe levels of radiation during space flight are established.

  4. Toward improved ionizing radiation safety standards.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Otto G

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation safety standards developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) during the past 50-plus years have provided guidance for effective protection of workers and the public from the potentially harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, including cancer. Earlier standards were based primarily on radiation dose rate to organs of the body. More recent recommendations have calculated cancer risk as a function of cumulative dose using a linear no-threshold cancer risk model based on the acute high dose rate exposures received by the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The underlying assumption in these current recommendations is that risk of radiation-induced cancer is proportional to cumulative dose without threshold. In conflict with this position are the studies of protracted exposures from internally-deposited radionuclides in people and laboratory animals that have demonstrated that cancer induction risk is a function of average dose rate for protracted exposures to ionizing radiation. At lower average dose rates, cancer latency can exceed natural lifespan leading to a virtual threshold. This forum statement proposes that the conflict of these two cancer risk models is explained by the fact that the increased risk of cancer observed in the atomic bomb survivor studies was primarily the result of acute high dose rate promotion of ongoing biological processes that lead to cancer rather than cancer induction. In addition, ionizing radiation-induced cancer is not the result of a simple stochastic event in a single living cell but rather a complex deterministic systemic effect in living tissues. It is recommended that the ICRP consider revising its position in light of this important distinction between cancer promotion and cancer induction.

  5. New Standards for Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines covering safe levels for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in an occupational environment are reported. The guidelines clarify the spectral radiant exposure doses and relative spectral effectiveness of ultraviolet radiation required to elicit adverse biologic effects.

  6. Cancer complexity and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2014-07-01

    Management of radiological risks typically encountered in environmental and occupational settings is challenging because of uncertainties in the magnitude of the risks and the benefits of risk reduction. In practice, radiation dose instead of risk is measured. However, the relationship between dose and risk is not straightforward because cancer (the major health effect of concern at low doses) is a disease of complexity. Risks at small doses (defined as less than 100 mSv) can never be known exactly because of the inherent uncertainties in cancer as a complex disease. Tumors are complex because of the nonlinear interactions that occur among tumor cells and between the tumor and its local tissue environment. This commentary reviews evidence for cancer complexity and what complexity means for radiation protection. A complexity view of cancer does not mean we must abandon our current system of protection. What it does mean is that complexity requires new ways of thinking about control of cancer-the ideas that cancers can occur without cause, cancers behave unpredictably, and calculated cancer risks following small doses of radiation are highly uncertain.

  7. Viewpoint on proposed radiation-protection standards

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed revision of 10CFR20 is discussed from a personal perspective. A brief historical review of the development of radiation standards is presented, and arguments against the proposed de minimis level elaborated upon. (ACR)

  8. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.36 - Radiation standards for mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Radiation standards for... CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.36 Radiation standards for mining. (a) For the purpose of this... employee) a report of the employee's exposure to radiation as shown in records maintained by the employer...

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.36 - Radiation standards for mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radiation standards for... CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.36 Radiation standards for mining. (a) For the purpose of this... employee) a report of the employee's exposure to radiation as shown in records maintained by the employer...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.36 - Radiation standards for mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radiation standards for... CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.36 Radiation standards for mining. (a) For the purpose of this... employee) a report of the employee's exposure to radiation as shown in records maintained by the employer...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.36 - Radiation standards for mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Radiation standards for... CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.36 Radiation standards for mining. (a) For the purpose of this... employee) a report of the employee's exposure to radiation as shown in records maintained by the employer...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.36 - Radiation standards for mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Radiation standards for... CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.36 Radiation standards for mining. (a) For the purpose of this... employee) a report of the employee's exposure to radiation as shown in records maintained by the employer...

  14. Heat standards calibration in the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Carillo, L.A.; Rudy, C.R.; Long, S.M.; McDaniel, J.; Rodenburg, W.W.

    1997-11-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Non-nuclear Reconfiguration Program, the Office of Safeguards and Security Calorimetry Development Program has transferred from EG and G Mound Applied Technologies to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. An important function of this program is the calibration and certification of {sup 238}Pu heat standards, which are used to assure accountability of plutonium and tritium throughout the complex. To facilitate relatively uninterrupted calibration service, two calorimeters have been installed in the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These calorimeters are capable of highly accurate measurements of heat standards with power ranging from 0.01 to 20 W. In addition, two new EG and G Mound Applied Technologies calibration calorimeters with a robot handling system have been installed in the Nuclear Safeguards Laboratories at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These calorimeters are located in a specially constructed laboratory that is controlled for temperature and humidity to achieve low uncertainty in the measurements. Because transportation of aging heat standards between sites within the DOE complex has become increasingly difficult, the authors are looking into several approaches to this problem. Repackaging of all heat standards to comply with Department of Transportation and American Nuclear Standards Institute requirements is a long-term goal.

  15. Stochastic electromagnetic radiation of complex sources.

    PubMed

    Naus, H W L

    2007-08-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by localized complex electric charge and current distributions is studied. A statistical formalism in terms of general dynamical multipole fields is developed. The appearing coefficients are treated as stochastic variables. Hereby as much as possible a priori physical knowledge is exploited. First results of simulated statistical electromagnetic fields as a function of position are presented. Sampling this field at one point approximates its resulting probability density.

  16. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  17. IEC standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Ambrosi, P; Behrens, R; Chiaro, P

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation' and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  18. Radiation standards and A-bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.

    1984-10-01

    For more than 33 years, the US government has supported the Life Span Study of Japanese survivors as a follow-up of the 1945 nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Since 1975, the study has been funded jointly by the United States and Japan under the auspices of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. In the May issue of this bulletin radiation epidemiologists Dr. Alice Stewart and George Kneale raise perhaps the most fundamental question of all: Does the Japanese A-bomb survivor study have any value in deriving risk estimates for low-level radiation. On the basis of data published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in 1978, Stewart and Kneale suggest that Foundation analysts have confused long-term effects of tissue-destructive high doses with single-cell low-dose effects. If they are correct, the method of linear extrapolation from high-dose studies for low-level radiation risk estimates is invalid. The author feels the A-bomb survivors study should be opened up to an independent peer review process.

  19. A new standard for core training in radiation safety

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    A new American National Standard for radiation worker training was recently developed. The standard emphasizes performance-based training and establishing a training program rather than simply prescribing objectives. The standard also addresses basic criteria, including instructor qualifications. The standard is based on input from a wide array of regulatory agencies, universities, national laboratories, and nuclear power entities. This paper presents an overview of the new standard and the philosophy behind it. The target audience includes radiation workers, management and supervisory personnel, contractors, students, emergency personnel, and visitors.

  20. IEC International Standards Under Development For Radiation-Generating Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, M; Radev, R; Chiaro, P; Thomson, I; Dray, C; Li, J

    2007-12-06

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is the leading and oldest global organization with over 100 years history of developing and publishing international standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies, including radiation detection instrumentation. Subcommittee 45B 'Radiation Protection Instrumentation' of the IEC has recently started the development of two standards on radiation-generating devices. IEC 62463 'Radiation protection instrumentation--X-ray Systems for the Screening of Persons for Security and the Carrying of Illicit Items' is applicable to X-ray systems designed for screening people to detect if they are carrying objects such as weapons, explosives, chemical and biological agents and other concealed items that could be used for criminal purposes, e.g. terrorist use, drug smuggling, etc. IEC 62523 'Radiation protection instrumentation--Cargo/Vehicle radiographic inspection systems' applies to cargo/vehicle imaging inspection systems using accelerator produced X-ray or gamma radiation to obtain images of the screened objects (e.g. cargo containers, transport and passenger vehicles and railroad cars). The objective of both standards is to specify standard requirements and general characteristics and test procedures, as well as, radiation, electrical, environmental, mechanical, and safety requirements and to provide examples of acceptable methods to test these requirements. In particular the standards address the design requirements as they relate to the radiation protection of the people being screened, people who are in the vicinity of the equipment and the operators. The standard IEC 62463 does not deal with the performance requirements for the quality of the object detection. Compliance with the standards requirements will provide the manufacturers with internationally acceptable specifications and the device users with assurance of the rigorous quality and accuracy of the measurements in relation to the radiological

  1. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, M.

    2011-01-01

    We review here the advances in understanding the effects of ionizing radiations on DNA, proteins and their complexes, resulting from the collaboration of the authors' teams. It concerns the preponderant indirect effect of low LET ionizing radiations, thus the attack of the macromolecules in aqueous solution by the most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl radical. A model of simulation of the reaction of these radicals with the macromolecules (called RADACK) was developed and was used for calculating the probabilities of damage of each constituent of DNA or proteins (nucleotide or amino-acid). The calculations allowed to draw conclusions from electrophoresis, mutagenesis, spectroscopic (fluorescence, circular dichroïsm) and mass spectrometry experiments. Thus we have shown that the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the 3D structure of the macromolecules, which in turns is modulated by their sequence and by the binding of some ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation completed our studies in showing the consequences of each lesion on the stability and structure of the proteins and their complexes with DNA.

  2. Ultraviolet Radiation Dose National Standard of México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, R.; Rosas, E.

    2006-09-01

    We present the Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Dose National Standard for México. The establishment of this measurement reference at Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM) eliminates the need of contacting foreign suppliers in the search for traceability towards the SI units when calibrating instruments at 365 nm. Further more, the UV Radiation Dose National Standard constitutes a highly accurate and reliable source for the UV radiation dose measurements performed in medical and cosmetic treatments as in the the food and pharmaceutics disinfection processes, among other.

  3. Estimating radiated energy for complex volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Ristau, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The August 6th, 2012 Te Maari eruption in the Tongariro National Park included a complex sequence of activity including a pre-eruption debris avalanche and at least three distinct eruptive pulses. In such a scenario, classic seismic methods such as moment tensor inversion struggle to characterize the whole event due to overlapping coda of the disparate bursts. To understand the entire eruption in terms of energy budget, we determine the trace energy density according to the more general formulations of Kanamori (1977) and Vassiliou and Kanamori (1982). By calculating the broad-band integral of the energy spectrum, we quantify radiated energy from the eruption cycle for each component at 3-component seismic monitoring sites surrounding the volcano and compare these results to observations at mid- and far-field distances. We correct for anelastic attenuation, noting that the solution is relatively insensitive to this correction as the records are essentially within the near-field. This suggests that even near to the source, most of the radiated energy is contained in relatively low frequencies which are less attenuated at short propagation distances. In the double-couple case of earthquakes (for which the method was originally developed), difficulties arise in situations with poor azimuthal data coverage. This is because the energy recorded at a single station is largely influenced by heterogeneous radiation patterns. For the volcano case, volumetric excitations of unknown source geometries may produce similar heterogeneities, which can be averaged by incorporation of well-distributed data. Our results provide estimates of radiated energy (Es) from the sequence ranging from 2.96 x 10^9 to 2.58 X 10^10 N*m, corresponding to an average energy magnitude of Me=3.72. This estimate is significantly lower than the predicted energy release based on an independently calculated moment tensor inversion. Preliminary results suggest that routine full-waveform energy calculations

  4. Environmental radiation protection: philosophy, monitoring and standards.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Augustin

    2004-01-01

    The Euratom Treaty confers important powers to the European Commission with regard to monitoring and assessment of levels of radioactivity in the environment and discharges with effluents (Articles 35-37 of the Euratom Treaty). Current developments in the area relate to harmonised reporting of environmental data and to harmonisation of effluent monitoring data. Both developments relate to the requirement under the new Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for a realistic assessment of population exposure. Guidance to this effect is being prepared by the Article 31 Group of Experts. In the context of Article 36 intercomparison exercises for radionuclides measurements in environmental samples are organised. New challenges for environmental monitoring result from the requirement under the BSS to regulate also industries processing NORM materials. Also the international move towards extending the scope of environmental radioactivity to the protection of biota opens new perspectives.

  5. Radiation hardness of Efratom M-100 rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T. C.; Vorwerk, H.; Rudie, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on rubidium gas cell frequency standards and components are presented, including the results of recent tests where a continuously operating rubidium frequency standard (Effratom, Model M-100) was subjected to simultaneous neutron/gamma radiation. At the highest neutron fluence 7.5 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm and total dose 11 krad(Si) tested, the unit operated satisfactorily; the total frequency change over the 2 1/2 hour test period due to all causes, including repeated retraction from and insertion into the reactor, was less than 1 x 10 to the -10th power. The effects of combined neutron/gamma radiation on rubidium frequency standard physics package components were also studied, and the results are presented.

  6. Radiation hardness of Efratom M-100 rubidium frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    English, T.C.; Vorwerk, H.; Rudie, N.J.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on rubidium gas cell frequency standards and components are presented, including the results of recent tests where a continuously operating rubidium frequency standard (Effratom, Model M-100) was subjected to simultaneous neutron/gamma radiation. At the highest neutron fluence 7.5 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm and total dose 11 krad(Si) tested, the unit operated satisfactorily. The total frequency change over the 2 1/2 hour test period due to all causes, including repeated retraction from and insertion into the reactor, was less than 1 x 10 to the -10th power. The effects of combined neutron/gamma radiation on rubidium frequency standard physics package components were also studied, and the results are presented.

  7. Setting standards for radiation protection: A time for change

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, H.W.; Hickman, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1950, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommended that ``certain radiation effects are irreversible and cumulative.`` Furthermore, the ICRP ``strongly recommended that every effort be made to reduce exposures to all types of ionizing radiations to the lowest possible level.`` Then in 1954, the ICRP published its assumption that human response to ionizing radiation was linear with dose, together with the recommendation that exposures be kept as low as practicable. These concepts are still the foundation of radiation protection policy today, even though, as Evans has stated, ``The linear non-threshold (LNT) model was adopted specifically on a basis of mathematical simplicity, not from radio-biological data.... Groups responsible for setting standards for radiation protection should be abreast of new developments and new data as they are published; however, this does not seem to be the case. For example, there have been many reports in scientific, peer-reviewed, and other publications during the last three decades that have shown the LNT model and the policy of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) to be invalid. However, none of these reports has been refuted or even discussed by standard-setting groups. We believe this mandates a change in the standard-setting process.

  8. Federal Guidance Report No. 1: Background Material for the Development of Radiation Protection Standards (Federal Radiation Council)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides required interim radiation protection recommendations. It includes recommendations for additional research which will provide a firmer basis for the formulation of radiation standards.

  9. International cooperative effort to establish dosimetry standardization for radiation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, H. IV

    1989-01-01

    Radiation processing is a rapidly developing technology with numerous applications in food treatment, sterilization, and polymer modification. The effectiveness of the process depends, however, on the proper application of dose and its measurement. These aspects are being considered by a wide group of experts from around the world who have joined together to write a comprehensive set of standards for dosimetry for radiation processing. Originally formed in 1984 to develop standards for food processing dosimetry, the group has now expanded into a full subcommittee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), with 97 members from 19 countries. The scope of the standards now includes dosimetry for all forms of radiation processing. The group has now completed and published four standards, and is working on an additional seven. Three are specifically for food applications and the others are for all radiation applications, including food processing. Together, this set of standards will specify acceptable guidelines and methods for accomplishing the required irradiation treatment, and will be available for adoption by national regulatory agencies in their procedures and protocols. 1 tab.

  10. Radiative breaking of conformal symmetry in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Pavlov, A. E.; Pervushin, V. N.; Zakharov, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Radiative mechanism of conformal symmetry breaking in a comformal-invariant version of the Standard Model is considered. The Coleman-Weinberg mechanism of dimensional transmutation in this system gives rise to finite vacuum expectation values and, consequently, masses of scalar and spinor fields. A natural bootstrap between the energy scales of the top quark and Higgs boson is suggested.

  11. A review of the history of U.S. radiation protection regulations, recommendations, and standards.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cynthia G

    2005-06-01

    Shortly after the discovery of x rays by Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen in 1895, and the isolation of the element radium by Pierre and Marie Curie three years later, the fascination with and potential for an array of uses of ionizing radiation in medicine, science, and technology was born. As with any new technology, there was a need to balance both the beneficial and potential detrimental effects of uses of these new technologies for the advancement of humankind. In the early days, radiation hazards were not well understood. Over the decades increasing concerns in the scientific community and lay population demanded that standardized guidance and recommendations be developed for the use of ionizing radiation. Today, U.S. radiation protection standards and recommendations to protect the occupational worker, members of the general public, and the environment are numerous and complex. This review summarizes the history of the development and application of radiation protection standards and regulations to assure the safe use of radiation and radioactive materials. The evolution and roles of international and national scientific recommending and regulatory organizations that shape U.S. radiation protection policy are described and discussed.

  12. Transition Radiation as a Secondary Standard Source in the VUV.

    PubMed

    Böhm, W; Labs, D

    1971-09-01

    The optical radiation caused by electron bombardment of metallic surfaces was tested for its use as a secondary standard source in the VUV. Aluminum of high purity was found to be a suitable target material. The reproducibility of the radiation is of the order of 4% to 2% for 0.11 < lambda < 0.15 microm and 0.15 < lambda < 0.27 microm, respectively. In the spectral region 0.17 microm to 0.27 microm, the source was calibrated absolutely by comparison with a deuterium lamp of known absolute intensity.

  13. HIPAA privacy standards raise complex implementation issues.

    PubMed

    DeMuro, P R; Gantt, W A

    2001-01-01

    In November 1999, under the mandate of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, HHS issued proposed standards to protect the privacy of electronically transmitted personal health information. With publication of the final standards due soon, healthcare organizations must prepare to implement new processes and information systems to comply with the HIPAA requirements. The privacy standards are intended to accomplish three broad objectives: define the circumstances in which protected health information may be used and disclosed, establish certain individual rights regarding protected health information, and require that administrative safeguards be adopted to ensure the privacy of protected health information. Among the required administrative safeguards are designation of a privacy officer, implementation of compliance training programs for all applicable staff, establishment of a complaint system, and implementation of appropriate sanctions for violations of privacy requirements.

  14. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksenov, A. F.; Burnazyan, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  15. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, A.F.; Burnazyan, A.I.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  16. 21 CFR 14.120 - Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). 14.120 Section 14.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Technical Electronic Products Radiation Safety Standards Committee § 14.120 Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). The Technical Electronic Product Radiation...

  17. 21 CFR 14.120 - Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). 14.120 Section 14.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Technical Electronic Products Radiation Safety Standards Committee § 14.120 Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). The Technical Electronic Product Radiation...

  18. 21 CFR 14.120 - Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). 14.120 Section 14.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Technical Electronic Products Radiation Safety Standards Committee § 14.120 Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). The Technical Electronic Product Radiation...

  19. 21 CFR 14.120 - Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). 14.120 Section 14.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Technical Electronic Products Radiation Safety Standards Committee § 14.120 Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). The Technical Electronic Product Radiation...

  20. 21 CFR 14.120 - Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). 14.120 Section 14.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Technical Electronic Products Radiation Safety Standards Committee § 14.120 Establishment of the Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC). The Technical Electronic Product Radiation...

  1. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  2. Evolution of radiation resistance in a complex microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Hyun; Austin, Robert; Mehta, Monal; Kahn, Atif

    2013-03-01

    Radiation treatment responses in brain cancers are typically associated with short progression-free intervals in highly lethal malignancies such as glioblastomas. Even as patients routinely progress through second and third line salvage therapies, which are usually empirically selected, surprisingly little information exists on how cancer cells evolve resistance. We will present experimental results showing how in the presence of complex radiation gradients evolution of resistance to radiation occurs. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  3. Contribution to the radiation protection for sunglasses standards.

    PubMed

    Masili, Mauro; Schiabel, Homero; Ventura, Liliane

    2015-04-01

    Literature establishes safe limits on the exposure of the eyes to ultraviolet radiation, for the range of 180-400 nm, including spectrally weighted and the total ultraviolet radiant exposure. Most standards for sunglasses protection only require ultraviolet protection in the spectral range of 280-380 nm to ensure the limits for effective spectrally weighted radiant exposure. Calculations of these limits were performed for 27 Brazilian state capitals, and they led to a change in the upper UVA limit to 400 nm on the 2013 review of the Brazilian standard. Moreover, because the sunlight irradiance in Brazil is quite high, integration over the 280- to 400-nm range yields an ultraviolet radiant exposure that is an average of 49% greater than that for the 280- to 380-nm range. These conclusions suggest revision on the standards. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The MCART radiation physics core: the quest for radiation dosimetry standardization.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Abdul M; MacVittie, Thomas J; Lasio, Giovanni; Lu, Wei; Prado, Karl L

    2014-01-01

    Dose-related radiobiological research results can only be compared meaningfully when radiation dosimetry is standardized. To this purpose, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)-sponsored Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Threats (MCART) consortium recently created a Radiation Physics Core (RPC) as an entity to assume responsibility of standardizing radiation dosimetry practices among its member laboratories. The animal research activities in these laboratories use a variety of ionizing photon beams from several irradiators such as 250-320 kVp x-ray generators, Cs irradiators, Co teletherapy machines, and medical linear accelerators (LINACs). In addition to this variety of sources, these centers use a range of irradiation techniques and make use of different dose calculation schemes to conduct their experiments. An extremely important objective in these research activities is to obtain a Dose Response Relationship (DRR) appropriate to their respective organ-specific models of acute and delayed radiation effects. A clear and unambiguous definition of the DRR is essential for the development of medical countermeasures. It is imperative that these DRRs are transparent between centers. The MCART RPC has initiated the establishment of standard dosimetry practices among member centers and is introducing a Remote Dosimetry Monitoring Service (RDMS) to ascertain ongoing quality assurance. This paper will describe the initial activities of the MCART RPC toward implementing these standardization goals. It is appropriate to report a summary of initial activities with the intent of reporting the full implementation at a later date.

  5. Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. L.

    2002-02-27

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued radiation protection standards for the potential spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste disposal system in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These standards are found in Part 197 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 197). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed, and gave the authority to, EPA to take this action based upon input from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The final standards were published in the Federal Register (66 FR 32073) on 13 June 2001. The 40 CFR Part 197 standards have four major parts: (1) individual-protection during storage activities; (2) individual-protection following closure of the repository; (3) human-intrusion; and (4) ground-water protection. The storage standard is 150 microsieverts (Sv) annual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to any member of the general public. The disposal standards are: (1) 150 Sv annual CEDE for the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for 10,000 years after disposal; (2) 150 Sv received by the RMEI within 10,000 years after disposal as a result of human intrusion; and (3) the levels of radionuclides in the ground water cannot exceed 40 Sv from beta and gamma emitters, 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of radium-226 and -228, and 15 pCi/L of gross alpha activity. There are also requirements related to the post-10,000-year period, the basis of compliance judgments, and performance assessments. The Agency has published its responses to the comments received, its technical background document, and its economic impact analysis. In addition to printed form, the documents are available on the World Wide Web at http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/index.html.

  6. Salen Mn complexes mitigate radiation injury in normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, RA; Fish, B.; Hill, R.P.; Huffman, KD; Lazarova, Z.; Mahmood, J; Medhora, M; Molthen, R; Moulder, J.E.; Sonis, ST; Tofilon, P.J.; Doctrow, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Salen Mn complexes, including EUK-134, EUK-189 and a newer cyclized analog EUK-207, are synthetic SOD/catalase mimetics that have beneficial effects in many models of oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is implicated in some forms of delayed radiation injury, we are investigating whether these compounds can mitigate injury to normal tissues caused by ionizing radiation. This review describes some of this research, focusing on several tissues of therapeutic interest, namely kidney, lung, skin, and oral mucosa. These studies have demonstrated suppression of delayed radiation injury in animals treated with EUK-189 and/or EUK-207. While an antioxidant mechanism of action is postulated, it is likely that the mechanisms of radiation mitigation by these compounds in vivo are complex and may differ in the various target tissues. Indicators of oxidative stress are increased in lung and skin radiation injury models, and suppressed by salen Mn complexes. The role of oxidative stress in the renal injury model is unclear, though EUK-207 does mitigate. In certain experimental models, salen Mn complexes have shown “mito-protective” properties, that is, attenuating mitochondrial injury. Consistent with this, EUK-134 suppresses effects of ionizing radiation on mitochondrial function in rat astrocyte cultures. In summary, salen Mn complexes could be useful to mitigate delayed radiation injury to normal tissues following radiation therapy, accidental exposure, or radiological terrorism. Optimization of their mode of delivery and other key pharmaceutical properties, and increasing understanding of their mechanism(s) of action as radiation mitigators, are key issues for future study. PMID:21453241

  7. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  8. 76 FR 70130 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... AGENCY Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards AGENCY... (EPA) will host a meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) on... of regulatory issues associated with radiation standards. Agencies represented as members of...

  9. 78 FR 21120 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... regulatory issues associated with radiation standards. Member agencies include the EPA; Nuclear Regulatory... AGENCY Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards AGENCY... Agency (EPA) will host a meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS)...

  10. 75 FR 66092 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... AGENCY Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards AGENCY... (EPA) will host a meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) on... of regulatory issues associated with radiation standards. Agencies represented as members of...

  11. 78 FR 54248 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... of regulatory issues associated with radiation standards. Member agencies include: EPA; the Nuclear... AGENCY Notice of Public Meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards AGENCY... Agency (EPA) will host a meeting of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS)...

  12. 10 CFR 71.47 - External radiation standards for all packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false External radiation standards for all packages. 71.47... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.47 External radiation standards for all packages. (a) Except as... the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external surface of the...

  13. 10 CFR 71.47 - External radiation standards for all packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false External radiation standards for all packages. 71.47... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.47 External radiation standards for all packages. (a) Except as... the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external surface of the...

  14. 10 CFR 71.47 - External radiation standards for all packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false External radiation standards for all packages. 71.47... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.47 External radiation standards for all packages. (a) Except as... the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external surface of the...

  15. 10 CFR 71.47 - External radiation standards for all packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false External radiation standards for all packages. 71.47... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.47 External radiation standards for all packages. (a) Except as... the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external surface of the...

  16. 10 CFR 71.47 - External radiation standards for all packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false External radiation standards for all packages. 71.47... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.47 External radiation standards for all packages. (a) Except as... the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external surface of the...

  17. Radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in standard model extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Gogoladze, Ilia; Khan, S.

    2017-05-01

    We study the possibility of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking where loop corrections to the mass parameter of the Higgs boson trigger the symmetry breaking in various extensions of the Standard Model (SM). Although the mechanism fails in the SM, it is shown to be quite successful in several extensions which share a common feature of having an additional scalar around the TeV scale. The positive Higgs mass parameter at a high energy scale is turned negative in the renormalization group flow to lower energy by the cross couplings between the scalars in the Higgs potential. The type-II seesaw model with a TeV scale weak scalar triplet, a two-loop radiative neutrino mass model with new scalars at the TeV scale, the inert doublet model, scalar singlet dark matter model, and a universal seesaw model with an additional U (1 ) broken at the TeV scale are studied and shown to exhibit successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking.

  18. Radar cross sections of standard and complex shape targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohel, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The theoretical, analytical, and experimental results are described for radar cross sections (RCS) of different-shaped targets. Various techniques for predicting RCS are given, and RCS of finite standard targets are presented. Techniques used to predict the RCS of complex targets are made, and the RCS complex shapes are provided.

  19. Robotic Delivery of Complex Radiation Volumes for Small Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel and complete system capable of delivering multidirectional (focal), kilo-voltage radiation fields to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focused beams to multiple animal models provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. This paper describes the design and operation of the SARRP for precise radiation delivery. Different delivery procedures are presented which enable the system to radiate through a series of points, representative of a complex shape. A particularly interesting case is shell dose irradiation, where the goal is to deliver a high dose of radiation to the shape surface, with minimal dose to the shape interior. The ability to deliver a dose shell allows mechanistic research of how a tumor interacts with its microenvironment to sustain its growth and lead to its resistance or recurrence. PMID:21643448

  20. The Common Core State Standards' Quantitative Text Complexity Trajectory: Figuring out How Much Complexity Is Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Gary L.; Fitzgerald, Jill; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) set a controversial aspirational, quantitative trajectory for text complexity exposure for readers throughout the grades, aiming for all high school graduates to be able to independently read complex college and workplace texts. However, the trajectory standard is presented without reference to how the…

  1. Estimating nurses' exposures to ionizing radiation: the elusive gold standard.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Kay; Chow, Yat; Chung, Joanna; Ratner, Pamela; Spinelli, John; Le, Nhu; Ward, Helen

    2008-02-01

    This study assessed ionizing radiation exposure in 58,125 registered nurses in British Columbia, Canada, for a cohort study of cancer morbidity and mortality. Two methods were used: (1) a survey of nurses in more than 100 acute care hospitals and health care centers; (2) and monitoring data reported to the National Dose Registry of Health Canada, considered the gold standard. The mean exposure of cohort nurses monitored during the study period from 1974 to 2000 was 0.27 milliSieverts (7028 person-years of monitoring). Of 609,809 person-years in the cohort, 554,595 (90.9%) were identified as unexposed by both exposure assessment methods. Despite crude agreement of 91% between the methods, weighted kappa for agreement beyond chance was only 0.045, and the sensitivity of the survey method to capture National Dose Registry monitored person-years was only 0.085 (specificity = 0.97). The survey missed exposures outside the acute care setting. The National Dose Registry also missed potential exposures, especially among hospital emergency department and pediatric staff nurses. It was unlikely that either method estimated nurses' true exposures to ionizing radiation with good sensitivity and specificity. The difficulty in exposure assessment likely arises because fewer than 10% of registered nurses are exposed to ionizing radiation, yet the settings in which they are exposed vary tremendously. This means that careful hazard assessment is required to ensure that monitoring is complete where exposures are probable, without incurring the excess costs and lack of specificity of including the unexposed.

  2. On a radiative origin of the Standard Model from trinification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a trinification-based grand unified theory incorporating a global SU(3) family symmetry that after a spontaneous breaking leads to a left-right symmetric model. Already at the classical level, this model can accommodate the matter content and the quark Cabbibo mixing in the Standard Model (SM) with only one Yukawa coupling at the unification scale. Considering the minimal low-energy scenario with the least amount of light states, we show that the resulting effective theory enables dynamical breaking of its gauge group down to that of the SM by means of radiative corrections accounted for by the renormalisation group evolution at one loop. This result paves the way for a consistent explanation of the SM breaking scale and fermion mass hierarchies.

  3. System 80+{trademark} standard design incorporates radiation protection lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Crom, T.D.; Naugle, C.L.; Turk, R.S.

    1995-03-01

    Many lessons have been learned from the current generation of nuclear plants in the area of radiation protection. The following paper will outline how the lessons learned have been incorporated into the design and operational philosophy of the System 80+{trademark} Standard Design currently under development by ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) with support from Duke Engineering and Services, Inc. and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation in the Balance-of-Plant design. The System 80+{trademark} Standard Design is a complete nuclear power plant for national and international markets, designed in direct response to utility needs for the 1990`s, and scheduled for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Design Certification under the new standardization rule (10 CFR Part 52). System 80+{trademark} is a natural extension of System 80{sup R} technology, an evolutionary change based on proven Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde in Arizona and under construction at Yonggwang in the Republic of Korea. The System 80+{trademark} Containment and much of the Balance of Plant design is based upon Duke Power Company`s Cherokee Plant, which was partially constructed in the late 1970`s, but, was later canceled (due to rapid declined in electrical load growth). The System 80+{trademark} Standard Design meets the requirements given in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Requirements Document. One of these requirements is to limit the occupational exposure to 100 person-rem/yr. This paper illustrates how this goal can be achieved through the incorporation of lessons learned, innovative design, and the implementation of a common sense approach to operation and maintenances practices.

  4. Physical and biological properties of U. S. standard endotoxin EC after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Elin, R.J.; Hochstein, H.D.; Tsai, C.M.

    1983-07-01

    Techniques that reduce the toxicity of bacterial endotoxins are useful for studying the relationship between structure and biological activity. We used ionizing radiation to detoxify a highly refined endotoxin preparation. U.S. standard endotoxin EC. Dose-dependent changes occurred by exposure to /sup 60/Co-radiation in the physical properties and biological activities of the endotoxin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis showed gradual loss of the polysaccharide components (O-side chain and R-core) from the endotoxin molecules. In contrast, although endotoxin revealed a complex absorption pattern in the UV range, radiation treatment failed to modify that pattern. Dose-related destruction of the primary toxic component, lipid A, was suggested by the results of activity tests: both the pyrogenicity and limulus reactivity of the endotoxin were destroyed by increasing doses of radiation. The results indicate that the detoxification is probably due to multiple effects of the ionizing radiation on bacterial lipopolysaccharides, and the action involves (i) the destruction of polysaccharide moieties and possibly (ii) the alteration of lipid A component of the endotoxin molecule.

  5. A novel approach to characterize information radiation in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Lin; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    The traditional research of information dissemination is mostly based on the virus spreading model that the information is being spread by probability, which does not match very well to the reality, because the information that we receive is always more or less than what was sent. In order to quantitatively describe variations in the amount of information during the spreading process, this article proposes a safety information radiation model on the basis of communication theory, combining with relevant theories of complex networks. This model comprehensively considers the various influence factors when safety information radiates in the network, and introduces some concepts from the communication theory perspective, such as the radiation gain function, receiving gain function, information retaining capacity and information second reception capacity, to describe the safety information radiation process between nodes and dynamically investigate the states of network nodes. On a micro level, this article analyzes the influence of various initial conditions and parameters on safety information radiation through the new model simulation. The simulation reveals that this novel approach can reflect the variation of safety information quantity of each node in the complex network, and the scale-free network has better ;radiation explosive power;, while the small-world network has better ;radiation staying power;. The results also show that it is efficient to improve the overall performance of network security by selecting nodes with high degrees as the information source, refining and simplifying the information, increasing the information second reception capacity and decreasing the noises. In a word, this article lays the foundation for further research on the interactions of information and energy between internal components within complex systems.

  6. In situ TEM of radiation effects in complex ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, L M; Sun, Kai; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-03-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been extensively applied to study radiation effects in a wide variety of materials, such as metals, ceramics and semiconductors and is an indispensable tool in obtaining a fundamental understanding of energetic beam-matter interactions, damage events, and materials' behavior under intense radiation environments. In this article, in situ TEM observations of radiation effects in complex ceramics (e.g., oxides, silicates, and phosphates) subjected to energetic ion and electron irradiations have been summarized with a focus on irradiation-induced microstructural evolution, changes in microchemistry, and the formation of nanostructures. New results for in situ TEM observation of radiation effects in pyrochlore, A(2)B(2)O(7), and zircon, ZrSiO(4), subjected to multiple beam irradiations are presented, and the effects of simultaneous irradiations of alpha-decay and beta-decay on the microstructural evolution of potential nuclear waste forms are discussed. Furthermore, in situ TEM results of radiation effects in a sodium borosilicate glass subjected to electron-beam exposure are introduced to highlight the important applications of advanced analytical TEM techniques, including Z-contrast imaging, energy filtered TEM (EFTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in studying radiation effects in materials microstructural evolution and microchemical changes. By combining ex situ TEM and advanced analytical TEM techniques with in situ TEM observations under energetic beam irradiations, one can obtain invaluable information on the phase stability and response behaviors of materials under a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  7. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; ...

    2015-01-30

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. Despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under themore » same controlled conditions. A model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. We observed the protein at low doses and found that they were susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.« less

  8. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses. PMID:25723923

  9. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-30

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. Despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. A model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. We observed the protein at low doses and found that they were susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.

  10. Anomalously small blackbody radiation shift in the Tl+ frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhrianda, Z.; Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2012-02-01

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. In the present work, we used configuration interaction + coupled-cluster method to evaluate polarizabilities of the 6s21S0 and 6s6p3P0 states of the Tl+ ion; we find α0(1S0)=19.6 a.u. and α0(3P0)=21.4 a.u. The resulting BBR shift of the 6s6p3P0-6s21S0 Tl+ transition at 300 K is ΔνBBR=-0.0157(16) Hz. This result demonstrates that near cancellation of the 1S0 and 3P0 state polarizabilities in divalent B+, Al+, and In+ ions of group IIIB [M. S. Safronova , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.143006 107, 143006 (2011)] continues for much heavier Tl+, leading to anomalously small BBR shift for this system. This calculation demonstrates that the BBR contribution to the fractional frequency uncertainty of the Tl+ frequency standard at 300 K is 1×10-18. We find that Tl+ has the smallest fractional BBR shift among all present or proposed frequency standards with the exception of Al+.

  11. Comparison of a suspended radiation protection system versus standard lead apron for radiation exposure of a simulated interventionalist.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Daniel A; Anwar, Temoor; Kirsch, David; Clements, Jessica; Carlson, Luke; Savage, Clare; Rees, Chet R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the radiation protective characteristics of a system designed to enhance operator protection while eliminating weight to the body and allowing freedom of motion. Radiation doses to a mock interventionalist were measured with calibrated dosimeters in a clinical interventional suite. A standard lead apron (SLA; Pb equivalent, 0.5 mm) was compared with a suspended radiation protection system (ZeroGravity; Zgrav) that shields from the top of the head to the calves (except the right arm and left forearm) with a complex overhead motion system that eliminates weight on the operator and allows freedom of motion. Zgrav included a suspended lead apron with increased lead equivalency, greater length, proximal left arm and shoulder coverage, and a wraparound face shield of 0.5 mm Pb equivalency. A 26-cm-thick Lucite stack (ie, mock patient) created scatter during 10 controlled angiography sequences of 120 exposures each. Parameters included a field of view of 40 cm, table height of 94 cm, 124 cm from the tube to image intensifier, 50 cm from the image center to operator, 66 kVp, and 466-470 mA. Under identical conditions, average doses (SLA vs Zgrav) were 264 versus 3.4 (ratio, 78) to left axilla (P < .001), 456 versus 10.2 (ratio, 45) to left eye (P < .001), 379.4 versus 6.6 (ratio, 57) to right eye (P < .005), and 18.8 versus 1.2 (ratio, 16) to gonad (P < .001). Relative to a conventional lead apron, the Zgrav system provided a 16-78-fold decrease in radiation exposure for a mock interventionalist in a simulated clinical setting. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Standards for protection against radiation, 10 CFR Part 20

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, D.A.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1991-10-01

    On may 21, 1991, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a revision to its standards for protection against ionizing radiation, 10 CFR Part 20. Although the revised part ({section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401) became effective on June 20, 1991, licensees may defer implementation of the revised rule until January 1, 1993. Licensees continue to be required to comply with the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 until the time they adopt the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401. Therefore, between June 20, 1991 and January 1, 1993 both the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 and {section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401 are in effect. This NUREG presents a comparative text of the provisions of the revised Part 20 ({section}{section} 20.1001-20. 2401) to the text of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 for use by the NRC staff and NRC licensees. 2 refs.

  13. Radiation Trapping in Electrodeless Lamps: Complex Geometries and Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaraman, Kapil; Kushner, Mark J.

    2003-10-01

    Electrodeless gas discharges are finding increasing applications as lighting sources, especially for Ar/Hg based fluorescent lamps. The particulars of resonance radiation trapping from Hg are important considerations in the design of these sources. For simple geometries, analytical formulas for the radiation trapping factors can be derived. For many lamp designs, however, the geometries are complex, and there are spatially non-uniform densities of the emitting and absorbing atoms. To address these complexities, a Monte Carlo model for resonance radiation transport has been developed which accounts for frequency resolved emission and absorption. This radiation transport model has been integrated into a 2-D self-consistent plasma equipment model which accounts for electromagnetics, electron energy transport, and heavy particle transport, and the solution of the Poisson's equation. The influence of the lamp geometry has been studied by varying the size and shape of bulb, as well as the number and positions of the inductive coils. The coil frequency, coil power, cold-spot temperature and the initial pressure were varied to investigate their effects on the trapping factors.

  14. Statistical aspects of determining compliance with radiation standards

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Kinnison, R.R.; Gilbert, R.O.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation surveys are an important tool used to monitor the safety of operations at nuclear fuel cycle facilities, as well as determining if contaminated sites require remedial action before license termination or unrestricted release. It is important that radiation surveys are carefully designed to provide the right quantity and quality of useful information for making valid decisions concerning public safety. The validity of survey information is especially important when low-level radiation detection techniques are required such as for environmental radiation monitoring. Thus, statistical aspects of radiation surveys are important in demonstrating compliance with radiation guidelines and for deciding when remedial action or cleanup is required. In this paper, we discuss the statistical aspects of evaluating whether guidelines are, in fact, being exceeded.

  15. Standards for Radiation Effects Testing: Ensuring Scientific Rigor in the Face of Budget Realities and Modern Device Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is presented of the space radiation environment and its effects on electrical, electronic, and electromechanical parts. Relevant test standards and guidelines are listed. Test standards and guidelines are necessary to ensure best practices, minimize and bound systematic and random errors, and to ensure comparable results from different testers and vendors. Test standards are by their nature static but exist in a dynamic environment of advancing technology and radiation effects research. New technologies, failure mechanisms, and advancement in our understanding of known failure mechanisms drive the revision or development of test standards. Changes to standards must be weighed against their impact on cost and existing part qualifications. There must be consensus on new best practices. The complexity of some new technologies exceeds the scope of existing test standards and may require development of a guideline specific to the technology. Examples are given to illuminate the value and limitations of key radiation test standards as well as the challenges in keeping these standards up to date.

  16. An update on standards for radiation in the environment and associated estimates of risk

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-06-21

    This presentation reviews current and proposed standards, recommendations, and guidances for limiting routine radiation exposures of the public, and estimates the risk corresponding to standards, recommendations, and guidances. These estimates provide a common basis for comparing different criteria for limiting public exposures to radiation, as well as hazardous chemicals.

  17. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  18. Provisional standards of radiation safety of flight personnel and passengers in air transport of the civil aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Provisional standards for radiation affecting passenger aircraft are considered. Agencies responsible for seeing that the regulations are enforced are designated while radiation sources and types of radiation are defined. Standard levels of permissible radiation are given and conditions for radiation safety are discussed. Dosimetric equipment on board aircraft is delineated and regulation effective dates are given.

  19. Rugged adaptive landscapes shape a complex, sympatric radiation

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Jobst; Hadiaty, Renny K.; Schliewen, Ulrich K.; Herder, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Strong disruptive ecological selection can initiate speciation, even in the absence of physical isolation of diverging populations. Species evolving under disruptive ecological selection are expected to be ecologically distinct but, at least initially, genetically weakly differentiated. Strong selection and the associated fitness advantages of narrowly adapted individuals, coupled with assortative mating, are predicted to overcome the homogenizing effects of gene flow. Theoretical plausibility is, however, contrasted by limited evidence for the existence of rugged adaptive landscapes in nature. We found evidence for multiple, disruptive ecological selection regimes that have promoted divergence in the sympatric, incipient radiation of ‘sharpfin’ sailfin silverside fishes in ancient Lake Matano (Sulawesi, Indonesia). Various modes of ecological specialization have led to adaptive morphological differences between the species, and differently adapted morphs display significant but incomplete reproductive isolation. Individual fitness and variation in morphological key characters show that disruptive selection shapes a rugged adaptive landscape in this small but complex incipient lake fish radiation. PMID:26763702

  20. Rugged adaptive landscapes shape a complex, sympatric radiation.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Jobst; Hadiaty, Renny K; Schliewen, Ulrich K; Herder, Fabian

    2016-01-13

    Strong disruptive ecological selection can initiate speciation, even in the absence of physical isolation of diverging populations. Species evolving under disruptive ecological selection are expected to be ecologically distinct but, at least initially, genetically weakly differentiated. Strong selection and the associated fitness advantages of narrowly adapted individuals, coupled with assortative mating, are predicted to overcome the homogenizing effects of gene flow. Theoretical plausibility is, however, contrasted by limited evidence for the existence of rugged adaptive landscapes in nature. We found evidence for multiple, disruptive ecological selection regimes that have promoted divergence in the sympatric, incipient radiation of 'sharpfin' sailfin silverside fishes in ancient Lake Matano (Sulawesi, Indonesia). Various modes of ecological specialization have led to adaptive morphological differences between the species, and differently adapted morphs display significant but incomplete reproductive isolation. Individual fitness and variation in morphological key characters show that disruptive selection shapes a rugged adaptive landscape in this small but complex incipient lake fish radiation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; ...

    2016-04-26

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. We developed a methodology whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98more » Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the largetrpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. In addition, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.« less

  2. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-04-26

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. We developed a methodology whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the largetrpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. In addition, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.

  3. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Bury, Charles S; McGeehan, John E; Antson, Alfred A; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B; Garman, Elspeth F

    2016-05-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3-25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein-DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density.

  4. European standards for protective apparel against UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Laperre, Jan; Foubert, Fred

    2002-01-01

    The first European standard which describes the test procedure to determine the UV-protection factor of clothing is about to be completed. A second part of the same standard, dealing with labelling and marking aspects, is ready to be submitted to public enquiry. In this effort a group of experts from most EU member states have cooperated with a high degree of consensus. In this chapter we explain this European standard together with the standard developed in the UK.

  5. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g., Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep (RFIC) method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  6. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Stephen Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  7. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards.

    PubMed

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  8. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients. PMID:26229680

  9. Radiation standards and calibrations. FY-1981 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Fox, R.A.; Hooker, C.D.; Hogan, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Hadley, R.T.

    1982-07-01

    The research program encompasses: reviewing calibration standards, regulations, and handbooks; assuring that calibration procedures used are in agreement with technically accepted methods; maintaining basic radioactive sources and instruments that serve as radiological standards; and providing traceability to the National Bureau of Standards where possible. In addition, major efforts are being expended to upgrade the 318 calibration facility. This report focuses on major accomplishments during FY-1981. However, most maintenance and quality assurance efforts involve routine support and only a summary report is provided. (PSB)

  10. Radiation protection standards: their evolution from science to philosophy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R L; Gray, Joel E; Archer, B R; Simpkin, D J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of applying constraints on individual sources to a small fraction of the public dose limit has been deemed inappropriate when shielding the medical X-ray sources. This represents a broad-based consensus of medical physics and radiological societies in the United States, and the report series on the shielding design for medical X-ray sources (including dental, X-ray imaging and therapeutic X ray) from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) utilises 1 mSv y(-1) as a source control limit. In the present study, the rationale for such a conclusion is discussed, and a somewhat critical look at the current model of radiation protection of the public is made.

  11. Blackbody radiation shift in ^87Rb frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, Marianna; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-03-01

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in ^87Rb using the relativistic all-order method and evaluated the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly-excited states. Various Rb atomic properties, including E1, E2, and E3 ground state polarizabilities, np and nd E1 polarizabilities, and hyperfine constants are also calculated. The results are compared with experiment and other theory where available.

  12. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  13. Radiation Standards: The Last Word or at Least a Definitive One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Robert

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the report of the National Academy of Science Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation, with particular reference to the possibilities for lowering maximum permissible standards for exposure to man-made radiation. The excessive use of diagnostic X-rays is considered. (AL)

  14. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Two-dimensional multilevel radiative transfer with standard partial frequency redistribution in isolated solar atmospheric structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.

    1995-10-01

    We have implemented standard partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in a two-dimensional multilevel non-LTE radiative transfer code. The Multilevel Accelerated Lambda Iteration (MALI) method is used. First, a numerical approach for treating standard PRD effects is described, as well as a simple method for treating an optically thick bound-free transition with MALI. Then, the method is validated in mono-dimensional geometry. Finally, preliminary results from two-dimensional radiative modelling of solar prominences are presented.

  16. 76 FR 4944 - Ionizing Radiation Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Ionizing Radiation Standard; Extension of the Office of... requirements specified in the Ionizing Radiation Standard (29 CFR 1910.1096). The information collection requirements contained in the Ionizing Radiation Standard protect workers from the adverse health effects that...

  17. Radiation Observations from CREAM & CREDO and Comparison with Standard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, C.; Watson, C.; Truscott, P.; Peerless, C.

    1996-12-01

    The Cosmic Radiation Environment and Activation Monitor (CREAM) has flown on six Shuttle flights between September 1991 and February 1995, covering the full range of inclinations as well as altitudes between 210 and 550 km. Meanwhile the Cosmic Radiation Environment and Dosimetry experiment (CREDO) has operated continuously on UOSAT-3 in 800 km, 98.7 degree orbit since April 1990. Similar detectors were launched on KITSAT-1 (1330 km, 66 degree inclination) in August 1992 and POSAT-l (790 km, 98.7 degree inclination) in September 1993. Since the summer of 1994, CREDO-II versions have been operating on APEX in an eccentric orbit (350x2486 km) at 70 degree inclination, and on STRV in geostationary transfer orbit (298x35953 km, 7 degree inclination). These experiments are designed to measure protons, cosmic rays and accumulated dose. Through the variety of missions employed they have now achieved wide coverage of the magnetosphere as well as a significant portion of a solar cycle. The LEO observations have shown the Westward drift of the South Atlantic Anomaly, new regimes of trapped protons in the region of L=2.6 following solar flare events in March 1991 and October 1992, and an altitude dependence of trapped protons which is at variance with AP8. On STRV the background channel of the Cold Ion Detector serves as a complementary electron detector and shows the extreme time variability of the outer radiation belt, while the total dose is significantly less than AE8 predictions. In addition to the data on trapped radiation, important results are being obtained on the linear energy transfer spectra from cosmic rays. Detailed shielding models of the APEX and STRV spacecraft have been constructed and used to compare the observations of dose and LET spectra with predictions from AE8, AP8 and CREME for a variety of shielding depths. Consistent results on the LET spectra are obtained from APEX and STRV when data are selected by cut-off rigidity. The influence of spacecraft

  18. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  19. Blackbody radiation shift in the {sup 87}Rb frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Jiang Dansha; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-08-15

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature, of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in {sup 87}Rb using the relativistic all-order method and carried out a detailed evaluation of the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly excited states. Our predicted value for the Stark coefficient, k{sub S}=-1.240(4)x10{sup -10} Hz/(V/m){sup 2}, is three times more accurate than the previous calculation [E. J. Angstman, V. A. Dzuba, and V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. A 74, 023405 (2006)].

  20. Blackbody radiation shift in the Rb87 frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Jiang, Dansha; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-08-01

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature, of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in Rb87 using the relativistic all-order method and carried out a detailed evaluation of the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly excited states. Our predicted value for the Stark coefficient, kS=-1.240(4)×10-10Hz/(V/m)2, is three times more accurate than the previous calculation [E. J. Angstman, V. A. Dzuba, and V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.74.023405 74, 023405 (2006)].

  1. [Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in São Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance.

  2. Modelling radiation fluxes in simple and complex environments--application of the RayMan model.

    PubMed

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Mayer, Helmut

    2007-03-01

    The most important meteorological parameter affecting the human energy balance during sunny weather conditions is the mean radiant temperature T(mrt). It considers the uniform temperature of a surrounding surface giving off blackbody radiation, which results in the same energy gain of a human body given the prevailing radiation fluxes. This energy gain usually varies considerably in open space conditions. In this paper, the model 'RayMan', used for the calculation of short- and long-wave radiation fluxes on the human body, is presented. The model, which takes complex urban structures into account, is suitable for several applications in urban areas such as urban planning and street design. The final output of the model is, however, the calculated T(mrt), which is required in the human energy balance model, and thus also for the assessment of the urban bioclimate, with the use of thermal indices such as predicted mean vote (PMV), physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and standard effective temperature (SET*). The model has been developed based on the German VDI-Guidelines 3789, Part II (environmental meteorology, interactions between atmosphere and surfaces; calculation of short- and long-wave radiation) and VDI-3787 (environmental meteorology, methods for the human-biometeorological evaluation of climate and air quality for urban and regional planning. Part I: climate). The validation of the results of the RayMan model agrees with similar results obtained from experimental studies.

  3. Retinal phototoxicity: a review of standard methodology for evaluating retinal optical radiation hazards.

    PubMed

    Landry, Robert J; Bostrom, Robert G; Miller, Sharon A; Shi, Dexiu; Sliney, David H

    2011-04-01

    Optical radiation (light) safety standards can be difficult to use for the evaluation of light hazards to the retina, even for persons experienced in radiometry and photometry. This paper reviews terminology and methodology for evaluating optical radiation hazards to the retina in accordance with international standard ISO 15004-2 Ophthalmic instruments-Fundamental requirements and test methods, Part 2: Light hazard protection (2007). All optical radiation safety standards use similar methods. Specifically, this paper illustrates how to evaluate the retinal hazards from various ophthalmic instruments including the following: diffuse illumination of the cornea; incident light diverging at the cornea (direct ophthalmoscope, operation microscope, fixation lamp); and incident light converging at the cornea (indirect ophthalmoscope, fundus camera, slit lamp biomicroscope). A brief review of radiometry and the use of certified optical components by manufacturers as specified by the ISO standard is also provided. Finally, the authors provide examples of the use of photometric measurements in hazard evaluation.

  4. Standard descriptive nomenclature of constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    This nomenclature is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Mar. 15, 1992 and published May 1992. Originally published as C 638-73. Last previous edition was C 638-84(1990). It was reapproved 1997.

  5. Experience with the application of radiation protection standards: A driving force

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    This paper identifies the driving forces for the development of new standards within the radiation protection areas, characterizes the process of developing such guidance, discusses problems with the application of guidance and discusses experience in applying recommendations and standards. Efforts to improve performance in health physics measurements will also be described including methods to determine the feasibility and applicability of standards. 15 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Rare radiative charm decays within the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Stefan; Hiller, Gudrun

    2017-08-01

    We present standard model (SM) estimates for exclusive c → uγ processes in heavy quark and hybrid frameworks. Measured branching ratios \\mathrmB({D}^0\\to (φ, {\\overline{K}}^{\\ast 0})γ ) are at or somewhat exceeding the upper range of the SM and suggest slow convergence of the 1 /m D , α s -expansion. Model-independent constraints on |Δ C| = | Δ U | = 1 dipole operators from ℬ( D 0 → ρ 0 γ) data are obtained. Predictions and implications for leptoquark models are worked out. While branching ratios are SM-like CP asymmetries ≲ 10% can be induced. In SUSY deviations from the SM can be even larger with CP asymmetries of O(0 .1). If Λ c -baryons are produced polarized, such as at the Z-pole, an angular asymmetry in Λ c → pγ decays can be studied that is sensitive to chirality-flipped contributions.

  7. National Education Standards: The Complex Challenge for Educational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faidley, Ray; Musser, Steven

    1991-01-01

    National standards for education are important elements in the excellence process, but standards imposed by a central authority simply do not work in the Information Era. It would be wise to increase teachers' decision-making role in establishing and implementing local level excellence standards and train teachers to employ the Japanese "kaizen"…

  8. National Education Standards: The Complex Challenge for Educational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faidley, Ray; Musser, Steven

    1991-01-01

    National standards for education are important elements in the excellence process, but standards imposed by a central authority simply do not work in the Information Era. It would be wise to increase teachers' decision-making role in establishing and implementing local level excellence standards and train teachers to employ the Japanese "kaizen"…

  9. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place.

  10. Feasibility of EBT Gafchromic films for comparison exercises among standard beta radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J A; Meira-Belo, L C; Reynaldo, S R; da Silva, T A

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of using radiochromic films to verify the metrological coherence among standard beta radiation fields was evaluated. Exercises were done between two Brazilian metrology laboratories in beta fields from (90)Sr/(90)Y, (85)Kr and (147)Pm radiation sources. Results showed that the radiochromic film was useful for field mapping aiming uniformity and alignment verification and it was not reliable for absorbed dose measurements only for (147)Pm beta field.

  11. Evaluation of standard radiation atmosphere aerosol models for a coastal environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Sebacher, D. I.; Fuller, W. H.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations are compared with data from an experiment to evaluate the utility of standard radiation atmosphere (SRA) models for defining aerosol properties in atmospheric radiation computations. Initial calculations with only SRA aerosols in a four-layer atmospheric column simulation allowed a sensitivity study and the detection of spectral trends in optical depth, which differed from measurements. Subsequently, a more detailed analysis provided a revision in the stratospheric layer, which brought calculations in line with both optical depth and skylight radiance data. The simulation procedure allows determination of which atmospheric layers influence both downwelling and upwelling radiation spectra.

  12. Simulation and analysis of antennas radiating in a complex environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the high-frequency radiation patterns of antennas mounted on curved surfaces is described. The procedure utilizes the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction to examine the antenna system's performance, which is dependent on antenna radiation patterns. Composite ellipsoid models of fuselage shapes are developed and the formation of geodesic paths on the models is studied; the shape of the fuselage affects the radiation patterns. The actual field radiated by the source and scattered by the structure is calculated using the ray field technique. The numerical solution is applied to the analysis of the antenna radiation patterns of a military aircraft, private aircraft, and the Space Shuttle orbiter. Good correlation between the calculated and measured radiation patterns is noted verifying the usefulness and accuracy of the numerical procedure.

  13. Student Reading Growth Illuminates the Common Core Text-Complexity Standard: Raising Both Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Gary L.; Fitzgerald, Jill; Stenner, Jackson A.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) establish a challenging text-complexity standard for all high school graduates to read at college and workplace text-complexity levels. We argue that implementation of the CCSS standard requires concurrent examination of historical student reading-growth trends. An example of a historical student average…

  14. Student Reading Growth Illuminates the Common Core Text-Complexity Standard: Raising Both Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Gary L.; Fitzgerald, Jill; Stenner, Jackson A.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) establish a challenging text-complexity standard for all high school graduates to read at college and workplace text-complexity levels. We argue that implementation of the CCSS standard requires concurrent examination of historical student reading-growth trends. An example of a historical student average…

  15. Measurement capabilities of a compact thermal-type standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech

    2001-08-01

    New instrument for measurements of laser pulse energy is described. Due to its parameters it can be used as a standard for unit of energy of pulse laser radiation. The instrument consists of a control unit, three sources of laser radiation, two receivers of optical signal, and a laptop. The whole system can be easily transported enabling one to carry out measurements in situ, at customer's, not only in laboratory conditions. This is a very important feature of the instrument because it allows inexpensive calibration and testing of large industrial laser installations and interesting laboratory intercomparisons as well. A method of measurement used in operation of the standard is presented. Main characteristics of the standard are shown. Methods of calculation of uncertainties of measurement during laser energy meters calibration by means of the standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation are also presented. An alternative measurement option of the standard operating as an energy calibrator for unknown pulse optical radiation source is also available. Some results of testing of laser energy meters at eye-safe wavelength (1.54 micrometer) are presented.

  16. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 1. Radiation of standard model particles

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Hyde, Jeffrey M.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: jmhyde@asu.edu

    2014-09-01

    In hidden sector models with an extra U(1) gauge group, new fields can interact with the Standard Model only through gauge kinetic mixing and the Higgs portal. After the U(1) is spontaneously broken, these interactions couple the resultant cosmic strings to Standard Model particles. We calculate the spectrum of radiation emitted by these ''dark strings'' in the form of Higgs bosons, Z bosons, and Standard Model fermions assuming that string tension is above the TeV scale. We also calculate the scattering cross sections of Standard Model fermions on dark strings due to the Aharonov-Bohm interaction. These radiation and scattering calculations will be applied in a subsequent paper to study the cosmological evolution and observational signatures of dark strings.

  17. Visualization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Model Using Standard Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Galbraith; L. Eric Greenwade

    2004-05-01

    Output from a deterministic radiation transport code running on a CRAY SV1 is imported into a standard distributed, parallel, visualization tool for analysis. Standard output files, consisting of tetrahedral meshes, are imported to the visualization tool through the creation of a application specific plug-in module. Visualization samples are included, providing visualization of steady state results. Different plot types and operators are utilized to enhance the analysis and assist in reporting the results of the analysis.

  18. Mobile phone radiation health risk controversy: the reliability and sufficiency of science behind the safety standards

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is ongoing discussion whether the mobile phone radiation causes any health effects. The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety and the World Health Organization are assuring that there is no proven health risk and that the present safety limits protect all mobile phone users. However, based on the available scientific evidence, the situation is not as clear. The majority of the evidence comes from in vitro laboratory studies and is of very limited use for determining health risk. Animal toxicology studies are inadequate because it is not possible to "overdose" microwave radiation, as it is done with chemical agents, due to simultaneous induction of heating side-effects. There is a lack of human volunteer studies that would, in unbiased way, demonstrate whether human body responds at all to mobile phone radiation. Finally, the epidemiological evidence is insufficient due to, among others, selection and misclassification bias and the low sensitivity of this approach in detection of health risk within the population. This indicates that the presently available scientific evidence is insufficient to prove reliability of the current safety standards. Therefore, we recommend to use precaution when dealing with mobile phones and, whenever possible and feasible, to limit body exposure to this radiation. Continuation of the research on mobile phone radiation effects is needed in order to improve the basis and the reliability of the safety standards. PMID:20205835

  19. Designing, implementing, and conducting a web-based radiation safety training program to meet Texas standards for radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Cerecero, Jennifer A; Charlton, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    The implementation of a web-based radiation safety training program for a large biomedical research institution has the capability of increasing the knowledge of proper use of radionuclides in the laboratories in a more cost effective and efficient way of demonstrating this material. The design and implementation of the web-based course for the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio must meet Texas radioactive material regulations while ensuring that the content engages and challenges the student's health physics knowledge. The implementation of this course required updating the existing course to reflect current regulatory requirements for radiation safety training, emergency response, and biological effects risk coefficients. The final web-based radiation safety training program was evaluated by a standard examination that it is equivalent to the knowledge gained in the classroom course. The results of the scores for the standard examination were equivalent for both the classroom and the web-based course. However, the web-based version with 1 h in the classroom has saved 5,407 h total throughout the institution.

  20. Quality control methodology and implementation of X-radiation standards beams, mammography level, following the standard IEC 61267.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, E L; Vivolo, V; Potiens, M P A

    2012-07-01

    This study presents the results of the establishment of a quality control program developed and applied for the X-ray system of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The X-ray standard beams, mammography level, using molybdenum and aluminum as additional filtration were established after the application of this quality control and the spectrometry of these qualities was made. The reference ionization chamber has traceability to the PTB. The radiation qualities RQR-M, RQA-M, RQN-M and RQB-M, following the recommendations of the IEC 61267 and the IAEA TRS 457 were established.

  1. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  2. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, L F; Schreppler, S; Kohler, J; Spethmann, N; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2016-07-15

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  3. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  4. The Locust Standard Brain: A 3D Standard of the Central Complex as a Platform for Neural Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    el Jundi, Basil; Heinze, Stanley; Lenschow, Constanze; Kurylas, Angela; Rohlfing, Torsten; Homberg, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Many insects use the pattern of polarized light in the sky for spatial orientation and navigation. We have investigated the polarization vision system in the desert locust. To create a common platform for anatomical studies on polarization vision pathways, Kurylas et al. (2008) have generated a three-dimensional (3D) standard brain from confocal microscopy image stacks of 10 male brains, using two different standardization methods, the Iterative Shape Averaging (ISA) procedure and the Virtual Insect Brain (VIB) protocol. Comparison of both standardization methods showed that the VIB standard is ideal for comparative volume analysis of neuropils, whereas the ISA standard is the method of choice to analyze the morphology and connectivity of neurons. The central complex is a key processing stage for polarization information in the locust brain. To investigate neuronal connections between diverse central-complex neurons, we generated a higher-resolution standard atlas of the central complex and surrounding areas, using the ISA method based on brain sections from 20 individual central complexes. To explore the usefulness of this atlas, two central-complex neurons, a polarization-sensitive columnar neuron (type CPU1a) and a tangential neuron that is activated during flight, the giant fan-shaped (GFS) neuron, were reconstructed 3D from brain sections. To examine whether the GFS neuron is a candidate to contribute to synaptic input to the CPU1a neuron, we registered both neurons into the standardized central complex. Visualization of both neurons revealed a potential connection of the CPU1a and GFS neurons in layer II of the upper division of the central body. PMID:20161763

  5. Cost Accounting Standards: An Overview of Compliance with These Complex Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Janet D.

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of federal cost accounting standards (CAS) chronicles briefly the history of CAS, notes other pertinent regulations applicable to higher education, summarizes the initial standards drafted for colleges and universities, and examines disclosure statement requirements and implications of noncompliance. (MSE)

  6. [Standard parenteral nutrition preparations in complex clinical situations].

    PubMed

    Llop Talaverón, J M; Berlana Martín, D; Badía Tahull, M B; Fort Casamartina, E; Vinent Genestar, J L; Tubau Mola, M; Jódar Massanés, R

    2004-01-01

    Binary and ternary parenteral nutrition preparations may be of limited use in certain cases. The goal of this study is to establish difficult nutritional situations to handle and analyze the type of formula used in these situations. The study included patients treated with parenteral nutrition over 9 months. Three clinically complex situations were defined: long duration, lasting more than 25 days; kidney failure, uraemia > 20 mmol/L or serum creatinine > 200 micromol/L; and liver failure, total bilirubin > 30 mmol/L or ALT > 2 microkat/L and alkaline phosphatase > 3 microkat/L or GGT > 3 microkat/L. Mortality and hypoalbuminaemia (< 35 g/L) were studied and compared by means of a chi squared test (p < 0.05) against the rest of the patients. The use of individualized formulas was studied using a multiple logarithmic regression model, the dependent variable being the administration or not of an individualized formula and the independent variables being the 3 groups of patients in clinical situations defined as complex. The Odds Ratio (OR) was studied as the measure of risk. A total of 511 patients receiving 8,015 feeds with parenteral nutrition were studied. Of these, 283 were included in one or more of the 3 complex clinical situations. All three groups presented higher levels of mortality and hypoalbuminaemia with statistically significant differences when compared to the group in a non-complex clinical situation. The use of individualized formulas was greater in the three groups defined, with statistically significant differences resulting: OR=6.7 (CI 95%; 3.78-11.91) with long duration; OR=3.66 (CI 95%; 2.68-5.68) in kidney failure; and OR=1.5 (CI 95%; 1.01-2.35) in liver failure. Patients in complex clinical situations present greater visceral malnutrition, a worse clinical evolution and, at our hospital, their nutritional treatment by parenteral means is based on a greater use of individualized formulas.

  7. Standardization Process for Space Radiation Models Used for Space System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Daly, Eamonn; Brautigam, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The space system design community has three concerns related to models of the radiation belts and plasma: 1) AP-8 and AE-8 models are not adequate for modern applications; 2) Data that have become available since the creation of AP-8 and AE-8 are not being fully exploited for modeling purposes; 3) When new models are produced, there is no authorizing organization identified to evaluate the models or their datasets for accuracy and robustness. This viewgraph presentation provided an overview of the roadmap adopted by the Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models.

  8. Development of a proposed international standard for certification of aircraft to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel B.

    1993-01-01

    Avionic systems performing critical functions in modern aircraft are potentially susceptible to the hazards of electromagnetic radiation from ground and airborne transmitters. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested that the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) coordinate the development of procedures and guidance material which can be used during the aircraft certification process to ensure adequate protection against high intensity radiated fields (HIRF). This paper addresses both the technical challenge of drafting a certification procedure and guidance standard as well as the management process used by the SAE subcommittee AE4R to converge a diverse range of opinions by its international membership in the shortest possible time.

  9. Cumulative Radiation Exposure With EOS Imaging Compared With Standard Spine Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Luo, T David; Stans, Anthony A; Schueler, Beth A; Larson, A Noelle

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective comparative study. This study sought to estimate the total radiation exposure to scoliosis patients during the entire treatment course using standard imaging techniques versus EOS posteroanterior (PA) and anteroposterior (AP) views. EOS is a slot-scanning X-ray system designed to reduce radiation exposure in orthopedic imaging. There are few independent studies comparing organ and total effective radiation dose from standard EOS PA, AP, and lateral imaging versus conventional projection radiographs for children with spinal deformity. A total of 42 skeletally immature idiopathic scoliosis patients were treated with bracing (21) or spinal fusion (21) and were followed to skeletal maturity. The number of scoliosis radiographs (PA and lateral) for each patient was recorded. A computerized dosing model was used to calculate estimated patient and organ doses for PA and lateral scoliosis X-rays taken with EOS or computed radiography with a filter (CR) or without a filter (CRF). Assuming that each X-ray taken delivered the same radiation as the phantom calculation, the authors estimated the total effective and organ dose that each adolescent would have received using EOS, CR, or CRF. Annual background radiation is 3 mSv. Mean number of radiographs per patient was 20.9 (range, 8-43). Patients who underwent surgical treatment had a significantly greater number of X-rays than those who were braced (27.3 vs. 14.5; p < .001). Assuming all films were CR, the mean cumulative dose was estimated at 5.38 mSv. With standard EOS films, the mean cumulative estimated dose was 2.66 mSv, a decrease of 50.6%. An AP versus PA EOS radiograph resulted in an 8 times higher radiation dose to the breasts and 4 times higher dose to the thyroid. The standard EOS imaging system moderately reduced the total radiation exposure to skeletally immature scoliosis patients. Over the entire treatment course, this represented 2.72 mSv mean reduction or 0.91 years of background radiation

  10. Effect on the insulation material of a MOSFET device submitted to a standard diagnostic radiation beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Magalhães, C. M. S.; dos Santos, L. A. P.; Souza, D. do N.; Maia, A. F.

    2010-11-01

    MOSFET electronic devices have been used for dosimetry in radiology and radiotherapy. Several communications show that due to the radiation exposure defects appear on the semiconductor crystal lattice. Actually, the structure of a MOSFET consists of three materials: a semiconductor, a metal and an insulator between them. The MOSFET is a quadripolar device with a common terminal: gate-source is the input; drain-source is the output. The gate controls the electrical current passing through semiconductor medium by the field effect because the silicon oxide acts as insulating material. The proposal of this work is to show some radiation effects on the insulator of a MOSFET device. A 6430 Keithley sub-femtoamp SourceMeter was used to verify how the insulating material layer in the structure of the device varies with the radiation exposure. We have used the IEC 61267 standard radiation X-ray beams generated from a Pantak industrial unit in the radiation energy range of computed tomography. This range was chosen because we are using the MOSFET device as radiation detector for dosimetry in computed tomography. The results showed that the behaviour of the electrical current of the device is different in the insulator and semiconductor structures.

  11. Evaluation of Breast Sentinel Lymph Node Coverage by Standard Radiation Therapy Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, Rachel Ballonoff, Ari; Newman, Francis M.S.; Finlayson, Christina

    2008-04-01

    Background: Biopsy of the breast sentinel lymph node (SLN) is now a standard staging procedure for early-stage invasive breast cancer. The anatomic location of the breast SLN and its relationship to standard radiation fields has not been described. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of radiotherapy treatment planning data sets was performed in patients with breast cancer who had undergone SLN biopsy, and those with a surgical clip at the SLN biopsy site were identified. The location of the clip was evaluated relative to vertebral body level on an anterior-posterior digitally reconstructed radiograph, treated whole-breast tangential radiation fields, and standard axillary fields in 106 data sets meeting these criteria. Results: The breast SLN varied in vertebral body level position, ranging from T2 to T7 but most commonly opposite T4. The SLN clip was located below the base of the clavicle in 90%, and hence would be excluded from standard axillary radiotherapy fields where the inferior border is placed at this level. The clip was within the irradiated whole-breast tangent fields in 78%, beneath the superior-posterior corner multileaf collimators in 12%, and outside the tangent field borders in 10%. Conclusions: Standard axillary fields do not encompass the lymph nodes at highest risk of containing tumor in breast cancer patients. Elimination of the superior-posterior corner MLCs from the tangent field design would result in inclusion of the breast SLN in 90% of patients treated with standard whole-breast irradiation.

  12. Conversion of simulated radioactive pollutant gas concentrations for a complex building array into radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Gallacher, D J; Robins, A G; Hayden, P

    2016-12-01

    Methods used to convert wind tunnel and ADMS concentration field data for a complex building array into effective radiation dose were developed based on simulations of a site in central London. Pollutant source terms were from positron emitting gases released from a cyclotron and clinical PET radiotracer facility. Five years of meteorological data were analysed to determine the probability distribution of wind direction and speed. A hemispherical plume cloud model (both static and moving) was developed which enabled an expression of gamma-ray dose, taking into account build-up factors in air, in terms of analytic functions in this geometry. The standard building wake model is presented, but this is extended and developed in a new model to cover the concentration field in the vicinity of a roof top structure recirculation zone, which is then related to the concentration in the main building wake zone. For all models presented the effective dose was determined from inhalation, positron cloud immersion and gamma ray plume contributions. Results of applying these models for determination of radiation dose for a particular site are presented elsewhere.

  13. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-23

    or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non- equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we...published online 23 December 2013) Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional

  14. Design of organic scintillators for non-standard radiation field dosimetry: experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Norman H, Machado R; Maximiliano, Trujillo T; Javier E, García G; Diana C, Narvaez G; Paula A, Marín M; Róbinson A, Torres V

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup designed for sensing the luminescent light coming from an organic plastic scintillator stimulated with ionizing radiation. This device is intended to be a part of a complete dosimeter system for characterization of small radiation fields which is the project of the doctoral thesis of the medical physicist at the Radiation Oncology facility of Hospital San Vicente Fundación in conjunction with the Universidad de Antioquia of Medellín Colombia. Some preliminary results predict a good performance of the unit, but further studies must be conducted in order to have a completed evaluation of the system. This is the first step in the development of an accuracy tool for measurement of non-standard fields in the Radiotherapy or Radiosurgery processes.

  15. Protective effect of polysaccharide-protein complex from a polypore mushroom, Phellinus rimosus against radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jini; Panicker, Sudheesh Narayana; Janardhanan, Kainoor Krishnankutty

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces severe oxidative stress in the body resulting an imbalance in prooxidant and antioxidant status in the cell. The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide protein complex (PPC-Pr) isolated from the mushroom Phellinus rimosus against the oxidative stress induced by gamma radiation. PPC-Pr complex was isolated from the aqueous extracts of P. rimosus. The complex was administered to Swiss albino mice at a concentration of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for 5 days consecutively and exposed to 4 Gy of gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 1 day after irradiation and the antioxidant parameters such as glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase as well as lipid peroxidation were evaluated in both liver and brain tissues to evaluate oxidative stress. Amifostine, a standard radioprotective agent, was used as a positive control. In vitro DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. Survival studies were also carried out to determine the protective role of PPC-Pr against radiation-induced delayed oxidative stress. PPC-Pr treatment enhanced the declined levels of antioxidants and comet parameters to a significant level, indicating its antioxidant as well as DNA protecting potential. Significant increase in the survival rate of animals was also observed in irradiated animals treated with PPC-Pr complex. The results were comparable to the standard drug amifostine. The results indicate profound effects of PPC-Pr against radiation-induced oxidative stress. The findings suggest potential therapeutic use of PPC-Pr in radiotherapy.

  16. Compliance of Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit with IEC standard - Radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Sahani, G; Kumar, Munish; Dash Sharma, P K; Sharma, D N; Chhokra, Kanta; Mishra, Bibekananda; Agarwal, S P; Kher, R K

    2009-04-28

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India designed and developed a telecobalt unit, which was named as Bhabhatron-II. In this paper, the results pertaining to radiation safety of indigenously developed Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit are reported. The various tests were carried out as per requirements of International Electrotechnical Commission standard and acceptance criteria developed nationally. Various devices such as CaSO4:Dy based thermoluminescent dosimeters, farmer type ionization chamber, water phantom and radiographic films were used. All the parameters pertaining to radiation leakage/transmission were within the tolerance limits as per IEC-60601-2-11 standard except the collimator transmission through X collimators (upper jaw), which marginally exceeds the tolerance limit.

  17. Collective biodosimetry as a dosimetric "gold standard": a study of three radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Pass, B; Baranov, A E; Kleshchenko, E D; Aldrich, J E; Scallion, P L; Gale, R P

    1997-03-01

    Quantification of the biologically relevant dose is required for the establishment of cause-and-effect between radiation detriment or burden and important biological outcomes. Most epidemiological studies of unanticipated radiation exposure fail to establish cause and effect because of an inability to construct a valid quantification of dose for the exposed population. No one biodosimetric technique (biophysical or biological) meets all the requirements of an ideal dosimeter and thus qualify as a "gold standard." This report combines new results with previously published data in order to establish a collective biodosimetry as a dosimetric "gold standard" for the victims of three radiation accidents. Combining new and previously published data is necessary as execution and planning of a comprehensive dosimetry is rarely done at the initial stages of a radiation accident. The first subject was a fireman during the initial moments of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; the second was the victim of an unspecified occupational accident; and the third was exposed to a 60Co sterilization source. There was generally good agreement among the various biodosimetric techniques used for the three accident victims.

  18. Calibration of the Standards and Calibration Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report measurements of dose rates at various locations in the LLNL Standards and Calibrations Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool. Plots show the dependence of dose rate on radius near the bottom of the pool and the dependence of dose rate on height at a fixed distance from the pool center. The effect of varying sample location within the pool`s dry-well was also investigated.

  19. Wave field synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jens; Spors, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    An approach to the synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties in wave field synthesis is presented. The approach exploits the fact that any stationary sound source of finite spatial extent radiates spherical waves at sufficient distance. The angular dependency of the radiation properties of the source under consideration is reflected by the amplitude and phase distribution on the spherical wave fronts. The sound field emitted by a uniformly moving monopole source is derived and the far-field radiation properties of the complex virtual source under consideration are incorporated in order to derive a closed-form expression for the loudspeaker driving signal. The results are illustrated via numerical simulations of the synthesis of the sound field of a sample moving complex virtual source.

  20. Toxic variability and radiation potentiation by Rh(III) complexes in Salmonella typhimurium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, R.C.; O'Hara, J.; Picker, D.H.; Douple, E.B.

    1986-12-01

    Stationary-phase cells of Salmonella typhimurium were irradiated in phosphate-buffered saline in the presence of rhodium complexes to test for the potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing. Eleven Rh complexes, two Rh(I) and nine Rh(III), were tested. Seven Rh(III) complexes were found to be radiation potentiators; six potentiate only under hypoxic conditions, and one potentiates under both hypoxic and oxic conditions. Four of these seven Rh(III) complexes demonstrate potentiation that is 2 to 13 times greater than the sensitization caused by oxygen. Irradiating cells in Ham's F-12 culture medium rather than in phosphate-buffered saline eliminates this latter hypoxic radiation potentiation. None of the seven Rh(III) radiation potentiators are directly toxic to cells. However, four complexes were tested for hypoxic radiation-induced cytocidal toxicity, and three were found to be toxic after irradiation. The efficiency of this toxicity is not sufficient to account for the observed radiation potentiation. It is suggested that both reductive and oxidative free radical events are involved in the spectrum of Rh(III) potentiation observed.

  1. Modelling radiation fluxes in simple and complex environments: basics of the RayMan model.

    PubMed

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Mayer, Helmut

    2010-03-01

    Short- and long-wave radiation flux densities absorbed by people have a significant influence on their energy balance. The heat effect of the absorbed radiation flux densities is parameterised by the mean radiant temperature. This paper presents the physical basis of the RayMan model, which simulates the short- and long-wave radiation flux densities from the three-dimensional surroundings in simple and complex environments. RayMan has the character of a freely available radiation and human-bioclimate model. The aim of the RayMan model is to calculate radiation flux densities, sunshine duration, shadow spaces and thermo-physiologically relevant assessment indices using only a limited number of meteorological and other input data. A comparison between measured and simulated values for global radiation and mean radiant temperature shows that the simulated data closely resemble measured data.

  2. Modelling radiation fluxes in simple and complex environments: basics of the RayMan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Mayer, Helmut

    2010-03-01

    Short- and long-wave radiation flux densities absorbed by people have a significant influence on their energy balance. The heat effect of the absorbed radiation flux densities is parameterised by the mean radiant temperature. This paper presents the physical basis of the RayMan model, which simulates the short- and long-wave radiation flux densities from the three-dimensional surroundings in simple and complex environments. RayMan has the character of a freely available radiation and human-bioclimate model. The aim of the RayMan model is to calculate radiation flux densities, sunshine duration, shadow spaces and thermo-physiologically relevant assessment indices using only a limited number of meteorological and other input data. A comparison between measured and simulated values for global radiation and mean radiant temperature shows that the simulated data closely resemble measured data.

  3. Methods of treating complex space vehicle geometry for charged particle radiation transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current methods of treating complex geometry models for space radiation transport calculations are reviewed. The geometric techniques used in three computer codes are outlined. Evaluations of geometric capability and speed are provided for these codes. Although no code development work is included several suggestions for significantly improving complex geometry codes are offered.

  4. MO-G-9A-01: Imaging Refresher for Standard of Care Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Labby, Z; Sensakovic, W; Hipp, E; Altman, M

    2014-06-15

    Imaging techniques and technology which were previously the domain of diagnostic medicine are becoming increasingly integrated and utilized in radiation therapy (RT) clinical practice. As such, there are a number of specific imaging topics that are highly applicable to modern radiation therapy physics. As imaging becomes more widely integrated into standard clinical radiation oncology practice, the impetus is on RT physicists to be informed and up-to-date on those imaging modalities relevant to the design and delivery of therapeutic radiation treatments. For example, knowing that, for a given situation, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image set is most likely what the physician would like to import and contour is helpful, but may not be sufficient to providing the best quality of care. Understanding the physics of how that pulse sequence works and why it is used could help assess its utility and determine if it is the optimal sequence for aiding in that specific clinical situation. It is thus important that clinical medical physicists be able to understand and explain the physics behind the imaging techniques used in all aspects of clinical radiation oncology practice. This session will provide the basic physics for a variety of imaging modalities for applications that are highly relevant to radiation oncology practice: computed tomography (CT) (including kV, MV, cone beam CT [CBCT], and 4DCT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging specific to brachytherapy (including ultrasound and some brachytherapy specific topics in MR). For each unique modality, the image formation process will be reviewed, trade-offs between image quality and other factors (e.g. imaging time or radiation dose) will be clarified, and typically used cases for each modality will be introduced. The current and near-future uses of these modalities and techniques in radiation oncology clinical practice will also be discussed. Learning

  5. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    DOEpatents

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  6. Analysis of thermal radiation in ion traps for optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležal, M.; Balling, P.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; King, S. A.; Jones, J. M.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Lindvall, T.; Wallin, A. E.; Merimaa, M.; Tamm, C.; Sanner, C.; Huntemann, N.; Scharnhorst, N.; Leroux, I. D.; Schmidt, P. O.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.; Peik, E.

    2015-12-01

    In many of the high-precision optical frequency standards with trapped atoms or ions that are under development to date, the ac Stark shift induced by thermal radiation leads to a major contribution to the systematic uncertainty. We present an analysis of the inhomogeneous thermal environment experienced by ions in various types of ion traps. Finite element models which allow the determination of the temperature of the trap structure and the temperature of the radiation were developed for five ion trap designs, including operational traps at PTB and NPL and further optimized designs. Models were refined based on comparison with infrared camera measurement until an agreement of better than 10% of the measured temperature rise at critical test points was reached. The effective temperature rises of the radiation seen by the ion range from 0.8 K to 2.1 K at standard working conditions. The corresponding fractional frequency shift uncertainties resulting from the uncertainty in temperature are in the 10-18 range for optical clocks based on the Sr+ and Yb+ E2 transitions, and even lower for Yb+ E3, In+ and Al+. Issues critical for heating of the trap structure and its predictability were identified and design recommendations developed.

  7. Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Neil; Holden, Lori; Robson, Sheila; Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

  8. Influence of inhomogeneous damping distribution on sound radiation properties of complex vibration modes in rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In order to reduce noise emitted by vibrating structures additional damping treatments such as constraint layer damping or embedded elastomer layers can be used. To save weight and cost, the additional damping is often placed at some critical locations of the structure, what leads to spatially inhomogeneous distribution of damping. This inhomogeneous distribution of structural damping leads to an occurrence of complex vibration modes, which are no longer dominated by pure standing waves, but by a superposition of travelling and standing waves. The existence of complex vibration modes raises the question about their influence on sound radiation. Previous studies on the sound radiation of complex modes of rectangular plates reveal, that, depending on the direction of travelling waves, the radiation efficiency of structural modes can slightly decrease or significantly increase. These observations have been made using a rectangular plate with a simple inhomogeneous damping configuration which includes a single plate boundary with a higher structural damping ratio. In order to answer the question about the influence of other possible damping configurations on the sound radiation properties, this paper addresses the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the resulting complex vibration modes. Numerical simulations are used for the calculation of complex structural modes of different inhomogeneous damping configurations with varying geometrical form and symmetry. The evaluation of self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies reveals that primarily the symmetry properties of the inhomogeneous damping distribution affect the sound radiation characteristics. Especially the asymmetric distributions of inhomogeneous damping show a high influence on the investigated acoustic metrics. The presented study also reveals that the acoustic cross-coupling between structural modes, which is described by the mutual-radiation efficiencies, generally increases with the presence of

  9. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  10. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Aizer, Ayal A.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  11. Radiated radiofrequency immunity testing of automated external defibrillators - modifications of applicable standards are needed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We studied the worst-case radiated radiofrequency (RF) susceptibility of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) based on the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of a current standard for cardiac defibrillators, IEC 60601-2-4. Square wave modulation was used to mimic cardiac physiological frequencies of 1 - 3 Hz. Deviations from the IEC standard were a lower frequency limit of 30 MHz to explore frequencies where the patient-connected leads could resonate. Also testing up to 20 V/m was performed. We tested AEDs with ventricular fibrillation (V-Fib) and normal sinus rhythm signals on the patient leads to enable testing for false negatives (inappropriate "no shock advised" by the AED). Methods We performed radiated exposures in a 10 meter anechoic chamber using two broadband antennas to generate E fields in the 30 - 2500 MHz frequency range at 1% frequency steps. An AED patient simulator was housed in a shielded box and delivered normal and fibrillation waveforms to the AED's patient leads. We developed a technique to screen ECG waveforms stored in each AED for electromagnetic interference at all frequencies without waiting for the long cycle times between analyses (normally 20 to over 200 s). Results Five of the seven AEDs tested were susceptible to RF interference, primarily at frequencies below 80 MHz. Some induced errors could cause AEDs to malfunction and effectively inhibit operator prompts to deliver a shock to a patient experiencing lethal fibrillation. Failures occurred in some AEDs exposed to E fields between 3 V/m and 20 V/m, in the 38 - 50 MHz range. These occurred when the patient simulator was delivering a V-Fib waveform to the AED. Also, we found it is not possible to test modern battery-only-operated AEDs for EMI using a patient simulator if the IEC 60601-2-4 defibrillator standard's simulated patient load is used. Conclusions AEDs experienced potentially life-threatening false-negative failures from radiated RF, primarily

  12. The estimation of surface solar radiation considering the distortion of the cloud shadow on complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, X.

    2016-12-01

    Clouds and topography are the two most important factors that affect the surface radiation, and cloud shadows are also an important influencing factor to estimate the surface radiation with remote sensing method. Cloud and its shadow under different observation angle and the angle of the sun will lead to 3-D geometry effect. Furthermore, the terrain also has influence on downward solar radiation. At the same time, the cloud shadow distortion under complex terrain also should be taken into consideration in the estimation of radiation. So "coupling" the clouds and the terrain under the certain condition has the vital significance on estimating the surface radiation values. Cloud detection results of high resolution satellite data was used, according to the height of the cloud and satellite observation angle information the position of cloud on the image was corrected to get the true position of the cloud. To more accurately describe the shadow distortion caused by the terrain, a geometrical method was used to calculate the true position of cloud shadows on complex terrain. On the basis of the result after the calculation of shadows, downward surface solar radiation of the corresponding position was calculated based on some parametric methods for clear and cloudy sky respectively. Then, according to the mountain radiative transfer theory, DEM and albedo was employed in the topographic correction model for the downward surface solar radiation (DSSR) calculated above. Finally, we made some comparisons between cloud shadows on smooth surface and complex terrain as well as DSSR without any correction and with correction of terrain effect. The results showed that it is necessary to make these corrections on complex terrain. There were some big difference of the DSSR distribution and values before making correction.

  13. Challenging the Research Base of the Common Core State Standards: A Historical Reanalysis of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamson, David A.; Lu, Xiaofei; Eckert, Sarah Anne

    2013-01-01

    The widely adopted Common Core State Standards (CCSS) call for raising the level of text complexity in textbooks and reading materials used by students across all grade levels in the United States; the authors of the English Language Arts component of the CCSS build their case for higher complexity in part upon a research base they say shows a…

  14. Complex Text and New Common Standards in the United States: Pedagogical Implications for English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, George C.; Walqui, Aída; Pearson, P. David

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, new common state standards in English language arts and disciplinary literacy require K-12 students to "read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently." Issues of text complexity have spurred debates in the mainstream literacy, educational practice, and policy…

  15. Challenging the Research Base of the Common Core State Standards: A Historical Reanalysis of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamson, David A.; Lu, Xiaofei; Eckert, Sarah Anne

    2013-01-01

    The widely adopted Common Core State Standards (CCSS) call for raising the level of text complexity in textbooks and reading materials used by students across all grade levels in the United States; the authors of the English Language Arts component of the CCSS build their case for higher complexity in part upon a research base they say shows a…

  16. National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Radiation Facilities for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gabrielle G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Black, David R.; Burdette, Harold E.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Spal, Richard D.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, include beam stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The emphasis is on materials characterization at the microstructural and at the atomic and molecular levels, where NIST scientists, and researchers from industry, universities and government laboratories perform state-of-the-art x-ray measurements on a broad range of materials. PMID:27500070

  17. Generating Automated Text Complexity Classifications That Are Aligned with Targeted Text Complexity Standards. Research Report. ETS RR-10-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kathleen M.; Kostin, Irene; Futagi, Yoko; Flor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Common Core Standards call for students to be exposed to a much greater level of text complexity than has been the norm in schools for the past 40 years. Textbook publishers, teachers, and assessment developers are being asked to refocus materials and methods to ensure that students are challenged to read texts at steadily increasing…

  18. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  20. EXAFS spectra using synchrotron radiation of Cu (II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninama, Samrath; Mishra, A.

    2016-10-01

    EXAFS analysis of Cu (II) complex as a ligand of 2-methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]- 3H-1, 5 benzodiazepine. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Cu (II) using the energy dispersive EXAFS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus - 2 synchrotron source at RRCAT, Indore, India. A theoretical EXAFS data analysis is also carried out by Fourier analysis of experimental EXAFS data of the copper (II) complexes. This analysis includes details of the Fourier transform of the data and the extraction of metal-ligand bond length. Bond lengths determined from data analysis methods are compared with the bond lengths obtained from several other known techniques, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. These data have also been calibrated by derivative method and bond lengths have also been obtained from Fourier transformation method and the results have been compared with the each other. The EXAFS data have been analyzed using the computer software Athena.

  1. Radiation damage within nucleoprotein complexes studied by macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Charles S.; Carmichael, Ian; McGeehan, John E.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-11-01

    In X-ray crystallography, for the determination of the 3-D structure of macromolecules, radiation damage is still an inherent problem at modern third generation synchrotron sources, even when utilising cryo-crystallographic techniques (sample held at 100 K). At doses of just several MGy, at which a typical diffraction dataset is collected, site-specific radiation-induced chemical changes are known to manifest within protein crystals, and a wide body of literature is now devoted to understanding the mechanisms behind such damage. Far less is known regarding radiation-induced damage to crystalline nucleic acids and the wider class of nucleoprotein complexes during macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) data collection. As the MX structural biology community now strives to solve structures for increasingly larger and complex macromolecular assemblies, it essential to understand how such structures are affected by the X-ray radiation used to solve them. The purpose of this review is to summarise advances in the field of specific damage to nucleoprotein complexes and to present case studies of MX damage investigations on both protein-DNA (C.Esp1396I) and protein-RNA (TRAP) complexes. To motivate further investigations into MX damage mechanisms within nucleoprotein complexes, current and emerging protocols for investigating specific damage within Fobs(n)-Fobs(1) electron density difference maps are discussed.

  2. Radiator standards for accurate IR calibrations in remote sensing based on heatpipe blackbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Juergen; Fischer, Joachim

    1999-09-01

    The demand of instrumentation in the field of remote sensing is increasing rapidly. For international compatibility, for reliable results and precise long-term investigation, necessary for example in the measurement of climatic trends, accurate traceability of the results to international standards or SI-units is mandatory. Additionally, interpretation of the results strongly requires a careful evaluation of the involved errors and the resulting uncertainties in order to allow for a rating of the obtained results. For that purpose quality assurance was introduced, not only for industrial fabrication, but also, and with increasing tendency, for industrial and scientific research. As an overview, the necessity and the possibilities of quality assurance in the area of remote sensing are discussed. Taking remote sensing of temperature as an example, the general approach is described. For that purpose, a description of heatpipe blackbodies used as standard radiation sources and of the apparatus for measuring the area of the beam limiting apertures is given. We also introduce the applied mathematical model for determination of the emissivity of the blackbodies, which crucially influenced the detected radiation temperature and the uncertainty. Finally the evaluation procedure of the uncertainties is described and a sophisticated estimation of the overall uncertainty is presented.

  3. Proposed Amendments to the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.

    2006-07-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed amendments to its radiation protection standards for the potential spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste disposal system in Yucca Mountain, Nevada on 22 August 2005. The original standards are found in Part 197 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 197). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed, and gave the authority to, EPA to take this action based upon input from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The final original standards were published in the Federal Register (66 FR 32073) on 13 June 2001. In July 2004, a Federal court remanded part of the standards to EPA for reconsideration. The 40 CFR Part 197 standards, as issued in 2001, have four major parts: (1) individual-protection during storage activities; (2) individual-protection following closure of the repository; (3) human-intrusion; and (4) ground-water protection. The storage standard is 150 micro-sieverts ({mu}Sv) (15 mrem) annual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to any member of the general public. The disposal standards are: (1) 150 {mu}Sv (15 mrem) annual CEDE for the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for 10,000 years after disposal; (2)150 {mu}Sv (15 mrem) annual CEDE received by the RMEI within 10,000 years after disposal as a result of human intrusion; and (3) the levels of radionuclides in the ground water cannot cause annual individual doses to exceed: (1) 40 {mu}Sv (4 mrem) per year from beta and gamma emitters or (2) 5 pico-curies per liter (pCi/L) of radium-226 and -228 or 15 pCi/L of gross alpha activity. There were also requirements related to the post-10,000-year period, the basis of compliance judgments, and performance assessments. The Agency's proposed amendments would retain the individual-protection standard established in the 2001 standards, up to 10,000 years. In addition, the compliance period for the individual-protection and human-intrusion standards would be increased

  4. Radiation-based quantitative bioimaging at the national institute of standards and technology

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Lisa R.

    2009-01-01

    Building on a long history of providing physical measurements and standards for medical X rays and nuclear medicine radionuclides, the laboratory has expanded its focus to better support the extensive use of medical physics in the United States today, providing confidence in key results needed for drug and device development and marketing, therapy planning and efficacy and disease screening. In particular, to support more quantitative medical imaging, this laboratory has implemented a program to provide key measurement infrastructure to support radiation-based imaging through developing standard, benchmark phantoms, which contain radioactive sources calibrated to national measurement standards, to allow more quantitative imaging through traceable instrument calibration for clinical trials or patient management. Working closely with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the Food and Drug Administration and Cornell University, this laboratory has taken the initial steps in developing phantoms, and the protocols to use them, for more accurate calibration of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras, including recently standardizing 68Ge. X-ray measurements of the laboratory's recently developed small, resilient and inexpensive length standard phantom have shown the potential usefulness of such a “pocket” phantom for patient-based calibration of computed tomography (alone or with PET) systems. The ability to calibrate diagnostic imaging tools in a way that is traceable to national standards will lead to a more quantitative approach; both physician and patient benefit from increased accuracy in treatment planning, as well as increased safety for the patient. PMID:20098556

  5. [The remote effects of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields with respect to hygienic standardization].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Shafirkin, A V; Nikitina, V N; Vasin, A L

    2003-01-01

    A variety and rate of non-cancer diseases occurred in humans as a result of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation or to electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of high and superhigh frequency have been compared. The intensity of EMR was slightly higher than a sanitary standard for population. A risk of health impairments in workers having occupational exposure to EMR was assessed on the basis of Selie's concept of development of non-specific reaction of the body to chronic stress factors (general adaptation syndrome), models of changes in the body compensatory reserves and calculations of radiation risk after severe and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation.

  6. From simply inaccurate to complex and inaccurate: complexity in standards-based quality measures

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Cohen, Aaron M.; Williams, Marsha Pierre-Jacques; Hurdle, John

    2011-01-01

    Quality measurement has been slow to make a major impact in health care. Initial measures were too simple to affect outcomes of importance. Incentive programs such as Meaningful Use encourage better measures, but in process may become more complex. We evaluated the measures selected for Meaningful Use in two ways: we counted unique concept identifiers, taxonomies, and aggregated concepts as measures of complexity; and we surveyed informatics professionals to assess difficulty. There were 20,316 unique concept identifiers, 35 taxonomies, and 317 aggregated concepts across the 45 measures. Half the respondents reported measures at least moderately difficult. The number of identifiers was associated with fewer implementations (r=−.37); rating-of-difficulty was associated with more taxonomies (r=.24). The impact on accuracy may be substantial when moving to measures intended to be more relevant to clinical outcomes but requiring the use of more taxonomies, unused structured concept identifiers, or concepts only in free text fields. PMID:22195085

  7. Kolmogorov Complexity Spectrum for Use in Analysis of Uv-B Radiation Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Malinović-Milićević, Slavica; Arsenić, Ilija; Drešković, Nusret; Bukosa, Beata

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we have used the Kolmogorov complexity and sample entropy measures to estimate the complexity of the UV-B radiation time series in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) for the period 1990-2007. We have defined the Kolmogorov complexity spectrum and have introduced the Kolmogorov complexity spectrum highest value (KCH). We have established the UV-B radiation time series on the basis of their daily sum (dose) for seven representative places in this region using: (i) measured data, (ii) data calculated via a derived empirical formula and (iii) data obtained by a parametric UV radiation model. We have calculated the Kolmogorov complexity (KC) based on the Lempel-Ziv algorithm (LZA), KCH and sample entropy (SE) values for each time series. We have divided the period 1990-2007 into two subintervals: (i) 1990-1998 and (ii) 1999-2007 and calculated the KC, KCH and SE values for the various time series in these subintervals. It is found that during the period 1999-2007, there is a decrease in the KC, KCH and SE, compared to the period 1990-1998. This complexity loss may be attributed to (i) the increased human intervention in the post civil war period causing increase of the air pollution and (ii) the increased cloudiness due to climate changes.

  8. Fluorescent polyion complex nanoparticle that incorporates an internal standard for quantitative analysis of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Nobori, Takanobu; Shiosaki, Shujiro; Mori, Takeshi; Toita, Riki; Kim, Chan Woo; Nakamura, Yuta; Kishimura, Akihiro; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2014-05-21

    We demonstrate a polyion complex (PIC) nanoparticle that contains both a responsive fluorophore and an "internal standard" fluorophore for quantitative measurement of protein kinase (PK) activity. The PK-responsive fluorophore becomes more fluorescent with PK-catalyzed phosphorylation of substrate peptides incorporated in the PIC, while fluorescence from the internal standard remains unchanged during phosphorylation. This new concept will be useful for quantitative PK assays and the discovery of PK inhibitors.

  9. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  10. Assessing interpersonal and communication skills in radiation oncology residents: a pilot standardized patient program.

    PubMed

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lamarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of "bad news" to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Overall resident performance ratings were "good" to "excellent," with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  12. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Popov, A. I.; Schwartz, K.; Shablonin, E.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic-covalent Lu3Al5O12 single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions (197Au, 209Bi, 238U, fluence of 1012 ions/cm2) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|Al or Ce|Al - a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce3+ single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|Lu-Ce|Al or Cr3+-Cr3+ in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|Al strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  13. Standard thermodynamic functions of Co2+ complexation with glycine and L-histidine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The enthalpies of the reactions between solutions of Co(NO3)2 and solutions of glycine (Gly) and L-histidine (His) are determined via direct calorimetry at different pH values and metal: ligand ratios using KNO3 as a background electrolyte ( T = 298.15 K, I = 0.2-1.0). The enthalpy changes upon the formation of cobalt glycinate complexes and Co2+ mixed-ligand complex, viz., glycine-L-histidine, were calculated. The standard thermodynamic parameters (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°) of complexation are determined. The CoGlyHis complex is shown to be stable toward decomposition into homogeneous complexes.

  14. The Relationship between Students' Performance on Conventional Standardized Mathematics Assessments and Complex Mathematical Modeling Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Ozgul; Dunya, Beyza Aksu; Diefes-Dux, Heidi A.; Zawojewski, Judith S.

    2016-01-01

    Critical to many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career paths is mathematical modeling--specifically, the creation and adaptation of mathematical models to solve problems in complex settings. Conventional standardized measures of mathematics achievement are not structured to directly assess this type of mathematical…

  15. INTERNATIONAL REPORT: Practical realization of the definition of the metre, including recommended radiations of other optical frequency standards (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, R.

    2005-08-01

    In 2003, the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) recommended updated values of the frequency for certain optical frequency standards recommended for the practical realization of the definition of the metre. The text of this CIPM Recommendation and details of the updated radiations are given here. The complete updated set of recommended radiations, including frequencies, wavelengths, uncertainties and operating conditions where appropriate, is available on the BIPM website.

  16. Investigation into the effects of VHF and UHF band radiation on Hewlett-Packard (HP) Cesium Beam Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation into reports which have indicated that exposure to VHF and UHF band radiation has adverse effects on the frequency stability of HP cesium beam frequency standards. Tests carried out on the basis of these reports show that sources of VHF and UHF radiation such as two-way hand held police communications devices do cause reproducible adverse effects. This investigation examines reproducible effects and explores possible causes.

  17. Radiation thermometry standards at NMIJ from −30 °C to 2800 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, J.; Yamada, Y.; Sasajima, N.; Shimizu, Y.

    2013-09-11

    NMIJ has established a national standard scale in radiation thermometry from −30 °C to 2800 °C. At low temperatures from 160 °C down to −30 °C large aperture fluid-bath blackbodies have been constructed for the calibration of thermal infrared thermometers. In the range from 160 °C to 420 °C, the standard scale has been realized on 1.6 μm thermometers calibrated against In, Sn, and Zn blackbodies. A variable temperature blackbody using an air-bath furnace has recently been developed for direct comparison measurements of a 10 μm thermometer with a 1.6 μm thermometers up to 500 °C. In the higher range of the temperature scale, dissemination consists of three schemes: the range from 400 °C to 1100 °C by Zn, Al, Ag and Cu fixed-point blackbodies: above the Ag point by 0.9 μm and 0.65 μm thermometers: and above the Cu point by metal-carbon high-temperature fixed points.

  18. Standard thermodynamic functions of complex formation between Cu2+ and glycine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Heat effects of the interaction of copper(II) solutions with aminoacetic acid (glycine) are measured by the direct calorimetry at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 against a background of potassium nitrate. Standard enthalpy values for reactions of the formation of aminoacetic acid copper complexes in aqueous solutions are obtained using an equation with a single individual parameter by extrapolating it to zero ionic strength. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation in the Cu2+-glycine system are calculated. It is shown that glycine-like coordination is most likely in Cu(II) complexes with L-asparagine, L-glutamine, and L-valine.

  19. Federal Guidance Report No. 2: Background Material for the Development of Radiation Protection Standards (Federal Radiation Council)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report discusses how to provide guidance for Federal agencies in activities designed to limit exposure of members of population groups to radiation from radioactive materials deposited in the body as a result of their occurrence in the environment.

  20. Factors affecting the implementation of complex and evolving technologies: multiple case study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research regarding the decision to adopt and implement technological innovations in radiation oncology is lacking. This is particularly problematic since these technologies are often complex and rapidly evolving, requiring ongoing revisiting of decisions regarding which technologies are the most appropriate to support. Variations in adoption and implementation decisions for new radiation technologies across cancer centres can impact patients' access to appropriate and innovative forms of radiation therapy. This study examines the key steps in the process of adopting and implementing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in publicly funded cancer centres and identifies facilitating or impeding factors. Methods A multiple case study design, utilizing document analysis and key informant interviews was employed. Four cancer centres in Ontario, Canada were selected and interviews were conducted with radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists, and senior administrative leaders. Results Eighteen key informants were interviewed. Overall, three centres made fair to excellent progress in the implementation of IMRT, while one centre achieved only limited implementation as of 2009. Key factors that influenced the extent of IMRT implementation were categorized as: 1) leadership, 2) training, expertise and standardization, 3) collaboration, 4) resources, and 5) resistance to change. Conclusion A framework for the adoption and implementation of complex and evolving technologies is presented. It identifies the key factors that should be addressed by decision-makers at specific stages of the adoption/implementation process. PMID:21801450

  1. Factors affecting the implementation of complex and evolving technologies: multiple case study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bak, Kate; Dobrow, Mark J; Hodgson, David; Whitton, Anthony

    2011-07-31

    Research regarding the decision to adopt and implement technological innovations in radiation oncology is lacking. This is particularly problematic since these technologies are often complex and rapidly evolving, requiring ongoing revisiting of decisions regarding which technologies are the most appropriate to support. Variations in adoption and implementation decisions for new radiation technologies across cancer centres can impact patients' access to appropriate and innovative forms of radiation therapy. This study examines the key steps in the process of adopting and implementing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in publicly funded cancer centres and identifies facilitating or impeding factors. A multiple case study design, utilizing document analysis and key informant interviews was employed. Four cancer centres in Ontario, Canada were selected and interviews were conducted with radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists, and senior administrative leaders. Eighteen key informants were interviewed. Overall, three centres made fair to excellent progress in the implementation of IMRT, while one centre achieved only limited implementation as of 2009. Key factors that influenced the extent of IMRT implementation were categorized as: 1) leadership, 2) training, expertise and standardization, 3) collaboration, 4) resources, and 5) resistance to change. A framework for the adoption and implementation of complex and evolving technologies is presented. It identifies the key factors that should be addressed by decision-makers at specific stages of the adoption/implementation process.

  2. Influence of planning time and treatment complexity on radiation therapy errors.

    PubMed

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Zeng, Jing; Carlson, Joshua; Spady, Phil; Jordan, Loucille; Kane, Gabrielle; Ford, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning is a complex process with potential for error. We hypothesized that shorter time from simulation to treatment would result in rushed work and higher incidence of errors. We examined treatment planning factors predictive for near-miss events. Treatments delivered from March 2012 through October 2014 were analyzed. Near-miss events were prospectively recorded and coded for severity on a 0 to 4 scale; only grade 3-4 (potentially severe/critical) events were studied in this report. For 4 treatment types (3-dimensional conformal, intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT], neutron), logistic regression was performed to test influence of treatment planning time and clinical variables on near-miss events. There were 2257 treatment courses during the study period, with 322 grade 3-4 near-miss events. SBRT treatments had more frequent events than the other 3 treatment types (18% vs 11%, P = .04). For the 3-dimensional conformal group (1354 treatments), univariate analysis showed several factors predictive of near-miss events: longer time from simulation to first treatment (P = .01), treatment of primary site versus metastasis (P < .001), longer treatment course (P < .001), and pediatric versus adult patient (P = .002). However, on multivariate regression only pediatric versus adult patient remained predictive of events (P = 0.02). For the intensity modulated radiation therapy, SBRT, and neutron groups, time between simulation and first treatment was not found to be predictive of near-miss events on univariate or multivariate regression. When controlling for treatment technique and other clinical factors, there was no relationship between time spent in radiation treatment planning and near-miss events. SBRT and pediatric treatments were more error-prone, indicating that clinical and technical complexity of treatments should be taken into account when targeting safety interventions. Copyright © 2015 American

  3. New image-processing and noise-reduction software reduces radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Tsai, Shirling; Modrall, J Gregory; Anderson, Jon A; Rectenwald, John; Timaran, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    A new proprietary image-processing system known as AlluraClarity, developed by Philips Healthcare (Best, The Netherlands) for radiation-based interventional procedures, claims to lower radiation dose while preserving image quality using noise-reduction algorithms. This study determined whether the surgeon and patient radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures (CEPs) is decreased after the implementation of this new operating system. Radiation dose to operators, procedure type, reference air kerma, kerma area product, and patient body mass index were recorded during CEPs on two Philips Allura FD 20 fluoroscopy systems with and without Clarity. Operator dose during CEPs was measured using optically stimulable, luminescent nanoDot (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, Ill) detectors placed outside the lead apron at the left upper chest position. nanoDots were read using a microStar ii (Landauer Inc) medical dosimetry system. For the CEPs in the Clarity group, the radiation dose to surgeons was also measured by the DoseAware (Philips Healthcare) personal dosimetry system. Side-by-side measurements of DoseAware and nanoDots allowed for cross-calibration between systems. Operator effective dose was determined using a modified Niklason algorithm. To control for patient size and case complexity, the average fluoroscopy dose rate and the dose per radiographic frame were adjusted for body mass index differences and then compared between the groups with and without Clarity by procedure. Additional factors, for example, physician practice patterns, that may have affected operator dose were inferred by comparing the ratio of the operator dose to procedural kerma area product with and without Clarity. A one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare groups for radiation doses, reference air kermas, and operating practices for each procedure type. The analysis included 234 CEPs; 95 performed without Clarity and 139 with Clarity. Practice patterns of operators during

  4. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mavragani, Ifigeneia V; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Souli, Maria P; Aziz, Asef; Nowsheen, Somaira; Aziz, Khaled; Rogakou, Emmy; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2017-07-18

    Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15-20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1) repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI) and malignant transformation and (2) can be considered as persistent "danger" signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity). Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  5. Polarized radiative transfer in two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries by natural element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kim, Yong-Jun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Xie, Ming; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The natural element method (NEM) is extended to solve the polarized radiative transfer problem in a two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The Laplace interpolation scheme is adopted to obtain the shape functions used in the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The NEM solution to the vector radiative transfer in a square enclosure filled with a Mie scattering medium is first examined to validate our program. We then study the polarized radiative transfer in two kinds of geometries filled with scattering medium which is equivalent to a suspension of latex spheres in water. Three sizes of spheres are considered. The results for non-dimensional polarized radiative flux along the boundaries and the angular distributions of the Stokes vector at specific positions are presented and discussed. For the complex geometry bounded by the square and circular object, numerical solutions are presented for the cases both with Lambertian (diffuse) reflection and with Fresnel reflection. Some interesting phenomenon are found and analyzed.

  6. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Ifigeneia V.; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Souli, Maria P.; Aziz, Asef; Nowsheen, Somaira; Aziz, Khaled; Rogakou, Emmy

    2017-01-01

    Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1) repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI) and malignant transformation and (2) can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity). Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair. PMID:28718816

  7. Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Reardon, David A.; Peters, Katherine B.; Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer; Bailey, Leighann; Threatt, Stevie; Sampson, John; Friedman, Allan; Friedman, Henry S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

  8. On the energy balance closure and net radiation in complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Niedrist, Georg; Scholz, Katharina; Tomelleri, Enrico; Zhao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In complex, sloping terrain, horizontal measurements of net radiation are not reflective of the radiative energy available for the conductive and convective heat exchange of the underlying surface. Using data from a grassland site on a mountain slope characterised by spatial heterogeneity in inclination and aspect, we tested the hypothesis that a correction of the horizontal net radiation measurements which accounts for the individual footprint contributions of the various surfaces to the measured sensible and latent heat eddy covariance fluxes will yield more realistic slope-parallel net radiation estimates compared to a correction based on the average inclination and aspect of the footprint. Our main result is that both approaches led to clear, but very similar improvements in the phase between available energy and the sum of the latent and sensible heat fluxes. As a consequence the variance in the sum of latent and sensible heat flux explained by available radiation improved by >10 %, while energy balance closure improved only slightly. This is shown to be mainly due to the average inclination and aspect corresponding largely with the inclination and aspect of the main flux source area in combination with a limited sensitivity of the slope correction to small angular differences in, particularly, inclination and aspect. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of the present approach and future research directions. PMID:28066093

  9. Combined micro-and standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy for complex renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Buldu, İbrahim; Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Karatağ, Tuna; İnan, Ramazan; Armağan, Abdullah; İstanbulluoğlu, Okan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to present the technique of combination of standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) with microperc for achieving higher success rates without increasing complication rates in the management of complex renal calculi. Material and methods The patients who underwent microperc procedure as a complementary procedure to standard PNL for complex kidney stones in two reference hospitals between 2013 and 2015, were evaluated retrospectively. Results All patients underwent a total of two accesses one for standard PNL and one for microperc. The mean stone size was measured as 54.3 mm. The procedures were completed after an average operative time of 88.2 minutes and fluoroscopy time of 5.3 minutes. Stone free status was achieved in 18 cases (78.2%) and small residual fragments (≤4 mm) were detected in 3 cases (13.1%). Complications were seen in three patients (13%) as hemorrhage in one and postoperative fever in two patients. Conclusion Despite the limitations of this study, the combination of standard PNL and microperc might reduce the complication rates and increase the success rates when treating complex kidney stones. Future prospective and comparative studies are needed. PMID:27635289

  10. Radiation Protection. Measurement of radioactivity in the environment - Air- radon 222. A proposed ISO standard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, G.; Woods, M.

    2009-04-01

    Radon isotopes (222, 220, 219) are radioactive gases produced by the disintegration of radium isotopes 226, 224 and 223, which are decay products of uranium238, thorium232 and uranium235 respectively. All are found in the earth's crust. Solid elements, also radioactive, are produced by radon disintegration. Radon is classed as a rare gas in the periodic table of elements, along with helium, argon, neon, krypton and xenon. When disintegrating, radon emits alpha particles and generates solid decay products, which are also radioactive (polonium, bismuth, lead etc.). The potential danger of radon lies in its solid decay products rather than the gas itself. Whether or not they are attached aerosols, radon decay products can be inhaled and deposited in the bronchopulmonary tree to varying depths according to their size. Radon today is considered to be the main source of human exposure to natural radiation. At the international level, radon accounts for 52% of global average exposure to natural radiation. Isotope 222 (48%) is far more significant than isotope 220 (4%), whilst isotope 219 is considered as negligible. Exposure to radon varies considerably from one region to another, depending on factors such as weather conditions, and underlying geology. Activity concentration can therefore vary by a factor of 10 or even a 100 from one period of time to the next and from one area to another. There are many ways of measuring the radon 222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products. Measuring techniques fall into three categories: - spot measurement methods; continuous measurement; integrated measurement. The proposed ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) document suggests guidelines for measuring radon222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products in a free (environment) and confined (buildings) atmosphere. The target date for availability of

  11. Enhancement of radiation-induced cell kill by platinum complexes (carboplatin and iproplatin) in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.A.; Douple, E.B.; Richmond, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    Two second generation platinum complexes currently undergoing clinical chemotherapeutic trials, carboplatin (CBDCA) and iproplatin (CHIP), were evaluated for their ability to alter the survival of cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells following irradiation. Two protocols were employed. In the first, the drug was added to preplated cells, some of which were subsequently made hypoxic with nitrogen gas. These hypoxic cells were irradiated following 1 hour exposure to drug and survival was assessed by standard colony forming unit (CFU) methods. Enhancement ratios (ER) of approximately 1.4 were obtained for irradiation under hypoxic conditions, if the cells were exposed to equitoxic doses of CBDCA (500 microM) CHIP (50 microM). In the second series of experiments, cells were treated with 10 Gy in air and then incubated for various times prior to trypsinization and serial dilution of single cell suspensions. Six hours after irradiation, cells treated with X rays alone had recovered to produce a surviving fraction twice that of cells trypsinized immediately after irradiation (not held). Post-irradiation administration of CBDCA (50 microM) or CHIP (20 microM), at a time when free radical-mediated radiosensitization would not be possible, operationally inhibited this recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD). Inhibition, expressed as recovery inhibition factor (RIF) after 6 hr with drug, was 2.0 for CBDCA and 1.2 for CHIP. These results suggest that the rationale for designing clinical trials to exploit interactions between cisplatin and radiation might also extend to include combined modality therapy using radiation with either of these two platinum complexes.

  12. A Simple Procedure to Determine Complex Permittivity of Moist Materials Using Standard Commercial Coaxial Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusoh, M. A.; Abbas, Z.; Hassan, J.; Azmi, B. Z.; Ahmad, A. F.

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed to determine complex permittivity of moist materials for known percentage of moisture content at any frequency based using a standard commercial coaxial sensor. Polynomial fitting and Gaussian elimination method were applied to obtain a single equation of complex permittivity as a function of frequency and moisture content. The empirical equation was tested for new samples and was found to have mean error percentage of 5.14 % and 10.22 % for dielectric constant and loss factor, respectively, when compared to a commercial probe.

  13. Study of decoder complexity for HEVC and AVC standards based on tool-by-tool comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. J.; Han, W. J.; Sim, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is the latest standardization efforts of ISO/IEC MPEG and ITU-T VCEG for further improving the coding efficiency of H.264/AVC standard. It has been reported that HEVC can provide comparable subjective visual quality with H.264/AVC at only half bit-rates in many cases. In this paper, decoder complexities between HEVC and H.264/AVC are studied for providing initial complexity estimates of the HEVC decoder compared with the H.264/AVC decoder. For this purpose, several selected coding tools including intra prediction, motion compensation, transform, loop filters and entropy coder have been analyzed in terms of number of operations as well as their statistical differences.

  14. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, H. J.; da Silva, E. J.; Mehta, K.; de Barros, V. S.; Asfora, V. K.; Guzzo, P. L.; Parker, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20-220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  15. Standards for environmental, non-threshold, carcinogens: a comparison of the approaches used for radiation and for chemicals.

    PubMed

    Duggan, M J; Lambert, B E

    1998-07-01

    Environmental standards for ionising radiation and for chemical carcinogens have been developed independently of each other. Radiation standards have been derived by deciding upon what is an acceptable risk, and then finding the corresponding dose from the exposure/risk relationship-quantitative risk assessment (QRA). The extent and the quality of the exposure/risk data for radiation, and the authority of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), have resulted in universally accepted guidance and standards. This is not the case for chemical, non-threshold carcinogens. Their carcinogenicity ranges from doubtful to well-established, the exposure/response data are generally of poor quality, and there is no authoritative international body analogous to the ICRP. For some of these carcinogens, some organisations have used QRA to derive environmental standards. Others consider the data inadequate for such an approach and have used more pragmatic methods. The problems associated with the various approaches used and the prospects of an integrated approach for both radiation and chemical carcinogens are discussed.

  16. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  17. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, R. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Bazanov, M. I.; Semeikin, A. S.

    2009-05-01

    The energy of combustion of cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin was determined in an isothermic-shell liquid calorimeter with a stationary calorimetric bomb. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of the complex were calculated, -Δ c H o = 27334.06 ± 50.98 kJ/mol and Δf H o = 3062.90 ± 50.97 kJ/mol.

  18. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions.

  19. Radiation Damage in XFEL: Case study from the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes induced by radiation damage in X-ray crystallography hinder the ability to understand the structure/function relationship in chemical reactions. Serial femtosecond crystallography overcomes this problem by exposing the sample to very short and intense laser pulse leading to measurement before destruction. Here we use molecular modeling to map the radiation damage during the 10–50 fs to the intensity, the energy and the time duration of the laser pulse on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. In the model, the nuclei move classically in a fully quantum potential created by electron density under the effect of strong laser pulse in the Ehrenfest dynamics regime. The results show that the Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca distances are less affected by radiation damage due to the their heavy masses, while one μ-oxo bridge (O5) moves significantly. The radiation damage may induce conformational changes of the water ligands but only bond elongation for the amino acids ligands. These effects are relatively intensity independent from 1016 to 1017 W/cm2, but changes increase dramatically if the beam intensity is increased to 1018 W/cm2. In addition, the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) nature of the laser beam does not affect the dynamics of the ions. PMID:27827423

  20. Validation testing of ANSI/IEEE n42.49 standard requirements for personal emergency radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M

    2010-04-01

    Various radiation detectors including electronic personal emergency radiation detectors (PERDs), radiochromic film cards and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to validate a subset of the radiological test requirements listed in the American National Standards Institute/The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (ANSI/IEEE) N42.49 standard. The subset of tests included the following: comparing the readout of the detectors with the value given at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); testing of the alarm settings (when applicable) in air-kerma (or exposure) and air-kerma rate (or exposure rate) mode; and investigating the effect of testing the detectors mounted on a phantom and free in air. The purpose of this work was not to test the performance of the sample of detectors used. Instead, the detectors were used to validate the requirements of the written standard being developed. For this purpose, the performance and response of these instruments were recorded when placed in (137)Cs, and x-ray beams at different air-kerma rates and test conditions. The measurements described in this report were performed at the NIST x-ray and gamma-ray radiation calibration facilities. The data in this report provide a benchmark in support of the development of the ANSI/IEEE N42.49 standard.

  1. Experimental and theoretical study of organometallic radiation-protective materials adapted to radiation sources with a complex isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Russkikh, I. M.; Seleznev, E. N.; Tashlykov, O. L. Shcheklein, S. E.

    2015-12-15

    The significance of optimizing the content of components of a radiation-protective material, which is determined by the isotopic composition of radioactive contamination, depending on the reactor type, operating time, and other factors is demonstrated. The results of computational and experimental investigation of the gamma-radiation attenuation capacity of homogenous radiation-protective materials with different fillers are reported.

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of organometallic radiation-protective materials adapted to radiation sources with a complex isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russkikh, I. M.; Seleznev, E. N.; Tashlykov, O. L.; Shcheklein, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The significance of optimizing the content of components of a radiation-protective material, which is determined by the isotopic composition of radioactive contamination, depending on the reactor type, operating time, and other factors is demonstrated. The results of computational and experimental investigation of the gamma-radiation attenuation capacity of homogenous radiation-protective materials with different fillers are reported.

  3. Radiation injury is a potentially serious complication to fluoroscopically-guided complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, LK

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced injury to skin is an infrequent but potentially serious complication to complex fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Due to a lack of experience with such injuries, the medical community has found fluoroscopically-induced injuries difficult to diagnose. Injuries have occurred globally in many countries. Serious injuries most frequently occur on the back but have also occurred on the neck, buttocks and anterior of the chest. Severities of injuries range from skin rashes and epilation to necrosis of the skin and its underlying structures. This article reviews the characteristics of these injuries and some actions that can be taken to reduce their likelihood or seriousness. PMID:21614271

  4. Quality assurance standards drive improvements in the profile of radiation therapy departments participating in trials of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Grant, Warren; Hurkmans, Coen W; Poortmans, Philip M; Maingon, Philippe; Monti, Angelo F; van Os, Marjolein J H; Weber, Damien C

    2014-09-01

    The Facility Questionnaire (FQ) of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG) evaluates the human, technical and organizational resources at each EORTC member institution. The purpose of this study is to use the FQ database to assess the improvement of radiation therapy (RT) structures and resources within the EORTC compared to the previous surveys performed by our group. We report the content of the current FQ database, completed online by 156 EORTC candidate member institutions from 22 countries between February 2011 and February 2013. Results are compared to FQ-published data from 1992 and 2007. The average number of patients per year per EORTC institution is 2381 (range 350-12,000) an 18.2% increase compared to the 2007 figures. From 2007 to 2013 the average number of radiation oncologists, physicists and radiation technologists per EORTC institution has increased by 27% (from 8.5 to 10.8), 41% (from 5.2 to 7.4) and 38% (from 26.1 to 36.1) respectively. Consequently the number of patients per year per radiation oncologist has decreased from 258 to 243, for physicists from 426 to 354 and for radiation technologists from 107 to 86. One hundred and forty-six (94%) and 101 (65%) institutions can now deliver IMRT and SBRT, compared to 77 (79%) and 53 (54%) in 2007. The standards set by the EORTC-ROG are met by a continually improving number of institutions, helping to safeguard use of advanced technologies in EORTC-ROG clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation-induced interstitial complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokov, P. M.; Selyshchev, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    A propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation induced defects as a result of thermal-concentration instability is studied. The defects that are considered in the model are complexes. Each of them consists of one atom of impunity and of one interstitial atom. Crystal with defects has extra energy which is transformed into heat during defect annealing. Simulation of the auto-wave of annealing has been performed. The front and the speed of the auto-wave have been obtained. It is shown that annealing occurs in a narrow region of time and space. There are two kinds of such annealing behaviour. In the first case the speed of the auto-wave oscillates near its constant mean value and the front of temperature oscillates in a complex way. In the second case the speed of propagation is constant and fronts of temperature and concentration look like sigmoid functions.

  6. Unravelling the Complexities of the Earth's Radiation Belts: Findings from the Van Allen Probes mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola; Kessel, Ramona; Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shri

    2014-05-01

    Within the first year of Van Allen Probe operations, team members made a series of highly publicized decisive discoveries concerning the structure and evolution of the Earth's radiation belts, the processes that energize particles there, and the locations where they operate. Nevertheless, much more extensive and less publicized findings from the Van Allen Probes suggest that Earth's radiation belts regions remain a highly complex and puzzling place. Although the relation between magnetic storm and radiation belt enhancements and loss has been emphasized, dynamics during non-storm periods has occasionally been shown to be dramatic. While emphasis has been placed on new findings regarding local non-adiabatic energization mechanisms, adiabatic mechanisms have also been shown to be important. Furthermore, the interplay between, and relative importance of, these and other energization processes remain uncertain. The role of seed populations has been highlighted, with some studies pointing to localized mechanisms and others pointing to the role of substorms in transporting and injecting such populations. Here we review some of the less publicized findings and future objectives of the Van Allen Probes mission to get a broader and in-depth view of present understanding of Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  7. A radiation-induced meningioma "cures" a complex dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Copeland, William R; Link, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of spontaneous thrombosis of an extremely complex dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), believed to be previously incurable, after the development of a radiation-induced meningioma resulting from prior attempts to treat the fistula with radiosurgery. A very large DAVF was treated over the course of 3 decades with a combination of partial embolization and stereotactic radiosurgery with no angiographic or clinical treatment response at long-term follow-up. However, with the development of new neurologic symptoms 13 years after radiosurgery, a meningioma was found to have arisen in the previously irradiated field, and surprisingly, the fistula had spontaneously thrombosed. The meningioma was successfully removed. We discuss the unique pathophysiology of the radiation-induced meningioma causing this previously incurable DAVF progressing to obliteration. We also review the natural history of DAVFs, including reported rates of spontaneous occlusion, as well as the success of radiosurgery in their treatment. Finally, the incidence of radiosurgery-induced tumors, particularly meningiomas, is reviewed. The relationship between the spontaneous thrombosis of a DAVF and the radiation-induced meningioma is unique and has not previously been reported. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Occupational hazard: radiation exposure for the urologist--developing a reference standard.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth A; Rangarajan, Sriram S; Chen, Tony; Palazzi, Kerrin L; Langford, J Scott; Sur, Roger L

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is a paucity of literature offering practicing urologists a reference for the amount of radiation exposure received while surgically managing urolithiasis. This study examines the cumulative radiation exposure of an urologist over 9 months. We present a case series of fluoroscopic exposures of an experienced stone surgeon operating at an academic comprehensive stone center between April and December 2011. Radiation exposure measurements were determined by a thermoluminescent dosimeter worn on the outside of the surgeon's thyroid shield. Estimations of radiation exposure (mrem) per month were charted with fluoroscopy times, using scatter plots to estimate Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The total 9-month radiation exposure was 87 mrems for deep dose equivalent (DDE), 293 mrem for lens dose equivalent (LDE), and 282 mrem for shallow dose equivalent (SDE). Total fluoroscopy time was 252.44 minutes for 64 ureteroscopies (URSs), 29 percutaneous nephrolithtomies (PNLs), 20 cystoscopies with ureteral stent placements, 9 shock wave lithotripsies (SWLs), 9 retrograde pyelograms (RPGs), 2 endoureterotomies, and 1 ureteral balloon dilation. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients examining the association between fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure were not significant for DDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), LDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), or SDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2). Over a 9-month period, total radiation exposures were well below annual accepted limits (DDE 5000 mrem, LDE 15,000 mrem and SDE 50,000 mrem). Although fluoroscopy time did not correlate with radiation exposure, future prospective studies can account for co-variates such as patient obesity and urologist distance from radiation source.

  9. Special Report on Standards for Radioactivity: Report on the 1989 Meeting of the Radionuclide Measurements Section of the Consultative Committee on Standards for the Measurement of Ionizing Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Hoppes, Dale D.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the activities discussed at the 10th meeting of Section II of the Consultative Committee on Standards for the Measurement of Ionizing Radiations (Comité Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants, CCEMRI) held in May 1989 at Sèvres (France). Topics included present and future international comparisons of activity measurements, the status and possible extension of the International reference system for activity measurements of gamma-ray emitting nuclides, reports from other working groups, accomplishments at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, BIPM), and progress at member laboratories. PMID:28053423

  10. Correction and homogenization of BSRN radiation records using updated calibrations from the World Standard Group of short- and longwave radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeki, Stephan; Wacker, Stefan; Gröbner, Julian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of our study is to correct and homogenize the ground-based radiation records of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The unique BSRN archive holds the world's most accurate radiation data which are used by research communities around the globe to validate satellite products and climate model outputs. Recent measurements with newly developed high precision ground-based radiometers have demonstrated, however, that corrections by up to 5 Wm-2 of the World Standard Groups of short- and long-wave radiation hosted by the World Radiation Center in Davos are required. Since most of the BSRN data are traceable to these reference groups, the BSRN data will also need to be corrected and re-calculated. Such a correction is undoubtedly a sensitive and difficult issue, and requires a thorough re-analysis of raw data from BSRN and the World Standard Groups using ancillary information on the current state of the atmosphere. The foreseen modifications to the short- and long-wave WSGs have profound implications on all networks including the BSRN archive and therefore on satellite-based surface fluxes, climate models and global surface radiation budget studies. The commission for instruments and methods of observations (CIMO) proposed that Task Teams should be established: 1) to assess the consequences of a change in solar/terrestrial reference scales with regard to BSRN, 2) to make recommendations for a modification of the current references, and 3) to propose methods on how to deal with old BSRN data. In this study we will give an overview of the above-mentioned tasks to be performed in the next several years and current progress.

  11. Ground-Based Multifunctional Radiometric Complex for Atmospheric and Solar Radiation Measurements at the Kishinev Site, Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aculinin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Smicov, V.; Eck, T.; Policarpov, A.; Grachev, V.

    2004-06-01

    The information about the ground-based multifunctional radiometric complex is presented. Radiometric complex is designated to make a high quality long-term continuous monitoring of the solar and atmospheric radiation and to collect datasets with the solar radiation broadband measurements from UV-B to IR. Complex is placed in an urban environment at the Kishinev site. Solar radiation data are supplied with the main meteorological elements such as air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind mean velocity and direction, and solar irradiances, which are continuously measured with the automatic meteorological station. Measurements of the total column ozone content with the MICROTOPS II Ozonemeter are regularly fulfilled at the Kishinev site. Results of measurements of the solar and atmospheric radiation and total ozone content in the column of atmosphere are originally presented for the Kishinev site of observation.

  12. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  13. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  14. MDP: A Deinococcus Mn2+-Decapeptide Complex Protects Mice from Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Gayen, Manoshi; Smith, Joan T; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Grichenko, Olga; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J; Kiang, Juliann G; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    The radioprotective capacity of a rationally-designed Mn2+-decapeptide complex (MDP), based on Mn antioxidants in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, was investigated in a mouse model of radiation injury. MDP was previously reported to be extraordinarily radioprotective of proteins in the setting of vaccine development. The peptide-component (DEHGTAVMLK) of MDP applied here was selected from a group of synthetic peptides screened in vitro for their ability to protect cultured human cells and purified enzymes from extreme damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR). We show that the peptides accumulated in Jurkat T-cells and protected them from 100 Gy. MDP preserved the activity of T4 DNA ligase exposed to 60,000 Gy. In vivo, MDP was nontoxic and protected B6D2F1/J (female) mice from acute radiation syndrome. All irradiated mice treated with MDP survived exposure to 9.5 Gy (LD70/30) in comparison to the untreated mice, which displayed 63% lethality after 30 days. Our results show that MDP provides early protection of white blood cells, and attenuates IR-induced damage to bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells via G-CSF and GM-CSF modulation. Moreover, MDP mediated the immunomodulation of several cytokine concentrations in serum including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-10 during early recovery. Our results present the necessary prelude for future efforts towards clinical application of MDP as a promising IR countermeasure. Further investigation of MDP as a pre-exposure prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic in radiotherapy and radiation emergencies is warranted.

  15. MDP: A Deinococcus Mn2+-Decapeptide Complex Protects Mice from Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joan T.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Grichenko, Olga; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2016-01-01

    The radioprotective capacity of a rationally-designed Mn2+-decapeptide complex (MDP), based on Mn antioxidants in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, was investigated in a mouse model of radiation injury. MDP was previously reported to be extraordinarily radioprotective of proteins in the setting of vaccine development. The peptide-component (DEHGTAVMLK) of MDP applied here was selected from a group of synthetic peptides screened in vitro for their ability to protect cultured human cells and purified enzymes from extreme damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR). We show that the peptides accumulated in Jurkat T-cells and protected them from 100 Gy. MDP preserved the activity of T4 DNA ligase exposed to 60,000 Gy. In vivo, MDP was nontoxic and protected B6D2F1/J (female) mice from acute radiation syndrome. All irradiated mice treated with MDP survived exposure to 9.5 Gy (LD70/30) in comparison to the untreated mice, which displayed 63% lethality after 30 days. Our results show that MDP provides early protection of white blood cells, and attenuates IR-induced damage to bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells via G-CSF and GM-CSF modulation. Moreover, MDP mediated the immunomodulation of several cytokine concentrations in serum including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-10 during early recovery. Our results present the necessary prelude for future efforts towards clinical application of MDP as a promising IR countermeasure. Further investigation of MDP as a pre-exposure prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic in radiotherapy and radiation emergencies is warranted. PMID:27500529

  16. Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Ho, Alice Y.; Montgomery, Leslie; Fornier, Monica N.; Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

  17. The effect of ionising radiation on testosterone binding globulin characteristics: correction of the protein' parameters by lipid polyene complexes of fungus Laetiporus sulfureus.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Eugene H; Kapich, Alexander N

    2010-03-01

    The aims of this work were: (i) To compare the effects of ionising radiation (IR) on testosterone binding globulin (TeBG) characteristics (serum concentration, cooperativity of androgen binding and affinity for hormone) in divergent mammalian species; (ii) to couple radiation effects with probable TeBG-parameter changes; and (iii) to investigate the prevention of these changes by fungal preparations (in particular - by lipid polyene complexes of Laetiporus sulphureus). Characteristics of TeBG were investigated in microaliquots of rat and human serum samples using [(3)H]-5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone ([(3)H]-DHT) radioligand assays after in vivo exposures to IR (external gamma-sources, incorporation of (131)I-, (137)Cs-radionuclides) at experimental and post-Chernobyl radioecological conditions (doses 0.25-2.2 Gy). Species-specific changes of TeBG parameters were found depending on the type of IR, dose and time after irradiation. Specifically children living in radionuclide contaminated regions (near Chernobyl) were found to have a decrease of positive cooperativity for the TeBG-androgen binding, a drop of TeBG levels, and a decline in hormone affinity. Screening of natural substances (from phanerogams and fungi) detected that lipid polyene complexes of the basidiomycete L. sulphureus allowed recovery of the standard features of TeBG. IR induced a depletion of TeBG from blood simultaneously with species-specific changes of TeBG, which depend on the type of radiation, the dose of radiation (from 0.25 up to 2.2 Gy), and the time after radiation. The Hill coefficient of TeBG (indicating the degree of molecular cooperativity when hormone binding) appeared to be the most radiosensitive marker of the glycoprotein activity because of it is inversely to radiation dose. There are pharmacological possibilities to restore IR-induced "declines" of TeBG's affinity and cooperativity for androgen ligand binding.

  18. Standardized Herbal Formula PM014 Inhibits Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Jin-Mo; Kim, Dongwook; An, Yong-Min; Yoo, Byung Rok; Chang, Hanna; Kim, Miran; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy is widely used for thoracic cancers. However, it occasionally causes radiation-induced lung injuries, including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Chung-Sang-Bo-Ha-Tang (CSBHT) has been traditionally used to treat chronic pulmonary disease in Korea. PM014, a modified herbal formula derived from CSBHT, contains medicinal herbs of seven species. In our previous studies, PM014 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease model. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of PM014 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Mice in the treatment group were orally administered PM014 six times for 2 weeks. Effects of PM014 on radiation pneumonitis were evaluated based on histological findings and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PM014 treatment significantly inhibited immune cell recruitment and collagen deposition in lung tissue. Normal lung volume, evaluated by radiological analysis, in PM014-treated mice was higher compared to that in irradiated control mice. PM014-treated mice exhibited significant changes in inspiratory capacity, compliance and tissue damping and elastance. Additionally, PM014 treatment resulted in the downregulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and fibrosis-related genes and a reduction in the transforming growth factor-β1-positive cell population in lung tissue. Thus, PM014 is a potent therapeutic agent for radiation-induced lung fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:28322297

  19. A standard dose of radiation for microscopic disease is not appropriate

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, L.B. )

    1990-12-15

    Elective irradiation of sites of potential occult tumor spread is often part of a patient's radiation therapy program. The required radiation dose (D) depends on the probability that occult disease exists (P(occ)), the number of sites at risk (A), the number of tumor clonogens present (Ni), their radiation sensitivity, and the desired control rate. An exponential model of cell survival is used to quantify the importance of these factors. Control Probability = (1 - Pocc x (1 - e-Ni x (SF2)D/2))A; SF2 = surviving fraction after 2 Gy. Implications for clinical radiation therapy include: 1. Since the number of clonogens in an occult site may vary from 10 degrees to 10(8), Ni is the major determinant of the required dose. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of the clonogens (SF2) is also extremely important in determining the dose. Other factors are less influential since they vary less. 2. The variability of Ni (8 logs) is larger than the variation in cell number seen with gross disease (1 cm3 versus 1000 cm3, 3 logs). When Ni approximately 10(8), the required dose approaches that needed for small volume gross disease (10(9) cells, 1 cm3). 3. The dose prescribed to elective sites should reflect the risk of occult disease based on the primary tumor site, stage, and grade. 4. Regions where clinicoradiologic evaluation is difficult (e.g., pelvis and obese neck) require higher doses because macroscopic tumor deposits may exist. 5. Relatively low doses (10 to 30 Gy) are often thought to be inadequate for microscopic tumor. However, similar doses have been reported to sterilize microscopic tumor in ovarian, rectal, bladder, breast, and head and neck carcinomas. Relatively low doses should not be discounted since they may be useful in select cases when normal tissue tolerances and/or previous irradiation treatment limit the radiation dose.

  20. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  1. Second Cancer Incidence Risk Estimates using BEIR VII Models for Standard and Complex External Beam Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, E M; James, H; Bonora, M; Yarnold, JR; Evans, PM

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy including cone beam CT verification following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Method Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated : (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) non-coplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low local cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contra-lateral breast, left and right lung, oesophagus, stomach, liver, colon and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 years according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver and bladder (< 0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB

  2. Mitochondrial genomes and avian phylogeny: complex characters and resolvability without explosive radiations.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Gillian C; Kardailsky, Olga; Kimball, Rebecca T; Braun, Edward L; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    We improve the taxon sampling for avian phylogeny by analyzing 7 new mitochondrial genomes (a toucan, woodpecker, osprey, forest falcon, American kestrel, heron, and a pelican). This improves inference of the avian tree, and it supports 3 major conclusions. The first is that some birds (including a parrot, a toucan, and an osprey) exhibit a complete duplication of the control region (CR) meaning that there are at least 4 distinct gene orders within birds. However, it appears that there are regions of continued gene conversion between the duplicate CRs, resulting in duplications that can be stable for long evolutionary periods. Because of this stable duplicated state, gene order can eventually either revert to the original order or change to the new gene order. The existence of this stable duplicate state explains how an apparently unlikely event (finding the same novel gene order) can arise multiple times. Although rare genomic changes have theoretical advantages for tree reconstruction, they can be compromised if these apparently rare events have a stable intermediate state. Secondly, the toucan and woodpecker improve the resolution of the 6-way split within Neoaves that has been called an "explosive radiation." An explosive radiation implies that normal microevolutionary events are insufficient to explain the observed macroevolution. By showing the avian tree is, in principle, resolvable, we demonstrate that the radiation of birds is amenable to standard evolutionary analysis. Thirdly, and as expected from theory, additional taxa breaking up long branches stabilize the position of some problematic taxa (like the falcon). In addition, we report that within the birds of prey and allies, we did not find evidence pairing New World vultures with storks or accipitrids (hawks, eagles, and osprey) with Falconids.

  3. Study of radiative neutrino mass generation and physics beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julio, Julio

    Scope and methods. In this dissertation I propose a new class of models of radiative neutrino mass generation induced by leptoquarks. These models generate neutrino mass at two-loop level. Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 are devoted to discuss such models. In Chapter 4, I study the perturbative unitarity constraints on class of W' models attempting to explain the Tevatron top quark asymmetry and CDF Wjj anomaly. Findings and conclusions. In one model discussed in Chapter 2, it is shown that all of neutrino oscillation data can be explained consistently. The lightest of neutrinos is predicted to be massless with the hierarchy of neutrino mass being normal. The oscillation parameters are linked to leptoquark branching ratios. Neutrinoless double beta decay might be observed through vector-scalar exchange. New contribution to CP violation in B0s system arises from leptoquark box diagrams, which can explain the apparent anomaly observed in experiments. In Chapter 3, I propose a model of two-loop neutrino mass involving a charge 2/3 vectorlike particle and a doublet of leptoquark scalar. This model predicts one of the neutrinos to be massless and admits both the normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies with correlated predictions for ℓi → ℓ j + gamma branching ratios. New contributions to CP violation in B0s-B0s mixing arise in the model through leptoquark box diagrams and through mixing of quarks with vectorlike quark. These can explain the anomalous dimuon events reported by the D0 Collaboration. These leptoquarks, with masses below 500 GeV, also provide a natural resolution to the apparent discrepancy in the measured values of the CP violation parameters sin 2beta and epsilonK. In Chapter 4, I study perturbative unitarity constraints on general W' models by considering the high energy behavior of fermion scattering into gauge bosons. In most cases that are surveyed, a Z' boson with a comparable mass must be present for the theory to be consistent, with fixed

  4. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  5. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ling; Chen, Wun-Ke; Liu, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-10-13

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation.

  6. Linear-no-threshold is a radiation-protection standard rather than a mechanistic effect model.

    PubMed

    Breckow, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    The linear-no-threshold (LNT) controversy covers much more than the mere discussion whether or not "the LNT hypothesis is valid". It is shown that one cannot expect to find only one or even the only one dose-effect relationship. Each element within the biological reaction chain that is affected by ionizing radiation contributes in a specific way to the final biological endpoint of interest. The resulting dose-response relationship represents the superposition of all these effects. Till now there is neither a closed and clear picture of the entirety of radiation action for doses below some 10 mSv, nor does clear epidemiological evidence exist for an increase of risk for stochastic effects, in this dose range. On the other hand, radiation protection demands for quantitative risk estimates as well as for practicable dose concepts. In this respect, the LNT concept is preferred against any alternative concept. However, the LNT concept does not necessarily mean that the mechanism of cancer induction is intrinsically linear. It could hold even if the underlying multi-step mechanisms act in a non-linear way. In this case it would express a certain "attenuation" of non-linearities. Favouring LNT against threshold-, hyper-, or sub-linear models for radiation-protection purposes on the one hand, but preferring one of these models (e.g. for a specific effect) because of biological considerations for scientific purposes on the other hand, does not mean a contradiction.

  7. An EGS4 based mathematical phantom for radiation protection calculations using standard man

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, K.N.

    1994-11-01

    This note describes an Electron Gamma Shower code (EGS4) Monte Carlo program for calculating radiation transport in adult males and females from internal or external electron and gamma sources which requires minimal knowledge of organ geometry. Calculations of the dose from planar gamma fields and from computerized tomography illustrate two applications of the package. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Relation of structure to function for the US reference standard endotoxin after exposure to /sup 60/Co radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Ahlgren, A.; Tsai, C.M.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and function of the highly purified US reference standard endotoxin (RSE) were studied after exposure to ionizing radiation from a /sup 60/Co source. With increasing doses of radiation, the trilaminar ribbon-like structure of untreated endotoxin exhibited focal swelling, after which only spherical particles were seen by electron microscopy. These morphological changes were paralleled by the respective loss of O-side chain repeating units and pieces of the R-core from the lipopolysaccharide molecules, as demonstrated by electrophoresis. The biologic function of the irradiated endotoxin was assessed with a variety of tests. At higher doses of radiation, a direct relation was observed between the degradation of the molecular and supramolecular structure and the loss of biologic function. At lower doses of radiation, however, there was variability among the functional assays in their rate of change with progressive irradiation of the RSE. The results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety plays an important role both in determining the supramolecular structure and in modulating certain biologic activities of bacterial endotoxins.

  9. The effect of combined treatment with a platinum complex and ionizing radiation on chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Szumiel, I.; Nias, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    Cis-dichlorobis(cyclopentylamine)platinum II (DBCP) belongs to the group of platinum complexes which have recently been reported to have anti-tumour activity. Its cytotoxic activity in CHO cells is not cell-age-dependent, but enhancement of the effect of ionizing radiation is both dose-and cell cycle phase-dependent. In asynchronous cell populations DBCP acts as a dose-modifying factor for ionizing radiation. Doses of DBCP reducing survival of CHO cells to 26% and 4% applied 1 h before irradiation reduce the Do value of radiation dose-survival curves by factors of 1-34 and 1-59 respectively. In synchronized CHO populations enhancement by DBCP of the effect of radiation is most pronounced in G1 and in late S while it is reduced in mid-S. Possible mechanisms of DBCP-radiation interaction are discussed. PMID:944586

  10. Two-photon standard technique for measuring the two-photon absorption cross section in complex organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alfimov, E.E.; Groshev, D.E.; Makukha, V.K.; Meshalkin, Y.P.

    1995-03-01

    The two-photon standard technique for measuring the absolute cross sections for two-photon absorption of complex organic molecules is proposed, which is quite insensitive to the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the laser beam. n-Bismethylsterilbenzene (MSB) with a known value of the two-photon absorption cross section is used as a standard. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The radiolysis of CMPO: effects of acid, metal complexation and alpha vs. gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Gary S. Groenewold

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The group actinide/lanthanide complexing agent octylphenylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) has been examined for its radiation stability by measuring the kinetics of its reactions with free radicals in both the aqueous and organic phases for the free and metal-complexed ligand, identifying its degradation products for both alpha and gamma irradiation, measuring the effects on solvent extraction performance, and measuring the G-values for its degradation under various conditions. This includes the G-values for CMPO in the absence of, and in contact with the acidic aqueous phase, where it is shown that the acidic aqueous phase provides radio-protection for this ligand. It was found that both solvent and metal complexation affect the kinetics of the reaction of the •NO3 radical, a product of HNO3 radiolysis, with CMPO. For example, CMPO complexed with lanthanides has a rate constant for this reaction an order of magnitude higher than for the free ligand, and the reaction for the free ligand in the organic phase is about three times faster than in the aqueous phase. In steady state radiolysis kinetics it was determined that HNO3, although not NO3- anion, provides radio-protection to CMPO, with the G-value for its degradation decreasing with increasing acidity, until it was almost completely suppressed by irradiation in contact with 5 M HNO3. The same degradation products were produced by irradiation with alpha and gamma-sources, except that the relative abundances of these products varied. For example, the product of C-C bond scission was produced only in low amounts for gamma-radiolysis, but it was an important product for samples irradiated with a He ion beam. These results are compared to the new data appearing in the literature on DGA radiolysis, since CMPO and the DGAs both contain the amide functional group.

  12. Upping the Ante of Text Complexity in the Common Core State Standards: Examining Its Potential Impact on Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Mesmer, Heidi Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core Standards for the English Language Arts (CCSS) provide explicit guidelines matching grade-level bands (e.g., 2-3, 4-5) with targeted text complexity levels. The CCSS staircase accelerates text expectations for students across Grades 2-12 in order to close a gap in the complexity of texts typically used in high school and those of…

  13. Resonance energies, lifetimes and complex energy potential curves from standard wave-packet calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2012-05-01

    We show here for a simple model system that the wavepacket dynamics in the interaction region can be described by a superposition of the non-Hermitian exponential divergent eigenfunctions of the physical Hamiltonian. We demonstrate how it is possible to obtain the complex eigenvalues and also the corresponding resonance eigenfunctions from the propagation of the wavepacket within the framework of the standard formalism of quantum mechanics. The general results demonstrated here for a simple model can lead to two different types of computational applications: (i) for systems where one can obtain the resonance energies and lifetimes as well as their corresponding eigenfunctions it is possible to study the evolution of the physical properties solely based on the initially populated resonance states without the need to propagate the wavepacket; (ii) for molecular systems where it is quite difficult to solve the non-Hermitian time-independent Schrödinger equation and obtain molecular resonance energies and functions. For this type of problem, the methods presented here enable one to evaluate the topology of complex potential energy surfaces from the wavepacket propagation and facilitate the study of the nuclear dynamics of ionizing molecular systems.

  14. Isobologram analysis of the combined effects of anti-tumour platinum complexes and ionizing radiation on mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Szumiel, I.; Nias, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells have been treated in vitro with the platinum coordination complexes cis-PAD or CHIP and with radiation, either alone or in combination with different doses and time intervals. The isobologram method has been used to make a graphic comparison of these combined-modality data in terms of additivity and enhancement. The data showed enhancement of the radiation effect by these platinum complexes in many combinations, and a truly synergistic effect in one case. This method of analysis points to the limited usefulness of the parameter dose-modifying effect (DMF) since the most synergistic combination did not have the highest DMF. PMID:7426336

  15. The Impact of Proposed Radio Frequency Radiation Standards on Military Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    EEG of mammalian brains. Radiat Environ Biophys 16, 1979:15-27. 148. Bawin SM, Gavalas- Medici RJ, Adey WR. Effects of modulated very high frequency...time, sex D. awlanoegasr, 2.4S (CU) 46,000-65.000 150-210(est) I X 45 ?2 - ratio, nor sex-linked lethal mutatlons In offspring No utations In adult sales ...exposure history. A re- cently completed project , performed by personnel at the Bioelectromagnetics Laboratory, University of Washington School of

  16. Editor's Choice - Minimizing Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Procedures: Basic Knowledge, Literature Review, and Reporting Standards.

    PubMed

    Hertault, A; Maurel, B; Midulla, M; Bordier, C; Desponds, L; Saeed Kilani, M; Sobocinski, J; Haulon, S

    2015-07-01

    Endovascular procedures, requiring X-ray guidance, are commonly performed in vascular surgery. X-ray exposure is associated with biological risks for both patients and physicians. Medical X-ray use must follow "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principles, which aim at using the lowest radiation exposure to achieve a procedure safely. This is underlined by European and international recommendations that also suggest that adequate theoretical and practical training is mandatory during the initial education of physicians. However, the content of this education and professional practices vary widely from one country to another. This review aims to summarize the basic knowledge required for vascular surgeons on X-ray physics and image production. A panel of endovascular therapists (vascular surgeons and radiologists) and physicists dedicated to X-rays was gathered. International recommendations were summarized. A literature review was performed via MEDLINE to identify studies reporting dosages of common endovascular procedures. The different mechanisms inducing biological risks, and the associated potential effects on health, are described. Details on dose metrics are provided and a common nomenclature to measure, estimate, and report dose is proposed in order to perform accurate comparisons between publications and practices. Key points of the European and international legislation regarding medical X-ray use are summarized, and radiation protection basics for patients and staff, are detailed. Finally, a literature review is proposed for physicians to evaluate their practice. Today's trainees will be highly exposed to radiation throughout their practice. It is thus compulsory that they undergo dedicated radiation education during their initial training, and regular refresher sessions later. In daily practice, focus on dose reduction and monitoring of patient and staff exposure are mandatory. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  17. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  18. Natural element method for solving radiative transfer with or without conduction in three-dimensional complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Ma, Yu; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-11-01

    A meshless method called as the natural element method (NEM) is developed for solving radiative heat transfer problem in 3D complex enclosures filled with an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. The boundary surfaces are supposed to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The NEM solutions dealing with the radiative heat transfer with or without conduction are validated by comparison with some cases reported by the literature. Furthermore, the radiative heat transfer in cubic enclosures with or without an inner hollow sphere, cylinder and elliptical cylinder is also examined to demonstrate the applicability of the present method towards various three-dimensional geometries. For pure radiative transfer, both the cases of radiative non-equilibrium and radiative equilibrium are investigated. For combined conduction and radiation heat transfer, effects of various parameters such as the conduction-radiation parameter, the scattering albedo, the extinction coefficient, and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the temperature distributions.

  19. Concerted action of Nrf2-ARE pathway, MRN complex, HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines - implication in modification of radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Anuranjani; Bala, Madhu

    2014-01-01

    Whole body exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiations (IRs) damages vital intracellular bio-molecules leading to multiple cellular and tissue injuries as well as pathophysiologies such as inflammation, immunosuppression etc. Nearly 70% of damage is caused indirectly by radiolysis of intracellular water leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals and producing a state of oxidative stress. The damage is also caused by direct ionization of biomolecules. The type of radiation injuries is dependent on the absorbed radiation dose. Sub-lethal IR dose produces more of DNA base damages, whereas higher doses produce more DNA single strand break (SSBs), and double strand breaks (DSBs). The Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important oxidative stress regulating pathway. The DNA DSBs repair regulated by MRN complex, immunomodulation and inflammation regulated by HMGB1 and various types of cytokines are some of the key pathways which interact with each other in a complex manner and modify the radiation response. Because the majority of radiation damage is via oxidative stress, it is essential to gain in depth understanding of the mechanisms of Nrf2-ARE pathway and understand its interactions with MRN complex, HMGB1 and cytokines to increase our understanding on the radiation responses. Such information is of tremendous help in development of medical radiation countermeasures, radioprotective drugs and therapeutics. Till date no approved and safe countermeasure is available for human use. This study reviews the Nrf2-ARE pathway and its crosstalk with MRN-complex, HMGB1 and cytokines (TNF-a, IL-6, IFN-? etc.). An attempt is also made to review the modification of some of these pathways in presence of selected antioxidant radioprotective compounds or herbal extracts.

  20. The luminescence properties of heteroleptic [OsCl(CO)(N∩N)(P∩P)](+) complexes - radiative and non-radiative deactivation of the excited (3)*MLCT state.

    PubMed

    Kamecka, Anna; Kapturkiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-09-28

    The luminescence properties of the heteroleptic [OsCl(CO)(N∩N)(P∩P)](+) complexes with bidentate phosphine P∩P and diimine N∩N ligands have been studied in acetonitrile solutions at room temperature and in methanol/ethanol (1 : 1) glasses at 77 K. At room temperature the investigated complexes feature strong (with the quantum yields ϕem from 0.17 up to 0.64), long-lived (with lifetimes τem in the range of 1.5-44.2 μs) (3)*MLCT emission. Analysis of (3)*MLCT emission band shapes leads to the quantities relevant for the radiative electron transfer (between the Os(2+) central ion and the N∩N ligand) in the Marcus inverted region. It is also demonstrated that radiative kr and non-radiative knr decay rate constants of the excited (3)*MLCT states can be interpreted within the Mulliken-Hush formalism. Especially values of knr rate constants can be predicted using the parameters available from the analysis of the radiative (1)*MLCT ← S0 and (3)*MLCT → S0 charge transfer processes.

  1. In vivo anti-radiation activities of the Ulva pertusa polysaccharides and polysaccharide-iron(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinming; Cheng, Cuilin; Zhao, Haitian; Jing, Jing; Gong, Ning; Lu, Weihong

    2013-09-01

    Polysaccharides with different molecular weights were extracted from Ulva pertusa and fractionated by ultrafiltration. Iron(III) complex of the low molecular-weight U. pertusa polysaccharides were synthesized. Atomic absorption spectrum showed that the iron content of iron(III)-polysaccharide complex was 27.4%. The comparison between U. pertusa polysaccharides and their iron(III) complex showed that iron chelating altered the structural characteristics of the polysaccharides. The bioactivity analysis showed that polysaccharide with low molecular weight was more effective than polysaccharide with high molecular weight in protecting mice from radiation induced damages on bone marrow cells and immune system. Results also proved that the anti-radiation and anti-oxidative activity of iron(III) complex of low molecular-weight polysaccharides were not less than that of low molecular-weight polysaccharides.

  2. History of the development of radiation protection standards for space activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1997-04-30

    Initial recommendations for limitations on radiation exposures in space were made in 1970 by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the Committee on Space Medicine, National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (NAS/NRC). Using a risk-based approach and taking into consideration a range of factors, the Panel recommended an overall career limit of 4 Sv. Because it was assumed that only small numbers of people would be involved, most of whom would be in excess of 30 y of age, the question of genetic effects did not appear to be of concern. On the basis of subsequent epidemiological findings, the values of the risk coefficients were increased. As a result of this and other considerations, NASA in the early 1980s asked the NCRP to re-examine both the risks and the philosophy for protecting astronauts. In undertaking this task, the NCRP decided to treat the radiation exposures of crew members and payload specialists as an occupational hazard and to evaluate their risks in terms of those to radiation workers and to workers in other industries. Noting that in the less safe but not the most hazardous occupations, workers had an average lifetime risk of mortality of about three percent, the NCRP concluded that a reasonable career limit for astronauts should be based on a lifetime absolute excess risk of mortality of three percent. Using this as a base, the NCRP recommended a career limit for 25 y olds of 1 Sv for females and 1.5 Sv for males. Since the risk decreases the older the age at which the exposures begin, the limits culminated with a career limit of 3 Sv for females and 4 Sv for males whose initial exposure occurred at age 55. These recommendations were based on an assumed nominal value of a lifetime risk of fatal cancers for all ages of about 2 {times} 10{sup -2} Sv{sup -1}.

  3. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    PubMed

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  4. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.; Hatchell, J.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, H.; Wilson, T.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; di Francesco, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450 μm and 850 μm observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, β = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8 arcsec resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36 K with a mean temperature of 20 ± 3 K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm-3. 13 of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 μm images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850 μm band of up to 20 per cent. We investigate the free-free contribution to SCUBA-2 bands from large-scale and ultracompact H II regions using archival VLA data and find the contribution is limited to individual stars, accounting for 9 per cent of flux per beam at 450 μm or 12 per cent at 850 μm in these cases. We conclude that radiative heating has potentially influenced the formation of stars in the Dust Arc sub-region, favouring Jeans stable clouds in the warm east and fragmentation in the cool west.

  5. Satellite-based solar radiation mapping over complex terrain: Validation in the Alps and possible improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Mariapina; Stoeckli, Reto; Tetzlaff, Anke; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Zardi, Dino; Petitta, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    . Consequently it is recommended to include in the clear-sky model more accurate input than the currently used monthly climatologies of aerosol and the operational 1 day forecast of column water vapor amount from the ECMWF model ouptut. References [1] K. V. Khlopenkov And A. P. Trishchenko, "SPARC: New Cloud, Snow, and Cloud Shadow Detection Scheme for Historical 1-km AVHHR Data over Canada", Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 24, pp. 322-343, 2007. [2] R.W. Müller, C. Matsoukas, A. Gratzki, H.D. Behr, R. Hollmann. "The CM-SAF operational scheme for the satellite based retrieval of solar surface irradiance - A LUT based eigenvector hybrid approach", Remote Sensing of Environment, 113, pp.1012-1024, 2009. [3] R. Stöckli (in prep.). "Supplementing Heliosat for physically-based surface radiation retrieval in complex terrain."

  6. Viable dark matter via radiative symmetry breaking in a scalar singlet Higgs portal extension of the standard model.

    PubMed

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Contreras, D; Mann, R B

    2014-05-02

    We consider the generation of dark matter mass via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an extension of the conformal standard model containing a singlet scalar field with a Higgs portal interaction. Generating the mass from a sequential process of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking followed by a conventional Higgs mechanism can account for less than 35% of the cosmological dark matter abundance for dark matter mass M(s)>80 GeV. However, in a dynamical approach where both Higgs and scalar singlet masses are generated via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, we obtain much higher levels of dark matter abundance. At one-loop level we find abundances of 10%-100% with 106 GeV80 GeV detection region of the next generation XENON experiment.

  7. Viable Dark Matter via Radiative Symmetry Breaking in a Scalar Singlet Higgs Portal Extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, T. G.; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Contreras, D.; Mann, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the generation of dark matter mass via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an extension of the conformal standard model containing a singlet scalar field with a Higgs portal interaction. Generating the mass from a sequential process of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking followed by a conventional Higgs mechanism can account for less than 35% of the cosmological dark matter abundance for dark matter mass Ms>80 GeV. However, in a dynamical approach where both Higgs and scalar singlet masses are generated via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, we obtain much higher levels of dark matter abundance. At one-loop level we find abundances of 10%-100% with 106 GeV80 GeV detection region of the next generation XENON experiment.

  8. Polyethylene as a Radiation Shielding Standard in SimulatedCosmic-Ray Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Komiyama, Tatsudo; Fukumura, A.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Bhattacharya M.

    2006-08-19

    Radiation risk management for human space missions dependson accurate modeling of high-energy heavy ion transport in matter. Theprocess of nuclear fragmentation can play a key role in reducing both thephysical dose and the biological effectiveness of the radiationencountered in deep space. Hydrogenous materials and light elements areexpected to be more effective shields against the deleterious effects ofGalactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) than aluminum, which is used in currentspacecraft hulls. NASA has chosen polyethylene, CH2, as the referencematerial for accelerator-based radiation testing of multi-functioncomposites that are currently being developed. A detailed discussion ofthe shielding properties of polyethylene under a variety of relevantexperimental conditions is presented, along with Monte Carlo simulationsof the experiments and other Monte Carlo calculations in which the entireGCR flux is simulated. The Monte Carlo results are compared to theaccelerator data and we assess the usefulness of 1 GeV/amu 56Fe as aproxy for GCR heavy ions. We conclude that additional accelerator-basedmeasurements with higher beam energies would be useful.

  9. Effects of X-Ray Radiation on Complex Visual Discrimination Learning and Social Recognition Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Catherine M.; Roma, Peter G.; Armour, Elwood; Gooden, Virginia L.; Brady, Joseph V.; Weed, Michael R.; Hienz, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes an animal model for examining the effects of radiation on a range of neurocognitive functions in rodents that are similar to a number of basic human cognitive functions. Fourteen male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform an automated intra-dimensional set shifting task that consisted of their learning a basic discrimination between two stimulus shapes followed by more complex discrimination stages (e.g., a discrimination reversal, a compound discrimination, a compound reversal, a new shape discrimination, and an intra-dimensional stimulus discrimination reversal). One group of rats was exposed to head-only X-ray radiation (2.3 Gy at a dose rate of 1.9 Gy/min), while a second group received a sham-radiation exposure using the same anesthesia protocol. The irradiated group responded less, had elevated numbers of omitted trials, increased errors, and greater response latencies compared to the sham-irradiated control group. Additionally, social odor recognition memory was tested after radiation exposure by assessing the degree to which rats explored wooden beads impregnated with either their own odors or with the odors of novel, unfamiliar rats; however, no significant effects of radiation on social odor recognition memory were observed. These data suggest that rodent tasks assessing higher-level human cognitive domains are useful in examining the effects of radiation on the CNS, and may be applicable in approximating CNS risks from radiation exposure in clinical populations receiving whole brain irradiation. PMID:25099152

  10. Effects of X-ray radiation on complex visual discrimination learning and social recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Catherine M; Roma, Peter G; Armour, Elwood; Gooden, Virginia L; Brady, Joseph V; Weed, Michael R; Hienz, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes an animal model for examining the effects of radiation on a range of neurocognitive functions in rodents that are similar to a number of basic human cognitive functions. Fourteen male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform an automated intra-dimensional set shifting task that consisted of their learning a basic discrimination between two stimulus shapes followed by more complex discrimination stages (e.g., a discrimination reversal, a compound discrimination, a compound reversal, a new shape discrimination, and an intra-dimensional stimulus discrimination reversal). One group of rats was exposed to head-only X-ray radiation (2.3 Gy at a dose rate of 1.9 Gy/min), while a second group received a sham-radiation exposure using the same anesthesia protocol. The irradiated group responded less, had elevated numbers of omitted trials, increased errors, and greater response latencies compared to the sham-irradiated control group. Additionally, social odor recognition memory was tested after radiation exposure by assessing the degree to which rats explored wooden beads impregnated with either their own odors or with the odors of novel, unfamiliar rats; however, no significant effects of radiation on social odor recognition memory were observed. These data suggest that rodent tasks assessing higher-level human cognitive domains are useful in examining the effects of radiation on the CNS, and may be applicable in approximating CNS risks from radiation exposure in clinical populations receiving whole brain irradiation.

  11. Pediatric patient radiation dosage during endomyocardial biopsies and right heart catheterization using a standard "ALARA" radiation reduction protocol in the modern fluoroscopic era.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nicole J; Lamour, Jacqueline; Gellis, Laura A; Pass, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) with right heart catheterization (RHC) is the standard of care for the assessment of post cardiac transplantation rejection. This procedure has traditionally relied upon fluoroscopy, which exposes both patient and staff to the risks of ionizing radiation. These risks may be of particular concern in the transplant patient who must undergo many such procedures lifelong. We present data on a new "ALARA - As Low As Reasonably Achievable" protocol to reduce radiation exposure during the performance of RHC with EMB. All cardiac transplantation patients < 21 years of age who underwent RHC with EMB at The Children's Hospital at Montefiore from 6/11-12/11 were included. EMB was performed after all right heart pressures including wedge pressure and thermodilution cardiac output were measured. A novel ALARA protocol consisting of multiple features including ultra-low frame rates (2-3 fps), low fluoro dose/frame (10-18 nGy/frame), use of the "air-gap" technique for patients < 20 kg, and multiple other techniques aimed at minimizing use of fluoroscopy were employed in all cases. Demographics, procedural data and patient radiation exposure levels were collected and analyzed. 18 patients underwent 45 surveillance RHC with EMB in the study period and were the subject of this analysis. The mean age was 5.9 ± 6.1 years, weight was 20.4 kg ± 16.6 kg, and BSA was 0.75 ± 45 m(2) . PA fluoroscopy was used exclusively in 45/45. Vascular access was RFV (21/45; 47%), RIJV (17/45; 38%), LFV (4/45; 9%) and LIJV (3/45; 7%). The median number of EMB specimens obtained was 5 (range, 4-7). The median fluoroscopy time was 3.7 min (range, 1.2-9). The median air Kerma product (K) was 1.4 mGy (range, 0.4-14), and dose area product (DAP) was 15.8 uGym(2) (range, 3.5-144.5). The K and DAP are substantially lower than any prior published data for RHC/EMB in this patient group. There were no procedural complications. The use of a novel ALARA protocol for RHC

  12. Generics Substitution, Bioequivalence Standards, and International Oversight: Complex Issues Facing the FDA.

    PubMed

    Bate, Roger; Mathur, Aparna; Lever, Harry M; Thakur, Dinesh; Graedon, Joe; Cooperman, Tod; Mason, Preston; Fox, Erin R

    2016-03-01

    The regulations for assessing the quality of generic drugs and their bioequivalence to innovator products are outdated and need to be substantially modernized. There are multiple reasons why these changes are needed, including: (i) the regulations remain largely unchanged since the passage of the Hatch-Waxman Act in 1984; (ii) medication therapies have become substantially more complex over the three decades since the passage of the Act; (iii) a switch from an innovator drug to a generic drug, or switching from one generic to another, is not a benign process - there is substantial clinical professional judgment involved and in some instances these decisions should be better informed; and (iv) pharmaceutical ingredients for finished products, whether innovator or generic, are from multiple sources of supply, adding variability in their production, and which may not be accounted for in specification tolerances. When these elements are viewed together, they clearly suggest that more transparency of responsible manufacturers in product labels and updated standards for bioequivalence are required.

  13. [Levels of radiation exposure and radiation risk in flights aboard the orbital complex "Mir" and the International space station].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Petrov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculating mean daily values of absorbed and equivalent doses from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth's radiation belts (ERB) to crew members on orbital missions aboard Mir and the International space station during solar minimum and maximum. Calculated doses were corrected in accordance with the dosimetric and spectrometric data from Mir missions 18 through to 23 that took place in the period of solar minimum. Contribution of local and albedo neutrons to equivalent dose was also taken into account. Presented are calculated total radiation risk and tumor risk over life time for Mir and ISS crews following missions of varying duration, and predictions for reduction in life span in view of recent dosimetric data.

  14. Recommendations for using the standardized terminology of respiratory physiology in radiation research

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Thews, G.; Sutherland, R.M.; Vaupel, P.

    1983-11-01

    A succinct review of the terminology and of correlations between basic quantities in respiration physiology is given with special regard to oxygen as the gas of topical interest in radiation research and tumor pathophysiology. The role of the oxygen partial pressure gradient as the driving force of O/sub 2/ diffusion is emphasized. It is generally recommended that the O/sub 2/ partial pressure be considered when investigating oxygen diffusion and distribution problems. During those studies the physical boundary conditions, in particular the temperature, the barometric pressure, and the water vapor saturation, have to be considered and should be indicated. During equilibration of suspensions containing oxygen-consuming sites the impact of geometry and fluid agitation on the efficiency of gas exchange has to be taken into account. Reviews on solutions of diffusion equations, on numerical data for relevant constants to be considered, and on terminology and units in respiration physiology are included.

  15. Low-intensity laser radiation in complex treatment of inflammatory diseases of parodontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Irina A.; Erina, Stanislava V.

    1995-04-01

    The problem of complex treatment of inflammatory disease of parodontium has become very acute and actual at the moment. The diseases of inflammatory nature are considered to be the most vital issues of the day. The state of the local immune system of oral cavity plays the most important role in the complicated mechanism of inflammatory process development in the tissues of parodontium. Recently physical factors have become predominant in the system of complex therapy of parodontitis. The application of low-intense laser radiation (LLR) is considered to be the most important and up-to-date method in the preventive dentistry. There were 60 patients of average damage rate suffering from chronic generalizing parodontitis at the age of 25 up to 55 under observation. The major goal of examination was to get the objective results of the following methods' application: parodontium index (Russel, 1956), hygiene index (Fyodorov, Volodkina, 1971), Bacterioscopy of dental-gingival pockets content, simple and broadened stomatoscopy (Kunin, 1970), SIgA level determination in mixed saliva (Manchini et all, 1965) and R-protein level in gingival blood (Kulberg, 1990). All the patients were split into 2 groups. The first group (30 patients) has undergone the laser therapy course while the second group of 30 patients couldn't get it (LLR). Despite the kind of therapy they have undergone, all the patients have got the local anti-inflammatory medicamental therapy. The results of clinical observations have proved the fact that laser therapy application makes it possible to shorten the course of treatment in 1.5 times. The shifts of oral cavity local resistance take place in case of chronic generalizing parodontitis. The direct immunostimulating effect could be observed as a result of LLR- therapy application. The close connection of both anti-inflammatory medicamental and LLR-therapy has proved the possibility of purposeful local immune status correction in case of parodontitis.

  16. Improving patient safety and workflow efficiency with standardized pretreatment radiation therapist chart reviews.

    PubMed

    Younge, Kelly Cooper; Naheedy, Katherine Woch; Wilkinson, Joel; Dekmak, Joumana; Covington, Elizabeth; Durbin, Bonnie; Nelson, Eric; Filpansick, Stephanie; Moran, Jean M

    Radiation therapists play a critical role in ensuring patient safety; however, they are sometimes given insufficient time to perform quality assurance (QA) of a patient's treatment chart and documentation before the start of treatment. In this work, we show the benefits of introducing a formal therapist prestart QA checklist, completed in a quiet space well in advance of treatment, into our workflow. A therapist prestart QA checklist was created by analyzing in-house variance reports and treatment unit delays over 6 months. Therapists were then given dedicated time and workspace to perform their checks within the dosimetry office of our department. The effectiveness of the checklist was quantified by recording the percentage of charts that underwent QA before treatment, the percentage of charts with errors needing intervention, and treatment unit delays during a nearly 2-year period. The frequency and types of errors found by the prestart QA were also recorded. Through the use of therapist prestart QA, instances of treatment unit delays were reduced by up to a factor of 9 during the first year of the program. At the outset of this new initiative, nearly 40% of charts had errors requiring intervention, with the majority being scheduling related. With upstream workflow changes and automation, this was reduced over the period of a year to about 10%. The number of treatment unit delays was dramatically reduced by using a formal therapist prestart QA checklist completed well in advance of treatment. The data collected via the checklist continue to be used for further quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. COMPLEX BIOGEOGRAPHIC SCENARIOS REVEALED IN THE DIVERSIFICATION OF THE LARGEST WOODPECKER RADIATION IN THE NEW WORLD.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Vázquez-Miranda, Hernán; Hernández-Alonso, Germán; García-Trejo, Erick A; Sánchez-González, Luis A

    2017-04-12

    Phylogenetic relationships and patterns of evolution within Melanerpes, one of the most diverse groups of New World woodpeckers (22-23 lineages), have been complicated due to complex plumages and morphological adaptations. In an attempt to resolve these issues, we obtained sequence data from four nuclear introns and two mitochondrial protein-coding genes for 22 of the 24 currently recognized species in the genus. We performed phylogenetic analyses involving Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, species-tree divergence dating, and biogeographic reconstructions. Tree topologies from the concatenated and species-tree analyses of the mtDNA and nDNA showed broadly similar patterns, with three relatively well-supported groups apparent: a) the Sphyrapicus clade (four species); b) the typical Melanerpes clade, which includes temperate and subtropical dry forest black-backed species; and c) the mostly barred-backed species, here referred to as the "Centurus" clade. The phylogenetic position of Melanerpes superciliaris regarding the rest of Melanerpes is ambiguous as it is recovered as sister to the rest of Melanerpes or as sister to a group including Sphyrapicus + Melanerpes. Our species tree estimations recovered the same well-delimited highly-supported clades. Geographic range evolution (estimated in BioGeoBEARS) was best explained by a DIVALIKE + j model, which includes vicariance, founder effect speciation, and anagenetic dispersal (range expansion) as important processes involved in the diversification of the largest radiation of woodpeckers in the New World.

  18. Adaptive radiations, ecological specialization, and the evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Leandro R; Nogueira, Marcelo R

    2010-03-01

    The evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures is a macroevolutionary pattern in which morphogenetic components evolve in a coordinated fashion, which can result from the interplay among processes of developmental, genetic integration, and different types of selection. We tested hypotheses of ecological versus developmental factors underlying patterns of within-species and evolutionary integration in the mandible of phyllostomid bats, during the most impressive ecological and morphological radiation among mammals. Shape variation of mandibular morphogenetic components was associated with diet, and the transition of integration patterns from developmental to within-species to evolutionary was examined. Within-species (as a proxy to genetic) integration in different lineages resembled developmental integration regardless of diet specialization, however, evolutionary integration patterns reflected selection in different mandibular components. For dietary specializations requiring extensive functional changes in mastication patterns or biting, such as frugivores and sanguivores, the evolutionary integration pattern was not associated with expected within-species or developmental integration. On the other hand, specializations with lower mastication demands or without major functional reorganization (such as nectarivores and carnivores), presented evolutionary integration patterns similar to the expected developmental pattern. These results show that evolutionary integration patterns are largely a result of independent selection on specific components regardless of developmental modules.

  19. Investigation of vesicle-capsular plague antigen complex formation by elastic laser radiation scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. P.; Maximova, Irina S.; Romanov, Sergey V.; Shubochkin, L. P.; Tatarintsev, Sergey N.

    1991-05-01

    Recently a great deal of attention has been given to the investigation artificial lipid liposomes, due to their application as "containers" for directed transport of biologically active compounds into particular cells, organs and tissues for prophylaxis and therapy of infectious diseases. The use of traditional methods of liposome investigation, such as sedimentation, electrophoresis and chromatography is impeded by low liposome resistivity to different deformations. In conjunction with this, optical methods of laser light scattering are promising as they allow nondisturbing, precise and quick investigations. This paper describes the investigation of vesicle systems prepared from egg lecithin of Serva Corporation and their complexes with the capsular antigen of the plague microbe. The capsular antigen Fl was obtained from EV plague microbe grown at 37° C on Huttinger agar. Fl was isolated by gel-filtration on ASA-22 followed by freeze drying of the preparation. Angular dependences of polarized radiation scattering were measured for several liposome suspension samples in a saline solution before and after the interaction with the plague microbe capsular antigen. The aim of the investigation was to analyze the nature of mutual antigen arrangement in a liposome and to develop methods for measuring its inclusion percentage.

  20. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Câmara-Costa, Hugo; Resch, Anika; Kieffer, Virginie; Lalande, Clémence; Poggi, Geraldina; Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Calaminus, Gabriele; Grill, Jacques; Doz, François; Rutkowski, Stefan; Massimino, Maura; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Dellatolas, Georges; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with marginally

  1. The biparametric Fisher-Rényi complexity measure and its application to the multidimensional blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puertas-Centeno, D.; Toranzo, I. V.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a biparametric Fisher-Rényi complexity measure for general probability distributions and we discuss its properties. This notion, which is composed of two entropy-like components (the Rényi entropy and the biparametric Fisher information), generalizes the basic Fisher-Shannon measure and the previous complexity quantifiers of Fisher-Rényi type. Then, we illustrate the usefulness of this notion by carrying out a information-theoretical analysis of the spectral energy density of a d-dimensional blackbody at temperature T. It is shown that the biparametric Fisher-Rényi measure of this quantum system has a universal character in the sense that it does not depend on temperature nor on any physical constant (e.g. Planck constant, speed of light, Boltzmann constant), but only on the space dimensionality d. Moreover, it decreases when d is increasing, but exhibits a non trivial behavior for a fixed d and a varying parameter, which somehow brings up a non standard structure of the blackbody d-dimensional density distribution.

  2. [Clinical scientific research with ionizing radiation in Italy. The standards-setting and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Valle, G; Petruccelli, L; Podagrosi, V; Giustini, A; Frusciante, V

    1999-09-01

    The paper reviews the laws that regulate the clinical scientific research with ionizing radiations in Italy. Although recent (all introduced after 1990), the laws are a maze of rules sometimes contradictory and unclear, with frequent cross-references which make them difficult to disentangle. The aim of the paper is to provide the researcher with a technical and legal guide to find his/her way in the labyrinth of rules, and to constitute a basis for a possible future rationalization of the regulations. The contents of the article n. 108 of the law by decree 230/1995 and of the Minister's Decree 21/11/1997 together with the ICRP 62 (introduced in Italy by the Minister's Decree 21/11/1997) are extensively reviewed. The authors stress the fact that these laws apply only to prospective, but not to retrospective studies. The procedure to obtain ministerial authorization of the research project is illustrated, together with the possibility of a bureaucratic shortcut whereby the ethical committee states that the project conforms to ICRP 62. Special attention is paid to the cases of contrast between the ICRP 62 and previously promulgated laws: dose thresholds in non-therapeutic research, research on pregnant women or in child-bearing age and the issue of the preliminary assessment of new radiopharmaceuticals on monkeys (recommended by ICRP 62 but strongly restricted by the law by decree 116/1992). As for studies with radiopharmaceuticals, the problem of the double authorization required by the Minister's Decree 21/11/1997 and by the memorandum 10/07/1997, n. 8 of the Ministry of Health is also discussed. The authors express the opinion that the Minister's Decree 21/11/1997, together with ICRP 62, render invalid all previous rules and regulations which contrast with them. The Minister's Decree 21/11/1997 and ICRP 62 are practical and exhaustive and offer the researchers and ethical committees precise and reliable guidelines. The paper aims to offer a contribution for the

  3. SU-E-P-22: AAPM Task Group 263 Tackling Standardization of Nomenclature for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, M; Feng, M; Moran, J; Xiao, Y; Mayo, C; Miller, R; Bosch, W; Popple, R; Marks, L; Wu, Q; Molineu, A; Martel, M; Yock, T; McNutt, T; Brown, N; Purdie, T; Yorke, E; Santanam, L; Gabriel, P; Michalski, J; and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing recognition of need for increased clarity and consistency in the nomenclatures used for body and organ structures, DVH metrics, toxicity, dose and volume units, etc. Standardization has multiple benefits; e.g. facilitating data collection for clinical trials, enabling the pooling of data between institutions, making transfers (i.e. hand-offs) between centers safer, and enabling vendors to define “default” settings. Towards this goal, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a task group (TG263) in July of 2014, operating under the Work Group on Clinical Trials to develop consensus statements. Guiding principles derived from the investigation and example nomenclatures will be presented for public feedback. Methods: We formed a multi-institutional and multi-vendor collaborative group of 39 physicists, physicians and others involved in clinical use and electronic transfer of information. Members include individuals from IROC, NRG, IHE-RO, DICOM WG-7, ASTRO and EORTC groups with overlapping interests to maximize the quality of the consensus and increase the likelihood of adoption. Surveys of group and NRG members were used to define current nomenclatures and requirements. Technical requirements of vendor systems and the proposed DICOM standards were examined. Results: There is a marked degree of inter and intra institutional variation in current approaches, resulting from inter-vendor differences in capabilities, clinic specific conceptualizations and inconsistencies. Using a consensus approach, the group defined optimal formats for the naming of targets and normal structures. A formal objective assessment of 13 existing clinically-used software packages show that all had capabilities to accommodate these recommended nomenclatures. Conclusions: A multi-stakeholder effort is making significant steps forward in developing a standard nomenclature that will work across platforms. Our current working list includes > 550

  4. Impact of ASTM Standard E722 update on radiation damage metrics

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    2014-06-01

    The impact of recent changes to the ASTM Standard E722 is investigated. The methodological changes in the production of the displacement kerma factors for silicon has significant impact for some energy regions of the 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence response function. When evaluating the integral over all neutrons energies in various spectra important to the SNL electronics testing community, the change in the response results in an increase in the total 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence of 2 7%. Response functions have been produced and are available for users of both the NuGET and MCNP codes.

  5. Metal-organic complexes in geochemical processes: Calculation of standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous acetate complexes at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Everett L.; Koretsky, Carla M.

    1993-10-01

    Estimates of standard partial molal properties at high temperatures and pressures for aqueous acetate complexes of major and trace elements in geologic fluids were made with the aid of experimental data from the literature and correlation algorithms. A system of correlation expressions allows the incorporation of all available experimental data, but also allows estimates in the absence of any measurements. Likely uncertainties for each type of estimate were assessed. Thermodynamic data and equation of state parameters permit calculation of standard partial molal properties including dissociation constants for 114 acetate complexes. Incorporation of many of these dissociation constants with those for hydroxide, chloride, and sulfate complexes demonstrate that acetate complexes are ineffectual in transporting major rock forming elements or trace metals in sedimentary basin brines. In contrast, these complexes could be considerably more efficient in metal transport in low salinity groundwater solutions with elevated concentrations of organic solutes. Calculations indicate that up to 40% of the acetate may be present as sodium and calcium complexes in basin brines with total salinities around 1.0 molal.

  6. Ethylene vinyl acetate based radiation grafted hydrophilic matrices: Process parameter standardization, grafting kinetics and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Mondal, R. K.; Dubey, K. A.; Grover, V.; Panicker, L.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Varshney, L.

    2016-08-01

    A transparent, elastomeric, grafted matrix for several potential applications was synthesized by single-step simultaneous radiation grafting of methacrylic acid onto ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). CuSO4 was found to be the most suitable homo-polymerization inhibitor among different inhibitors tried. The grafting kinetics was found to be a strong function of dose rate (D) and monomer content (M) and an equation relating grafting rate Rg=Kg [M]1.13D0.23 was deduced. Crystallinity of the grafted matrices as assessed from XRD and DSC measurements indicated decrease in crystalline content with increase in grafting yield, suggesting crystalline domain of EVA get disrupted on grafting. Elastic modulus increased linearly with the increase in grafting yield, though elongation at break decreased precipitously from 900% to 30% at even ~9% grafting. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed three step weight loss of the grafted EVA matrix. The grafting of MAA resulted in increase in surface energy mainly due to enhanced polar component.

  7. Integrating Map Algebra and Statistical Modeling for Spatio- Temporal Analysis of Monthly Mean Daily Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) over a Complex Terrain.

    PubMed

    Evrendilek, Fatih

    2007-12-12

    This study aims at quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of monthly mean dailyincident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over a vast and complex terrain such asTurkey. The spatial interpolation method of universal kriging, and the combination ofmultiple linear regression (MLR) models and map algebra techniques were implemented togenerate surface maps of PAR with a grid resolution of 500 x 500 m as a function of fivegeographical and 14 climatic variables. Performance of the geostatistical and MLR modelswas compared using mean prediction error (MPE), root-mean-square prediction error(RMSPE), average standard prediction error (ASE), mean standardized prediction error(MSPE), root-mean-square standardized prediction error (RMSSPE), and adjustedcoefficient of determination (R²adj.). The best-fit MLR- and universal kriging-generatedmodels of monthly mean daily PAR were validated against an independent 37-year observeddataset of 35 climate stations derived from 160 stations across Turkey by the Jackknifingmethod. The spatial variability patterns of monthly mean daily incident PAR were moreaccurately reflected in the surface maps created by the MLR-based models than in thosecreated by the universal kriging method, in particular, for spring (May) and autumn(November). The MLR-based spatial interpolation algorithms of PAR described in thisstudy indicated the significance of the multifactor approach to understanding and mappingspatio-temporal dynamics of PAR for a complex terrain over meso-scales.

  8. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., and Radiation Therapy Technologists The following section describes basic elements to be incorporated... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  9. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., and Radiation Therapy Technologists The following section describes basic elements to be incorporated... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., and Radiation Therapy Technologists The following section describes basic elements to be incorporated... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  11. The diverse and complex roles of radiation on cancer treatment: therapeutic target and genome maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Baskar, Rajamanickam; Yap, Swee Peng; Chua, Kevin Lee Min; Itahana, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, grows exponentially with the development of intrinsic and acquired treatment resistance. Past decade has witnessed a considerable progress towards the treatment and understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer and together with advances in early detection and various treatment modalities. Radiation therapy is an integral part of cancer treatment armamentarium. In developed countries more than half of all cancer patients receive radiation therapy during their course of illness. Although radiation damages both cancer and normal cells, the goal of radiation therapy is to maximize the radiation dose to abnormal cancer cells while minimizing exposure to normal cells, which is adjacent to cancer cells or in the path of radiation. In recent years, life expectancy increases among cancer patients and this increase is due to the results of early diagnosis, screening efforts, improved treatments and with less late effects mostly secondary cancer development. Therefore, cancer survivorship issues have been gaining prominence in the area of radiation oncology research. Understanding the tradeoff between the expected decreases in normal tissue toxicity resulting from an improved radiation dose distribution to the targeted site is an increasingly pertinent, yet needed attention and research in the area of radiation oncology. In recent years, a number of potential molecular targets that involve either with radiation increased tumor cell killing or protecting normal cells have been identified. For clinical benefits, translating these findings to maximize the toxicity of radiation on tumor cells while safeguarding early or late normal cell toxicities using molecular targeted radioprotectors will be useful in radiation treatment. PMID:22860229

  12. Station coordinates in the standard earth 3 system and radiation-pressure perturbations from ISAGEX camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Latimer, J.; Mendes, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous and individual camera observations of GEOS 1, GEOS 2, Pageos, and Midas 4 obtained during the International Satellite Geodesy Experiment are utilized to determine station coordinates. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Standard Earth III system of coordinates is used to tie the geometrical network to a geocentric system and as a reference for calculating satellite orbits. A solution for coordinates combining geometrical and dynamical methods is obtained, and a comparison between the solutions and terrestrial data is made. The radiation-pressure and earth-albedo perturbations for Pageos are very large, and Pageos' orbits are used to evaluate the analytical treatment of these perturbations. Residual effects, which are probably of interest to aeronomists, remain in the Pageos orbits.

  13. A 160 x 120 pixel uncooled TEC-less infrared radiation focal plane array on a standard ceramic package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Hideyuki; Honda, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Ikuo; Yagi, Hitoshi; Ishii, Kouichi; Sasaki, Keita

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a 32 μm pitch and 160 × 120 pixel uncooled infrared radiation focal plane array (IRFPA) on SOI by 0.35 μm CMOS technology and bulk-micromachining. For IR detection, we use silicon single crystal series p-n junctions which can realize high uniformity of temperature coefficient and low voltage drift. We have also developed a low-noise CMOS readout circuit on the same SOI which can calibrate the substrate temperature variation in every frame period, comparing two types of pixels, a bulk-micromachined infrared detection pixel and a non-micromachined reference pixel. Then the FPA requires no thermo-electric cooler (TEC) and is mounted on a low-cost standard ceramic package for the consumer products market.

  14. Standard thermodynamic functions of complexation between copper(II) and glycine and L-histidine in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The Cu2+-glycine-L-histidine system is studied calorimetrically at 298.15 K and an ionic strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 in aqueous solutions containing potassium nitrate. The standard thermodynamic parameters (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°) of complexation processes are determined.

  15. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of solar radiation surfaces from MODIS and reanalysis data over topographically complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Todd A. Schroeder; Robbie Hember; Nicholas C. Coops; Shunlin Liang

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of incoming shortwave solar radiation (SW) has significant influence on the productive capacity of forest vegetation. Models that estimate forest productivity require accurate and spatially explicit radiation surfaces that resolve both long- and short-term temporal climatic patterns and that account for topographic variability of the land...

  17. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mozdarani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity). It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation therapy, all these

  18. Variations in the radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens associated with complex ready-to-eat food products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Christopher H.; Boyd, Glenn

    2006-07-01

    Foodborne illness outbreaks and product recalls are occasionally associated with ready-to-eat (RTE) sandwiches and other "heat and eat" multi-component RTE products. Ionizing radiation can inactivate foodborne pathogens on meat and poultry, fruits and vegetables, seafood, and RTE meat products. However, less data are available on the ability of low-dose ionizing radiation, doses under 5 kGy typically used for pasteurization purposes, to inactivate pathogenic bacteria on complex multi-component food products. In this study, the efficacy of ionizing radiation to inactivate Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Yersinia enterocolitica on RTE foods including a "frankfurter on a roll", a "beef cheeseburger on a bun" and a "vegetarian cheeseburger on a bun" was investigated. The average D-10 values, the radiation dose needed to inactivate 1 log 10 of pathogen, by bacterium species, were 0.61, 0.54, 0.47, 0.36 and 0.15 kGy for Salmonella spp., S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, and Y. enterocolitica, respectively when inoculated onto the three product types. These results indicate that irradiation may be an effective means for inactivating common foodborne pathogens including Salmonella spp, S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and Y. enterocolitica in complex RTE food products such as 'heat and eat" sandwich products.

  19. Capturing the Complex, Situated, and Active Nature of Teaching through Inquiry-Oriented Standards for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Meyer, Frauke; Aitken, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Given widespread acceptance of the role of teaching in improving student outcomes, it is not surprising that policy makers have turned to teaching standards as a lever for educational improvement. There are, however, long-standing critiques of standards that suggest they are reductionist and promote a dualism between theory and practice. Our…

  20. Capturing the Complex, Situated, and Active Nature of Teaching through Inquiry-Oriented Standards for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Meyer, Frauke; Aitken, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Given widespread acceptance of the role of teaching in improving student outcomes, it is not surprising that policy makers have turned to teaching standards as a lever for educational improvement. There are, however, long-standing critiques of standards that suggest they are reductionist and promote a dualism between theory and practice. Our…

  1. COOMET regional comparison of national measurement standards of air kerma for 137Cs γ radiation at protection level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, L.; Oborin, A. V.; Milevsky, V. S.; Walwyn Salas, G.; Sukhishvili, S.; Ginga, I.; Ivanov, R.; Gudelis, A.; Gomola, I.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented of the COOMET supplementary comparison of the national measurement standards for air kerma in 137Cs γ radiation at protection level (~10 mGy/h). Ten National Metrology Institutes from the COOMET organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency participated in this COOMET project no. 445. The PTB acted as pilot laboratory. Two of the participants, the SMU (Slovakia) and the NSC-'IM' (Ukraine) participated in the measurements but did not submit a valid report of results. The comparison reference value (CRV) was obtained as the mean result of the PTB and the VNIIM, both of which had previously taken part in the key comparison BIPM-RI(I)-K5. The degree of equivalence with the CRV was evaluated. The results were consistent within the relative standard uncertainties of the comparison ranging from 0.28% to 1.3% and deviated from the CRV by less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Wrestling With a Paradox: Complexity in Interoperability Standards Making for Healthcare Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaway, Jeff; Archer, Norm

    Medical interventions are often delayed or erroneous when information needed for diagnosing or prescribing is missing or unavailable. In support of increased information flows, the healthcare industry has invested substantially in standards intended to specify, routinize, and make uniform the type and format of medical information in clinical healthcare information systems such as Electronic Medical Record systems (EMRs). However, fewer than one in four Canadian physicians have adopted EMRs. Deeper analysis illustrates that physicians may perceive value in standardized EMRs when they need to exchange information in highly structured situations among like participants and like environments. However, standards present restrictive barriers to practitioners when they face equivocal situations, unforeseen contingencies, or exchange information across different environments. These barriers constitute a compelling explanation for at least part of the observed low EMR adoption rates. Our recommendations to improve the perceived value of standardized clinical information systems espouse re-conceptualizing the role of standards to embrace greater flexibility in some areas.

  3. Genetic control of radiation leukemia virus-induced tumorigenesis. I. Role of the major murine histocompatibility complex, H-2

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Resistance to radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemogenesis is associated with the H-2D region of the H-2 complex, or with closely linked loci. The H-2Dd allele confers resistance ot the disease, while the H-2D-Q and H-2Ds alleles are associated with susceptibility. It is not clear whether Ir genes, or an alternative mechanism are responsible for the observed H-2-linked resistance to the disease. PMID:197195

  4. The complex action of major solutes on radiation induced swelling of Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A. ); Lauritzen, T. ); Mitchell, M.A. )

    1992-06-01

    The radiation-induced swelling of simple Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys is sensitive to solute additions. It is shown in this paper that three of the most common solute elements (P,Si,Mo) exert a very complex and often non-monotonic influence on swelling with increasing solute level. The complexity of this influence and its dependence on other variables appears to be the result of a closely balanced competition between two or more roles played by each solute in its interaction with both vacancies and interstitials. This competition yields a variety of different swelling behaviors in response to changes in solute or solvent composition, displacement rate, and irradiation temperature.

  5. Radiative and semileptonic B decays involving the tensor meson K2*(1430) in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Hisaki; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2009-06-01

    We study semileptonic and radiative B decays involving the strange tensor meson K2*(1430) in the final state. Using the large energy effective theory (LEET) techniques, we formulate the B→K2* transition form factors in large recoil region. All the form factors can be parametrized in terms of two independent LEET functions ζ⊥ and ζ∥. The magnitude of ζ⊥ is estimated from the data for B(B→K2*(1430)γ). Assuming a dipole q2 dependence for the LEET functions and ζ∥/ζ⊥=1.0±0.2, for which the former consists with the QCD counting rules, and the latter is favored by the B→ϕK2* data, we investigate the decays B→K2*ℓ+ℓ- and B→K2*νν¯, where the contributions due to ζ∥ are suppressed by mK2*/mB. For the B→K2*ℓ+ℓ- decay, in the large recoil region where the hadronic uncertainties are considerably reduced, the longitudinal distribution dFL/ds is reduced by 20-30% due to the flipped sign of c7eff compared with the standard model result. Moreover, the forward-backward asymmetry zero is about 3.4GeV2 in the standard model, but changing the sign of c7eff yields a positive asymmetry for all values of the invariant mass of the lepton pair. We calculate the branching fraction for B→K2*νν¯ in the standard model. Our result exhibits the impressed resemblance between B→K2*(1430)ℓ+ℓ-, νν¯, and B→K*(892)ℓ+ℓ-, νν¯.

  6. Analysis and Testing of Radiation-Induced Transient Effects in Complex Microcircuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Important similarities between bulk and localized ionizing radiation effects are experimental and analytical techniques which must e used to detect the...rocircuit response. 2.2.4 Radiation-Induced Diode Saturation, Recovery Time As mentioned previously, systems can be designed to detect the presence of a...of errors are detected following expo- sure the results may be reported as an error cross-section - defined as the number of errors divided by the

  7. Severity Levels and Symptoms Complexes for Acute Radiation Sickness -- Description and Quantification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-30

    Maryland, 1978. 54 Hubner, K. F., and S. A. Fry (eds.), The Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness, Elsevier North Holland, Inc., New York ...conference held in Geneva, Switzerland, 17-21 October 1960, Inter- national Documents Service, New York City, 1961. Langham, W. H. (ed.), Radioblological...Res. Suppl. 16, 1975, pp. 49-66. Prasad, K. N., Human Radiation Biology, Harper and Row, New York City, 1974. Ricks, R. C., et. al., "Pulmonary

  8. Cobalt complexes as internal standards for capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry studies in biological inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah U; Morrow, Stuart J; Kubanik, Mario; Hartinger, Christian G

    2017-01-02

    Run-by-run variations are very common in capillary electrophoretic (CE) separations and cause imprecision in both the migration times and the peak areas. This makes peak and kinetic trend identification difficult and error prone. With the aim to identify suitable standards for CE separations which are compatible with the common detectors UV, ESI-MS, and ICP-MS, the Co(III) complexes [Co(en)3]Cl3, [Co(acac)3] and K[Co(EDTA)] were evaluated as internal standards in the reaction of the anticancer drug cisplatin and guanosine 5'-monophosphate as an example of a classical biological inorganic chemistry experiment. These Co(III) chelate complexes were considered for their stability, accessibility, and the low detection limit for Co in ICP-MS. Furthermore, the Co(III) complexes are positively and negatively charged as well as neutral, allowing the detection in different areas of the electropherograms. The background electrolytes were chosen to cover a wide pH range. The compatibility to the separation conditions was dependent on the ligands attached to the Co(III) centers, with only the acetylacetonato (acac) complex being applicable in the pH range 2.8-9.0. Furthermore, because of being charge neutral, this compound could be used as an electroosmotic flow (EOF) marker. In general, employing Co complexes resulted in improved data sets, particularly with regard to the migration times and peak areas, which resulted, for example, in higher linear ranges for the quantification of cisplatin.

  9. Neurobehavioral radiation mitigation to standard brain cancer therapy regimens by Mn(III) n-butoxyethylpyridylporphyrin-based redox modifier.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Douglas H; Tovmasyan, Artak; Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Boico, Alina; Birer, Samuel R; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Herndon, James; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Peters, Katherine B; Spasojevic, Ivan; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    Combinations of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy have shown efficacy toward brain tumors. However, therapy-induced oxidative stress can damage normal brain tissue, resulting in both progressive neurocognitive loss and diminished quality of life. We have recently shown that MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) (Mn(III)meso-tetrakis(N-n-butoxyethylpyridinium -2-yl)porphyrin) rescued RT-induced white matter damage in cranially-irradiated mice. Radiotherapy is not used in isolation for treatment of brain tumors; temozolomide is the standard-of-care for adult glioblastoma, whereas cisplatin is often used for treatment of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, we evaluated the brain radiation mitigation ability of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) after either temozolomide or cisplatin was used singly or in combination with 10 Gy RT. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) accumulated in brains at low nanomolar levels. Histological and neurobehavioral testing showed a drastic decrease (1) of axon density in the corpus callosum and (2) rotorod and running wheel performance in the RT only treatment group, respectively. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) completely rescued this phenotype in irradiated animals. In the temozolomide groups, temozolomide/ RT treatment resulted in further decreased rotorod responses over RT alone. Again, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) treatment rescued the negative effects of both temozolomide ± RT on rotorod performance. While the cisplatin-treated groups did not give similar results as the temozolomide groups, inclusion of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) did not negatively affect rotorod performance. Additionally, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) sensitized glioblastomas to either RT ± temozolomide in flank tumor models. Mice treated with both MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) and radio-/chemo-therapy herein demonstrated brain radiation mitigation. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+) may well serve as a normal tissue radio-/chemo-mitigator adjuvant therapy to standard brain cancer treatment regimens. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:372-381, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Accumulation of DNA damage in complex normal tissues after protracted low-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Stefanie; Schuler, Nadine; Lorat, Yvonne; Fan, Li; Kaestner, Lars; Wennemuth, Gunther; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E

    2012-10-01

    The biological consequences of low levels of radiation exposure and their effects on human health are unclear. Ionizing radiation induces a variety of lesions of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most biologically significant, because unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs can lead to genomic instability and cell death. Using repair-proficient mice as an in vivo system we monitored the accumulation of DNA damage in normal tissues exposed to daily low-dose radiation of 100mGy or 10mGy. Radiation-induced foci in differentiated and tissue-specific stem cells were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose radiation and DNA lesions were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with immunogold-labeling. In brain, long-living cortical neurons had a significant accumulation of foci with increasing cumulative doses. In intestine and skin, characterized by constant cell renewal of their epithelial lining, differentiated enterocytes and keratinocytes had either unchanged or only slightly increased foci levels during protracted low-dose radiation. Significantly, analysis of epidermal stem cells in skin revealed a constant increase of 53BP1 foci during the first weeks of low-dose radiation even with 10mGy, suggesting substantial accumulations of DSBs. However, TEM analysis suggests that these remaining 53BP1 foci, which are predominantly located in compact heterochromatin, do not co-localize with phosphorylated Ku70 or DNA-PKcs, core components of non-homologous end-joining. The biological relevance of these persistent 53BP1 foci, particularly their contribution to genomic instability by genetic and epigenetic alterations, has to be defined in future studies.

  11. Prediction of radiation ratio and sound transmission of complex extruded panel using wavenumber domain Unite element and boundary element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Ryue, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Müller, A. D.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, complex shaped aluminium panels have been adopted in many structures to make them lighter and stronger. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of these complex panels has been of interest for many years but conventional finite element and boundary element methods are not efficient to predict their performance at higher frequencies. Where the cross-sectional properties of the panels are constant in one direction, wavenumber domain numerical analysis can be applied and this becomes more suitable for panels with complex cross-sectional geometries. In this paper, a coupled wavenumber domain finite element and boundary element method is applied to predict the sound radiation from and sound transmission through a double-layered aluminium extruded panel, having a typical shape used in railway carriages. The predicted results are compared with measured ones carried out on a finite length panel and good agreement is found.

  12. Evaluation of the WIPP Project`s compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M. |

    1998-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP`s compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA`s proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA`s responses to EEG`s comments.

  13. A rapid fish radiation associated with the last sea-level changes in southern Brazil: the silverside Odontesthes perugiae complex.

    PubMed Central

    Beheregaray, Luciano B; Sunnucks, Paul; Briscoe, David A

    2002-01-01

    Coastal freshwater fishes provide valuable models for studying the role of the last glaciations in promoting speciation. To date, the great majority of studies are of Northern Hemisphere taxa, and reflect the influence of vicariant events during, or prior to, the Pleistocene. Microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA sequences were used to investigate patterns of population divergence and evolutionary relationships in a freshwater group of silverside fishes (Odontesthes perugiae complex), endemic to the recently formed coastal plain of southern Brazil. Lacustrine morphotypes showed concordant patterns of genetic and morphological divergence consistent with the geographical history of the coastal plain. The results support the proposal of a silverside radiation chronologically shaped by the sea-level changes of the Pleistocene and Holocene. The radiating lineage comprises a minimum of three allopatric and two sympatric lacustrine species. Four species displayed extremely high levels of genetic variation and some of the most rapid speciation rates reported in fishes. These features were related to a marine-estuarine origin of the radiation. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first molecular phylogeographic survey of a coastal radiation in South America. PMID:11788038

  14. Study of high speed complex number algorithms. [for determining antenna for field radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of evaluating the radiation integral on the curved surface of a reflecting antenna is presented. A three dimensional Fourier transform approach is used to generate a two dimensional radiation cross-section along a planer cut at any angle phi through the far field pattern. Salient to the method is an algorithm for evaluating a subset of the total three dimensional discrete Fourier transform results. The subset elements are selectively evaluated to yield data along a geometric plane of constant. The algorithm is extremely efficient so that computation of the induced surface currents via the physical optics approximation dominates the computer time required to compute a radiation pattern. Application to paraboloid reflectors with off-focus feeds in presented, but the method is easily extended to offset antenna systems and reflectors of arbitrary shapes. Numerical results were computed for both gain and phase and are compared with other published work.

  15. Setting Standards for Complex Performances: An Iterative, Judgmental Policy-Capturing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed performance standard-setting procedure, termed iterative judgmental policy capturing (JPC), is applicable to assessments composed of distinct multidimensional exercises. The procedure is described, and results are reported from the application of JPC in a study involving a panel of 20 teachers and 6 performance exercises. (SLD)

  16. Chaos and Complexities Theories. Superposition and Standardized Testing: Are We Coming or Going?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility of using the principle of "superposition of states" (commonly illustrated by Schrodinger's Cat experiment) to understand the process of using standardized testing to measure a student's learning. Comparisons from literature, neuroscience, and Schema Theory will be used to expound upon the…

  17. Setting Standards for Complex Performances: An Iterative, Judgmental Policy-Capturing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed performance standard-setting procedure, termed iterative judgmental policy capturing (JPC), is applicable to assessments composed of distinct multidimensional exercises. The procedure is described, and results are reported from the application of JPC in a study involving a panel of 20 teachers and 6 performance exercises. (SLD)

  18. Laser damage of skin by 1540-nm Er-glass laser radiation: impact on laser safety standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashev, Alexei V.; Denker, Boris I.; Pashinin, Pavel P.; Sverchkov, Sergey E.

    1996-11-01

    The skin response was studied for different radiant exposure of short and long laser pulses and reaction to multipulse action using Er-glass laser radiation. Lesion ranging from a mild erythema to tissue coagulation were produced on porcine skin. Radiant exposure producing 50 percent probability of a particular grade of lesion were established. A dependence of ED50 of minimum erythema versus number of pulses and beam cross section were studied. The dose-response relationship for producing different grades of burns were determined for energy densities of single laser pulse within the range 0.5- 35 J/cm2 and pulse duration 100 ns and 3 ms. The single pulse dose in a chain of repetitive pluses producing minimum erythema were determined for 2n(n equals 1-6 pulses). The minimum reaction of skin on laser irradiance were studied for different beam diameter. The reaction of skin is mostly considered as local super heating. The data obtained are adequate to update safety standards for cutaneous injury within thee ranges of radiant exposure and beam spotsize.

  19. The development of a single molecule fluorescence standard and its application in estimating the stoichiometry of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Madugula, Viswanadh; Lu, Lei

    2016-09-30

    We report here an image-based method to quantify the stoichiometry of diffraction-limited sub-cellular protein complexes in vivo under spinning disk confocal microscopy. A GFP single molecule fluorescence standard was first established by immobilizing His-tagged GFP molecules onto the glass surface via nickel nitrilotriacetic acid functionalized polyethylene glycol. When endogenous nucleoporins were knocked down and replaced by the exogenously expressed and knockdown-resistant GFP-nucleoporins, the stoichiometry of the nucleoporin was estimated by the ratio of its fluorescence intensity to that of the GFP single molecules. Our measured stoichiometry of Nup35, Nup93, Nup133 and Nup88 is 23, 18, 14 and 9 and there are possibly16 copies of Nup107-160 complex per nuclear pore complex.

  20. Computing the complex : Dusty plasmas in the presence of magnetic fields and UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, V.

    2007-12-01

    About 90% of the visible universe is plasma. Interstellar clouds, stellar cores and atmospheres, the Solar wind, the Earth's ionosphere, polar lights, and lightning are all plasma; ionized gases, consisting of electrons, ions, and neutrals. Not only many industries, like the microchip and solar cell industry, but also future fusion power stations, rely heavily on the use of plasma. More and more, home appliances include plasma technologies, like compact fluorescent light sources, and plasma screens. Dust particles, which can disrupt plasma processes, enter these plasmas, through chemical reactions in the plasma, or through interactions between plasma and walls. For instance, during microchip fabrication, dust particles can destroy the tiny, nanometre-sized structures on the surface of these chips. On the other hand, dust particles orbiting Young Stellar Objects coagulate and form the seeds of planets. In order to understand fundamental processes, such as planet formation, or to optimize industrial plasma processes, a thorough description of dusty plasma is necessary. Dust particles immersed in plasma collect ions and electrons from the plasma and charge up electrically. Therefore, the presence of dust changes plasma, while at the same time many forces start acting on the dust. Therefore, the dust and plasma become coupled, making dusty plasma a very complex medium to describe, in which many length and time scales play a role, from the Debye length to the length of the electrodes, and from the inverse plasma frequencies to the dust transport times. Using a self-consistent fluid model, we simulate these multi-scale dusty plasmas in radio frequency discharges under micro-gravity. We show that moderate non-linear scattering of ions by the dust particles is the most important aspect in the calculation of the ion drag force. This force is also responsible for the formation of a dust-free 'void' in dusty plasma under micro-gravity, caused by ions moving from the centre of

  1. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G.; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A.; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  2. Radiation inactivation (target size analysis) of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: evidence for a high molecular weight complex

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, P.M.; Venter, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    In the present study we used radiation inactivation (target size analysis) to measure the functional mol wt of the GnRH receptor while it is still a component of the plasma membrane. This technique is based on the observation that an inverse relationship exists between the dose-dependent inactivation of a macromolecule by ionizing radiation and the size of that macromolecule. This method demonstrates a mol wt of 136,346 +/- 8120 for the GnRH receptor. This estimate is approximately twice that obtained (60,000) by photoaffinity labeling with a radioactive GnRH analog followed by electrophoresis under denaturing conditions and, accordingly, presents the possibility that the functional receptor consists of a high mol wt complex in its native state. The present studies indicate that the GnRH receptor is either a single weight class of protein or several closely related weight classes, such as might occur due to protein glycosylation.

  3. The seismic spectrum, radiated energy, and the Savage and Wood inequality for complex earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kenneth D.; Brune, James N.; Priestley, Keith F.

    1991-03-01

    We have integrated velocity squared spectra in order to determine the seismic energy radiated during fault rupture. The high frequency spectral fall-off and the shape of the spectrum at the corner frequency are critical to the energy calculation. High frequency spectral fall-offs of ω-2 beyond the corner frequency, in a Brune (1970) source model, return radiated energies approximately equal to that of an Orowan (1960) type fault failure, where the final stress level is equal to the dynamic frictional stress. Any spectra with an extended intermediate slope of ω-1 would therefore result in higher radiated energies. Savage and Wood (1971) proposed a model in which the final stress level was less than the dynamic stress level and that this was the result of "overshoot". They based their model on the observation that the ratio of twice the apparent stress to the stress drop was typically around 0.3. We show that for such a ratio to exist high frequency spectral fall-offs of ≈ ω-3 would be required. Composite spectra have been constructed for several moderate to large earthquakes, these spectra have been compared to that predicted by the Haskell (1966) model and velocity squared spectra have been integrated to determine the radiated energy. In all cases this ratio, twice the apparent stress to the stress drop, is greater than or equal to one, violating the Savage and Wood (1971) inequality, and provides evidence against "overshoot" as a source model.

  4. Effect of low-level alpha-radiation on bioluminescent assay systems of various complexity.

    PubMed

    Rozhko, Tatiana V; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S; Kuznetsov, Alexander M; Vydryakova, Galina A; Bondareva, Lydia G; Bolsunovsky, Alexander Ya

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of low-level alpha-radiation on bioluminescent assay systems of different levels of organization: in vivo and in vitro. Three bioluminescent assay systems are used: intact bacteria, lyophilized bacteria, and bioluminescent system of coupled enzyme reactions. Solutions of 241Am(NO3)3 are used as a source of alpha-radiation. It has been shown that activation processes predominate in all the three bioluminescent assay systems subjected to short-term exposure (20-55 h) and inhibition processes in the systems subjected to longer-term exposure to radiation. It has been found that these effects are caused by the radiation component of 241Am3+ impact. The intensity of the 241Am3+ effect on the bioluminescent assay systems has been shown to depend on the 241Am3+ concentration, level of organization and integrity of the bioluminescent assay system. The bioluminescent assay systems in vivo have been found to be highly sensitive to 241Am3+ (up to 10(-17) M).

  5. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted.

  6. Extension of Standard Model with a Complex Singlet and Iso-Doublet Vector Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishi, Neda

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the extension of the SM by a neutral complex scalar singlet with a nonzero vacuum expectation value and a heavy vector quark pair is considered. This model provides an extra source of spontaneous CP violation. The focus of this article is to obtain the rate of baryon number generation. We show that the considered model provides a strong enough first-order electroweak phase transition to suppress the baryon-violating sphaleron process.

  7. Radiation and scattering by thin-wire structures in the complex frequency domain. [electromagnetic theory for thin-wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Piecewise-sinusoidal expansion functions and Galerkin's method are employed to formulate a solution for an arbitrary thin-wire configuration in a homogeneous conducting medium. The analysis is performed in the real or complex frequency domain. In antenna problems, the solution determines the current distribution, impedance, radiation efficiency, gain and far-field patterns. In scattering problems, the solution determines the absorption cross section, scattering cross section and the polarization scattering matrix. The electromagnetic theory is presented for thin wires and the forward-scattering theorem is developed for an arbitrary target in a homogeneous conducting medium.

  8. Exposure and temperature dependence of elongated blister formation in complex radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Blistering of platinum alloy surfaces by /sup 252/Cf alpha particle and fission fragment radiations occurred at relatively low concentrations of implanted helium during exposures at room temperature as well as at 1000/sup 0/C. Distinctive configurations of the blisters resulting from transport of atoms displaced by the fission fragments persisted during the high temperature exposures. Post-exposure heating of specimens exposed at room-temperature produced no additional blistering until temperatures of 1300/sup 0/C were reached. Post-exposure heating of 1000/sup 0/C blistered specimens produced only thermal etching effects. The low helium concentrations required for blistering and the distinctive blister configurations produced by /sup 252/Cf exposures suggest a unique mode of surface distortion resulting from the large number and highly localized distributions of atom displacements generated by /sup 252/Cf fission fragments. Such conditions may not be duplicated in the He-ion and fast neutron radiation environments of fusion reactors.

  9. Beryllium Sampling and Analysis Within the DOE Complex and Opportunities for Standardization

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, BRISSON

    2005-02-07

    Since the U. S. Department of Energy published the DOE Beryllium Rule, 10 CFR 850, in 1999, DOE sites have been required to measure beryllium on air filters and wipes for worker protection and for release of materials from beryllium-controlled areas. Measurements in the nanogram range on a filter or wipe are typically required. Industrial hygiene laboratories have applied methods from various analytical compendia, and a number of issues have emerged with sampling and analysis practices. As a result, a committee of analytical chemists, industrial hygienists, and laboratory managers was formed in November 2003 to address the issues. The committee developed a baseline questionnaire and distributed it to DOE sites and other agencies in the U.S. and U.K. The results of the questionnaire are presented in this paper. These results confirmed that a wide variety of practices were in use in the areas of sampling, sample preparation, and analysis. Additionally, although these laboratories are generally accredited by the American Industrial Hygiene Association there are inconsistencies in performance among accredited labs. As a result, there are significant opportunities for development of standard methods that could improve consistency. The current availabilities and needs for standard methods are further discussed in a companion paper.

  10. Beryllium Sampling and Analysis Within the DOE Complex and Opportunities for Standardization

    SciTech Connect

    BRISSON, MICHAEL

    2005-01-25

    Since the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the DOE Beryllium Rule (10 CFR 850) in 1999, DOE sites have been required to measure beryllium on air filters and wipes for worker protection and for release of materials from beryllium-controlled areas. Measurements in the nanogram range on a filter or wipe are typically required. Industrial hygiene laboratories have applied methods from various analytical compendia, and a number of issues have emerged with sampling and analysis practices. As a result, a committee of analytical chemists, industrial hygienists, and laboratory managers was formed in November 2003 to address the issues. The committee developed a baseline questionnaire and distributed it to DOE sites and other agencies in the U.S. and U.K. The results of the questionnaire are presented in this paper. These results confirmed that a wide variety of practices were in use in the areas of sampling, sample preparation, and analysis. Additionally, although these laboratories are generally accredited by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), there are inconsistencies in performance among accredited labs. As a result, there are significant opportunities for development of standard methods that could improve consistency. The current availabilities and needs for standard methods are further discussed in a companion paper.

  11. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy (AHRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer: can we leave standard fractionation?

    PubMed

    de Dios, N Rodríguez; Sanz, X; Foro, P; Membrive, I; Reig, A; Ortiz, A; Jiménez, R; Algara, M

    2017-04-01

    To report interim results from a single-institution study conducted to assess accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy (AHRT) delivered with 3D conformal radiotherapy in two groups of patients with non-small cell lung cancer: (1) patients with early stage disease unable to tolerate surgery and ineligible for stereotactic body radiation therapy, and (2) patients with locally advanced disease unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A total of 83 patients (51 stage I-II, 32 stage III) were included. Radiotherapy targets included the primary tumor and positive mediastinal areas identified on the pre-treatment PET-CT. Mean age was 77.8 ± 7.8 years. ECOG performance status (PS) was ≥2 in 50.6 % of cases. Radiotherapy was delivered in daily fractions of 2.75 Gy to a total dose of 66 Gy (BED10 84 Gy). Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to NCI CTC criteria. At a median follow-up of 42 months, median overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were 23 and 36 months, respectively. On the multivariate analysis, PS [HR 4.14, p = 0.0001)], stage [HR 2.51, p = 0.005)], and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) [HR 1.04, p = 0.04)] were independent risk factors for OS. PS [HR 5.2, p = 0.0001)] and stage [HR 6.3, p = 0.0001)] were also associated with CSS. No cases of severe acute or late treatment-related toxicities were observed. OS and CSS rates in patients treated with AHRT for stage I-II and stage III NSCLC were good. Treatment was well tolerated with no grade three or higher treatment-related toxicity. PS, stage, and SUV max were predictive for OS and CSS.

  12. Radiation effects and annealing kinetics in crystalline silicates, phosphates and complex Nb-Ta-Ti oxides. FInal Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1987-08-10

    Interaction of heavy particles (alpha-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, implanted ions) with ceramics is complex because they have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions and chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage can produce diverse results, but most commonly, crystalline periodic materials become either polycrystalline or aperiodic (metamict state). We studied the transition from crystalline to aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by alpha recoil nuclei in the U and Th decay series and in synthetic, analogous structure types which have been amorphized by ion implantation. Transition from crystalline to aperiodic was followed by analysis of XRD, high resolution TEM, and EXAFS/XANE spectroscopy. Use of these techniques with increasing dose provided data on an increasing finer scale as the damage process progressed.

  13. New developed urological protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT reduce radiation exposure of endourological patients below the levels of the low dose standard CT scans.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, M-C; Banckwitz, R; Koehler, C; Mueller-Allissat, B; Michel, M-S; Häcker, A; Ritter, M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional imaging by computed tomography (CT) is associated with higher radiation dose compared to plain X-ray. The Uro Dyna-CT provides CT-like images in the endourological operating room. Our aim was to reduce the radiation exposure of endourological patients with the Uro Dyna-CT and optimize the cross-sectional image quality. For the hard contrast protocol, two artificial stones were placed in a Rando-Alderson phantom's left kidney region. Relevant parameters of the standard abdomen protocol were changed. After each modification, two urologists subjectively evaluated the image quality. We developed two customized protocols (standard, low-dose) for hard contrast imaging. To optimize the examination protocol for soft tissue imaging a standardized cone beam phantom was used. Parameters of the preset high-resolution protocol were changed to develop a protocol with similar objective image quality but lower radiation dose. To evaluate the effective radiation dose we embedded 129 thermoluminescence dosimeters in the kidney and ureter region of the Rando-Alderson phantom and performed each protocol five times (stone, soft tissue) and ten times (low-dose protocol). Mean effective dose values per 3D-examination were calculated. We detected a dose area product (DAP) 776.2 (standard) and 163.5 μGym(2) (low-dose) for the stone protocols with an effective dose of 1.96 and 0.33 mSv, respectively. The soft tissue protocol produced a DAP of 5,070 μGym(2) and an effective dose of 7.76 mSv. Our newly developed examination protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT provide CT-like image quality during urological interventions with low radiation dose.

  14. [Corrective effects of electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range on the parameters of oxidative stress after standard anti-helicobacterial therapy in patients with ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Ivanishkina, E V; Podoprigorova, V G

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the possibilities of correction of oxidative stress parameters in the serum and gastroduodenal mucosa using electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range in 127 patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer after eradication therapy. Control group included 230 healthy subjects. Parameter of lipid oxidation by free radicals were measured by direct methods (hemiluminescence and EPR-spectroscopy). The results show that standard eradication therapy does not influence parameters of oxidative stress. More pronounced effect of electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range may be due to the correction of prooxidant-antioxidant and antioxidant disbalance. This observation provides pathogenetic substantiation for the inclusion of this physical method in modern therapeutic modalities.

  15. New Monte Carlo model of laser radiation propagation in sprays, aerosols, and other complex polydisperse turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocal, E.; Jermy, M.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2006-08-01

    Modern optical diagnostics for quantitative characterization of polydisperse sprays and other aerosols which contain a wide range of droplet size encounter difficulties in the dense regions due to the multiple scattering of laser radiation with the surrounding droplets. The accuracy and efficiency of optical measurements can only be improved if the radiative transfer within such polydisperse turbid media is understood. A novel Monte Carlo code has been developed for modeling of optical radiation propagation in inhomogeneous polydisperse scattering media with typical drop size ranging from 2 μm to 200 μm in diameter. We show how strong variations of both particle size distribution and particle concentration within a 3D scattering medium can be taken into account via the Monte Carlo approach. A new approximation which reduces ~20 times the computational memory space required to determine the phase function is described. The approximation is verified by considering four log-normal drop size distributions. It is found valid for particle sizes in the range of 10-200 μm with increasing errors, due to additional photons scattered at large angles, as the number of particles below than 10 μm increases. The technique is applied to the simulation of typical planar Mie imaging of a hollow cone spray. Simulated and experimental images are compared and shown to agree well. The code has application in developing and testing new optical diagnostics for complex scattering media such as dense sprays.

  16. Outdoor 220Rn, 222Rn and terrestrial gamma radiation levels: investigation study in the thorium rich Fen Complex, Norway.

    PubMed

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis

    2012-01-01

    The present study was done in the Fen Complex, a Norwegian area rich in naturally occurring radionuclides, especially in thorium ((232)Th). Measurement of radioactivity levels was conducted at the decommissioned iron (Fe) and niobium (Nb) mining sites (TENORM) as well as at the undisturbed wooded sites (NORM), all open for free public access. The soil activity concentrations of (232)Th (3280-8395 Bq kg(-1)) were significantly higher than the world and the Norwegian average values and exceeded the Norwegian screening level (1000 Bq kg(-1)) for radioactive waste, while radium ((226)Ra) was present at slightly elevated levels (89-171 Bq kg(-1)). Terrestrial gamma dose rates were also elevated, ranging 2.6-4.4 μGy h(-1). Based on long-term surveys, the air concentrations of thoron ((220)Rn) and radon ((222)Rn) reached 1786 and 82 Bq m(-3), respectively. Seasonal variation in the outdoor gamma dose rates and Rn concentrations was confirmed. Correlation analyses showed a linear relationship between air radiation levels and the abundance of (232)Th in soil. The annual outdoor effective radiation doses for humans (occupancy 5 h day(-1)) were estimated to be in the range of 3.0-7.7 mSv, comparable or higher than the total average (summarized indoor and outdoor) exposure dose for the Norwegian population (2.9 mSv year(-1)). On the basis of all obtained results, this Norwegian area should be considered as enhanced natural radiation area (ENRA).

  17. Development and Use of Engineering Standards for Computational Fluid Dynamics for Complex Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyung B.; Ghia, Urmila; Bayyuk, Sami; Oberkampf, William L.; Roy, Christopher J.; Benek, John A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Powers, Joseph M.; Bush, Robert H.; Mani, Mortaza

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) methods are increasingly relied on for predictive performance, reliability and safety of engineering systems. Analysts, designers, decision makers, and project managers, who must depend on simulation, need practical techniques and methods for assessing simulation credibility. The AIAA Guide for Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations (AIAA G-077-1998 (2002)), originally published in 1998, was the first engineering standards document available to the engineering community for verification and validation (V&V) of simulations. Much progress has been made in these areas since 1998. The AIAA Committee on Standards for CFD is currently updating this Guide to incorporate in it the important developments that have taken place in V&V concepts, methods, and practices, particularly with regard to the broader context of predictive capability and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and approaches. This paper will provide an overview of the changes and extensions currently underway to update the AIAA Guide. Specifically, a framework for predictive capability will be described for incorporating a wide range of error and uncertainty sources identified during the modeling, verification, and validation processes, with the goal of estimating the total prediction uncertainty of the simulation. The Guide's goal is to provide a foundation for understanding and addressing major issues and concepts in predictive CFD. However, this Guide will not recommend specific approaches in these areas as the field is rapidly evolving. It is hoped that the guidelines provided in this paper, and explained in more detail in the Guide, will aid in the research, development, and use of CFD in engineering decision-making.

  18. On the standard conjecture for complex 4-dimensional elliptic varieties and compactifications of Néron minimal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankeev, S. G.

    2014-02-01

    We prove that the Grothendieck standard conjecture B(X) of Lefschetz type on the algebraicity of operators * and \\Lambda of Hodge theory holds for every smooth complex projective model X of the fibre product X_1\\times_CX_2, where X_1\\to C is an elliptic surface over a smooth projective curve C and X_2\\to C is a family of K3 surfaces with semistable degenerations of rational type such that \\operatorname{rank}\\operatorname{NS}(X_{2s})\

  19. Improvements to the "STANDARD" Complex Kohn Variational Method: Towards the Development of AN "R-MATRIX Theory Without a BOX"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    The complex Kohn variational method is among the most successful ab initio techniques currently being used to study electron-molecule collisions. We review the essential features of the standard method and then discuss a few recent developments that allow us to relax some of the simplifying approximations that have been used in the past and reduce the size of the expansion basis sets needed for convergence. We also discuss an extension that allows one to evaluate scattering amplitudes as a continuous function of energy, much like R-matrix theory, but without the R-matrix "box".

  20. Morpholino oligonucleotides do not participate perfectly in standard Watson-Crick complexes with RNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoping; Wesolowski, Donna; Izadjoo, Mina; Altman, Sidney

    2010-11-01

    RNase P from E. coli will cleave a RNA at a site designated in a complex with an external guide sequence (EGS). The location of the site is determined by the Watson-Crick complementary sequence that can be formed between the RNA and the EGS. Morpholino oligonucleotides (PMOs) that have the same base sequences as any particular EGS will not direct cleavage by RNase P of the target RNA at the expected site in three mRNAs. Instead, cleavage occurs at a secondary site that does not correspond exactly to the expected Watson-Crick sequence in the PMO. This cleavage in the mRNA for a drug resistance gene, CAT mRNA, is at least second order in the concentration of the PMOs, but the mechanism is not understood yet and might be more complicated than a simple second-order reaction. EGSs and PMOs inhibit the reactions of each other effectively in a competitive fashion. A basic peptide attached to the PMO (PPMO) is more effective because of its binding properties to the mRNA as a substrate. However, a PMO is just as efficient as a PPMO on a mRNA that is mutated so that the canonical W-C site has been altered. The altered mRNA is not recognizable by effective extensive W-C pairing to an EGS or PMO. The complex of a PMO on a mutated mRNA as a substrate shows that the dimensions of the modified oligonucleotide cannot be the same as a naked piece of single-stranded RNA.

  1. On Influence of Neutrals on Dust Particle Charging in Complex Plasmas in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    Effects associated with neutral component of complex (dusty) ionospheric plasmas which affect dust particle charging are studied. Microscopic ion currents on dust particles with taking into account ion-neutral interaction are presented. Calculations are performed both for the case of negative charges of dust particles, when the influence of Solar radiation on dust particle charging processes is negligible, and for the case of positive charges which is realized in the presence of sufficiently intensive UV or X-ray radiation. We also carry out investigation of the electron heating due to the photoelectric effect. We show that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral component of the plasma. As result, we determine altitudes where the influence of the neutral plasma component on dust particle charging processes as well as the electron heating effect are significant and should be taken into account under consideration of the ionospheric complex plasmas. In particular, we show that the effects considered could be important for the description of noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and some other physical phenomena associated with dust particles in the ionosphere.

  2. Context dependence in complex adaptive landscapes: frequency and trait-dependent selection surfaces within an adaptive radiation of Caribbean pupfishes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H

    2016-06-01

    The adaptive landscape provides the foundational bridge between micro- and macroevolution. One well-known caveat to this perspective is that fitness surfaces depend on ecological context, including competitor frequency, traits measured, and resource abundance. However, this view is based largely on intraspecific studies. It is still unknown how context-dependence affects the larger features of peaks and valleys on the landscape which ultimately drive speciation and adaptive radiation. Here, I explore this question using one of the most complex fitness landscapes measured in the wild in a sympatric pupfish radiation endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas by tracking survival and growth of laboratory-reared F2 hybrids. I present new analyses of the effects of competitor frequency, dietary isotopes, and trait subsets on this fitness landscape. Contrary to expectations, decreasing competitor frequency increased survival only among very common phenotypes, whereas less common phenotypes rarely survived despite few competitors, suggesting that performance, not competitor frequency, shapes large-scale features of the fitness landscape. Dietary isotopes were weakly correlated with phenotype and growth, but did not explain additional survival variation. Nonlinear fitness surfaces varied substantially among trait subsets, revealing one-, two-, and three-peak landscapes, demonstrating the complexity of selection in the wild, even among similar functional traits. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  4. Using Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Practices to Address Scientific Misunderstandings Around Complex Environmental Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Kenna, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The new NGSS provide an important opportunity for scientists to develop curriculum that links the practice of science to research-based data in order to improve understanding in areas of science that are both complex and confusing. Our curriculum focuses in particular on the fate and transport of anthropogenic radionuclides. Radioactivity, both naturally occurring and anthropogenic, is highly debated and largely misunderstood, and for large sections of the population is a source of scientific misunderstanding. Developed as part of the international GEOTRACES project which focuses on identifying ocean processes and quantifying fluxes that control the distributions of selected trace elements and isotopes in the ocean, and on establishing the sensitivity of these distributions to changing environmental conditions, the curriculum topic fits nicely into the applied focus of NGSS with both environmental and topical relevance. Our curriculum design focuses on small group discussion driven by questions, yet unlike more traditional curriculum pieces these are not questions posed to the students, rather they are questions posed by the students to facilitate their deeper understanding. Our curriculum design challenges the traditional question/answer memorization approach to instruction as we strive to develop an educational approach that supports the practice of science as well as the NGSS Cross Cutting Concepts and the Science & Engineering Practices. Our goal is for students to develop a methodology they can employ when faced with a complex scientific issue. Through background readings and team discussions they identify what type of information is important for them to know and where to find a reliable source for that information. Framing their discovery around key questions such as "What type of radioactive decay are we dealing with?", "What is the potential half-life of the isotope?", and "What are the pathways of transport of radioactivity?" allows students to evaluate a

  5. Effects of complex radiative and convective environments on the thermal biology of the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii).

    PubMed

    Wolf, B O; Wooden, K M; Walsberg, G E

    2000-02-01

    in wind speed was equivalent to a decrease in chamber air temperature of 16 degrees C. Overall, shifting environmental conditions from a wind speed of 0.25 m s(-1) and irradiance of 936 W m(-2) to a wind speed of 2.0 m s(-1) with no short-wave radiation present was equivalent to decreasing chamber air temperature by approximately 20 degrees C. The sensitivity to changes in the convective environment, combined with the complex effects of changes in irradiance levels revealed by re-analyzing data published previously, significantly complicates the task of estimating the heat balance of animals in nature.

  6. Radiation and divergence in the Rhagoletis pomonella species complex: inferences from DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Xie, X; Michel, A P; Schwarz, D; Rull, J; Velez, S; Forbes, A A; Aluja, M; Feder, J L

    2008-05-01

    Here, we investigate the evolutionary history and pattern of genetic divergence in the Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) sibling species complex, a model for sympatric speciation via host plant shifting, using 11 anonymous nuclear genes and mtDNA. We report that DNA sequence results largely coincide with those of previous allozyme studies. Rhagoletis cornivora was basal in the complex, distinguished by fixed substitutions at all loci. Gene trees did not provide reciprocally monophyletic relationships among US populations of R. pomonella, R. mendax, R. zephyria and the undescribed flowering dogwood fly. However, private alleles were found for these taxa for certain loci. We discuss the implications of the results with respect to identifiable genetic signposts (stages) of speciation, the mosaic nature of genomic differentiation distinguishing formative species and a concept of speciation mode plurality involving a biogeographic contribution to sympatric speciation in the R. pomonella complex.

  7. The analysis of complex mixed-radiation fields using near real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan; Mellor, Matthew P; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2014-10-01

    A new mixed-field imaging system has been constructed at Lancaster University using the principles of collimation and back projection to passively locate and assess sources of neutron and gamma-ray radiation. The system was set up at the University of Manchester where three radiation sources: (252)Cf, a lead-shielded (241)Am/Be and a (22)Na source were imaged. Real-time discrimination was used to find the respective components of the neutron and gamma-ray fields detected by a single EJ-301 liquid scintillator, allowing separate images of neutron and gamma-ray emitters to be formed. (252)Cf and (22)Na were successfully observed and located in the gamma-ray image; however, the (241)Am/Be was not seen owing to surrounding lead shielding. The (252)Cf and (241)Am/Be neutron sources were seen clearly in the neutron image, demonstrating the advantage of this mixed-field technique over a gamma-ray-only image where the (241)Am/Be source would have gone undetected.

  8. Modification of the chemical composition and structure of the US Reference Standard Endotoxin (RSE) by /sup 60/Co radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Tsai, C.M.; Slomiany, B.L.; Herp, A.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    A highly purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparation was exposed in water to megadoses of ionizing radiation from a /sup 60/Co source. As evidenced by electrophoresis, the radiation treatment progressively degraded the lipopolysaccharide molecules by removing first the O-side chain units and then components of the R-core. Chemical analysis of the irradiated (LPS) preparations showed that, in accord with the structural changes, the most profound effects of ionizing radiation occurred in the hydrophilic oligo/polysaccharide moieties (R-core and O-side chain). Progressively higher doses of radiation degraded the simple sugars in decreasing order of galactose, galactosamine, glucosamine, glucose, and heptose. The R-core component 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate was the most resistant sugar derivative to ionizing radiation. Due to its central position in the LPS aggregates in water, even at comparatively high doses of radiation the hydrophobic lipid A moiety of endotoxin was less affected than the sugar components. Of the fatty acids of lipid A, however, either partial conversion of beta-hydroxymyristic acid into myristic acid or selective loss of the former occurred. The observed structural and chemical changes of LPS are consistent with the effect of active oxygen radicals of radiolysis. In addition, the extensive physicochemical changes explain the altered biological reactivity of radiation-treated endotoxins.

  9. Research Program For Radiation Stability of the Aerospace Materials Development of ISO Standards for Space Environment Simulation at Material Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    gamma rays, or neutrons .) 4.14. Kapton®, DuPont trade name for polyimide polymer. 4.15. Linear energy transfer, LET The energy delivered by a...Protons (E ≥1.0 MeV) 1.5 2.0 2.0 1.0 8.3.1.4. At simulation of mixed radiation consisting of n components by one monoenergetic kind of radiation, a...choice of fluences of the separate radiation sources. 9.1.2. Convert a monoenergetic beam to a number of quasimonoenergetic beams using a sectioned foil

  10. Complex radiation-thermal history of Kaidun meteorite on data of track study of silicate minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashkarov, L. L.; Korotkova, N. N.; Skripnik, A. YA.

    1993-01-01

    The results of track study of approximately 80 individual silicate mineral crystals (ol, px, plag) picked out from Kaidun meteorite are presented. A wide range of observed rho(sub VH) value distributions indicate the complex irradiation history of Kaidun minerals. In one anortite crystal having two track groups with different parameters the pre-accretion irradiation traces were observed in all probability.

  11. Standardization of nodal radiation therapy through changes to a breast cancer clinical pathway throughout a large, integrated cancer center network.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Thomas, Joel; Horne, Zachary D; Champ, Colin E; Ahrendt, Gretchen M; Diego, Emilia; Heron, Dwight E; Beriwal, Sushil

    2017-07-20

    Studies demonstrate safety of omitting axillary nodal dissection for early-stage breast cancer with positive sentinel lymph node (+SLN) biopsy, although trial designs differed in radiation therapy (RT) fields. Regional nodal irradiation was separately shown to improve outcomes in high-risk patients. This led to lack of consensus in RT volumes. Clinical pathways (CPs) standardize care where practice varies unnecessarily. We evaluated the impact of changes to a CP guiding postoperative RT in women with +SLNs on practice patterns throughout a network. We implemented a CP for management of breast cancer with postoperative RT designed to promote uniform nodal treatment. The CP recommended modified tangents (MTs) including level I/II nodes for women with micrometastases (pN1mi). For women with macrometastases (pN1a), CPs recommended including level I/II LN in MT and a third supraclavicular node (SCN) LN ± internal mammary nodes for women with adverse factors present. RT fields of 233 women undergoing breast-conserving surgery with +SLN but not axillary nodal dissection were retrospectively reviewed: 25% had pN1mi disease and 75% pN1a. Of 127 women treated before CP changes, 35% with pN1mi and 22% with pN1a were treated with whole-breast irradiation alone. Following CP changes, 106 women were treated: 5% with whole-breast irradiation alone, 58% with MT, and 38% with MT + SCN field. Utilization of MT was associated with CP changes. Utilization of a third SCN field was associated with CP changes, pN stage, extracapsular extension, and total number of adverse factors. CPs translate published data and institutional experience into management plans that promote evidence-based care and eliminate unnecessary practice variations. Recognizing that postoperative RT treatment volumes were heterogeneous, we modified the CP based upon the latest evidence for regional nodal irradiation, after which we found increased compliance and consistency with quality guidelines, which will also

  12. Editor's choice--Angulation of the C-arm during complex endovascular aortic procedures increases radiation exposure to the head.

    PubMed

    Albayati, M A; Kelly, S; Gallagher, D; Dourado, R; Patel, A S; Saha, P; Bajwa, A; El-Sayed, T; Salter, R; Gkoutzios, P; Gkoutzious, P; Carrell, T; Abisi, S; Modarai, B

    2015-04-01

    The increased complexity of endovascular aortic repair necessitates longer procedural time and higher radiation exposure to the operator, particularly to exposed body parts. The aims were to measure directly exposure to radiation of the bodies and heads of the operating team during endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA), and to identify factors that may increase exposure. This was a single-centre prospective study. Between October 2013 and July 2014, consecutive elective branched and fenestrated TAAA repairs performed in a hybrid operating room were studied. Electronic dosimeters were used to measure directly radiation exposure to the primary (PO) and assistant (AO) operator in three different areas (under-lead, over-lead, and head). Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisition times, C-arm angulation, and PO/AO height were recorded. Seventeen cases were analysed (Crawford II-IV), with a median operating time of 280 minutes (interquartile range 200-330 minutes). Median age was 76 years (range 71-81 years); median body mass index was 28 kg/m(2) (25-32 kg/m(2)). Stent-grafts incorporated branches only, fenestrations only, or a mixture of branches and fenestrations. A total of 21 branches and 38 fenestrations were cannulated and stented. Head dose was significantly higher in the PO compared with the AO (median 54 μSv [range 24-130 μSv] vs. 15 μSv [range 7-43 μSv], respectively; p = .022), as was over-lead body dose (median 80 μSv [range 37-163 μSv] vs. 32 μSv [range 6-48 μSv], respectively; p = .003). Corresponding under-lead doses were similar between operators (median 4 μSv [range 1-17 μSv] vs. 1 μSv [range 1-3 μSv], respectively; p = .222). Primary operator height, DSA acquisition time in left anterior oblique (LAO) position, and degrees of LAO angulation were independent predictors of PO head dose (p < .05). The head is an unprotected area receiving a significant radiation dose

  13. Comparison of dot-ELISA and standard ELISA for detection of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Belo, Elza Ft; Farhat, Calil K; Gaspari, Elizabeth N De

    2010-01-01

    Dot-ELISA using the outer membrane complex antigens of Neisseria meningitidis as a target was standardized for rapid detection of meningococcal-specific antibodies in human serum. We investigated the level of meningococcal-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in serum using dot-ELISA with outer membrane antigens prepared from Neisseria meningitidis serotype B:4.19:P1.15,3,7,9 (a strain isolated from a Brazilian epidemic). The dot-ELISA is based on the same principles as the standard ELISA and is useful for detection of anti-N. meningitidis B antibodies in serum of patients with meningococcal infections. For the assay, outer membrane complexes (OMCs) were absorbed by nitrocellulose membrane and blocked with a 5% skim milk solution. Serum samples were drawn upon hospital admission and during convalescence from patients with meningococcal septicemia, and single samples were drawn from uninfected controls. We retrospectively examined a total of 57 serum samples: 35 from patients infected with N. meningitidis B, 12 from patients infected with Haemophilus influenzae b, and 10 from health individuals. When performed at room temperature, dot-ELISA took approximately four hours to perform, and the optimum antigen concentration was 0.42 microg per dot. The specificity of IgG, IgM, and IgA demonstrates that dot-ELISA using OMCs from N. meningitidis B as a target is suitable for serologic verification of clinically suspected meningococcal disease in patients and for titer determination of antibodies produced during different phases of natural infection. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dot-ELISA was comparable to that of standard ELISA. Overall, dot-ELISA is simple to perform, rapid, and low cost. Further validation of the test as a screening tool is required.

  14. Improved DNA equilibrium binding affinity determinations of platinum(II) complexes using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Ang, Dale L; Jones, Nykola C; Stootman, Frank; Ghadirian, Bahman; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2015-06-21

    The binding affinity of a series of square planar platinum(II) compounds of the type [Pt(A(L))(I(L))](2+), where A(L) is 1,2-diaminoethane and I(L) are 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4Mephen), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5Mephen), 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (47Me2phen), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (56Me2phen) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3478Me4phen) has been reinvestigated using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The additional peaks exhibited considerably greater intensity than those observed between 200 and 400 nm affording additional binding affinity determinations. In addition, the authors have reviewed the various mathematical approaches used to estimate equilibrium binding constants and thereby demonstrate that their mathematical approach, implemented with Wolfram Mathematica, has merit over other methods.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of complex sidearms subject to solar radiation and surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Dittko, Karl A; Kirkpatrick, Michael P; Armfield, Steven W

    2013-09-15

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to model two lake sidearms subject to heating from solar radiation and cooling from a surface flux. The sidearms are part of Lake Audrey, NJ, USA and Lake Alexandrina, SA, Australia. The simulation domains are created using bathymetry data and the boundary is modelled with an Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the cooling and heating phases with separate quasi-steady state simulations. Differential heating occurs in the cavity due to the changing depth. The resulting temperature gradients drive lateral flows. These flows are the dominant transport process in the absence of wind. Study in this area is important in water quality management as the lateral circulation can carry particles and various pollutants, transporting them to and mixing them with the main lake body.

  16. Inorganic species in geologic fluids: correlations among standard molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous ions and hydroxide complexes.

    PubMed

    Shock, E L; Sassani, D C; Willis, M; Sverjensky, D A

    1997-03-01

    Correlations among experimentally determined standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of inorganic aqueous species at 25 degrees C and 1 bar allow estimates of these properties for numerous monatomic cations and anions, polyatomic anions, oxyanions, acid oxyanions, neutral oxy-acid species, dissolved gases, and hydroxide complexes of metal cations. Combined with correlations among parameters in the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state (Shock et al., 1992), these estimates permit predictions of standard partial molal volumes, heat capacities, and entropies, as well as apparent standard partial molal enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation to 1000 degrees C and 5 kb for hundreds of inorganic aqueous species of interest in geochemistry. Data and parameters for more than 300 inorganic aqueous species are presented. Close agreement between calculated and experimentally determined equilibrium constants for acid dissociation reactions and cation hydrolysis reactions supports the generality and validity of these predictive methods. These data facilitate the calculation of the speciation of major, minor, and trace elements in hydrothermal and metamorphic fluids throughout most of the crust of the Earth.

  17. Dose distribution of gamma radiation in a new geometric configuration of a standard carton date package and its experimental application for disinfestation of packed dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. S. H.; Al-Taweel, A. A.; Hameed, A. A.

    1994-06-01

    A new geometrical configuration composed of three standard carton boxes (SCBs) full with polyethylene bags (PBs), where each bag contains 1 kg of date, was placed on a single turntable of Gammabeam-650 and irradiated with low doses. The mean "radiation absorbed dose" for disinfestation of this geometrical unit at 15 equally distributed positions (Fricke dosimeters) inside 3 SCBs put on a single turntable was calculated to be 0.46 ± 0.20 kGy and dose uniformity ratio ( U) = 1.0019/0.2500 = 4.00. The development and genetic tests carried out on insects found in the PBs 1-2 days after irradiation resulted in that all insects were completely sterile and died within a short period of time. No sign of any reinfestation was recorded at all in the treated packages even after 30 days of storage in an insectory. Apparently the prevention of insects from invading and/or penetrating the date packages is due mainly to the new combination of standard carton boxes that are widely used for commercial purposes and hermetically heat-sealed polyethylene bags of dates in addition to the entire prevention of reproduction induced by the "low" doses of γ radiation. Therefore, by using similar geometrical configuration, 18 big standard carton date packages can be simultaneously disinfected, using the same range of doses or so, by utilizing all the 6 turntables inside the radiation chamber of the Gammabeam-650 irradiation facility.

  18. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad.

  19. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lima, Nathalia B D; Dutra, José Diogo L; Gonçalves, Simone M C; Freire, Ricardo O; Simas, Alfredo M

    2016-02-19

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad.

  20. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad. PMID:26892900

  1. Water binding energies of [Pb(amino acid-H)H2O]+ complexes determined by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael B; Decker, Sarah G A; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-11-21

    The water binding energies (E(0)) of eight deprotonated Pb(2+)-amino acid (Aa) complexes of the form [Pb(Aa-H)H(2)O](+) (Aa = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Phe, Glu, and Lys) were determined using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD). A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer was used to trap ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) in a "zero"-pressure (~10(-10) torr) cell where dissociation can only occur by absorption of thermally generated photons. Since the [Pb(Aa-H)H(2)O](+) complexes have relatively few vibrational degrees of freedom (36-78) and are within the slow-exchange kinetic limit, the master equation was solved to extract meaningful threshold dissociation energies and thermal unimolecular dissociation rate constants (k(uni)). The master equation analysis uses variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) to minimize the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) dissociation rate constants. The determined water binding energies range from 76.6 to 113.6 kJ mol(-1), and agree well with 0 K dissociation energies calculated using the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and MP2(full)/6-311++G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) methods. The relative strengths of the binding energies reflect the known structural isomers (A-, B-, C-, and D-type) of these [Pb(Aa-H)H(2)O](+) complexes.

  2. Non-radiative deactivation in phenol-pyridine complex: theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Esboui, Mounir; Jaidane, Nejmeddine

    2015-06-01

    Minimum energy structures of the ground and lowest excited states of the phenol (PhOH)-pyridine (Py) hydrogen-bonded complex in the gas phase were determined by ab initio calculations. Photophysical and photochemical features of the complex under Cs symmetry (planar (Pl) and perpendicular (Pe) conformers) and without any symmetry constraints (unconstrained (Un) conformer) were studied with respect to nonradiative decay processes to the ground state. The mechanism involves internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC) along the O-H bond elongation coordinate, where a coupled electron/proton-transfer reaction plays a decisive role in the photophysics of this complex. For the Pl conformer, nonradiative decay proceeds from a locally excited (1)ππ*(LE) minimum over a conical intersection barrier (0.12 eV) to a charge-transfer (CT) minimum, which corresponds to a hydrogen-bonded PhO˙HPy˙ biradical. Near this second minimum, a barrierless conical intersection (1)A'(ππ*(CT))-S0 funnels the electron population from the CT to the ground S0 state, completing the nonradiative deactivation. Calculations performed for the Pe and Un conformers confirmed that the same radiationless mechanism proceeds with no (1)ππ*(LE)/(1)ππ*(CT) conical intersection near the Franck-Condon region. Furthermore, the population of the lowest triplet states via ISC and their contribution to the photophysics of PhOH-Py complex have been discussed. These findings appear to suggest that there is no single dominant path, but rather many distinct paths involving different quenching mechanisms.

  3. Effect of radiation on cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human osteosarcoma MG-63 induced by a ruthenium(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Deng, Kun-Kang; Wu, Yong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Qing-Hua; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wu, Hai-Feng; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2015-04-01

    Radiation has large influence on the cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The bioactivity of ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(dmb)2(DBHIP)](ClO4)2 (Ru1) (DBHIP = 2-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxylphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) was investigated in the absence and presence of radiation. The cytotoxicity of Ru1 against MG-63 cells was evaluated by CCK-8 method. Ru1 shows high cytotoxicity upon radiation. Radiation can enhance the cytotoxicity of Ru1 on MG-63 cells. The apoptosis was studied by Hoechst 33258 staining method and flow cytometry. The reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest and western blot analysis were investigated in detail. The complex induces the apoptosis in MG-63 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  4. Effect of radiation on cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human osteosarcoma MG-63 induced by a ruthenium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Deng, Kun-Kang; Wu, Yong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Qing-Hua; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wu, Hai-Feng; Li, Xin-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2015-04-05

    Radiation has large influence on the cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The bioactivity of ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(dmb)2(DBHIP)](ClO4)2 (Ru1) (DBHIP=2-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxylphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) was investigated in the absence and presence of radiation. The cytotoxicity of Ru1 against MG-63 cells was evaluated by CCK-8 method. Ru1 shows high cytotoxicity upon radiation. Radiation can enhance the cytotoxicity of Ru1 on MG-63 cells. The apoptosis was studied by Hoechst 33258 staining method and flow cytometry. The reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest and western blot analysis were investigated in detail. The complex induces the apoptosis in MG-63 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  5. Complex responses of intertidal molluscan embryos to a warming and acidifying ocean in the presence of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew R; Coleman, Daniel; Broad, Allison; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A; Przeslawski, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors-acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in large outdoor water tables in a multifactorial design. Solar UV radiation was modified with plastic filters, while levels of the other factors reflected IPCC predictions for near-future change. We quantified mortality and the rate of embryonic development for a mid-shore littorinid, Bembicium nanum, and low-shore opisthobranch, Dolabrifera brazieri. Outcomes were consistent for these model species with embryos faring significantly better at 26°C than 22°C. Mortality sharply increased at the lowest temperature (22°C) and lowest pH (7.6) examined, producing a significant interaction. Under these conditions mortality approached 100% for each species, representing a 2- to 4-fold increase in mortality relative to warm (26°C) non-acidified conditions. Predictably, development was more rapid at the highest temperature but this again interacted with acidified conditions. Development was slowed under acidified conditions at the lowest temperature. The presence of UV radiation had minimal impact on the outcomes, only slowing development for the littorinid and not interacting with the other factors. Our findings suggest that a warming ocean, at least to a threshold, may compensate for the effects of decreasing pH for some species. It also appears that stressors will interact in complex and unpredictable ways in a changing climate.

  6. Apparatus complex based on liquid xenon detector for gamma spectrometry in the intervals between pulses of intense radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intense radiation on the operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer we have created apparatus complex on the basis of the liquid xenon detector. The experimental setup consists of a multifunctional chamber, gas system, cooling system, temperature control system, X-ray generator, a special preamp, passive protection, scintillation monitor of the accelerator beam, thermoluminescent dosimeters, copper monitor bremsstrahlung, Ge(Li) detector. Multifunctional chamber includes a detecting unit (flat or cylindrical ionization chamber), the cleaning unit of the xenon, control unit of the purity of liquid xenon. The liquid xenon detector was irradiated by bremsstrahlung pulses of the microtron. The frequency of irradiation pulses was 400 Hz. The absorbed dose was varied from 10-7 to 0.1 Gy per pulse. The electronic and ionic processes in liquid xenon at different radiation doses were investigated. The recovery time of the spectrometric mode of operation of the liquid xenon detector after intense pulse irradiation has been studied. Stable operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer in the intervals between the pulses of the accelerator shown for a long time.

  7. Polysaccharide protein complex isolated from mushroom Phellinus rimosus (berk.) Pilat alleviates γ radiation-induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jini; Smina, Thozhuthum Parambil Pathmanabhan; Janardhanan, Kainoor Krishnankutty

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiations generate reactive oxygen species in irradiated tissue that induces several pathophysiological changes in the body. Radiotherapy induced toxicity is a major dose-limiting factor in anticancer treatments. Radioprotective agents are of significant importance in medical, industrial, environmental, military, and space applications. Radioprotective effect of polysaccharide protein complex (PPC-Pr) isolated from mushroom, Phellinus rimosus, was evaluated in Swiss albino mice. PPC-Pr (5 and 10 mg/kg bwt, i.p.) significantly increased leukocyte count, bone marrow cellularity, glutathione content, and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in blood as well as intestinal mucosa when compared with the irradiated control group. Histopathological observation of intestinal jejunal mucosa revealed the tissue protective effects of PPC-Pr. Further radioprotective activity of PPC-Pr was in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest potential radioprotective efficacy of PPC-Pr.

  8. Hawking radiation for twisted complex scalar fields on the Reissner-Nordström black holes and Dirac monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Yu. P.; Firsova, N. E.

    1997-02-01

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the contribution of the twisted topologically inequivalent configurations (TICs) of complex scalar fields on the Reissner-Nordström black holes to the Hawking radiation. Physically this contribution is conditioned by the natural presence of the Dirac monopoles on the black holes. When neglecting the own (external) electric field of black hole it is established that while increasing the black hole electric charge Q to the extremal value Q = M (M is the black hole mass), the given contribution to the total luminosity (summed up over all the TICs) of the black hole decreases (from the one of order 17% at Q = 0) up to 0. At this value the total luminosity itself tends to 0.

  9. Membrane restructuring following in situ sialidase digestion of gangliosides: Complex model bilayers by synchrotron radiation reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean; Tringali, Cristina; Cantu', Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2017-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation reflectometry was used to access the transverse structure of model membranes under the action of the human sialidase NEU2, down to the Ångström length scale. Model membranes were designed to mimic the lipid composition of so-called Glycosphingolipids Enriched Microdomains (GEMs), which are membrane platforms specifically enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and where also typical signalling molecules are hosted. Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids containing one or more sialic acid residues, are asymmetrically embedded in GEMs, in the outer membrane leaflet where gangliosides are claimed to interact directly with growth-factor receptors, modulating their activation and then the downstream intracellular signalling pathways. Thus, membrane dynamics and signalling could be strongly influenced by the activity of enzymes regulating the membrane ganglioside composition, including sialidases. Our results, concerning the structure of single membranes undergoing in-situ enzymatic digestion, show that the outcome of the sialidase action is not limited to the emergence of lower-sialylated ganglioside species. In fact, membrane reshaping occurs, involving a novel arrangement of the headgroups on its surface. Thus, sialidase activity reveals to be a potential tool to control dynamically the structural properties of the membrane external leaflet of living cells, influencing both the morphology of the close environment and the extent of interaction among active molecules belonging to signalling platforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Complex composite engineering architectures for nuclear and high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, Drew E; Vaidya, Rajendra U; Ammerman, Curtt N

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is a novel overarching approach to bridge length and time scales in computational materials science and engineering. This approach integrates all elements of multi-scale modeling (including various empirical and science-based models) with materials informatics to provide users the opportunity to tailor material selections based on stringent application needs. Typically, materials engineering has focused on structural requirements (stress, strain, modulus, fracture toughness etc.) while multi-scale modeling has been science focused (mechanical threshold strength model, grain-size models, solid-solution strengthening models etc.). Materials informatics (mechanical property inventories) on the other hand, is extensively data focused. All of these elements are combined within the framework of ICME to create architecture for the development, selection and design new composite materials for challenging environments. We propose development of the foundations for applying ICME to composite materials development for nuclear and high-radiation environments (including nuclear-fusion energy reactors, nuclear-fission reactors, and accelerators). We expect to combine all elements of current material models (including thermo-mechanical and finite-element models) into the ICME framework. This will be accomplished through the use of a various mathematical modeling constructs. These constructs will allow the integration of constituent models, which in tum would allow us to use the adaptive strengths of using a combinatorial scheme (fabrication and computational) for creating new composite materials. A sample problem where these concepts are used is provided in this summary.

  11. XRD measurement and EXAFS study using synchrotron radiation of Ni (II) complexes of macro cyclic ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath

    2013-06-01

    Nickel (II) tetra-aza macro cyclic complexes compound were synthesis by chemical rout method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement were carried out. XRD analysis shows that sample is crystalline in nature and having particle size in the range of few micrometers. The EXAFS technique used to determine the bond lengths by three different methods, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The phase uncorrected bond lengths have also been obtained from Fourier transformation (F.T.) method and the results obtained have been compared with the results obtained from LSS method, which also gives phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  12. Beyond barcodes: complex DNA taxonomy of a South Pacific Island radiation

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael T; Balke, Michael; Pons, Joan; Vogler, Alfried P

    2005-01-01

    DNA barcodes can provide rapid species identification and aid species inventories in taxonomically unstudied groups. However, the approach may fail in recently diverged groups with complex gene histories, such as those typically found on oceanic islands. We produced a DNA-based inventory of taxonomically little known diving beetles (genus Copelatus) in the Fiji archipelago, where they are a dominant component of the aquatic invertebrate fauna. Sampling from 25 localities on five islands and analysis of sequences from one nuclear (328 bp histone 3) and three mitochondrial (492 bp rrnL, 786 bp cox1, 333 bp cob) gene regions revealed high haplotype diversity, mainly originated since the Pleistocene, and subdivided into three major phylogenetic lineages and 22 statistical parsimony networks. A traditional taxonomic study delineated 25 morphologically defined species that were largely incongruent with the DNA-based groups. Haplotype diversity and their spatial arrangement demonstrated a continuum of relatedness in Fijian Copelatus, with evidence for introgression at various hierarchical levels. The study illustrates the difficulties for formal classification in evolutionarily complex lineages, and the potentially misleading conclusions obtained from either DNA barcodes or morphological traits alone. However, the sequence profile of Fijian Copelatus provides an evolutionary framework for the group and a DNA-based reference system for the integration of ecological and other biodiversity data, independent of the Linnaean naming system. PMID:16618684

  13. Phylogenomics and species delimitation of a complex radiation of Neotropical suboscine birds (Pachyramphus).

    PubMed

    Musher, Lukas J; Cracraft, Joel

    2017-09-22

    Phylogeographic studies within the Neotropics continue to uncover hidden diversity, the extent of which remains poorly known. In birds, molecular studies are producing evidence that species-level diversity is substantially underestimated. Many avian taxa comprise large complexes of subspecies that often represent species-level taxa by various criteria. One such group of Neotropical suboscine birds, the becards (Pachyramphus), ranges from Argentina through northern Mexico. Their taxonomic limits have been complex and controversial as the genus has bounced around a number of suboscine families. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationships within Pachyramphus are unresolved due to insufficient sampling of taxa and populations across species' ranges. We used target capture of ultraconserved elements for 62 individuals representing 42 taxa, and sequenced two mitochondrial genes and two nuclear introns covering 265 individuals of 51 taxa, including all recognized species, resulting in the most densely and completely sampled phylogenetic hypothesis for Pachyramphus to date. We delimited species using a traditional taxonomic approach and then tested them under a Bayesian multi-species coalescent framework. In doing so, we provide evidence for multiple young, previously undetected evolutionary lineages within Pachyramphus. Deep, well-supported branches and a high number of intraspecific lineages across the tree suggest that at least 50% of species diversity may be unrecognized. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Scattering and radiative properties of complex soot and soot-containing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Mackowski, D. W.; Dlugach, J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric soot and soot containing aerosols often exhibit nonspherical overall shapes and complex morphologies. They can externally, semi-externally, and internally mix with other aerosol species. This poses a tremendous challenge in particle characterization, remote sensing, and global climate modeling studies. To address these challenges, we used the new numerically exact public-domain Fortran-90 code based on the superposition T-matrix method (STMM) and other theoretical models to analyze the potential effects of aggregation and heterogeneity on light scattering and absorption by morphologically complex soot containing particles. The parameters we computed include the whole scattering matrix elements, linear depolarization ratios, optical cross-sections, asymmetry parameters, and single scattering albedos. It is shown that the optical characteristics of soot and soot containing aerosols very much depend on particle sizes, compositions, and aerosol overall shapes. The soot particle configurations and heterogeneities can have a substantial effect that can result in a significant enhancement of extinction and absorption relative to those computed from the Lorenz-Mie theory. Meanwhile the model calculated information combined with in-situ and remote sensed data can be used to constrain soot particle shapes and sizes which are much needed in climate models.

  15. New Mechanism for Non-Radiative Recombination at Light-Induced Boron-Oxygen Complexes in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Du, M. H.; Branz, H. M.; Crandall, R. S.; Zhang, S. B.

    2005-11-01

    First-principles study of BO2 complex in B-doped Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) reveals a novel, self-trapping-enhanced carrier recombination mechanism, in sharp contrasts to the standard fixed-level Shockley-Read-Hall theory for carrier recombination. We found that an O2 dimer, distant from any B, would cause only weak carrier recombination under illumination -- only enough to drive its diffusion to find B and form the BO2 complexes. Surprisingly, BO2 and O2 produce nearly identical defect gap states. Despite this, recombination at BO2 is substantially faster than that at O2, because the charge state of the latter inhibits hole capture, the key step for such recombination.

  16. Standard redox potentials, pKas, and hydricities of inorganic complexes under electrochemical conditions and implications for CO2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, K; Keith, J A

    2016-10-21

    We use computational chemistry to systematically study the thermodynamic stabilities of protonated and reduced intermediate states for Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3, Ru(1,10-phenanthroline)3, and Ru(phen)2(pyrido[3',4':5,6] pyrazino[2,3-f][1,10]phenanthroline) in aqueous solutions. Following our previous studies of aromatic N-heterocycle molecules, we report pKas, standard redox potentials, and hydricities as well as computationally derived Pourbaix diagrams that show which states would be thermodynamically stable at different conditions of pH and applied potential. Locations of added electrons within ligands and complexes after reductions are also shown with electron density difference plots. As with other aromatic N-heterocycle molecules implicated in CO2 reduction, we find that several of the boundary lines from the Pourbaix diagrams are in close proximity to the thermodynamic redox potentials for CO2 electroreductions, making them thermodynamically appropriate for energetically efficient hydrogen shuttling.

  17. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r. In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*}, scattering phase function f, and anisotropy factor g. Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g, yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓ_{c} is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ. More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*} whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300% in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30% for ℓ_{c}/λ=10^{3} no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r . In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ*, scattering phase function f , and anisotropy factor g . Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g , yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓc is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ . More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ* whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300 % in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30 % for ℓc/λ =103 no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Exploiting Radiation Damage to Map Proteins in Nucleoprotein Complexes: The Internal Structure of Bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Naiqian; Wu, Weimin; Watts, Norman R.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2014-01-01

    In the final stage of radiation damage in cryo-electron microscopy of proteins, bubbles of hydrogen gas are generated. Proteins embedded in DNA bubble sooner than free-standing proteins and DNA does not bubble under the same conditions. These properties make it possible to distinguish protein from DNA. Here we explored the scope of this technique (“bubblegram imaging”) by applying it to bacteriophage T7, viewed as a partially defined model system. T7 has a thin-walled icosahedral capsid, 60 nm in diameter, with a barrel-shaped protein core under one of its twelve vertices (the portal vertex). The core is densely wrapped with DNA but details of their interaction and how their injection into a host bacterium is coordinated are lacking. With short (10 sec) intervals between exposures of 17 electrons/Å2 each, bubbling starts in the third exposure, with 1 – 4 bubbles nucleating in the core: in subsequent exposures, these bubbles grow and merge. A 3D reconstruction from fifth-exposure images depicts a bipartite cylindrical gas cloud in the core. In its portal-proximal half, the axial region is gaseous whereas in the portal-distal half, it is occupied by a 3 nm-wide dense rod. We propose that they respectively represent core protein and an end of the packaged genome, poised for injection into a host cell. Single bubbles at other sites may represent residual scaffolding protein. Thus, bubbling depends on dose rate, protein amount, and tightness of the DNA seal. PMID:24345345

  20. Dosimetry measurements using Timepix in mixed radiation fields induced by heavy ions; comparison with standard dosimetry methods

    PubMed Central

    Ploc, Ondrej; Kubancak, Jan; Sihver, Lembit; Uchihori, Yukio; Jakubek, Jan; Ambrozova, Iva; Molokanov, Alexander; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Objective of our research was to explore capabilities of Timepix for its use as a single dosemeter and LET spectrometer in mixed radiation fields created by heavy ions. We exposed it to radiation field (i) at heavy ion beams at HIMAC, Chiba, Japan, (ii) in the CERN's high-energy reference field (CERF) facility at Geneva, France/Switzerland, (iii) in the exposure room of the proton therapy laboratory at JINR, Dubna, Russia, and (iv) onboard aircraft. We compared the absolute values of dosimetric quantities obtained with Timepix and with other dosemeters and spectrometers like tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) Hawk, silicon detector Liulin, and track-etched detectors (TEDs).

  1. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the NIM, China and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Wang, K.; Fan, Y.; Jin, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for air kerma of the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in November 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the NIM and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9997 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.7 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; De la Cruz Hernández, D.; Cabrera Vertti, M. R.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in February 2015. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0048 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.0 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the ININ, Mexico and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.

    2013-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in 2012. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the ININ and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0035 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.1 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  5. The Standard European Vector Architecture (SEVA): a coherent platform for the analysis and deployment of complex prokaryotic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Martínez-García, Esteban; Calles, Belén; Chavarría, Max; Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; de Las Heras, Aitor; Páez-Espino, A David; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Kim, Juhyun; Nikel, Pablo I; Platero, Raúl; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The 'Standard European Vector Architecture' database (SEVA-DB, http://seva.cnb.csic.es) was conceived as a user-friendly, web-based resource and a material clone repository to assist in the choice of optimal plasmid vectors for de-constructing and re-constructing complex prokaryotic phenotypes. The SEVA-DB adopts simple design concepts that facilitate the swapping of functional modules and the extension of genome engineering options to microorganisms beyond typical laboratory strains. Under the SEVA standard, every DNA portion of the plasmid vectors is minimized, edited for flaws in their sequence and/or functionality, and endowed with physical connectivity through three inter-segment insulators that are flanked by fixed, rare restriction sites. Such a scaffold enables the exchangeability of multiple origins of replication and diverse antibiotic selection markers to shape a frame for their further combination with a large variety of cargo modules that can be used for varied end-applications. The core collection of constructs that are available at the SEVA-DB has been produced as a starting point for the further expansion of the formatted vector platform. We argue that adoption of the SEVA format can become a shortcut to fill the phenomenal gap between the existing power of DNA synthesis and the actual engineering of predictable and efficacious bacteria.

  6. Aligning "TextEvaluator"® Scores with the Accelerated Text Complexity Guidelines Specified in the Common Core State Standards. Research Report. ETS RR-15-21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    The "TextEvaluator"® text analysis tool is a fully automated text complexity evaluation tool designed to help teachers, curriculum specialists, textbook publishers, and test developers select texts that are consistent with the text complexity guidelines specified in the Common Core State Standards.This paper documents the procedure used…

  7. Disentangling regular and chaotic motion in the standard map using complex network analysis of recurrences in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yong; Donner, Reik V.; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Recurrence in the phase space of complex systems is a well-studied phenomenon, which has provided deep insights into the nonlinear dynamics of such systems. For dissipative systems, characteristics based on recurrence plots have recently attracted much interest for discriminating qualitatively different types of dynamics in terms of measures of complexity, dynamical invariants, or even structural characteristics of the underlying attractor's geometry in phase space. Here, we demonstrate that the latter approach also provides a corresponding distinction between different co-existing dynamical regimes of the standard map, a paradigmatic example of a low-dimensional conservative system. Specifically, we show that the recently developed approach of recurrence network analysis provides potentially useful geometric characteristics distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits. We find that chaotic orbits in an intermittent laminar phase (commonly referred to as sticky orbits) have a distinct geometric structure possibly differing in a subtle way from those of regular orbits, which is highlighted by different recurrence network properties obtained from relatively short time series. Thus, this approach can help discriminating regular orbits from laminar phases of chaotic ones, which presents a persistent challenge to many existing chaos detection techniques.

  8. Luminescence lifetime standards for the nanosecond to microsecond range and oxygen quenching of ruthenium(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kaleem J; Roach, Michael S; Xu, Wenying; Demas, J N; DeGraff, B A

    2007-12-15

    A rapid and reproducible method for determining the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes has been developed. With the use of this method, a set of standards for the excited-state lifetime oxygen quenching of several ruthenium(II) transition metal complexes was established. With the use of three solvents of different viscosities and two metal complexes with widely different lifetimes, an overlapping range of ca. 100 ns to 6 micros was obtained. The decays are pure single exponentials, which means that they can be used reliably with both phase and pulsed lifetime instruments. For a pure single-exponential decay, a properly operating phase shift instrument will give the same lifetime as a time domain instrument. With the use of a thermal deactivation model and a three-parameter temperature-dependent oxygen quenching constant, the lifetime temperature-dependent data was well fit by a simple six-parameter equation that covers the temperature range of 10-50 degrees C and oxygen pressures from 0 to 1 atm of oxygen with excellent precision (ca. <1%). This permits both laboratory and field calibration of instruments.

  9. Quality Control of Biomedicinal Allergen Products - Highly Complex Isoallergen Composition Challenges Standard MS Database Search and Requires Manual Data Analyses.

    PubMed

    Spiric, Jelena; Engin, Anna M; Karas, Michael; Reuter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Allergy against birch pollen is among the most common causes of spring pollinosis in Europe and is diagnosed and treated using extracts from natural sources. Quality control is crucial for safe and effective diagnosis and treatment. However, current methods are very difficult to standardize and do not address individual allergen or isoallergen composition. MS provides information regarding selected proteins or the entire proteome and could overcome the aforementioned limitations. We studied the proteome of birch pollen, focusing on allergens and isoallergens, to clarify which of the 93 published sequence variants of the major allergen, Bet v 1, are expressed as proteins within one source material in parallel. The unexpectedly complex Bet v 1 isoallergen composition required manual data interpretation and a specific design of databases, as current database search engines fail to unambiguously assign spectra to highly homologous, partially identical proteins. We identified 47 non-allergenic proteins and all 5 known birch pollen allergens, and unambiguously proved the existence of 18 Bet v 1 isoallergens and variants by manual data analysis. This highly complex isoallergen composition raises questions whether isoallergens can be ignored or must be included for the quality control of allergen products, and which data analysis strategies are to be applied.

  10. Quantification of Complex Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures in Standard Reference Materials Using GC×GC/ToF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Carlos; Hoh, Eunha; Massey Simonich, Staci L.

    2014-01-01

    This research is the first to quantify complex PAH mixtures in NIST SRMs using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/ToF-MS), with and without extract cleanup, and reports previously unidentified PAH isomers in the NIST SRMs. We tested a novel, high orthogonality GC column combination (LC-50×NSP-35), as well as with a commonly used column combination (Rtx-5ms×Rxi-17) for the quantification of a complex mixture of 85 different PAHs, including parent (PAHs), alkyl- (MPAHs), nitro- (NPAHs), oxy- (OPAHs), thio- (SPAHs), bromo- (BrPAHs), and chloro-PAHs (ClPAHs) in extracts from two standard reference materials: NIST SRM1650b (diesel particulate matter), with cleanup and NIST SRM1975 (diesel particulate extract), with and without extract cleanup. The LC-50×NSP-35 column combination resulted in an average absolute percent difference of 33.8%, 62.2% and 30.8% compared to the NIST certified PAH concentrations for NIST SRM1650b, NIST SRM1975 with cleanup and NIST SRM1975 without cleanup, while the Rtx-5ms×Rxi-17 resulted in an absolute percent difference of 38.6%, 67.2% and 79.6% for NIST SRM1650b, NIST SRM1975 with cleanup and NIST SRM1975 without cleanup, respectively. This GC×GC/ToF-MS method increases the number of PAHs detected and quantified in complex environmental extracts using a single chromatographic run. Without clean-up, 7 additional compounds were detected and quantified in NIST SRM1975 using the LC-50×NSP-35 column combination. These results suggest that the use of the LC-50×NSP-35 column combination in GC×GC/ToF-MS not only results in better chromatographic resolution and greater orthogonality for the separation of complex PAH mixtures, but can also be used for the accurate quantification of complex PAH mixtures in environmental extracts without cleanup. PMID:23932031

  11. Relation of structure to function for the US reference standard endotoxin after exposure to /sup 60/Co radiation, Interim report, September 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Suba, E.A.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and function of the highly purified U.S. reference standard endotoxin (RSE) were studied after exposure to ionizing radiation from a /sup 60/Co source. With increasing doses of radiation, the trilaminar ribbon-like structure of untreated endotoxin exhibited focal swelling, after which only spherical particles were seen by electron microscopy. These morphological changes were paralleled by the respective loss of O-side chain-repeating units and pieces of the R-core from the lipopolysaccharide molecules, as demonstrated by electrophoresis. The biologic function of the irradiated endotoxin was assessed with a variety of tests. At higher doses of radiation, a direct relation was observed between the degradation of the molecular and supramolecular structure and the loss of biologic function. At lower doses of radiation, however, there was variability among the functional assays in their rate of change with progressive irradiation of the RSE. The results suggest that the carbohydrate moiety plays an important role both in determining the supramolecular structure and in modulating certain biologic activities of bacterial endotoxins.

  12. Adaptive radiation in Lesser Antillean lizards: molecular phylogenetics and species recognition in the Lesser Antillean dwarf gecko complex, Sphaerodactylus fantasticus.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, R S; Jones, A G; Malhotra, A; Surget-Groba, Y

    2008-03-01

    The time associated with speciation varies dramatically among lower vertebrates. The nature and timing of divergence is investigated in the fantastic dwarf gecko Sphaerodactylus fantasticus complex, a nominal species that occurs on the central Lesser Antillean island of Guadeloupe and adjacent islands and islets. This is compared to the divergence in the sympatric anole clade from the Anolis bimaculatus group. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of numerous gecko populations from across these islands, based on three mitochondrial DNA genes, reveals several monophyletic groups occupying distinct geographical areas, these being Les Saintes, western Basse Terre plus Dominica, eastern Basse Terre, Grand Terre, and the northern and eastern islands (Montserrat, Marie Galante, Petite Terre, Desirade). Although part of the same nominal species, the molecular divergence within this species complex is extraordinarily high (27% patristic distance between the most divergent lineages) and is compatible with this group occupying the region long before the origin of the younger island arc. Tests show that several quantitative morphological traits are correlated with the phylogeny, but in general the lineages are not uniquely defined by these traits. The dwarf geckos show notably less nominal species-level adaptive radiation than that found in the sympatric southern clade of Anolis bimculatus, although both appear to have occupied the region for a broadly similar period of time. Nevertheless, the dwarf gecko populations on Les Saintes islets are the most morphologically distinct and are recognized as a full species (Sphaerodactylus phyzacinus), as are anoles on Les Saintes (Anolis terraealtae).

  13. Benchmarking quantitative label-free LC-MS data processing workflows using a complex spiked proteomic standard dataset.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Claire; Hovasse, Agnès; Marcellin, Marlène; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bouyssié, David; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Chaoui, Karima; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Cianférani, Sarah; Ferro, Myriam; Van Dorssaeler, Alain; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Schaeffer, Christine; Couté, Yohann; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne

    2016-01-30

    Proteomic workflows based on nanoLC-MS/MS data-dependent-acquisition analysis have progressed tremendously in recent years. High-resolution and fast sequencing instruments have enabled the use of label-free quantitative methods, based either on spectral counting or on MS signal analysis, which appear as an attractive way to analyze differential protein expression in complex biological samples. However, the computational processing of the data for label-free quantification still remains a challenge. Here, we used a proteomic standard composed of an equimolar mixture of 48 human proteins (Sigma UPS1) spiked at different concentrations into a background of yeast cell lysate to benchmark several label-free quantitative workflows, involving different software packages developed in recent years. This experimental design allowed to finely assess their performances in terms of sensitivity and false discovery rate, by measuring the number of true and false-positive (respectively UPS1 or yeast background proteins found as differential). The spiked standard dataset has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange repository with the identifier PXD001819 and can be used to benchmark other label-free workflows, adjust software parameter settings, improve algorithms for extraction of the quantitative metrics from raw MS data, or evaluate downstream statistical methods. Bioinformatic pipelines for label-free quantitative analysis must be objectively evaluated in their ability to detect variant proteins with good sensitivity and low false discovery rate in large-scale proteomic studies. This can be done through the use of complex spiked samples, for which the "ground truth" of variant proteins is known, allowing a statistical evaluation of the performances of the data processing workflow. We provide here such a controlled standard dataset and used it to evaluate the performances of several label-free bioinformatics tools (including MaxQuant, Skyline, MFPaQ, IRMa-hEIDI and Scaffold) in

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer: is the technology ready to be the standard of care?

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Studenski, Matthew T; Dicker, Adam P; Gomella, Leonard; Den, Robert B

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent solid tumor diagnosed in men in the United States and Western Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is touted as a superior type of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for the treatment of various tumors. SBRT developed from the theory that high doses of radiation from brachytherapy implant seeds could be recapitulated from advanced technology of radiation treatment planning and delivery. Moreover, SBRT has been theorized to be advantageous compared to other RT techniques because it has a treatment course shorter than that of conventionally fractionated EBRT (a single session, five days per week, for about two weeks vs. eight weeks), is non-invasive, is more effective at killing tumor cells, and is less likely to cause damage to normal tissue. In areas of the US and Europe where there is limited access to RT centers, SBRT is frequently being used to treat prostate cancer, even though long-term data about its efficacy and safety are not well established. We review the impetus behind SBRT and the current clinical evidence supporting its use for prostate cancer, thus providing oncologists and primary care physicians with an understanding of the continually evolving field of prostate radiation therapy. Studies of SBRT provide encouraging results of biochemical control and late toxicity. However, they are limited by a number of factors, including short follow-up, exclusion of intermediate- and high-risk patients, and relatively small number of patients treated. Currently, SBRT regimens should only be used in the context of clinical trials.

  15. Concerted action of Nrf2-ARE pathway, MRN complex, HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines - Implication in modification of radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Anuranjani; Bala, Madhu

    2014-01-01

    Whole body exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiations (IRs) damages vital intracellular bio-molecules leading to multiple cellular and tissue injuries as well as pathophysiologies such as inflammation, immunosuppression etc. Nearly 70% of damage is caused indirectly by radiolysis of intracellular water leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals and producing a state of oxidative stress. The damage is also caused by direct ionization of biomolecules. The type of radiation injuries is dependent on the absorbed radiation dose. Sub-lethal IR dose produces more of DNA base damages, whereas higher doses produce more DNA single strand break (SSBs), and double strand breaks (DSBs). The Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important oxidative stress regulating pathway. The DNA DSBs repair regulated by MRN complex, immunomodulation and inflammation regulated by HMGB1 and various types of cytokines are some of the key pathways which interact with each other in a complex manner and modify the radiation response. Because the majority of radiation damage is via oxidative stress, it is essential to gain in depth understanding of the mechanisms of Nrf2-ARE pathway and understand its interactions with MRN complex, HMGB1 and cytokines to increase our understanding on the radiation responses. Such information is of tremendous help in development of medical radiation countermeasures, radioprotective drugs and therapeutics. Till date no approved and safe countermeasure is available for human use. This study reviews the Nrf2-ARE pathway and its crosstalk with MRN-complex, HMGB1 and cytokines (TNF-a, IL-6, IFN-? etc.). An attempt is also made to review the modification of some of these pathways in presence of selected antioxidant radioprotective compounds or herbal extracts. PMID:25009785

  16. Aspects of γ-radiation induced modification of calf thymus DNA in the presence of sodium 1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and its transition metal complexes with Cu2+ and Ni2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Partha Sarathi; Mandal, Parikshit Chandra; Das, Saurabh

    2013-08-01

    Radiation-induced double-strand modification of DNA was studied in the absence and presence of sodium 1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (NaQSH2) and its metal (Cu2+ and Ni2+) complexes in aerated, de-aerated (Argon saturated) and N2O saturated aqueous media at pH 7.4. Ethidium bromide, an established DNA intercalator was used to estimate DNA remaining after interaction with γ-radiation, by measuring loss of fluorescence of the ethidium bromide-DNA adduct. In de-aerated (Argon saturated) and N2O saturated aqueous media radiation-induced double-strand modification of calf thymus DNA was comparatively less in presence of NaQSH2 and its Ni(II) complex than standard control indicating the compounds behaved as radio-protectors. However, in presence of the Cu(II) complex radiation-induced double-strand modification increased significantly. In N2O saturated medium, double-strand modification of DNA was almost double in all cases than that observed in de-aerated (Argon saturated) medium indicating OH radicals played a major role in modifying DNA. That OH radicals were important was verified by repeating experiments using tertiary-butanol that showed significant decrease in DNA modification. Another important observation was in aerated medium NaQSH2, Ni(II)-NaQSH2 did not show radioprotection while Cu(II)-NaQSH2 was an almost equally effective radiosensitizer as that observed in N2O saturated medium. Role of molecular oxygen as radiosensitizer was thus realized.

  17. VUV radiometry below 100 nm: the high-power hydrogen arc as a standard source of continuum radiation between 53 nm and 92 nm.

    PubMed

    Behringer, K; Thoma, P

    1979-08-01

    A stationary hydrogen arc discharge may be used as a standard source of radiation in the VUV below 100 nm. The Lyman resonance continuum is used, the cross sections of which are theoretically well known. The method described is based on optically thin radiation, requiring high plasma temperatures and an effective helium gas separation in the arc. The investigations demonstrate that, in appropriate experimental conditions, the plasma is indeed transparent down to the onset of the He ground-state absorption. Above that, the VUV spectral radiance can be predicted within less than 15% uncertainty from conventional plasma diagnostics. For a first application, the He continuum has been measured between 65 nm and 92 nm. The consistency of these results with theoretical calculations confirms the validity of the concept presented.

  18. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  19. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  1. EDITORIAL Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne

    2010-07-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing is rapidly transforming the landscape of cancer research. Computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role and have become the third major method of scientific inquiry, supplementing traditional methods of observation and theory. This evolution began in the 1940s when high-performance computing techniques were developed for military applications, including radiation transport calculations. These same basic methods are still widely utilized in a broad spectrum of computational problems in medicine, including radiation cancer therapy (Rogers 2006, Spezi 2010) and radiologic diagnostic imaging (Doi 2006, Kalender 2006). Supercomputing is also now being used to study the genetics and genomics of cancer (Geurts van Kessel 2010), with application to gene sequencing (Mardis 2008), genome-wide association studies (Pearson and Manolio 2008), biomolecular dynamics (Sanbonmatsu and Tung 2007) and systems biology (Wolkenhauer et al 2010). The extensive and growing body of literature is evidence of a remarkable expansion of activity and enormous boost to cancer research from the application of high-performance computing. Early successes were facilitated by inexpensive computing resources and advances in modeling algorithms. Many contemporary models require extensive approximations and phenomenological approaches. In fact, many critical problems remain computationally intractable; the underlying physical and biological processes are simply too complex to model with contemporary theory and computing capacity. In the future, a vast stream of new insights will flow from studies that use increasingly exact models and first-principles approaches. Hence, in the war on cancer the present status of computational research could be summarized as the beginning of the beginning. For these reasons, there is a vital need for scientists and clinicians to periodically discuss progress and future plans regarding

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides is a reliable internal standard for radiation-inactivation studies of membranes in the frozen state

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, J.O.; Churchill, P.

    1985-06-01

    The target size of four soluble enzymes (beta-galactosidase, pyruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) in the presence or absence of subcellular membrane fractions has been determined by the radiation-inactivation method using samples in the frozen state. For each of the four enzymes, full activity was recovered after freezing and thawing in the absence of radiation. The authors found minimal (less than 20%) binding of the enzymes to either submitochondrial vesicles or sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Under the conditions tested, beta-galactosidase, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase exhibited target sizes which varied according to the experimental conditions, i.e., the buffer selected and also the presence or absence of membrane preparations. For these tetrameric enzymes, the target sizes were generally comparable to either a monomer or a dimer. By contrast, the target size of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides was found to be essentially invariant when frozen in a variety of buffers and in the presence or absence of either cryoprotectant (sucrose or glycerol) or different membrane preparations. The target size from 19 separate determinations gave an average value of 104 +/- 16 kDa, which is comparable to the molecular weight of the enzyme (104 kDa). The authors conclude that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from L. mesenteroides is a reliable internal standard for radiation-inactivation studies of membrane preparations in the frozen state.

  3. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: Yucca mountain radiation standards, dose/risk assessments, thinking outside the box, evaluations, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W

    2009-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository is designed to contain spent nuclear fuel and vitrified fission products. Due to the fact that it will be the first such facility constructed anywhere in the world, it has proved to be one in which multiple organizations, most prominently the U.S. Congress, are exercising a role. In addition to selecting a site for the facility, Congress specified that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) promulgate the associated Standards, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission establish applicable Regulations to implement the Standards, and the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) design, construct, and operate the repository. Congress also specified that U.S. EPA request that the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) provide them guidance on the form and nature of the Standards. In so doing, Congress also stipulated that the Standards be expressed in terms of an "equivalent dose rate." As will be noted, this subsequently introduced serious complications. Due to the inputs of so many groups, and the fact that the NAS recommendations conflicted with the Congressional stipulation that the limits be expressed in terms of a dose rate, the outcome is a set of Standards that not only does not comply with the NAS recommendations, but also is neither integrated, nor consistent. The initial goals of this paper are to provide an independent risk/dose analysis for each of the eight radionuclides that are to be regulated, and to evaluate them in terms of the Standards. These efforts reveal that the Standards are neither workable nor capable of being implemented. The concluding portions of the paper provide guidance that, if successfully implemented, would enable U.S. DOE to complete the construction of the repository and operate it in accordance with the recommendations of NAS while, at the same time, provide a better, more accurate, understanding of its potential risks to the public. This facility is too important to

  4. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 of the absorbed dose to water standards of the PTB, Germany and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Krauss, A.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison has been made of the standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co radiation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), Germany and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The measurements at the BIPM were carried out in October 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for two transfer standards and evaluated as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9977 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  6. The effect of ionizing radiation on the optical properties of NaMgF3(Mn): Observation of an F-center Mn complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuyt, J. J.; Williams, G. V. M.

    2017-08-01

    We report the results from optical absorption, photoluminescence, radioluminescence, and optically stimulated luminescence measurements on polycrystalline NaMgF3(Mn). A point defect that absorbed near 340 nm at 300 K was observed after X-ray irradiation, which is not seen in the pure compound and may be due to self-trapped holes close to the Mn sites. This defect could be optically bleached, and optically stimulated luminescence was observed during the bleaching process. Non-distorted and distorted Mn2+ photoluminescence was found where only the non-distorted sites showed optically stimulated luminescence. Both sites displayed radioluminescence, but the dependence on the radiation dose was different for each site. An F-center Mn complex was observed after X-ray irradiation, which has not been previously reported for the NaMgF3(Mn) compound. The photoluminescence emission at 670 nm from this complex increased with increasing radiation dose and was not bleached by optical excitation at 566 nm. However, it could be bleached after 254 nm excitation. Thus, unlike Mn2+ optically stimulated luminescence, the photoluminescence from this emission can be used to provide a non-destructive measure of the radiation dose. Our results show that NaMgF3(Mn) can potentially be used as a radiation dosimeter for dose-rate monitoring via radioluminescence, continual monitoring of individual doses via F-center Mn complex photoluminescence, and cumulative dose detection via optically stimulated luminescence.

  7. A national approach for automated collection of standardized and population-based radiation therapy data in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Tufve; Olsson, Caroline; Agrup, Måns; Björk, Peter; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Grinaker, Hanne; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Gustafsson, Anders; Gustafsson, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt; Johnsson, Stefan; Karlsson, Magnus; Kristensen, Ingrid; Nilsson, Per; Nyström, Leif; Onjukka, Eva; Reizenstein, Johan; Skönevik, Johan; Söderström, Karin; Valdman, Alexander; Zackrisson, Björn; Montelius, Anders

    2016-05-01

    To develop an infrastructure for structured and automated collection of interoperable radiation therapy (RT) data into a national clinical quality registry. The present study was initiated in 2012 with the participation of seven of the 15 hospital departments delivering RT in Sweden. A national RT nomenclature and a database for structured unified storage of RT data at each site (Medical Information Quality Archive, MIQA) have been developed. Aggregated data from the MIQA databases are sent to a national RT registry located on the same IT platform (INCA) as the national clinical cancer registries. The suggested naming convention has to date been integrated into the clinical workflow at 12 of 15 sites, and MIQA is installed at six of these. Involvement of the remaining 3/15 RT departments is ongoing, and they are expected to be part of the infrastructure by 2016. RT data collection from ARIA®, Mosaiq®, Eclipse™, and Oncentra® is supported. Manual curation of RT-structure information is needed for approximately 10% of target volumes, but rarely for normal tissue structures, demonstrating a good compliance to the RT nomenclature. Aggregated dose/volume descriptors are calculated based on the information in MIQA and sent to INCA using a dedicated service (MIQA2INCA). Correct linkage of data for each patient to the clinical cancer registries on the INCA platform is assured by the unique Swedish personal identity number. An infrastructure for structured and automated prospective collection of syntactically interoperable RT data into a national clinical quality registry for RT data is under implementation. Future developments include adapting MIQA to other treatment modalities (e.g. proton therapy and brachytherapy) and finding strategies to harmonize structure delineations. How the RT registry should comply with domain-specific ontologies such as the Radiation Oncology Ontology (ROO) is under discussion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Professional Standards for Teacher Educators: How to Deal with Complexity, Ownership and Function. Experiences from the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, B.; Dengerink, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade several professional standards describing competencies for teaching staff in secondary and higher education have been developed. Not all these standards are considered fruitful by the relevant professional communities of teachers and teacher educators. In this article we analyse the experiences with the Dutch standard for…

  9. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yaqi; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  10. Euroforgen-NoE collaborative exercise on LRmix to demonstrate standardization of the interpretation of complex DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Prieto, L; Haned, H; Mosquera, A; Crespillo, M; Alemañ, M; Aler, M; Alvarez, F; Baeza-Richer, C; Dominguez, A; Doutremepuich, C; Farfán, M J; Fenger-Grøn, M; García-Ganivet, J M; González-Moya, E; Hombreiro, L; Lareu, M V; Martínez-Jarreta, B; Merigioli, S; Milans Del Bosch, P; Morling, N; Muñoz-Nieto, M; Ortega-González, E; Pedrosa, S; Pérez, R; Solís, C; Yurrebaso, I; Gill, P

    2014-03-01

    There has been very little work published on the variation of reporting practices of mixtures between laboratories, but it has been previously demonstrated that there is little consistency. This is because there is no current uniformity of practice, so different laboratories will operate using different rules. The interpretation of mixtures is not solely a matter of using some software to provide 'an answer'. An assessment of a case will usually begin with a consideration of the circumstances of a crime. Assumptions made about the numbers of contributors follow from an examination of the electropherogram(s)--and these may differ between the prosecution and the defence hypotheses. There may be a necessity to evaluate several sets of hypotheses for any given case if the circumstances are uncertain. Once the hypotheses are formulated, the mathematical analysis is complex and can only be accomplished by the use of specialist software. In order to obtain meaningful results, it is essential that scientists are trained, not only in the use of the software, but also in the methodology to understand the likelihood ratio concept that is used. The Euroforgen-NoE initiative has developed a training course that utilizes the LRmix program to carry out the calculations. This software encompasses the recommendations of the ISFG DNA commissions on mixture interpretation and is able to interpret samples that may come from two or more contributors and may also be partial profiles. Recently, eighteen different laboratories were trained in the methodology. Afterwards they were asked to independently analyze two different cases with partial mixture DNA evidence and to write a statement court-report. We show that by introducing a structured training programme, it is possible to demonstrate, for the first time, that a high degree of standardization, leading to uniformity of results can be achieved by participating laboratories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding the complexities of private standards in global agri-food chains as they impact developing countries.

    PubMed

    Henson, Spencer; Humphrey, John

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of private standards governing food safety, food quality and environmental and social impacts of agri-food systems has raised concerns about the effects on developing countries, as well as the governance of agri-food value chains more broadly. It is argued that current debates have been 'clouded' by a failure to recognise the diversity of private standards in terms of their institutional form, who develops and adopts these standards and why. In particular, there is a need to appreciate the close inter-relationships between public regulations and private standards and the continuing ways in which private standards evolve.

  12. [The effect of natural polyphenol complex of red grape wine on L-arginine/NO system in peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Sabadashka, M V; Hnatush, A R; Datsiuk, L O; Staranko, U V; Fedorovych, A M; Herzhikova, V H; Zotov, A M; Slast'ia, É A; Sybirna, N O

    2014-01-01

    The total activity of NO-synthase and content of stable metabolitic products of nitric oxide in the peripheral blood of rats under low doses of ionizing radiation and administration of natural polyphenol complex of grape was investigated. It was found that natural polyphenol compounds of grapes have the ability to correct radioinduced changes in L-arginine/NO system. It was noted that the action of X-radiation increased activity of NO-synthase in the peripheral blood of rats. However, the consumption of natural polyphenol complex of grape led to a decrease of this index to control values. An increase in NOS activity under irradiation leads to the increase of NO stable metabolites content, which is reflected in the accumulation of nitrite- and nitrate-anions in the peripheral blood of rats. The consumption of preparation of polyphenol complex this index decreased in the early period of the experiment, and on the third day after exposure, the total content of NO stable metabolites is slightly higher compared to the indices of control animals. Thus, the ability of natural polyphenol complex to cause attenuation of oxidative-nitrative stress caused by ionizing radiation was investigated experimentally.

  13. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  14. Effect of curcumin and curcumin copper complex (1:1) on radiation-induced changes of anti-oxidant enzymes levels in the livers of Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Koiram, Prabhakar R; Veerapur, Veeresh P; Kunwar, Amit; Mishra, Beena; Barik, Atanu; Priyadarsini, Indira K; Mazhuvancherry, Unnikrishnan K

    2007-05-01

    The effect of mononuclear copper (II) complex of curcumin in 1:1 stoichiometry (hereafter referred to as complex) administered 30 min before gamma-irradiation (4.5 Gy) on alterations in antioxidant and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in livers was studied in comparison to curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The different antioxidants like GSH, GST, catalase, SOD, TBARS and total thiols were estimated in the liver homogenates excised at different time intervals (1, 2 and 4 h) post irradiation using colorimetric methods. There was a radiation-induced decrease in the levels of all the studied enzymes at 1 h post irradiation, while an increase was observed at later time points. Both curcumin and complex treatment in sham-irradiated mice decreased the levels of GSH and total thiols, whereas there was an increase in the levels of catalase, GST and SOD compared to normal control. Under the influence of irradiation, both curcumin and complex treatment protected the decline in the levels of GSH, GST, SOD, catalase and total thiols, and inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. Further, the complex was found to be more effective in protecting the enzymes at 1 h post irradiation compared to curcumin treated group. This may be due to the higher rate constants of the complex compared to curcumin for their reactions with various free radicals.

  15. High-resolution global grids of revised Priestley-Taylor and Hargreaves-Samani coefficients for assessing ASCE-standardized reference crop evapotranspiration and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschonitis, Vassilis G.; Papamichail, Dimitris; Demertzi, Kleoniki; Colombani, Nicolo; Mastrocicco, Micol; Ghirardini, Andrea; Castaldelli, Giuseppe; Fano, Elisa-Anna

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the study is to provide global grids (0.5°) of revised annual coefficients for the Priestley-Taylor (P-T) and Hargreaves-Samani (H-S) evapotranspiration methods after calibration based on the ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers)-standardized Penman-Monteith method (the ASCE method includes two reference crops: short-clipped grass and tall alfalfa). The analysis also includes the development of a global grid of revised annual coefficients for solar radiation (Rs) estimations using the respective Rs formula of H-S. The analysis was based on global gridded climatic data of the period 1950-2000. The method for deriving annual coefficients of the P-T and H-S methods was based on partial weighted averages (PWAs) of their mean monthly values. This method estimates the annual values considering the amplitude of the parameter under investigation (ETo and Rs) giving more weight to the monthly coefficients of the months with higher ETo values (or Rs values for the case of the H-S radiation formula). The method also eliminates the effect of unreasonably high or low monthly coefficients that may occur during periods where ETo and Rs fall below a specific threshold. The new coefficients were validated based on data from 140 stations located in various climatic zones of the USA and Australia with expanded observations up to 2016. The validation procedure for ETo estimations of the short reference crop showed that the P-T and H-S methods with the new revised coefficients outperformed the standard methods reducing the estimated root mean square error (RMSE) in ETo values by 40 and 25 %, respectively. The estimations of Rs using the H-S formula with revised coefficients reduced the RMSE by 28 % in comparison to the standard H-S formula. Finally, a raster database was built consisting of (a) global maps for the mean monthly ETo values estimated by ASCE-standardized method for both reference crops, (b) global maps for the revised annual coefficients of the P

  16. In Vivo Comparison of Radiation Exposure of Dual-Energy CT Versus Low-Dose CT Versus Standard CT for Imaging Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jepperson, Maria A.; Cernigliaro, Joseph G.; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H.; Morin, Richard L.; Haley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging modality with the unique capability of determining urinary stone composition. This study compares radiation exposure of DECT, standard single-energy CT (SECT), and low-dose renal stone protocol single-energy CT (LDSECT) for the evaluation of nephrolithiasis in a single in vivo patient cohort. Materials and Methods: Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, we retrospectively reviewed 200 consecutive DECT examinations performed on patients with suspected urolithiasis over a 6-month period. Of these, 35 patients had undergone examination with our LDSECT protocol, and 30 patients had undergone examination of the abdomen and pelvis with our SECT imaging protocol within 2 years of the DECT examination. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was used to compare radiation exposure between scans. Image quality was objectively evaluated by comparing image noise. Statistical evaluation was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp did not produce a significant difference in radiation exposure compared with LDSECT (p=0.09 and 0.18, respectively). DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp produced an average 40% and 31%, respectively, reduction in radiation exposure compared with SECT (p<0.001). For patients imaged with the 100/140 kVp protocol, average values for images noise were higher in the LDSECT images compared with DECT images (p<0.001) and there was no significant difference in image noise between DECT and SECT images in the same patient (p=0.88). Patients imaged with the 80/140 kVp protocol had equivocal image noise compared with LDSECT images (p=0.44), however, DECT images had greater noise compared with SECT images in the same patient (p<0.001). Of the 75 patients included in the study, stone material was available for 16; DECT analysis correctly predicted stone composition in 15/16 patients (93%). Conclusion: DECT

  17. A prospective case control comparison of the ZeroGravity system versus a standard lead apron as radiation protection strategy in neuroendovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Haussen, Diogo C; Van Der Bom, Imramsjah Martijn John; Nogueira, Raul G

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to compare the performance of the ZeroGravity (ZG) system (radiation protection system composed by a suspended lead suit) against the use of standard protection (lead apron (LA), thyroid shield, lead eyeglasses, table skirts, and ceiling suspended shield) in neuroangiography procedures. Radiation exposure data were prospectively collected in consecutive neuroendovascular procedures between December 2014 and February 2015. Operator No 1 was assigned to the use of an LA (plus lead glasses, thyroid shield, and a 1 mm hanging shield at the groin) while operator No 2 utilized the ZG system. Dosimeters were used to measure peak skin dose for the head, thyroid, and left foot. The two operators performed a total of 122 procedures during the study period. The ZG operator was more commonly the primary operator compared with the LA operator (85% vs 71%; p=0.04). The mean anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and cumulative dose area product (DAP) radiation exposure as well as the mean fluoroscopy time were not statistically different between the operators' cases. The peak skin dose to the head of the operator with LA was 2.1 times higher (3380 vs 1600 μSv), while the thyroid was 13.9 (4460 vs 320 μSv), the mediastinum infinitely (520 vs 0 μSv), and the foot 3.3 times higher (4870 vs 1470 μSv) compared with the ZG operator, leading to an overall accumulated dose 4 times higher. The ratio of cumulative operator received dose/total cumulative DAP was 2.5 higher on the LA operator. The ZG radiation protection system leads to substantially lower radiation exposure to the operator in neurointerventional procedures. However, substantial exposure may still occur at the level of the lens and thyroid to justify additional protection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K1 of the air-kerma standards of the SCK.CEN, Belgium and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Chiriotti, S.

    2017-01-01

    A first key comparison of the standards for air kerma of the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) from the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie—Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK.CEN), Belgium and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 60Co radiation beam of the BIPM in September 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the SCK.CEN and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 1.0021 with a combined standard uncertainty of 2.6 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 7 parts in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K5 of the air kerma standards of the VSL and the BIPM in 137Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Jansen, B. J.; de Pooter, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A direct comparison of the standards for air kerma of the VSL, Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out in the 137Cs radiation beam of the BIPM in April 2016. The comparison result, evaluated as a ratio of the VSL and the BIPM standards for air kerma, is 0.9952 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results for an indirect comparison made at the same time are consistent with the direct results at the level of 1 part in 104. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Time-Efficient Calculation of High Temperature Mixture of CO2 and N2 Radiation for Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, D.; Surzhikov, S.

    2011-02-01

    The two dimensional axisymmetric calculation of radiation heating rate for EXOMARS capsule is maintained by the P1-approximation of Spherical Harmonics method (SHM). The time efficiency of the calculations with adequately accuracy of the results is demonstrated. The comparison of P1-approximation and the ray-tracing method (RTM) radiation flux density is performed.

  1. Modified Hecht model qualifying radiation damage in standard and oxygenated silicon detectors from 10 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, A.; Charron, S.; Houdayer, A.; Lebel, C.; Leroy, C.; Linhart, V.; Pospíšil, S.

    2007-06-01

    The Hecht model describes the charge collection efficiency of semiconductor detectors using the mean free path of the charge carriers. While the fits to data are very good for non-irradiated detectors, modifications to the model are necessary to take into account the structural changes in the detectors induced by their exposure to high particle fluences. A modified model is presented. In this model, the mean free path depends on the shape of the electric field and on the charge carrier lifetimes. The lifetimes were measured experimentally from the front- and back-illuminations of the detectors by 660 nm laser light and by α particles from an 241Am source. This new Hecht model was successfully fitted to alpha and beta charge collection efficiencies of standard and oxygenated silicon detectors after their irradiation by 10 MeV protons with fluences varying from 10 11 to 3×10 14 p/cm 2.

  2. A design tool for direct and non-stochastic calculations of near-field radiative transfer in complex structures: The NF-RT-FDTD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didari, Azadeh; Pinar Mengüç, M.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanophotonics are inextricably linked with the need for reliable computational algorithms to be adapted as design tools for the development of new concepts in energy harvesting, radiative cooling, nanolithography and nano-scale manufacturing, among others. In this paper, we provide an outline for such a computational tool, named NF-RT-FDTD, to determine the near-field radiative transfer between structured surfaces using Finite Difference Time Domain method. NF-RT-FDTD is a direct and non-stochastic algorithm, which accounts for the statistical nature of the thermal radiation and is easily applicable to any arbitrary geometry at thermal equilibrium. We present a review of the fundamental relations for far- and near-field radiative transfer between different geometries with nano-scale surface and volumetric features and gaps, and then we discuss the details of the NF-RT-FDTD formulation, its application to sample geometries and outline its future expansion to more complex geometries. In addition, we briefly discuss some of the recent numerical works for direct and indirect calculations of near-field thermal radiation transfer, including Scattering Matrix method, Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD), Wiener Chaos Expansion, Fluctuating Surface Current (FSC), Fluctuating Volume Current (FVC) and Thermal Discrete Dipole Approximations (TDDA).

  3. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A; Thornton, Lauren T; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultraviolet-B radiation mobilizes uranium from uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes in aquatic systems, demonstrated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Nehete, Sachin Vilas; Christensen, Terje; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2017-05-05

    Humic substances have a tendency to form complexes with metal ions in aquatic medium, impacting the metal mobility, decreasing bioavailability and toxicity. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure degrades the humic substance, changes their molecular weight distribution and their metal binding capacity in aquatic medium. In this study, we experimented the effect of UV-B radiation on the uranium complexed with fulvic acids and humic acids in a soft water system at different pH, uranium concentrations and radiant exposure. The concentration and distribution of uranium in a complexed form were investigated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi detection technique (AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS). The major concentration of uranium present in complexes was primarily associated with average and higher molecular weight fulvic and humic acids components. The concentration of uranium in a complexed form increased with increasing fulvic and humic acid concentrations as well as pH of the solution. The higher molecular weight fraction of uranium was degraded due to the UV-B exposure, transforming about 50% of the uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes into low molecular weight uranium species in complex form with organic ligands and/or free form. The result also suggests AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS to be an important separation and detection technique for understanding the interaction of radionuclides with dissolved organic matter, tracking size distribution changes during degradation of organic complexes for understanding mobility, bioavailability and ecosystem transfer of radionuclides as well as metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The radiative leptonic decays D0 -> e+ e-γ ,μ ^+μ ^-γ in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, S.; Singer, P.; Zupan, J.

    2003-03-01

    We present a calculation of the rare decay modes D^0 to e^+ e^- γ and D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ in the framework of the standard model. For the short distance part we have derived QCD corrections to the Wilson coefficients involved, including C9. The latter is found to be strongly suppressed by the corrections, leading to diminished values for the cto u l^+l^- branching ratios in the 10-10 range. Within SM the exclusive decays are dominated by long distance effects. Non-resonant contributions are estimated using heavy quark and chiral symmetries to be at the level of 10%, compared to the contributions arising from D^0to V γto l^+l^- γ, with V = ρ, ω, φ. The total SM branching ratio is predicted to be in the range (1-3)× 10^{-9}. We also consider contributions coming from MSSM with and without R parity conservation. The effects from MSSM are significant only for the R parity violating case. Such contributions enhance the branching ratio D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ to lesssim 0.5 × 10^{-7}, based on appropriately allowed values for C9 and C10. This selects D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ as a possible probe of new physics.

  6. [Relation between radiation safety criteria of human and the environment].

    PubMed

    Kazakov, S V; Utkin, S S

    2008-01-01

    System approach is used for developing of procedures of complex radiation safety of human and the environment. Relation between radiation safety criteria of human and the environment is considered by the example of different strategies of water bodies using. It is demonstrated that as to water bodies (though the methodology and conclusions are correct to terrestrial ecosystems too) observance of human radiation safety standards on condition that environment resources are used unrestrictedly (considering radiation factor) is necessary and sufficient to protection of objects of the environment. It allows reaching compromise between anthropocentric and ecological approaches to radiation protection of the environment from general biospheric principles.

  7. Influence of instability of laser radiation on accuracy of record and reading of the information of diagnostic complex Intest 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moguilnaia, T. Y.; Botikov, A.; Agibalov, A. A.; Kosenkov, E.

    2005-09-01

    The theoretical and the experimental researches of spectra of absent-minded radiation in medium containing viruses of the influenza, the hepatitis C and smallpox of the rabbit were carried out. The noises arising at a stage of generation of radiation in biological structure of a virus have been investigated. It has been shown, that the intensity of the parasitic luminescence is the least if solvent is alcohol and the greatest if solvent is water.

  8. A prospective evaluation of contrast and radiation dose and image quality in cardiac CT in children with complex congenital heart disease using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiao-Ru; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ai-Min; Wang, Qian; Qiu, Hai-Sheng; Wang, Fang; Hu, Li-Wei; Li, Jian-Ying; Zhong, Yu-Min

    2017-02-01

    To the assess image quality, contrast dose and radiation dose in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current in comparison with standard dose protocol. 110 patients with CHD were randomized to 1 of the 2 scan protocols: Group A (n = 45) with 120 mA tube current and contrast agent of 270 mgI/ml in concentration (Visipaque(™); GE Healthcare Ireland, Co., Cork, UK); and Group B (n = 65) with the conventional 160 mA and 370 mgI/ml concentration contrast (Iopamiro(®); Shanghai Bracco Sine Pharmaceutical Corp Ltd, Shanghai, China). Both groups used 80 kVp tube voltage and were reconstructed with 70% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The CT value and noise in aortic arch were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. A five-point scale was used to subjectively evaluate image quality. Contrast and radiation dose were recorded. There was no difference in age and weight between the two groups (all p > 0.05). The iodine load and radiation dose in Group A were statistically lower (3976 ± 747 mgI vs 5763 ± 1018 mgI in iodine load and 0.60 ± 0.08 mSv vs 0.77 ± 0.10 mSv in effective dose; p < 0.001). However, image noise, CT value, CNR, SNR and subjective image quality for the two groups were similar (all p > 0.05), and with good agreement between the two observers. Comparing the surgery results, the diagnostic accuracy for extracardiac and intracardiac defects for Group A was 96% and 92%, respectively, while the corresponding numbers for Group B were 95% and 93%. Compared with the standard dose protocol, the use of low tube voltage (80 kVp), low tube current (120 mA) and low-concentration iodinated contrast agent (270 mgI/ml) enables a reduction of 30% in iodine load and 22% in radiation dose while maintaining compatible image quality and

  9. [Substantiation of a complex of radiation-hygienic approaches to the management of very low-level waste].

    PubMed

    Korenkov, I P; Lashchenova, T N; Shandala, N K

    2015-01-01

    In the article there are presented materials on radiation-hygienic approaches to the treatment of very low level radioactive waste (VLLW) and industrial waste containing radionuclides. There is done detailed information on radiation-hygienic principles and criteria for the assurance ofradiation safety in the collection, transportation, storage and processing of VLLW as a category of radioactive waste.. Particular attention is paid to the problem of designing VLLW landfill site choice, system of radiation monitoring in operation and decommissioning of the landfill. There are presented data about the criteria for the release of VLLW buried at the site, from regulatory control. Also there are considered in detail the radiation-hygienic requirements for radiation safety of industrial waste containing radionuclides for which there is assumed unlimited and limited use of solid materials in economic activity, based on the requirements ofthe revised Basic Sanitary Rules for Radiation Safety - 99/2010. There are considered basic requirements for the organization of industrial waste landfill. As an example, there-are presented the hygiene requirements for industrial waste management and results of waste categorization in Northern Federal Enterprise for Radioactive Waste Management.

  10. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Jason A; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W; Greer, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). The MR-Sim setup and automatic sCT generation methods using standard MR sequences generates realistic contours and

  11. Deciphering the Conformational Choreography of Zinc Coordination Complexes with Standard and Novel Proton NMR Techniques Combined with DFT Methods.

    PubMed

    Pucheta, Jose Enrique Herbert; Prim, Damien; Gillet, Jean Michel; Farjon, Jonathan

    2016-04-04

    The presence of water has been shown to deeply impact the stability and geometry of Zn complexes in solution. Evidence for tetra- and penta-coordinated species in a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) model complex is presented. Novel (1) H NMR tools such as T1 -filtered selective exchange spectroscopy and pure shifted gradient-encoded selective refocusing as well as classical 2D ((1) H-(1) H) exchange spectroscopy, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy and T1 ((1) H) measurements, in combination with density functional theory methods allow the full conformational dynamics of a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) complex to be revealed. Four conformers and two families of complexes depending on the hydration states are elucidated.

  12. SU-E-T-418: Explore the Sensitive of the Planar Quality Assurance to the MLC Error with Different Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Peng, J; Xie, J; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of the planar quality assurance to MLC errors with different beam complexities in intensity-modulate radiation therapy. Methods: sixteen patients’ planar quality assurance (QA) plans in our institution were enrolled in this study, including 10 dynamic MLC (DMLC) IMRT plans measured by Portal Dosimetry and 6 static MLC (SMLC) IMRT plans measured by Mapcheck. The gamma pass rate was calculated using vender’s software. The field numbers were 74 and 40 for DMLC and SMLC, respectively. A random error was generated and introduced to these fields. The modified gamma pass rate was calculated by comparing the original measured fluence and modified fields’ fluence. A decreasing gamma pass rate was acquired using the original gamma pass rate minus the modified gamma pass rate. Eight complexity scores were calculated in MATLAB based on the fluence and MLC sequence of these fields. The complexity scores include fractal dimension, monitor unit of field, modulation index, fluence map complexity, weighted average of field area, weighted average of field perimeter, and small aperture ratio ( <5cm{sup 2} and <50cm{sup 2}). The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was implemented to analyze the correlation between these scores and decreasing gamma rate. Results: The relation between the decreasing gamma pass rate and field complexity was insignificant for most complexity scores. The most significant complexity score was fluence map complexity for SMLC, which have ρ =0.4274 (p-value=0.0063). For DMLC, the most significant complex score was fractal dimension, which have ρ=−0.3068 (p-value=0.0081). Conclusions: According to the primarily Result of this study, the sensitivity gamma pass rate was not strongly relate to the field complexity.

  13. Standard and reduced radiation dose liver CT images: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction versus model-based iterative reconstruction-comparison of findings and image quality.

    PubMed

    Shuman, William P; Chan, Keith T; Busey, Janet M; Mitsumori, Lee M; Choi, Eunice; Koprowicz, Kent M; Kanal, Kalpana M

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether reduced radiation dose liver computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction ( MBIR model-based iterative reconstruction ) might compromise depiction of clinically relevant findings or might have decreased image quality when compared with clinical standard radiation dose CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction ( ASIR adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction ). With institutional review board approval, informed consent, and HIPAA compliance, 50 patients (39 men, 11 women) were prospectively included who underwent liver CT. After a portal venous pass with ASIR adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction images, a 60% reduced radiation dose pass was added with MBIR model-based iterative reconstruction images. One reviewer scored ASIR adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction image quality and marked findings. Two additional independent reviewers noted whether marked findings were present on MBIR model-based iterative reconstruction images and assigned scores for relative conspicuity, spatial resolution, image noise, and image quality. Liver and aorta Hounsfield units and image noise were measured. Volume CT dose index and size-specific dose estimate ( SSDE size-specific dose estimate ) were recorded. Qualitative reviewer scores were summarized. Formal statistical inference for signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR signal-to-noise ratio ), contrast-to-noise ratio ( CNR contrast-to-noise ratio ), volume CT dose index, and SSDE size-specific dose estimate was made (paired t tests), with Bonferroni adjustment. Two independent reviewers identified all 136 ASIR adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction image findings (n = 272) on MBIR model-based iterative reconstruction images, scoring them as equal or better for conspicuity, spatial resolution, and image noise in 94.1% (256 of 272), 96.7% (263 of 272), and 99.3% (270 of 272), respectively. In 50 image sets, two reviewers

  14. [Hybrid room - the new standard for cooperation of cardiosurgeon, anaesthesiologist and invasive cardiologist in treating difficult, complex cardiovascular patients].

    PubMed

    Hawranek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz; Tajstra, Mateusz; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The concept of hybrid room is to combine capabilities of cardiosurgery operating room and fully equipped cathlab. Since May 2011, an ultramodern hybrid room has been working, in our center. The cases reported in this article show the possibilities of cooperation of cardiosurgeons, anaesthesiologists and invasive cardiologists in performing difficult, complex cardiovascular interventions. In near future the capabilities of hybrid room will allow to perform simultaneously a number of complex cardiovascular procedures. It should not only shorten the time of hospitalisation but also substantially improve the patients comfort.

  15. Crafting Coherence from Complex Policy Messages: Educators' Perceptions of Special Education and Standards-Based Accountability Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jennifer Lin; Bray, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Federal special education and accountability policies requires that educators individualize instruction for students with disabilities, while simultaneously ensuring that the vast majority of these students meet age-based grade-level standards and assessment targets. In this paper, we examine this dynamic interplay between policies through…

  16. Ethical Complexities in Standard of Care Randomized Trials: A Case Study of Morning Versus Nighttime Dosing of Blood Pressure Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Scott YH; Miller, Franklin G

    2015-01-01

    Background Pragmatic trials comparing ‘standard of care’ treatments provide comparative effectiveness data to make practice of medicine more evidence-based. With electronic health records, recruiting and conducting such trials can be relatively inexpensive. But some worry that the traditional research ethics framework poses unnecessary obstacles and is not appropriate for evaluating such clinical trials. This concern is based on the view (which we call the ‘Standard of Care Principle’) that such research is similar to usual clinical practice and therefore does not raise significant ethical issues since everyone in the research study will receive an accepted standard of care treatment. Methods A case study of a pragmatic RCT (BPMedTime study) comparing morning versus nighttime dosing of antihypertensive medications. The BPMedTime study has been proposed as a paradigm example of why the Standard of Care Principle obviates the need for traditional levels of ethical scrutiny and how the current regulatory framework poses unnecessary obstacles to research. We provide an ethical analysis of the BPMedTime study drawing on empirical literature as well as normative analysis. Results The Standard of Care Principle is the main ethical rationale given by commentators for asserting that the BPMedTime study does not require “significant ethical debate” and by investigators for the assertion that the BPMedTime study is minimal risk and thus eligible for lessened regulatory requirements. However, the BPMedTime study raises important ethical issues, including whether it is even necessary, given the considerable RCT evidence in support of nighttime dosing, a much larger (N≈17000) confirmatory RCT already in progress, evidence for safety of nighttime dosing, and the cost-free availability of the intervention. Further, the Standard of Care Principle provides a misleading basis for analyzing the informed consent requirements, especially regarding the requirement to

  17. EPR characteristics of free radicals in DOPA-melanin-moxifloxacin complexes at ambient level of UVA radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beberok, Artur; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    EPR studies pointed out that o-semiquinone free radicals with g-values 2.0038-2.0040 take part in moxifloxacin-melanin complex formation. The process contributed to increase in free radicals concentration in nonirradiated complexes. This effect was observed for the complexes with 1 × 10-4 M, 1 × 10-3 M and 4 × 10-3 M drug concentrations. UV irradiation contributed to decrease in free radicals concentration in DOPA-melanin complexes with moxifloxacin, besides the complexes with the drug concentration of 1 × 10-4 M. The strongest decrease was observed for DOPA-melanin-moxifloxacin complexes with the drug concentration of 1 × 10-3 M. Homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, strong dipolar interactions and slow spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized all the tested melanin samples.

  18. Controlled Space Radiation concept for mesh-free semi-analytical technique to model wave fields in complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Das, Samik; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    Numerical modelling of the ultrasonic wave propagation is important for Structural Heath Monitoring and System Prognosis problems. In order to develop intelligent and adaptive structures with embedded damage detector and classifier mechanisms, detailed understanding of scattered wave fields due to anomaly in the structure is inevitably required. A detailed understanding of the problem demands a good modelling of the wave propagation in the problem geometry in virtual form. Therefore, efficient analytical, semi-analytical or numerical modelling techniques are required. In recent years a semi-analytical mesh-free technique called Distributed Point Source Method (DPSM) is being used for modelling various ultrasonic, electrostatic and electromagnetic wave field problems. In the conventional DPSM approach point sources are placed along the transducer faces, problem boundaries and interfaces to model incident and scattered fields. Every point source emits energy in all directions uniformly. Source strengths of these 360 degrees radiation sources are obtained by satisfying interface and boundary conditions of the problem. In conventional DPSM modelling approach it is assumed that the shadow zone does not require any special consideration. 360 degrees Radiation point sources should be capable of properly modelling shadow zones because all boundary and interface conditions are satisfied. In this paper it is investigated how good this assumption is by introducing the 'shadow zone' concept at the point source level and comparing the results generated by the conventional DPSM and by this modified approach where the conventional 360 degrees radiation point sources are replaced by the Controlled Space Radiation (CSR) sources.

  19. Molecular phylogenetics of the Espeletia complex (Asteraceae): evidence from nrDNA ITS sequences on the closest relatives of an Andean adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Jason T

    2002-07-01

    The subtribe Espeletiinae (Asteraceae, Heliantheae) comprises morphologically and ecologically diverse plants endemic to the tropical montane paramos of the Andes of Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador. Though the ecophysiology and ecology of this adaptive radiation have been well studied, relationships among taxa in the subtribe and between the subtribe and other taxa in the Heliantheae are poorly known. In this study, sequences from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA are used to test previous hypotheses about the phylogenetic position of the Espeletiinae within the Heliantheae and to determine which taxa are the subtribe's closest relatives. Gene phylogenies based on maximum parsimony analyses reveal that the Espeletiinae clade is nested well within the subtribe Melampodiinae and thus should be considered a monophyletic complex of species, not a separate subtribe. The most parsimonious gene trees suggest that the genus Ichthyothere may be the sister taxon to the Espeletia complex and that the genus Smallanthus and a species of Rumfordia are likely among the complex's other closest living relatives. These data offer preliminary insights into the origins of this adaptive radiation and the broader phylogenetic context in which it occurred.

  20. Performance comparison of an active matrix flat panel imager, computed radiography system, and a screen-film system at four standard radiation qualities.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Gutierrez, D; Bulling, S; Lepori, D; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2005-02-01

    Four standard radiation qualities (from RQA 3 to RQA 9) were used to compare the imaging performance of a computed radiography (CR) system (general purpose and high resolution phosphor plates of a Kodak CR 9000 system), a selenium-based direct flat panel detector (Kodak Direct View DR 9000), and a conventional screen-film system (Kodak T-MAT L/RA film with a 3M Trimax Regular screen of speed 400) in conventional radiography. Reference exposure levels were chosen according to the manufacturer's recommendations to be representative of clinical practice (exposure index of 1700 for digital systems and a film optical density of 1.4). With the exception of the RQA 3 beam quality, the exposure levels needed to produce a mean digital signal of 1700 were higher than those needed to obtain a mean film optical density of 1.4. In spite of intense developments in the field of digital detectors, screen-film systems are still very efficient detectors for most of the beam qualities used in radiology. An important outcome of this study is the behavior of the detective quantum efficiency of the digital radiography (DR) system as a function of beam energy. The practice of users to increase beam energy when switching from a screen-film system to a CR system, in order to improve the compromise between patient dose and image quality, might not be appropriate when switching from screen-film to selenium-based DR systems.

  1. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  2. Space Radiation Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation shows the various elements of the Space Radiation Program. It reviews the program requirements: develop and validate standards, quantify space radiation human health risks, mitigate risks through countermeasures and technologies, and treat and monitor unmitigated risks.

  3. Complex Parts, Complex Data: Why You Need to Understand What Radiation Single Event Testing Data Does and Doesn't Show and the Implications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie D.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic parts (integrated circuits) have grown in complexity such that determining all failure modes and risks from single particle event testing is impossible. In this presentation, the authors will present why this is so and provide some realism on what this means. Its all about understanding actual risks and not making assumptions.

  4. Noise-immune complex correlation for optical coherence angiography based on standard and Jones matrix optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a complex correlation mapping algorithm for optical coherence angiography (cmOCA). The proposed algorithm avoids the signal-to-noise ratio dependence and exhibits low noise in vasculature imaging. The complex correlation coefficient of the signals, rather than that of the measured data are estimated, and two-step averaging is introduced. Algorithms of motion artifact removal based on non perfusing tissue detection using correlation are developed. The algorithms are implemented with Jones-matrix OCT. Simultaneous imaging of pigmented tissue and vasculature is also achieved using degree of polarization uniformity imaging with cmOCA. An application of cmOCA to in vivo posterior human eyes is presented to demonstrate that high-contrast images of patients’ eyes can be obtained. PMID:27446673

  5. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  6. Copy and recall performance of 6-8-year-old children after standard vs. Step-by-step administration of the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure.

    PubMed

    Frisk, Virginia; Jakobson, Lorna S; Knight, Rachel M; Robertson, Barbara

    2005-04-01

    The Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF; Rey 1941; Osterrieth, 1944) is frequently used in the neuropsychological assessment of children and adults. The present study was designed, in part, to examine the impact of providing organizational scaffolding to young children being tested with the ROCF. To this end, 6-, 7-, and 8-year-old children were administered the test either in the standard fashion, or using a format in which the 18 key elements of the figure were introduced sequentially. Participants included 132 children who were randomly assigned to the standard or step-by-step administration groups. Significantly higher accuracy and organization scores for both copy and recall were seen with the step-by-step format than with the standard format, even though children in the step-by-step condition took less time to execute their drawings. Retention of encoded information was not affected by age or testing format. The fact that 6-year-olds in the step-by-step condition performed as well as, or better than, 8-year-olds in the standard condition suggests that the primary problem young children experience with the ROCF lies with organizational strategy formation. Advantages of using the Step-by-step ROCF in clinical practice are discussed.

  7. The search for gamma radiation from supernova 1987A in an experiment aboard the Salut-7/Cosmos-1686 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachilova, R. N.; Bloch, G. M.; Pankov, V. M.; Prohin, V. L.; Rutkovsky, A. I.; Rumin, S. P.

    1988-07-01

    Gamma-quanta flux measurements were carried out during February-October 1987 in a search for radiation from SN 1987A. The time dependence of the mean monthly gamma-quanta flux measured with the Nega telescope at an altitude of 500 km in the equatorial region is analyzed. The upper limit of the gamma-quanta flux is determined to be 1.5 x 10 to the -6th/sq cm s keV on the 3-sigma level for the 1.5-4.4 MeV energy interval.

  8. The Complexity that the First Stars Brought to the Universe: Fragility of Metal-enriched Gas in a Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykutalp, A.; Spaans, M.

    2011-08-01

    The initial mass function (IMF) of the first (Population III) stars and Population II (Pop II) stars is poorly known due to a lack of observations of the period between recombination and reionization. In simulations of the formation of the first stars, it has been shown that, due to the limited ability of metal-free primordial gas to cool, the IMF of the first stars is a few orders of magnitude more massive than the current IMF. The transition from a high-mass IMF of the first stars to a lower-mass current IMF is thus important to understand. To study the underlying physics of this transition, we performed several simulations using the cosmological hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo for metallicities of 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, and 10-1 Z sun. In our simulations, we include a star formation prescription that is derived from a metallicity-dependent multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM) structure, an external UV radiation field, and a mechanical feedback algorithm. We also implement cosmic ray heating, photoelectric heating, and gas-dust heating/cooling, and follow the metal enrichment of the ISM. It is found that the interplay between metallicity and UV radiation leads to the coexistence of Pop III and Pop II star formation in non-zero-metallicity (Z/Z sun >= 10-2) gas. A cold (T < 100 K) and dense (ρ > 10-22 g cm-3) gas phase is fragile to ambient UV radiation. In a metal-poor (Z/Z sun <= 10-3) gas, the cold and dense gas phase does not form in the presence of a radiation field of F 0 ~ 10-5-10-4 erg cm-2 s-1. Therefore, metallicity by itself is not a good indicator of the Pop III-Pop II transition. Metal-rich (Z/Z sun >= 10-2) gas dynamically evolves two to three orders of magnitude faster than metal-poor gas (Z/Z sun <= 10-3). The simulations including supernova explosions show that pre-enrichment of the halo does not affect the mixing of metals.

  9. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  10. Organizational strategy use in children aged 5-7: standardization and validity of the Rey Complex Figure Organizational Strategy Score (RCF-OSS).

    PubMed

    Martens, R; Hurks, P P M; Jolles, J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated psychometric properties (standardization and validity) of the Rey Complex Figure Organizational Strategy Score (RCF-OSS) in a sample of 217 healthy children aged 5-7 years. Our results showed that RCF-OSS performance changes significantly between 5 and 7 years of age. While most 5-year-olds used a local approach when copying the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF), 7-year-olds increasingly adopted a global approach. RCF-OSS performance correlated significantly, but moderately with measures of ROCF accuracy, executive functioning (fluency, working memory, reasoning), and non-executive functioning (visual-motor integration, visual attention, processing speed, numeracy). These findings seem to indicate that RCF-OSS performance reflects a range of cognitive skills at 5 to 7 years of age, including aspects of executive and non-executive functioning.

  11. Assessing the compatibility of the management of standardized procedures with the complexity of a sociotechnical system: case study of a control room in an oil refinery.

    PubMed

    Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu; Gonzalez, Santiago Sosa

    2013-09-01

    Although the need for the management of complex socio-technical systems (STS) to be compatible with the nature of those systems is widely recognized, there are few guidelines on how to determine the actual extent of this compatibility. The purpose of this study is to assess how compatible the management of standardized procedures (SPs) is with the nature of a complex STS. To this end, a case study was made of a control room in an oil refinery, involving the following stages: (a) delimitation of the investigated STS; (b) description of the STS according to a set of characteristics of complex STS; (c) application of two types of questionnaires to thirty workers - one of them to assess their perceptions about the applicability of seven principles of SPs management in complex STS and the other to determine their perceptions about the actual use of these principles; and (d) a feedback meeting with workers to discuss the results of the assessment. The assessment is discussed in terms of its limitations, usefulness and ease of use of the data collection and analysis tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Research Ethics: Considerations for the Radiation Oncologist.

    PubMed

    Koyfman, Shlomo A; Yom, Sue S

    2017-10-01

    Consideration of clinical research ethics in radiation oncology is underexplored relative to other areas of oncology. A number of ethical challenges related to informed consent, randomization, conflicts of interest, and scientific validity and social value are shared with other areas of medicine, although their exact inflections are specific to radiation oncology. In addition, there are unique concerns in radiation oncology arising from the rapid evolution and uneven distribution of radiation technologies; the greater unfamiliarity of the general public and research oversight committees in regard to radiation oncology clinical practice; and the high complexity of managing most radiation oncology research, much of which is carried out in high-acuity multidisciplinary oncologic settings. To produce the best research, adherence to the highest ethical standards should be pursued as an integral component of all radiation oncology research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  14. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high

  15. Measurement of complex DNA damage induction and repair in human cellular systems after exposure to ionizing radiations of varying linear energy transfer (LET).

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Nikolov, Vladimir; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V; Mladenov, Emil; Mangelis, Anastasios; Laskaratou, Danae A; Fragkoulis, Georgios I; Hellweg, Christine E; Martin, Olga A; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Iliakis, George; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2016-11-01

    Detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are correlated to the varying efficiency of IR to induce complex DNA damage. A double strand break (DSB) can be considered the simpler form of complex DNA damage. These types of damage can consist of DSBs, single strand breaks (SSBs) and/or non-DSB lesions such as base damages and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) sites in different combinations. Enthralling theoretical (Monte Carlo simulations) and experimental evidence suggests an increase in the complexity of DNA damage and therefore repair resistance with linear energy transfer (LET). In this study, we have measured the induction and processing of DSB and non-DSB oxidative clusters using adaptations of immunofluorescence. Specifically, we applied foci colocalization approaches as the most current methodologies for the in situ detection of clustered DNA lesions in a variety of human normal (FEP18-11-T1) and cancerous cell lines of varying repair efficiency (MCF7, HepG2, A549, MO59K/J) and radiation qualities of increasing LET, that is γ-, X-rays 0.3-1 keV/μm, α-particles 116 keV/μm and (36)Ar ions 270 keV/μm. Using γ-H2AX or 53BP1 foci staining as DSB probes, we calculated a DSB apparent rate of 5-16 DSBs/cell/Gy decreasing with LET. A similar trend was measured for non-DSB oxidized base lesions detected using antibodies against the human repair enzymes 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) or AP endonuclease (APE1), that is damage foci as probes for oxidized purines or abasic sites, respectively. In addition, using colocalization parameters previously introduced by our groups, we detected an increasing clustering of damage for DSBs and non-DSBs. We also make correlations of damage complexity with the repair efficiency of each cell line and we discuss the biological importance of these new findings with regard to the severity of IR due to the complex nature of its DNA damage.

  16. Studies of EXAFSSpectra using Copper (II) Schiff Base complexes and Determination of Bond lengths Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Vibhute, V.; Ninama, S.; Parsai, N.; Jha, S. N.; Sharma, P.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) at the K-edge of copper has been studied in some copper (II) complexes with substituted anilines like (2Cl, 4Br, 2NO2, 4NO2 and pure aniline) with o-PDA (orthophenylenediamine) as ligand. The X-ray absorption measurements have been performed at the recently developed BL-8 dispersive EXAFS beam line at 2.5 GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Source at RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using EXAFS data analysis program Athena.The graphical method gives the useful information about bond length and also the environment of the absorbing atom. The theoretical bond lengths of the complexes were calculated by using interactive fitting of EXAFS using fast Fourier inverse transformation (IFEFFIT) method. This method is also called as Fourier transform method. The Lytle, Sayers and Stern method and Levy's method have been used for determination of bond lengths experimentally of the studied complexes. The results of both methods have been compared with theoretical IFEFFIT method.

  17. On application of the complex demodulation procedure for VLBI data analysis: consistecy check with the standard approach using the long periodic EOP components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Aleksander; Wielgosz, Agata; Boehm, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    In the recent work (Boehm et al., J. Geodynamics, 62 (2012) 56-68) we demonstrated the application of the complex demodulation technique to VLBI parameter estimation for determination of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). This technique enables simultaneous estimation of the long period components of polar motion (x,y), dUT1 (=UT1-UTC) and nutation (celestial pole offsets dX,dY) as well as the high frequency (diurnal, semidiurnal, ...) components of polar motion and dUT1. In this work we address the problem of consistency of the complex demodulation with the conventional approach to the EOP estimation. For this purpose we perform an analysis of the long periodic time series x, y, dUT1, dX, dY derived by the complex demodulation algorithm implemented in the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS). Next, we compare those series to the EOP series derived by the standard VieVS run as well as to the other available EOP data sets.

  18. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of

  19. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    DOE PAGES

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; ...

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collectionmore » times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high

  20. Analytical algorithm for modeling polarized solar radiation transfer through the atmosphere for application in processing complex lidar and radiometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovskaya, L.; Dubovik, O.; Litvinov, P.; Grudo, J.; Lopatsin, A.; Chaikovsky, A.; Denisov, S.

    2015-01-01

    Inversion algorithms and program packages recently created for processing data of the ground-based radiometer spectral measurements along with lidar multi-wavelength measurements are extremely multiparametric. Therefore, it is very important to develop an efficient program module for computations of functions modeling measurements by a sun-radiometer in the inversion procedure. In this paper, we present the analytical version of such efficient algorithm and analytical code on C++ designed for performance of algorithm testing. The code computes multiple scattering of the Sun light in the atmosphere. Data output are the radiance and linear polarization parameters angular patterns at a preselected altitude. The atmosphere model with mixed aerosol and molecular scattering is given approximately as the homogeneous atmosphere model. The algorithm testing has been carried out by comparison of computed data with accurate data obtained on the base of the discrete-ordinate code. Errors of estimates of downward radiance above the Earth surface turned out to be within 10%-15%.. The analytical solution construction concept has taken from the scalar task of solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere where an approximate analytical solution was developed. Taking into account the fact that aerosol phase functions are highly forward elongated, the multi-component method of solving vector transfer equations and small-angle approximation have been used. Generalization of the scalar approach to the polarization parameters is described.

  1. Evaluation of the donor ability of phenanthrolines in iridium complexes by means of synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Crotti, Corrado; Farnetti, Erica; Filipuzzi, Serena; Stener, Mauro; Zangrando, Ennio; Moras, Paolo

    2007-01-07

    Synchrotron radiation XPS measurements of Ir 4f, N 1s and I 4d core levels for the compounds Ir(cod)(N-N)X (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene; N-N=1,10-phenanthroline and substituted derivatives; X=Cl, I) are reported. The compounds Ir(cod)(3,4,7,8-Me4phen)X (3,4,7,8-Me4phen=3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray analyses. The comparison among the binding energies shows differences that are interpreted in terms of electron density variations due to the change of the phenanthroline substituents. Such analysis provides a quantitative evaluation of the ligand donor properties. The trend in the measured binding energies is confirmed by the results obtained by DFT DeltaSCF calculations, which include final state relaxation effects, while the specific role of initial state effects has been assessed in terms of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues analysis.

  2. Toxicity of cobalt-complexed cyanide to Oncorhynchus mykiss, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia: Potentiation by ultraviolet radiation and attenuation by dissolved organic carbon and adaptive UV tolerance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, Edward E.; Calfee, Robin D.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brown, Zoe Ann; Johnson, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundCobalt cyanide complexes often result when ore is treated with cyanide solutions to extract gold and other metals. These have recently been discovered in low but significant concentrations in effluents from gold leach operations. This study was conducted to determine the potential toxicity of cobalt-cyanide complexes to freshwater organisms and the extent to which ultraviolet radiation (UV) potentiates this toxicity. Tests were also conducted to determine if humic acids or if adaptation to UV influenced sensitivity to the cyanide complexes.MethodsRainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia were exposed to potassium hexacyanocobaltate in the presence and absence of UV radiation, in the presence and absence of humic acids. Cyano-cobalt exposures were also conducted with C. dubia from cultures adapted to elevated UV.ResultsWith an LC50 concentration of 0.38 mg/L, cyanocobalt was over a 1000 times more toxic to rainbow trout in the presence of UV at a low, environmentally relevant irradiance level (4 μW/cm2 as UVB) than exposure to this compound in the absence of UV with an LC50 of 112.9 mg/L. Toxicity was immediately apparent, with mortality occurring within an hour of the onset of exposure at the highest concentration. Fish were unaffected by exposure to UV alone. Weak-acid dissociable cyanide concentrations were observed in irradiated aqueous solutions of cyanocobaltate within hours of UV exposure and persisted in the presence of UV for at least 96 hours, whereas negligible concentrations were observed in the absence of UV. The presence of humic acids significantly diminished cyanocobalt toxicity to D. magna and reduced mortality from UV exposure. Humic acids did not significantly influence survival among C. dubia. C. dubia from UV-adapted populations were less sensitive to metallocyanide compounds than organisms from unadapted populations.ConclusionsThe results indicate that metallocyanide complexes may pose a hazard to

  3. A comparison of radiation doses between state-of-the-art multislice CT coronary angiography with iterative reconstruction, multislice CT coronary angiography with standard filtered back-projection and invasive diagnostic coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Gosling, O; Loader, R; Venables, P; Roobottom, C; Rowles, N; Bellenger, N; Morgan-Hughes, G

    2010-06-01

    To accurately compare the radiation dose between prospectively gated cardiac multidetector CT (with and without iterative reconstruction) and diagnostic invasive coronary angiography using the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 (ICRP) tissue weightings. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients presenting to a university teaching hospital for investigation of coronary artery disease. Radiation doses for each technique were calculated using computational Monte Carlo modelling of a standard Cristy phantom rather than the application of previously published conversion factors. While these have frequently been used in other studies, they are based on out-dated ICRP tissue weightings (ICRP 60) and are for the whole chest rather than for structures irradiated in cardiac imaging. In order to allow a comparison, doses were calculated and expressed in terms of effective dose in millisieverts (mSv). From a population presenting for angiography within a clinical service, the median radiation dose from cardiac CT with standard filtered back-projection (84 patients, 5.4 mSv) was comparable with the dose from invasive diagnostic coronary angiography (94 patients, 6.3 mSv). The dose for cardiac CT using iterative reconstruction was significantly lower (39 patients, 2.5 mSv). The median effective dose from cardiac CT with standard filtered back-projection was comparable with the effective dose from invasive coronary angiography, even with application of the most contemporary ICRP tissue weightings and use of cardiac specific volumes. Cardiac CT scanning incorporating iterative reconstruction resulted in a significant reduction in the effective dose.

  4. Photoprotective Potential of Glycolic Acid by Reducing NLRC4 and AIM2 Inflammasome Complex Proteins in UVB Radiation-Induced Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sung-Jen; Tang, Sheau-Chung; Liao, Pei-Yun; Ge, Jheng-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation induces inflammation and free radical-mediated oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a crucial role in the induction of skin cancer. Glycolic acid (GA) is frequently used in cosmetics and dermatology. The aim of the study was to analyze the photoprotective mechanisms through which GA retards UVB-induced ROS accumulation and inflammation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mice skin, respectively. NHEK cell line and C57BL/6J mice were treated with GA (0.1 or 5 mM) for 24 h followed by UVB irradiation. ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and expression of inflammasome complexes (NLRP3, NLRC4, ASC, and AIM2) were measured in vitro. Epidermal thickness and inflammasome complex proteins were analyzed in vivo. GA significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of skin cell viability, ROS formation, and DNA damage (single and double strands DNA break). GA suppressed the mRNA expression levels of NLRC4 and AIM2 among the inflammasome complexes. GA also blocked interleukin (IL)-1β by reducing the activity of caspase-1 in the NHEKs. Treatment with GA (2%) inhibited UVB-induced inflammation marker NLRC4 protein levels in mouse dorsal skin. The photoprotective activity of GA was ascribed to the inhibition of ROS formation and DNA damage, as well as a reduction in the activities of inflammasome complexes and IL-1β. We propose that GA has anti-inflammatory and photoprotective effects against UVB irradiation. GA is potentially beneficial to the protection of human skin from UV damage.

  5. The effect of a supersaturated calcium phosphate mouth rinse on the development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation: a single-center, randomized, prospective study of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse + standard of care versus standard of care.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Mercier, Carole; Geussens, Yasmyne; Nuyts, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Mucosal damage is an important and debilitating side effect when treating head and neck cancer patients with (chemo-)radiation. The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to investigate whether the addition of a neutral, supersaturated, calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse benefits the severity and duration of acute mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation. A total of 60 patients with malignant neoplasms of the head and neck receiving (chemo)radiation were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients were randomized into two treatment arms: a control group receiving standard of care (n = 31) and a study group receiving standard of care + daily CP mouth rinses (n = 27) starting on the first day of (chemo-)radiation. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were assessed twice a week using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria scale version 3, oral pain was scored with a visual analogue scale. No significant difference in grade III mucositis (59 vs. 71 %; p = 0.25) and dysphagia (33 vs. 42 %, p = 0.39) was observed between the study group compared to the control group. Also no significant difference in time until development of peak mucositis (28.6 vs. 28.7 days; p = 0.48), duration of peak mucositis (22.7 vs. 24.6 days; p = 0.31), recuperation of peak dysphagia (20.5 vs 24.2 days; p = 0.13) and occurrence of severe pain (56 vs. 52 %, p = 0.5). In this randomized study, the addition of CP mouth rinse to standard of care did not improve the frequency, duration or severity of the most common acute toxicities during and early after (chemo)radiation. There is currently no evidence supporting its standard use in daily practice.

  6. Distilling Complex Model Results into Simple Models for use in Assessing Compliance with Performance Standards for Low Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur S. Rood

    2007-02-01

    Assessing the long term performance of waste disposal facility requires numerical simulation of saturated and unsaturated groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Complex numerical models have been developed to try to realistically simulate subsurface flow and transport processes. These models provide important information about system behavior and identify important processes, but may not be practical for demonstrating compliance with performance standards because of excessively long computer simulation times and input requirements. Two approaches to distilling the behavior of a complex model into simpler formulations that are practical for demonstrating compliance with performance objectives are examined in this paper. The first approach uses the information obtained from the complex model to develop a simple model that mimics the complex model behavior for stated performance objectives. The simple model may need to include essential processes that are important to assessing performance, such as time-variable infiltration and waste emplacement rates, subsurface heterogeneity, sorption, decay, and radioactive ingrowth. The approach was applied to a Low-Level Waste disposal site at the Idaho National Laboratory where a complex three dimensional vadose zone model was developed first to understand system behavior and important processes. The complex model was distilled down to a relatively simple one-dimensional vadose zone model and three-dimensional aquifer transport model. Comparisons between the simple model and complex model of vadose zone fluxes and groundwater concentrations showed relatively good agreement between the models for both fission and activation products (129I, 36Cl, 99Tc) and actinides (238U, 239Pu, 237Np). Application of the simple model allowed for Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and simulations of numerous disposal and release scenarios. The second approach investigated was the response surface model. In the response surface model approach

  7. Time-resolved radiation chemistry: Dynamics of electron attachment to uracil following UV excitation of iodide-uracil complexes

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sarah B.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Stephansen, Anne B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-12-14

    Electron attachment to uracil was investigated by applying time-resolved photoelectron imaging to iodide-uracil (I{sup –}U) complexes. In these studies, an ultraviolet pump pulse initiated charge transfer from the iodide to the uracil, and the resulting dynamics of the uracil temporary negative ion were probed. Five different excitation energies were used, 4.00 eV, 4.07 eV, 4.14 eV, 4.21 eV, and 4.66 eV. At the four lowest excitation energies, which lie near the vertical detachment energy of the I{sup –}U complex (4.11 eV), signatures of both the dipole bound (DB) as well as the valence bound (VB) anion of uracil were observed. In contrast, only the VB anion was observed at 4.66 eV, in agreement with previous experiments in this higher energy range. The early-time dynamics of both states were highly excitation energy dependent. The rise time of the DB anion signal was ∼250 fs at 4.00 eV and 4.07 eV, ∼120 fs at 4.14 eV and cross-correlation limited at 4.21 eV. The VB anion rise time also changed with excitation energy, ranging from 200 to 300 fs for excitation energies 4.00–4.21 eV, to a cross-correlation limited time at 4.66 eV. The results suggest that the DB state acts as a “doorway” state to the VB anion at 4.00–4.21 eV, while direct attachment to the VB anion occurs at 4.66 eV.

  8. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  9. Comparison of radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort and financial break-even of standard digital radiography and a novel biplanar low-dose X-ray system for upright full-length lower limb and whole spine radiography.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Schwab, Alexander; Pankalla, Katja; Buck, Florian M

    2013-07-01

    To compare the radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort, and financial break-even of a standard digital radiography and a biplanar low-dose X-ray system. A standard digital radiography system (Ysio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was compared with a biplanar X-ray unit (EOS, EOS imaging, Paris, France) consisting of two X-ray tubes and slot-scanning detectors, arranged at an angle of 90° allowing simultaneous vertical biplanar linear scanning in the upright patient position. We compared data of standing full-length lower limb radiographs and whole spine radiographs of both X-ray systems. Dose-area product was significantly lower for radiographs of the biplanar X-ray system than for the standard digital radiography system (e.g. whole spine radiographs; standard digital radiography system: 392.2 ± 231.7 cGy*cm(2) versus biplanar X-ray system: 158.4 ± 103.8 cGy*cm(2)). The mean examination time was significantly shorter for biplanar radiographs compared with standard digital radiographs (e.g. whole spine radiographs: 449 s vs 248 s). Patients' comfort regarding noise was significantly higher for the standard digital radiography system. The financial break-even point was 2,602 radiographs/year for the standard digital radiography system compared with 4,077 radiographs/year for the biplanar X-ray unit. The biplanar X-ray unit reduces radiation exposure and increases subjective noise exposure to patients. The biplanar X-ray unit demands a higher number of examinations per year for the financial break-even point, despite the lower labour cost per examination due to the shorter examination time.

  10. Quality Control of Biomedicinal Allergen Products – Highly Complex Isoallergen Composition Challenges Standard MS Database Search and Requires Manual Data Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Spiric, Jelena; Engin, Anna M.; Karas, Michael; Reuter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Allergy against birch pollen is among the most common causes of spring pollinosis in Europe and is diagnosed and treated using extracts from natural sources. Quality control is crucial for safe and effective diagnosis and treatment. However, current methods are very difficult to standardize and do not address individual allergen or isoallergen composition. MS provides information regarding selected proteins or the entire proteome and could overcome the aforementioned limitations. We studied the proteome of birch pollen, focusing on allergens and isoallergens, to clarify which of the 93 published sequence variants of the major allergen, Bet v 1, are expressed as proteins within one source material in parallel. The unexpectedly complex Bet v 1 isoallergen composition required manual data interpretation and a specific design of databases, as current database search engines fail to unambiguously assign spectra to highly homologous, partially identical proteins. We identified 47 non-allergenic proteins and all 5 known birch pollen allergens, and unambiguously proved the existence of 18 Bet v 1 isoallergens and variants by manual data analysis. This highly complex isoallergen composition raises questions whether isoallergens can be ignored or must be included for the quality control of allergen products, and which data analysis strategies are to be applied. PMID:26561299

  11. Measuring cereblon as a biomarker of response or resistance to lenalidomide and pomalidomide requires use of standardized reagents and understanding of gene complexity

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Anita K; Mendy, Derek; Waldman, Michelle; Chen, Gengxin; Rychak, Emily; Miller, Karen; Gaidarova, Svetlana; Ren, Yan; Wang, Maria; Breider, Michael; Carmel, Gilles; Mahmoudi, Afshin; Jackson, Pilgrim; Abbasian, Mahan; Cathers, Brian E; Schafer, Peter H; Daniel, Tom O; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Thakurta, Anjan; Chopra, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Cereblon, a member of the cullin 4 ring ligase complex (CRL4), is the molecular target of the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) lenalidomide and pomalidomide and is required for the antiproliferative activity of these agents in multiple myeloma (MM) and immunomodulatory activity in T cells. Cereblon's central role as a target of lenalidomide and pomalidomide suggests potential utility as a predictive biomarker of response or resistance to IMiD therapy. Our studies characterized a cereblon monoclonal antibody CRBN65, with high sensitivity and specificity in Western analysis and immunohistochemistry that is superior to commercially available antibodies. We identified multiple cereblon splice variants in both MM cell lines and primary cells, highlighting challenges with conventional gene expression assays given this gene complexity. Using CRBN65 antibody and TaqMan quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays, we showed lack of correlation between cereblon protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, lack of correlation between cereblon expression in MM cell lines and sensitivity to lenalidomide was shown. In cell lines made resistant to lenalidomide and pomalidomide, cereblon protein is greatly reduced. These studies show limitations to the current approaches of cereblon measurement that rely on commercial reagents and assays. Standardized reagents and validated assays are needed to accurately assess the role of cereblon as a predictive biomarker. PMID:24206017

  12. Phylogeography of the Indo-West Pacific maskrays (Dasyatidae, Neotrygon): a complex example of chondrichthyan radiation in the Cenozoic

    PubMed Central

    Puckridge, Melody; Last, Peter R; White, William T; Andreakis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Maskrays of the genus Neotrygon (Dasyatidae) have dispersed widely in the Indo-West Pacific being represented largely by an assemblage of narrow-ranging coastal endemics. Phylogenetic reconstruction methods reproduced nearly identical and statistically robust topologies supporting the monophyly of the genus Neotrygon within the family Dasyatidae, the genus Taeniura being consistently basal to Neotrygon, and Dasyatis being polyphyletic to the genera Taeniurops and Pteroplatytrygon. The Neotrygon kuhlii complex, once considered to be an assemblage of color variants of the same biological species, is the most derived and widely dispersed subgroup of the genus. Mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (RAG1) phylogenies used in synergy with molecular dating identified paleoclimatic fluctuations responsible for periods of vicariance and dispersal promoting population fragmentation and speciation in Neotrygon. Signatures of population differentiation exist in N. ningalooensis and N. annotata, yet a large-scale geological event, such as the collision between the Australian and Eurasian Plates, coupled with subsequent sea-level falls, appears to have separated a once homogeneous population of the ancestral form of N. kuhlii into southern Indian Ocean and northern Pacific taxa some 4–16 million years ago. Repeated climatic oscillations, and the subsequent establishment of land and shallow sea connections within and between Australia and parts of the Indo-Malay Archipelago, have both promoted speciation and established zones of secondary contact within the Indian and Pacific Ocean basins. PMID:23467194

  13. Phylogeography of the Indo-West Pacific maskrays (Dasyatidae, Neotrygon): a complex example of chondrichthyan radiation in the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Puckridge, Melody; Last, Peter R; White, William T; Andreakis, Nikos

    2013-02-01

    Maskrays of the genus Neotrygon (Dasyatidae) have dispersed widely in the Indo-West Pacific being represented largely by an assemblage of narrow-ranging coastal endemics. Phylogenetic reconstruction methods reproduced nearly identical and statistically robust topologies supporting the monophyly of the genus Neotrygon within the family Dasyatidae, the genus Taeniura being consistently basal to Neotrygon, and Dasyatis being polyphyletic to the genera Taeniurops and Pteroplatytrygon. The Neotrygon kuhlii complex, once considered to be an assemblage of color variants of the same biological species, is the most derived and widely dispersed subgroup of the genus. Mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (RAG1) phylogenies used in synergy with molecular dating identified paleoclimatic fluctuations responsible for periods of vicariance and dispersal promoting population fragmentation and speciation in Neotrygon. Signatures of population differentiation exist in N. ningalooensis and N. annotata, yet a large-scale geological event, such as the collision between the Australian and Eurasian Plates, coupled with subsequent sea-level falls, appears to have separated a once homogeneous population of the ancestral form of N. kuhlii into southern Indian Ocean and northern Pacific taxa some 4-16 million years ago. Repeated climatic oscillations, and the subsequent establishment of land and shallow sea connections within and between Australia and parts of the Indo-Malay Archipelago, have both promoted speciation and established zones of secondary contact within the Indian and Pacific Ocean basins.

  14. Competitive inhibition of carcinogen-activating CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 enzymes by a standardized complex mixture of PAH extracted from coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, B.; Marston, C.P.; Luch, A.; Dashwood, W.M.; Brooks, E.; Pereira, C.; Doehmer, J.; Baird, W.M.

    2007-03-15

    A complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) extracted from coal tar, the Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1597, was recently shown to decrease the levels of DNA binding of the 2 strong carcinogens benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and dibenzo(a,l)pyrene (DBP) in the human mammary carcinoma-derived cell line MCF-7. The present study was designed to further elucidate the biochemical mechanisms involved in this inhibition process. We examined the effects of SRM 1597 on the metabolic activation of BP and DBP toward DNA-binding derivatives in Chinese hamster cells expressing either human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 or CYP1B1. The data obtained from biochemical experiments revealed that SRM 1597 competitively inhibited the activity of both human enzymes as analyzed by 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation assays. While the Michaelis-Menten constant (K-M) was {lt} 0.4 {mu}M in the absence of SRM 1597, this value increased up to 1.12 (CYP1A1) or 4.45 {mu}M (CYP1B1) in the presence of 0.1 {mu} g/ml SRM 1597. Hence the inhibitory effects of the complex mixture on human CYP1B1 were much stronger when compared to human CYP1A1 Taken together, the decreases in PAH-DNA adduct formation on co-treatment with SRM 1597 revealed inhibitory effects on the CYP enzymes that convert carcinogenic PAH into DNA-binding metabolites. The implications for the tumorigenicity of complex environmental PAR mixtures are discussed.

  15. Phylogeny of the Oenanthe lugens complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae): paraphyly of a morphologically cohesive group within a recent radiation of open-habitat chats.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Manuel; Shirihai, Hadoram

    2013-12-01

    The morphologically inferred Oenanthe lugens complex comprises nine taxa of open-habitat chats which occur in rocky and/or mountainous areas adjacent to the Saharo-Sindian desert belt. It has traditionally been divided into the lugubris group of north-east Africa, the lugentoides group of the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula and the lugens group of North Africa and the Middle East. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the O. lugens complex might not be monophyletic. However, it remained unclear how this result might have been affected by incomplete taxon sampling, as the lugentoides group and two out of three taxa of the lugubris group have not been analyzed so far. In this study, we present a phylogenetic hypothesis of the O. lugens complex based on two mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron using, for the first time, a complete taxon sampling. The application of a multispecies coalescent approach allowed us to simultaneously estimate the sequence and timing of speciation events. The O. lugens complex was consistently revealed as a polyphyletic assemblage and the traditionally recognized groups should be treated as at least three different species: O. lugens, Oenanthelugubris, and Oenanthelugentoides. While O. lugubris and O. lugentoides were revealed to be sister groups, O. lugens was found to be closely related to the species pair Oenanthechrysopygia/Oenanthexanthoprymna. The latter differ quite strongly in morphology and have traditionally not been associated with members of the lugens complex. We thus corroborate the results of previous studies, which demonstrated that morphology seems to be a poor predictor of phylogenetic relationships in Oenanthe. In contrast to the mtDNA markers analyzed, it was revealed that differences among taxa were not fixed in the nuclear intron. In the case of the taxa persica of the lugens group, an influence of introgression in autosomal markers cannot be excluded and deserves further study. The three

  16. 40 CFR 191.04 - Alternative standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 191.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Management and Storage §...

  17. 40 CFR 191.04 - Alternative standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 191.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Management and Storage §...

  18. 40 CFR 191.04 - Alternative standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 191.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Management and Storage §...

  19. 40 CFR 191.04 - Alternative standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 191.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Management and Storage §...

  20. Effect of Brain Stem and Dorsal Vagus Complex Dosimetry on Nausea and Vomiting in Head and Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciura, Katherine; McBurney, Michelle; Nguyen, Baongoc; Pham, Mary; Rebueno, Neal; Fuller, Clifton D.; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Rosenthal, David I.

    2011-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is becoming the treatment of choice for many head and neck cancer patients. IMRT reduces some toxicities by reducing radiation dose to uninvolved normal tissue near tumor targets; however, other tissues not irradiated using previous 3D techniques may receive clinically significant doses, causing undesirable side effects including nausea and vomiting (NV). Irradiation of the brainstem, and more specifically, the area postrema and dorsal vagal complex (DVC), has been linked to NV. We previously reported preliminary hypothesis-generating dose effects associated with NV in IMRT patients. The goal of this study is to relate brainstem dose to NV symptoms. We retrospectively studied 100 consecutive patients that were treated for oropharyngeal cancer with IMRT. We contoured the brainstem, area postrema, and DVC with the assistance of an expert diagnostic neuroradiologist. We correlated dosimetry for the 3 areas contoured with weekly NV rates during IMRT. NV rates were significantly higher for patients who received concurrent chemotherapy. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that chemoradiation cases exhibited a trend towards the same dose-response relationship with both brainstem mean dose (p = 0.0025) and area postrema mean dose (p = 0.004); however, both failed to meet statistical significance at the p {<=} 0.002 level. Duration of toxicity was also greater for chemoradiation patients, who averaged 3.3 weeks with reported Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTC-AE), compared with an average of 2 weeks for definitive RT patients (p = 0.002). For definitive RT cases, no dose-response trend could be ascertained. The mean brainstem dose emerged as a key parameter of interest; however, no one dose parameter (mean/median/EUD) best correlated with NV. This study does not address extraneous factors that would affect NV incidence, including the use of antiemetics, nor chemotherapy dose schedule specifics before and during RT. A

  1. NOON EDT: EPA's Office of Air and Radiation to Hold Media Call on Proposed Methane Standards for Oil and Gas Industry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON- -Today at noon EDT, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Acting Assistant Administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation Janet McCabe will hold a press call on methane. At the direction of President Obama, the EPA is propos

  2. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee--study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Michalsen, Andreas; Roll, Stephanie; Morandi, Antonio; Gupta, Shivnarain; Rosenberg, Mark; Kronpass, Ludwig; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Hissar, Syed; Müller, Matthias; Kessler, Christian

    2013-05-23

    Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy-effectiveness continuum. This trial

  3. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee – study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  4. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  5. The US radiation dosimetry standards for 60Co therapy level beams, and the transfer to the AAPM accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories.

    PubMed

    Minniti, R; Chen-Mayer, H; Seltzer, S M; Huq, M Saiful; Bryson, L; Slowey, T; Micka, J A; DeWerd, L A; Wells, N; Hanson, W F; Ibbott, G S

    2006-04-01

    This work reports the transfer of the primary standard for air kerma from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to the secondary laboratories accredited by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM). This transfer, performed in August of 2003, was motivated by the recent revision of the NIST air-kerma standards for 60Co gamma-ray beams implemented on July 1, 2003. The revision involved a complete recharacterization of the two NIST therapy-level 60Co gamma-ray beam facilities, resulting in new values for the air-kerma rates disseminated by the NIST. Some of the experimental aspects of the determination of the new air-kerma rates are briefly summarized here; the theoretical aspects have been described in detail by Seltzer and Bergstrom ["Changes in the U.S. primary standards for the air-kerma from gamma-ray beams," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 108, 359-381 (2003)]. The standard was transferred to reference-class chambers submitted by each of the AAPM Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories (ADCLs). These secondary-standard instruments were then used to characterize the 60Co gamma-ray beams at the ADCLs. The values of the response (calibration coefficient) of the ADCL secondary-standard ionization chambers are reported and compared to values obtained prior to the change in the NIST air-kerma standards announced on July 1, 2003. The relative change is about 1.1% for all of these chambers, and this value agrees well with the expected change in chambers calibrated at the NIST or at any secondary-standard laboratory traceable to the new NIST standard.

  6. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elicin, Olgun; Callaway, Sharon; Prior, John O.; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Herrera, Fernanda G.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  7. Radiation Nanomedicine for EGFR-Positive Breast Cancer: Panitumumab-Modified Gold Nanoparticles Complexed to the β-Particle-Emitter, (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    Yook, Simmyung; Cai, Zhongli; Lu, Yijie; Winnik, Mitchell A; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Reilly, Raymond M

    2015-11-02

    Our objective was to construct a novel radiation nanomedicine for treatment of breast cancer (BC) expressing epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR), particularly triple-negative tumors (TNBC). Gold nanoparticles (AuNP; 30 nm) were modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (4 kDa) derivatized with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelators for complexing the β-emitter, (177)Lu and with PEG chains (5 kDa) linked to panitumumab for targeting BC cells expressing EGFR. The AuNP were further coated with PEG chains (2 kDa) to stabilize the particles to aggregation. The binding and internalization of EGFR-targeted AuNP ((177)Lu-T-AuNP) into BC cells was studied and compared to nontargeted (177)Lu-NT-AuNP. The cytotoxicity of (177)Lu-T-AuNP and (177)Lu-NT-AuNP was measured in clonogenic assays using BC cells with widely different EGFR densities: MDA-MB-468 (10(6) receptors/cell), MDA-MB-231 (10(5) receptors/cell), and MCF-7 cells (10(4) receptors/cell). Radiation absorbed doses to the cell nucleus of MDA-MB-468 cells were estimated based on subcellular distribution. Darkfield and fluorescence microscopy as well as radioligand binding assays revealed that (177)Lu-T-AuNP were specifically bound by BC cells dependent on their EGFR density whereas the binding and internalization of (177)Lu-NT-AuNP was significantly lower. The affinity of binding of (177)Lu-T-AuNP to MDA-MB-468 cells was reduced by 2-fold compared to (123)I-labeled panitumumab (KD = 1.3 ± 0.2 nM vs 0.7 ± 0.4 nM, respectively). The cytotoxicity of (177)Lu-T-AuNP was dependent on the amount of radioactivity incubated with BC cells, their EGFR density and the radiosensitivity of the cells. The clonogenic survival (CS) of MDA-MB-468 cells overexpressing EGFR was reduced to <0.001% at the highest amount of (177)Lu-T-AuNP tested (4.5 MBq; 6 × 10(11) AuNP per 2.5 × 10(4)-1.2 × 10(5) cells). (177)Lu-T-AuNP were less effective for killing MDA-MB-231 cells or MCF-7 cells with

  8. Training course for radiation safety technicians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasuk, S. R.; Moe, H. J.

    1967-01-01

    Course of instruction includes sections on basic information, natural radioactivity, properties of alpha, beta, gamma, X rays, and neutrons, concepts of radiation units and dose determinations, shielding, biological effects, background radiation, radiation protection standards, and internal dose calculation.

  9. Cytogenetic analysis of Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) with Xyp sex determination system using standard staining, C-bands, NOR and synaptonemal complex microspreading techniques.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, M C; Zacaro, A A; Cella, D M

    2000-01-01

    The mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of the beetles Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) were analysed using standard staining, C-banding and silver impregnation techniques. We determine the diploid and haploid chromosome numbers, the sex determination system and describe the chromosomal morphology, the C-banding pattern and the chromosome(s) bearing NORs (nucleolar organizer regions). Both species shown 2n = 20 chromosomes, the chromosomal meioformula 9 + Xyp, and regular chromosome segregation during anaphases I and II. The chromosomes of E. atomaria are basically metacentric or submetacentric and P. dermestoides chromosomes are submetacentric or subtelocentric. In both beetles the constitutive heterochromatin is located in the pericentromeric region in all autosomes and in the Xp chromosome; additional C-bands were observed in telomeric region of the short arm in some autosomes in P. dermestoides. The yp chromosome did not show typical C-bands in these species. As for the synaptonemal complex, the nucleolar material is associated to the 7th bivalent in E. atomaria and 3rd and 7th bivalents in P. dermestoides. Strong silver impregnated material was observed in association with Xyp in light and electron microscopy preparations in these species and this material was interpreted to be related to nucleolar material.

  10. Establishment of 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration fields produced using the 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the Facility of Radiation Standards, Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-01

    A 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, produced by the nuclear reaction of (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O, has been established at the Facility of Radiation Standards (FRS) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency for calibration purposes. Basic dosimetric quantities (i.e. averaged gamma-ray energy, air-kerma-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients and air kerma rates at the point of test) have been precisely determined through a series of measurements using the NaI(Tl) spectrometer and an ionisation chamber coupled with an appropriate build-up material. The measurements obtained comply with values recommended by the International Organization for Standardization for an 'R-F field'. The neutron contamination component for the field has also been measured by means of a conventional neutron dose equivalent meter (the so-called neutron rem-counter) and determined to be ∼ 0.5 % of the total dose equivalent.

  11. Topical Hyaluronic acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis after Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation (RT) compared with best supportive care. Materials and Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast RT to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel, on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast, and the control gel to the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥grade 2 dermatitis. Results The study closed early based on a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed significantly higher rate of ≥grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel (61.5% [40/65] vs. 47.7% [31/65], P = 0.027). Only one patient developed grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than petrolatum gel at the end of RT (42% vs. 14%, P = 0.003). Conclusion We found no benefit from use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of grade ≥2 dermatitis after adjuvant RT for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. PMID:22172912

  12. ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

    2011-08-03

    Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data

  13. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  14. Mitotane sensitizes adrenocortical cancer cells to ionizing radiations by involvement of the cyclin B1/CDK complex in G2 arrest and mismatch repair enzymes modulation.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla; Amendola, Donatella; Bucci, Barbara; Misiti, Silvia; Raza, Giorgio; De Paula, Ugo; Marchese, Rodolfo; Brunetti, Ercole; Toscano, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Mitotane inhibits steroid synthesis by an action on steroidogenic enzymes, as 11beta-hydroxylase and cholesterol side chain cleavage. It also has a cytotoxic effect on the adrenocortical cells and represents a primary drug used in the adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). H295R and SW13 cell lines were treated with mitotane 10(-5) M and ionizing radiations (IR) in combination therapy, inducing an irreversible inhibition of cell growth in both adrenocortical cancer cells. As shown in a previous report, mitotane/IR combination treatment induced a cell accumulation in the G2 phase. Here, we report the radiosensitizing properties of mitotane in two different ACC cell lines. The drug reveals the effectiveness to enhance the cytotoxic effects of IR by attenuating DNA repair and interfering on the activation of mitosis promoting factor (MPF), mainly regulated by the degradation of cyclin B1 in the mitotic process. These events may explain the inappropriate activation of cdc2, implicated in G2/M phase arrest and probably induced by the mitotane and IR in the combined treatment. Indeed, treatment with purvalanol, a cdc2-inhibitor prevents cell cycle arrest, triggering the G2/M transition. The observation that mitotane and IR in combination treatment amplifies the activation level of cyclin B/cdc2 complexes contributing to cell cycle arrest, suggests that the MPF could function as a master signal for controlling the temporal order of different mitotic events. Moreover, we report that mitotane interferes in modulation of mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes, revealing radiosensitizing drug ability.

  15. [Influence of ionizing radiation, application of iron ions and their chelate complexes on the oxidative status of blood serum of rats].

    PubMed

    Riabchenko, N I; Ivannik, B P; Riabchenko, V I; Dzikovskaia, L A

    2011-01-01

    Influence of ionizing radiation, ions of iron and their chelate complexes on the oxidative status of blood serum of rats has been investigated. Animals were irradiated by gamma-rays 60Co at a dose of 4 Gy. Ions of iron and iron chelates with nitrilotriacetic acid and citric acid were introduced into animals intra-abdominally at a doze of 10 mg of iron on 1 kg of body weight. The oxidative status of blood serum was determined according to the estimated content of oxidizing peroxide equivalents which oxidize ferrous iron in ferric iron with the subsequent estimation of ferric iron by means of xylenol orange. We also estimated the total content of iron in blood serum using ferrozine as an indicator. The oxidative status was defined 24 and 96 hours after irradiation and 2 hours after introduction of iron ions and their chelates. The research conducted has shown that the concentration of oxidizing peroxide equivalents in serum and the total iron concentration increase 1.47 times and 1.63 times correspondingly 24 hours after irradiation. The increase in the content of oxidizing peroxide equivalents and iron owing to Fenton's reaction can lead to the appearance of OH* radical and raise the level of damage of nuclear and membrane structures in irradiated cells. 2 hours after introduction of iron ions and their chelates, the content of oxidizing peroxide equivalents increased in the blood serum of irradiated and non-irradiated rats, and the maximum effect was observed when introducing ferrous iron and its chelate with citric acid.

  16. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  17. Topical hyaluronic acid vs. standard of care for the prevention of radiation dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer: single-blind randomized phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H; Strom, Eric A; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E; Smith, Benjamin D; Buchholz, Thomas A; Yu, T Kuan

    2012-07-15

    To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis. The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only one patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation treatment of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dám, A. M.; Gazsó, L. G.; Kaewpila, S.; Maschek, I.

    1996-03-01

    Product specific doses were calculated for pharmaceuticals to be radiation treated. Radio-pasteurization dose were determined for some heat sensitive pharmaceutical basic materials (pancreaton, neopancreatin, neopancreatin USP, duodenum extract). Using the new recommendation (ISO standards, Method 1) dose calculations were performed and radiation sterilization doses were determined for aprotinine and heparine Na.

  19. Radiation health research, 1986 - 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of 225 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by NASA during the period 1986 through 1990 is reported. Each abstract was categorized within one of four discipline areas: physics, biology, risk assessment, and microgravity. Topic areas within each discipline were assigned as follows: Physics - atomic physics, nuclear science, space radiation, radiation transport and shielding, and instrumentation; Biology - molecular biology, cellular radiation biology, tissue, organs and organisms, radioprotectants, and plants; Risk assessment - radiation health and epidemiology, space flight radiation health physics, inter- and intraspecies extrapolation, and radiation limits and standards; and Microgravity. When applicable subareas were assigned for selected topic areas. Keywords and author indices are provided.

  20. Ionizing Radiation: The issue of radiation quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe

    Types of Ionising radiations are differentiated from each other by fundamental characteristics of their energy deposition patterns when they interact with biological materials. At the level of the DNA these non-random patterns drive differences in the yields and distributions of DNA damage patterns and specifically the production of clustered damage or complex lesions. The complex radiation fields found in space bring significant challenges for developing a mechanistic understanding of radiation effects from the perspective of radiation quality as these consist of a diverse range of particle and energy types unique to the space environment. Linear energy transfer, energy deposited per unit track length in units of keV per micron, has long been used as a comparator for different types of radiation but has limitations in that it is an average value. Difference in primary core ionizations relative to secondary delta ray ranges vary significantly with particle mass and energy leading to complex interrelationships with damage production at the cellular level. At the cellular level a greater mechanistic understanding is necessary, linking energy deposition patterns to DNA damage patterns and cellular response, to build appropriate biophysical models that are predictive for different radiation qualities and mixed field exposures. Defined studies using monoenergetic beams delivered under controlled conditions are building quantitative data sets of both initial and long term changes in cells as a basis for a great mechanistic understanding of radiation quality effects of relevance to not only space exposures but clinical application of ion-beams.

  1. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  2. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  3. Comparison of two treatment strategies for irradiation of regional lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer: Lymph flow guided portals versus standard radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Sergey Nikolaevich; Kanaev, Sergey Vasilevich; Semiglazov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Jukova, Ludmila Alekseevna; Krzhivitckiy, Pavel Ivanovich

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy being an essential part of breast cancer treatment, we evaluate various radiotherapy strategies in patients with breast cancer. Lymph node (LN) scintigraphy was performed in 172 primary patients with BC. LN visualization started 30-360 min after intratumoral injection of 75-150 MBq of 99mTc-nanocolloids. Our standard recommendation for postoperative radiotherapy in patients with LN invasion by BC were as follows: for patients with external localization of tumour - breast + axillary (Ax) + sub-supraclavicular (SSCL) regions; with internal localization - all above + internal mammary nodes (IM). Proposed strategy of lymph flow guided radiotherapy is based on the assumption that only regions that contain 'hot' LNs must be included in a treatment volume. Among 110 patients with external localization of BC, Ax LNs were visualized in all cases and in 62 patients it was the only region with 'hot' LN. Twenty-three patients (20.9%) had drainage to Ax + SSCL, 12 (10.9%) - Ax + IM, 13 (11.8%) - Ax + SSCL + IM regions. After the visualization of lymph flow patterns, standard treatment volume was changed in 87/110 cases (79.1%): in 56.4%, reduced, in 22.7%, enlarged or changed. In 62 patients with tumours in internal quadrants, we revealed the following patterns of lymph-flow: only to the Ax region in 23 (37.1%); Ax + IM, 13 (21%); Ax + SSCL, 15 (24.2%); Ax + IM + ISSCL, 11 (17.7%) cases. After lymph-flow visualization, the standard irradiation volume was reduced in 53/62 (85.5%) cases. Visualization of an individual lymph flow pattern from BC can be used for the optimization of standard fields used for irradiation of regional LNs.

  4. Standards not that standard.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Cristina; Tanner, Kristie; Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Villaescusa, Paula; Chugani, Divya; Frías, Alba; Segredo, Ernesto; Molero, Xavier; Fritschi, Marco; Morales, Lucas; Ramón, Daniel; Peña, Carlos; Peretó, Juli; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    There is a general assent on the key role of standards in Synthetic Biology. In two consecutive letters to this journal, suggestions on the assembly methods for the Registry of standard biological parts have been described. We fully agree with those authors on the need of a more flexible building strategy and we highlight in the present work two major functional challenges standardization efforts have to deal with: the need of both universal and orthogonal behaviors. We provide experimental data that clearly indicate that such engineering requirements should not be taken for granted in Synthetic Biology.

  5. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  6. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  7. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  8. Phase function, backscatter, extinction, and absorption for standard radiation atmosphere and El Chichon aerosol models at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabular values of phase function, Legendre polynominal coefficients, 180 deg backscatter, and extinction cross section are given for eight wavelengths in the atmospheric windows between 0.4 and 2.2 microns. Also included are single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and refractive indices. These values are based on Mie theory calculations for the standard rediation atmospheres (continental, maritime, urban, unperturbed stratospheric, volcanic, upper atmospheric, soot, oceanic, dust, and water-soluble) assest measured volcanic aerosols at several time intervals following the El Chichon eruption. Comparisons of extinction to 180 deg backscatter for different aerosol models are presented and related to lidar data.

  9. MR Evaluation of Radiation Synovectomy of the Knee by Means of Intra-articular Injection of Holmium-166-Chitosan Complex in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results at 4-month Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ho Seok; Lee, Jong Doo; Song, Jungsik; Lee, Soo Kon

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether MRI is able to demonstrate the effect of radiation synovectomy after the intra-articular injection of holmium-166-chitosan complex for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis of the knee. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients aged 36-59 years were treated with 10-20 mCi of holmium-166-chitosan complex. A criterion for inclusion in this study was the absence of observable improvement after 3- or more months of treatment of the knee with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. MR images were acquired both prior to and 4-months after treatment. Clinical evaluation included the use of visual analog scales to assess pain, and the circumference of the knee and its range of motion were also determined. MR evaluation included measurement of the volume of synovial enhancement and wall thickness, the amount of joint effusion, and quantifiable scoring of bone erosion, bone edema and lymph nodes. Results Visual analog scale readings decreased significantly after radiation synovectomy (p < 0.05). MRI showed that joint effusion decreased significantly (p < 0.05), and that the volume of synovial enhancement tended to decrease, but to an insignificant extent (p = 0.107). Conclusion The decreased joint effusion noted at 4-month follow-up resulted from radiation synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee by means of intra-articular injection of holmium-166-chitosan complex. PMID:14530646

  10. Searching the inclusive ℓγE̸T+b-quark signature for radiative top quark decay and non-standard-model processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-07-01

    We compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton (ℓ), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E̸T), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV corresponding to 1.9fb-1 of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector. We find 28 ℓγbE̸T events versus an expectation of 31.0-3.5+4.1 events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, the largest SM source is radiative top-quark pair production, t tmacr +γ. In the data we observe 16 t tmacr γ candidate events versus an expectation from SM sources of 11.2-2.1+2.3. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total of 6.8-2.0+2.2 is due to SM top-quark production, we estimate the t tmacr γ cross section to be 0.15±0.08pb.

  11. Absolute radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John E.

    1996-11-01

    An absolute radiation detector (a cryogenic radiometer) is being developed to replace the existing UK primary national standard cryogenic radiometer with an improved uncertainty. The cryogenic radiometer will be capable of measuring black body radiation and laser radiation with an uncertainty approaching 10 ppm. From these measurements it will be possible to determine the fundamental constant, the Stefan Boltzmann constant, confirming the radiometer as an absolute detector, and link this determination to the SI unit of luminous intensity, the candela. Thus detector and source based scales/standards will be tied to an invariant physical quantity ensuring their long-term stability.

  12. Radiation hydrodynamics integrated in the PLUTO code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Stefan M.; Stute, Matthias; Kley, Wilhelm; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Aims: The transport of energy through radiation is very important in many astrophysical phenomena. In dynamical problems the time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics have to be solved. We present a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics module specifically designed for the versatile magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PLUTO. Methods: The solver is based on the flux-limited diffusion approximation in the two-temperature approach. All equations are solved in the co-moving frame in the frequency-independent (gray) approximation. The hydrodynamics is solved by the different Godunov schemes implemented in PLUTO, and for the radiation transport we use a fully implicit scheme. The resulting system of linear equations is solved either using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) method (for testing purposes) or using matrix solvers that are available in the PETSc library. We state in detail the methodology and describe several test cases to verify the correctness of our implementation. The solver works in standard coordinate systems, such as Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical, and also for non-equidistant grids. Results: We present a new radiation-hydrodynamics solver coupled to the MHD-code PLUTO that is a modern, versatile, and efficient new module for treating complex radiation hydrodynamical problems in astrophysics. As test cases, either purely radiative situations, or full radiation-hydrodynamical setups (including radiative shocks and convection in accretion disks) were successfully studied. The new module scales very well on parallel computers using MPI. For problems in star or planet formation, we added the possibility of irradiation by a central source.

  13. Video Display Terminals: Radiation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses information gathered in past few years related to health effects of video display terminals (VDTs) with particular emphasis given to issues raised by VDT users. Topics covered include radiation emissions, health concerns, radiation surveys, occupational radiation exposure standards, and long-term risks. (17 references) (EJS)

  14. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  15. Radiation hybrid maps of the D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Seetan, Raed; Mergoum, Mohamed; Tiwari, Vijay K; Iqbal, Muhammad J; Wang, Yi; Al-Azzam, Omar; Šimková, Hana; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Gu, Yong Q; Denton, Anne; Kilian, Andrzej; Lazo, Gerard R; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2015-10-16

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high resolution genome maps with saturated marker scaffolds to anchor and orient BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an excellent tool for the development of such maps for it offers much higher and more uniform marker resolution across the length of the chromosome compared to genetic mapping and does not require marker polymorphism per se, as it is based on presence (retention) vs. absence (deletion) marker assay. In this study, a 178 line RH panel was genotyped with SSRs and DArT markers to develop the first high resolution RH maps of the entire D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. To confirm map order accuracy, the AL8/78-RH maps were compared with:1) a DArT consensus genetic map constructed using more than 100 bi-parental populations, 2) a RH map of the D-genome of reference hexaploid wheat 'Chinese Spring', and 3) two SNP-based genetic maps, one with anchored D-genome BAC contigs and another with anchored D-genome sequence scaffolds. Using marker sequences, the RH maps were also anchored with a BAC contig based physical map and draft sequence of the D-genome of Ae. tauschii. A total of 609 markers were mapped to 503 unique positions on the seven D-genome chromosomes, with a total map length of 14,706.7 cR. The average distance between any two marker loci was 29.2 cR which corresponds to 2.1 cM or 9.8 Mb. The average mapping resolution across the D-genome was estimated to be 0.34 Mb (Mb/cR) or 0.07 cM (cM/cR). The RH maps showed almost perfect agreement with several published maps with regard to chromosome assignments of markers. The mean rank correlations between the position of markers on AL8/78 maps and the four published maps, ranged from 0.75 to 0.92, suggesting a good agreement in marker order. With 609 mapped markers, a total of 2481 deletions for the whole D-genome were detected with an average

  16. (68) Ga-PSMA-PET for radiation treatment planning in prostate cancer recurrences after surgery: Individualized medicine or new standard in salvage treatment.

    PubMed

    Habl, Gregor; Sauter, Katharina; Schiller, Kilian; Dewes, Sabrina; Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-06-01

    (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging is a novel promising diagnostic tool to locate early biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP) in prostate cancer (PC) patients. Exact knowledge of the relapse location may result in changes of the therapy concept aside from changes to the TNM stage. To gain data for this approach, we evaluated PC patients receiving (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging before salvage radiotherapy (RT). In this study, 100 patients with biochemical failure after RP± prior RT who underwent (68) Ga-PSMA PET/CT or PET/MRI were evaluated undergoing salvage RT in our department. We analyzed TNM staging changes due to (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging and its influence on RT planning and treatment. Uptake indicative for tumor recurrence in (68) Ga-PSMA-PET was found in 76% of the patients with biochemical recurrent PC. Median PSA level was 1.0 ng/mL (range 0.12-14.7 ng/mL). Of these, 80% showed no morphological correlate in the corresponding CT or MRI. A 43% of all patients experienced a change in TNM stage due to (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging. Patients had changes from Tx to rcT+ (28%), 12% from pN0 to rcN1, 1% from pN0/cM0 to rcM1a, and 8% from cM0 to rcM1b. Due to the additional knowledge of (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging, initial planned RT planning was adapted in 59% of all cases. An additional simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate bed or lymph nodes was given to 32% and 63%, respectively. Ten patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT) to single bone metastases. (68) Ga-PSMA-PET imaging showed a high clinical impact on staging and RT management in patients with biochemically recurrent PC, even at low serum PSA levels. With 43% changes in staging and 59% in radiotherapy planning (68) Ga-PSMA-PET could lead to an indispensable tool in guiding radiation treatment in recurrent PC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of organ-specific-radiation dose levels between 70 kVp perfusion CT and standard tri-phasic liver CT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma using a Monte-Carlo-Simulation-based analysis platform.

    PubMed

    Gawlitza, J; Haubenreisser, H; Meyer, M; Hagelstein, C; Sudarski, S; Schoenberg, S O; Henzler, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically compare organ-specific-radiation dose levels between a radiation dose optimized perfusion CT (dVPCT) protocol of the liver and a tri-phasic standard CT protocol of the liver using a Monte-Carlo-Simulation-based analysis platform. The complete CT data of 52 patients (41 males; mean age 65 ± 12) with suspected HCC that underwent dVPCT examinations on a 3rd generation dual-source CT (Somatom Force, Siemens) with a dose optimized tube voltage of 70 kVp or 80 kVp were exported to an analysis platform (Radimetrics, Bayer). The dVPCT studies were matched with a reference group of 50 patients (35 males; mean age 65 ± 14) that underwent standard tri-phasic CT (sCT) examinations of the liver with 130 kVp using the calculated water-equivalent-diameter of the patients. The analysis platform was used for the calculation of the organ-specific effective dose (ED) as well as global radiation-dose parameters (ICRP103). The organ-specific ED of the dVPCT protocol was statistically significantly lower when compared to the sCT in 14 of 21, and noninferior in a total of 18 of 21 examined items (all p < 0.05). The EDs of the dVPCT examinations were especially in the dose sensitive organs such as the red marrow (17.3 mSv vs 24.6 mSv, p = < 0.0001) and the liver (33.3 mSv vs 46.9 mSv, p = 0.0003) lower when compared to the sCT. Our results suggest that dVPCT performed at 70 or 80 kVp compares favorably to sCT performed with 130 kVp with regard to effective organ dose levels, especially in dose sensitive organs, while providing additional functional information which is of paramount importance in patients undergoing novel targeted therapies.

  18. [Radiation protection agents to provide the radiation safety of astronauts].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Ivanov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Taking into consideration the complexity of radiation factors and stressogenic factors of non-radiation nature in cosmic flights and prognostic difficulties of radiation situation, the authors propose to distinguish several stages of pharmacological protection for cosmonauts. The preparatory stage is realized on the Earth. The next stage is monitoring and correction of radioresistance during a flight. A possible stage consists of treatment of the radiation damage using a traditional protocol. The permanent stage includes pharmacological prevention of the distant consequences of irradiation.

  19. Quality of Life and Performance Status From a Substudy Conducted Within a Prospective Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Concurrent Standard Radiation Versus Accelerated Radiation Plus Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Carcinoma: NRG Oncology RTOG 0129.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Canhua; Zhang, Qiang; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; List, Marcie; Weber, Randal S; Ang, K Kian; Rosenthal, David; Filion, Edith J; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas; Fortin, Andre; Gore, Elizabeth; Winquist, Eric; Jones, Christopher U; Robinson, William; Raben, David; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bruner, Deborah

    2017-03-15

    To analyze quality of life (QOL) and performance status (PS) for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated on NRG Oncology RTOG 0129 by treatment (secondary outcome) and p16 status, and to examine the association between QOL/PS and survival. Eligible patients were randomized into either an accelerated-fractionation arm or a standard-fractionation arm, and completed the Performance Status Scale for the Head and Neck (PSS-HN), the Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ), and the Spitzer Quality of Life Index (SQLI) at 8 time points from before treatment to 5 years after treatment. The results from the analysis of area under the curve showed that QOL/PS was not significantly different between the 2 arms from baseline to year after treatment (P ranged from .39 to .98). The results from general linear mixed models further supported the nonsignificant treatment effects until 5 years after treatment (P=.95, .90, and .84 for PSS-HN Diet, Eating, and Speech, respectively). Before treatment and after 1 year after treatment, p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients had better QOL than did p16-negative patients (P ranged from .0283 to <.0001 for all questionnaires). However, QOL/PS decreased more significantly from pretreatment to the last 2 weeks of treatment in the p16-positive group than in the p16-negative group (P ranged from .0002 to <.0001). Pretreatment QOL/PS was a significant independent predictor of overall survival, progression-free survival, and local-regional failure but not of distant metastasis (P ranged from .0063 to <.0001). The results indicated that patients in both arms may have experienced similar QOL/PS. p16-positive patients had better QOL/PS at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up. Patients presenting with better baseline QOL/PS scores had better survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Healing effect of Dillenia indica fruit extracts standardized to betulinic acid on ultraviolet radiation-induced psoriasis-like wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; David, Isabela Machado Barbosa; Fernandes, Flávia de Souza; Correa, Marina Dos Reis; Clarinda, Morgana Miranda; Freitas, Amanda Fernandes; Silva, Jane da; Gava, Marta; Müller, Simony Davet; Florentino, Drielly; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Moterle, Diego; Kanis, Luiz Alberto; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2017-12-01

    Dillenia indica Linn. (Dilleniaceae) is traditionally used to treat skin inflammation. This study evaluated the healing effect of Dillenia indica fruit extracts on induced psoriasis-like wounds in Wistar rats. Extracts were standardized to betulinic acid, including an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE), ethyl acetate extract (EAE) and petroleum ether extract. Effects against lipid peroxidation were assessed in vitro. Wounds were created at rat tails (n = 12). Topical treatments were applied once daily for 7 days (1 mL of AEE or EAE at 5 or 50 mg/mL). Maximal dose was defined by the extract solubility. A 10-fold l