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Sample records for radiation therapy treatments

  1. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upper GI What is Radiation Therapy? Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... infections. This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called ...

  2. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... action of molecules on the surface of cancer cells called growth factors. Radioprotectors Some medicines called radioprotectors can help protect healthy tissue from the effects of radiation. Radiosensitizers Any drug that can make tumor cells ...

  3. Treatment planning for conformal proton radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bussière, Mark R; Adams, Judith A

    2003-10-01

    Clinical results from various trials have demonstrated the viability of protons in radiation therapy and radiosurgery. This has motivated a few large medical centers to design and build expensive hospital based proton facilities based proton facilities (current cost estimates for a proton facility is around 100 million US dollars). Until this development proton therapy was done using retrofitted equipment originally designed for nuclear experiments. There are presently only three active proton therapy centers in the United States, 22 worldwide. However, more centers are under construction and being proposed in the US and abroad. The important difference between proton and x-ray therapy is in the dose distribution. X-rays deposit most of their dose at shallow depths of a few centimeters with a gradual decay with depth in the patient. Protons deliver most of their dose in the Bragg peak, which can be delivered at most clinically required depths followed by a sharp fall-off. This sharp falloff makes protons sensitive to variations in treatment depths within patients. Treatment planning incorporates all the knowledge of protons into a process, which allows patients to be treated accurately and reliably. This process includes patient immobilization, imaging, targeting, and modeling of planned dose distributions. Although the principles are similar to x-ray therapy some significant differences exist in the planning process, which described in this paper. Target dose conformality has recently taken on much momentum with the advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with photon beams. Proton treatments provide a viable alternative to IMRT because they are inherently conformal avoiding normal tissue while irradiating the intended targets. Proton therapy will soon bring conformality to a new high with the development of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Future challenges include keeping the cost down, increasing access to conventional proton therapy as

  4. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Treatment of arterial lesions after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergqvist, D.; Jonsson, K.; Nilsson, M.; Takolander, R.

    1987-08-01

    Of 1,724 patients who underwent peripheral vascular operation, 12 (0.7 per cent) underwent radiation therapy of the areas including the relevant arteries one and one-half to 28 years (a mean of 15 years) previously; one patient had carcinoma of the breast, three had tumors of the neck and eight patients had malignant gynecologic disease. One patient with an occluded carotid artery was not actively treated, two underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and the remaining patients underwent different types of vascular reconstructions. These patients frequently have other radiation lesions as well with involvement of the skin, bladder or intestine, which may make them problematic from a surgical point of view. Extra-anatomic reconstructions or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty can be recommended. One patient died of malignant disease three years after arterial operation. Otherwise, the results of follow-up study for these patients did not differ from other patients who underwent arterial reconstruction.

  6. Helical Electron Avoidance Radiation Therapy (HEART) for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    electron beams. Our end point is to test the technical feasibilities of generating helical electrons and its applications for breast cancer treatments . We...therapy", Int. J. Rad. Oncol. 48(2000) No. 3, 219. Summary 9 The BC99087 project "Helical Electron Beam Avoidance Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer Treatments " completed

  7. Functional imaging in treatment planning in radiation therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos A; Bradley, Jeffrey; Chao, Clifford K S; Grigsby, Perry W; Mutic, Sasa; Malyapa, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable technical developments obtained in radiation oncology have resulted in an increasing use of image-based treatment planning in radiation therapy for three-dimensional and intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and image-guided brachytherapy. There has been increased use of computer-based record and verify systems as well as electronic portal imaging to enhance treatment delivery. From the data presented it is evident that PET scanning and other functional imaging techniques play a major role in the definition of tumor extent and staging of patients with cancer. The recent introduction of a combined CT and PET scanner will substantially simplify image acquisition and treatment planning.

  8. Treatment of pathologic fracture following postoperative radiation therapy: clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Man; Park, Min-Hyeog; Yun, Seong-Won; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    Pathologic fractures are caused by diseases that lead to weakness of the bone structure. This process sometimes occurs owing to bony change after radiation therapy. Treatment of pathologic fractures may be difficult because of previous radiation therapy. In this study, we analyzed clinical and radiographic data and progress of five patients with mandibular pathological fractures who had received postoperative radiation therapy following cancer surgery. Patients received an average radiation dose of 59.2 (SD, 7.2) Gy. Four of five patients exhibited bone union regardless of whether open reduction and internal fixation (OR/IF) was performed. Patients have the potential to heal after postoperative radiation therapy. Treatment of a pathologic fracture following postoperative radiation therapy, such as traditional treatment for other types of fractures, may be performed using OR/IF or CR. OR/IF may be selected in cases of significant bone deviation, small remaining bone volume, or occlusive change. Patients have the potential to heal after postoperative radiation therapy.

  9. Radiation Therapy in Keloids Treatment: History, Strategy, Effectiveness, and Complication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Yang, Elan; Yu, Nan-Ze; Long, Xiao

    2017-07-20

    Radiation therapy combined with surgical excision was considered as one of the most effective treatment plans for keloid lesions. However, there was no unanimity found over present literatures regarding the issue on optimized treatment strategy for keloids. We here provide a comprehensive review over this issue and emphasize on the influencing factors. The data analyzed in this review were searched from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE databases. The original articles and critical reviews discussing the application of radiation therapy in keloids treatment were selected for this review. The application of radiation therapy has transitioned from simple superficial X-ray irradiation to brachytherapy. Furthermore, several factors including radiation type, dose, fraction, interval, and complications were reviewed, and the results revealed that these factors were significant toward clinical outcome at various levels. Both past and present evidence support the idea that combination therapy of radiation and surgical therapy is safe and feasible. However, the optimization of treatment strategy was based on different radiation types and should take dose, fractions, interval, and complications into consideration, which will then decrease the rate of recurrence and increase the level of satisfaction.

  10. Radiation Therapy in Keloids Treatment: History, Strategy, Effectiveness, and Complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Yang, Elan; Yu, Nan-Ze; Long, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Radiation therapy combined with surgical excision was considered as one of the most effective treatment plans for keloid lesions. However, there was no unanimity found over present literatures regarding the issue on optimized treatment strategy for keloids. We here provide a comprehensive review over this issue and emphasize on the influencing factors. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were searched from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Study Selection: The original articles and critical reviews discussing the application of radiation therapy in keloids treatment were selected for this review. Results: The application of radiation therapy has transitioned from simple superficial X-ray irradiation to brachytherapy. Furthermore, several factors including radiation type, dose, fraction, interval, and complications were reviewed, and the results revealed that these factors were significant toward clinical outcome at various levels. Conclusions: Both past and present evidence support the idea that combination therapy of radiation and surgical therapy is safe and feasible. However, the optimization of treatment strategy was based on different radiation types and should take dose, fractions, interval, and complications into consideration, which will then decrease the rate of recurrence and increase the level of satisfaction. PMID:28685723

  11. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy Print A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  12. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  13. 3D treatment planning and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image-based treatment planning and new delivery technologies have spurred the implementation of external beam radiation therapy techniques, in which the high-dose region is conformed much more closely to the target volume than previously possible, thus reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose. This form of external beam irradiation is referred to as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). 3DCRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation oncology process; it represents a radical change in practice, particularly for the radiation oncologist. Defining target volumes and organs at risk in 3D by drawing contours on CT images on a slice-by-slice basis, as opposed to drawing beam portals on a simulator radiograph, can be challenging, because radiation oncologists are generally not well trained in cross-sectional imaging. Currently, the 3DCRT approach will increase the time and effort required by physicians inexperienced with 3D treatment planning. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more advanced form of 3DCRT, but there is considerable developmental work remaining. The instrumentation and methods used for IMRT quality assurance procedures and testing are not well established. Computer optimization cost functions are too simplistic, and thus time-consuming. Subjective plan evaluation by the radiation oncologist is still the norm. In addition, many fundamental questions regarding IMRT remain unanswered. For example, the radiobiophysical consequences of altered time-dose-fraction are unknown. Also, the fact that there is much greater dose heterogeneity for both the target and normal critical structures with IMRT compared to traditional irradiation techniques challenges current radiation oncology planning principles. However, this new process of planning and treatment delivery shows significant potential for improving the therapeutic ratio. In addition, while inefficient today, these systems, when fully developed

  14. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  15. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  16. Application of Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-03-01

    A carcinoma is a malignant cancer that emerges from epithelial cells in structures through out the body.It invades the critical organs, could metastasize or spread to lymph nodes.IMRT is an advanced mode of radiation therapy treatment for cancer. It delivers more conformal doses to malignant tumors sparing the critical organs by modulating the intensity of radiation beam.An automated software, HART (S. Jang et al.,2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812) was used for efficient analysis of dose volume histograms (DVH) for multiple targets and critical organs in four IMRT treatment plans for each patient. IMRT data for ten head and neck cancer patients were exported as AAPM/RTOG format files from a commercial treatment planning system at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH).HART extracted DVH statistics were used to evaluate plan indices and to analyze dose tolerance of critical structures at prescription dose (PD) for each patient. Mean plan indices (n=10) were found to be in good agreement with published results for Linac based plans. The least irradiated volume at tolerance dose (TD50) was observed for brainstem and the highest volume for larynx in SIB treatment techniques. Thus HART, an open source platform, has extensive clinical implications in IMRT treatments.

  17. Image-guided radiation therapy for treatment delivery and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Leah Kayomi

    Target conformity and normal tissue sparing provided by modern radiation therapy techniques often result in steep dose gradients, which increase the need for more accurate patient setup and treatment delivery. Image guidance is starting to play a major role in determining the accuracy of treatment setup. A typical objective of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is to minimize differences between planned and delivered treatment by imaging the patient prior to delivery. This step verifies and corrects for patient setup and is referred to as setup verification. This dissertation evaluates the efficacy of daily imaging for setup verification and investigates new uses of IGRT for potential improvements in treatment delivery. The necessity of daily imaging can first be determined by assessing differences in setup corrections between patient groups. Therefore, the first objective of this investigation was to evaluate the application of IGRT for setup verification by quantifying differences in patient positioning for several anatomical disease sites. Detailed analysis of setup corrections for brain, head and neck, lung, and prostate treatments is presented. In this analysis, large setup errors were observed for prostate treatments. Further assessment of prostate treatments was performed, and patient-specific causes of setup errors investigated. Setup corrections are applied via rigid shifts or rotations of the patient or machine, but anatomical deformations occur for which rigid shifts cannot correct. Fortunately, IGRT provides images on which anatomical changes occurring throughout the course of treatment can be detected. From those images, the efficacy of IGRT in ensuring accurate treatment delivery can be evaluated and improved by determining delivered doses and adapting the plan during treatment. The second objective of this dissertation was to explore new applications of IGRT to further improve treatment. By utilizing daily IGRT images, a retrospective analysis of

  18. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ...

  19. Dianhydrogalactitol and radiation therapy. Treatment of supratentorial glioma.

    PubMed

    Eagan, R T; Childs, D S; Layton, D D; Laws, E R; Bisel, H F; Holbrook, M A; Fleming, T R

    1979-05-11

    Dianhydrogalactitol was the most active of 177 agents tested against a mouse ependymoblastoma tumor. We conducted a prospectively randomized trial comparing whole-brain irradiation alone vs identical irradiation plus dianhydrogalactitol in 42 patients with grade 3 and 4 supratentorial astrocytomas. Patients receiving dianhydrogalactitol in addition to irradiation had a significantly longer median survival time (67 vs 35 weeks) than did patients receiving only irradiation. The major toxic effect of dianhydrogalactitol is hematologic suppression of a cumulative nature. Dianhydrogalactitol may play an important role (in conjunction with radiation therapy) in the initial treatment of patients with supratentorial glioma. Our data may indicate that the mouse ependymoblastoma system is a useful screen for agents to be used in the treatment of human glioma.

  20. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Proton therapy is another kind of radiation used to ... than using x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  1. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  2. Scope of nanotechnology-based radiation therapy and thermotherapy methods in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Mohamadreza K; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2012-10-01

    The main aim of nanomedicine is to revolutionize the health care system and find effective approaches to fighting fatal diseases. Therapeutic beams, which are employed in radiation therapy, do not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and must rely on targeting the radiation beams to specific cells. Interestingly, the application of nanoscale particles in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing toxicity in tumors and reducing it in normal tissues. This review focuses on approaches to nanotechnology-based cancer radiation therapy methods such as radionuclide therapy, photodynamic therapy, and neutron capture therapy. Moreover, we have investigated nanotechnology-based thermotherapy methods, including hyperthermia and thermoablation, as non-ionizing modalities of treatment using thermal radiation. The results strongly demonstrate that nanotechnology-based cancer radiation therapy and thermotherapy methods hold substantial potential to improve the efficacy of anticancer radiation and thermotherapy modalities.

  3. Image correlation techniques in radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Chen, G T; Pelizzari, C A

    1989-01-01

    A technique to spatially correlate multi-modality or serial imaging studies of the head is described. Surface fitting of a well defined structure in different imaging studies is used to determine the optimal three dimensional transformation between the coordinate systems. The transformation is then used to map volumes of interest between studies or to reslice the studies along comparable planes. The approach is feasible in the presence of variations in slice thickness, pixel size, imaging plane, or head position, and for correlations between different modalities. Correlations have been performed between serial CT, CT/MRI, and PET/CT/MRI studies. Phantom studies and clinical cases are presented. Accuracy is typically on the order of the sum of the pixel sizes between studies. Applications in radiation therapy treatment planning are described.

  4. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. The radiation may be delivered by a machine outside the body ( external-beam radiation therapy ), or ... by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. CT scans are often used in treatment planning ...

  5. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to three years. If I choose surgery, will radiation treatment still be required? If your surgery is ... option with your physician team. If I choose radiation therapy, will surgical treatment still be an option? ...

  6. Radiation therapy for adjunctive treatment of adrenal cortical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Markoe, A.M.; Serber, W.; Micaily, B.; Brady, L.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease which is primarily approached surgically. There have been few reports of the efficacy of radiation therapy and, for the most part, these have been anecdotal. This paper reports on the potential adjuvant role of radiation therapy after surgical excision of primary adrenal cortical carcinoma and also comments about the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for metastases. We have identified eight patients treated for adrenal cortical carcinomas at Hahnemann University Hospital (HUH) from 1962 until the present and have also identified five patients with the same diagnosis at Philadelphia General Hospital (PGH) from 1962 until its close in 1975. These two groups are examined separately. In the PGH group, in which two patients were diagnosed at autopsy and only one patient was treated by radiation therapy, the median survival was between 0 and 1 month for Stage IV disease with the only patient surviving to 6 months being that patient receiving radiation therapy. In the HUH group, five of eight patients were treated adjunctively after diagnosis, one was not and two received palliative therapy. The median survival for treated Stage III patients was between 34 months and 7 years. The suggestion, based on a limited patient series, is that patients treated postoperatively to the tumor bed and nodal areas in Stage III disease may have improved survival over historic series and improved local control.

  7. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  8. Radiation therapy in the multimodal treatment approach of pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gerd; Kocher, Martin; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Paulsen, Frank; Jeremic, Branislav; Müller, Rolf-Peter; Bamberg, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Pituitary tumors are relatively uncommon, comprising 10-12% of all intracranial tumors. The treatment consisting of surgery, radiotherapy and drug therapy or a combination of these modalities is aimed at the control of tumor cell proliferation and--in endocrine active tumors--the reduction of hormone secretion. However, the slow proliferation characteristics of pituitary tumors necessitate long-term studies for the evaluation of the treatment results. In the last decade there has been continuous improvement in surgical procedures, radiotherapy techniques and drug generation. In this paper, literature will be reviewed to assess the role of modern radiotherapy and radiosurgery in the management of pituitary adenomas. Nowadays, magnetic resonance imaging for the definition of the target volume and a real three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning with field conformation and the possibility for non-coplanar irradiation has to be recommended. Most groups irradiate these benign tumors with single doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy up to a total dose of 45 Gy or 50.4 Gy in extensive parasellar adenomas. Adenomas are mostly small, well circumscribed lesions, and have, therefore, attracted the use of stereotactically guided high-precision irradiation techniques which allow extreme focussing and provide steep dose gradients with selective treatment of the target and optimal protection of the surrounding brain tissue. Radiation therapy controls tumor growth in 80-98% of patients with non-secreting adenomas and 67-89% for endocrine active tumors. Reviewing the recent literature including endocrine active and non-secreting adenomas, irradiated postoperatively or in case of recurrence the 5-, 10- and 15-year local control rates amount 92%, 89% and 79%. In cases of microprolactinoma primary therapy consists of dopamine agonists. Irradiation should be preferred in patients with macroprolactinomas, when drug therapy and/or surgery failed or for patients medically unsuitable for surgery. Reduction

  9. Treatment charts in radiation therapy. An analysis of European treatment records.

    PubMed

    Maciá, M; Rubio, A M; De Blas, R; Monfa, C; Bonet, A

    1993-02-01

    The radiotherapy treatment chart (dose prescription, set-up parameters, dose computation and daily dose recording form) represents an important working tool in radiotherapy, not only as a compilation of data, but also as a method of communication among physicians, physicists and technicians. In addition to administrative and medical data, physical and simulation data that are indispensable for the daily accurate reproduction of the therapy procedures should be recorded, as well as accurate daily entries of the fractional and cumulative absorbed doses. Moreover, any radiation therapy quality assurance programme must rely on the accessibility of the radiation treatment history and a correct record of the therapy protocol in order to be verifiable. We have analysed the treatment charts of 92 European Departments of Radiation Oncology, with the aim of identifying their salient characteristics and data recorded. The study shows strong differences among the charts analysed, not only in the amount of information recorded, but also in the kind of data and concepts used.

  10. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Junyi Mart, Christopher; Bayouth, John

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  11. Treatment of endometrial carcinoma with radiation therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Kupelian, P A; Eifel, P J; Tornos, C; Burke, T W; Delclos, L; Oswald, M J

    1993-11-15

    complications of radiation therapy. Radical radiotherapy achieved acceptable DSS and local control rates in patients with medically or surgically inoperable uterine carcinoma. However for patients with localized disease, such treatment is justified only when the operative risk exceeds the 10-15% uterine recurrence rate expected with radiation alone.

  12. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mouw, Kent W.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith; Grabowski, Eric; Mukai, Shizuo; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  13. Optimizing global liver function in radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Victor W.; Epelman, Marina A.; Wang, Hesheng; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Matuszak, Martha M.

    2016-09-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients differ in both pre-treatment liver function (e.g. due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatment) and radiosensitivity, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work investigates three treatment planning optimization models that minimize risk of toxicity: two consider both voxel-based pre-treatment liver function and local-function-based radiosensitivity with dose; one considers only dose. Each model optimizes different objective functions (varying in complexity of capturing the influence of dose on liver function) subject to the same dose constraints and are tested on 2D synthesized and 3D clinical cases. The normal-liver-based objective functions are the linearized equivalent uniform dose (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) (conventional ‘\\ell \\text{EUD} model’), the so-called perfusion-weighted \\ell \\text{EUD} (\\text{fEUD} ) (proposed ‘fEUD model’), and post-treatment global liver function (GLF) (proposed ‘GLF model’), predicted by a new liver-perfusion-based dose-response model. The resulting \\ell \\text{EUD} , fEUD, and GLF plans delivering the same target \\ell \\text{EUD} are compared with respect to their post-treatment function and various dose-based metrics. Voxel-based portal venous liver perfusion, used as a measure of local function, is computed using DCE-MRI. In cases used in our experiments, the GLF plan preserves up to 4.6 % ≤ft(7.5 % \\right) more liver function than the fEUD (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) plan does in 2D cases, and up to 4.5 % ≤ft(5.6 % \\right) in 3D cases. The GLF and fEUD plans worsen in \\ell \\text{EUD} of functional liver on average by 1.0 Gy and 0.5 Gy in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. Liver perfusion information can be used during treatment planning to minimize the risk of toxicity by improving expected GLF; the degree of benefit varies with perfusion pattern. Although fEUD model optimization is computationally inexpensive and

  14. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  15. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ...

  16. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  17. Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in the Adjuvant and Definitive Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T. Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHC) are rare tumors for which large randomized studies regarding the use of radiation are not available. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of IHC in a large group of patients. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,839 patients with IHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results: Patients received either surgery alone (25%), radiation therapy alone (10%), surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (7%) or no treatment (58%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 22-102 years); 52% of patients were male and 81% were Caucasian. Median OS was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-13), 6 (95% CI, 5-6), 7 (95% CI, 6-8), and 3 months for surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy, sugery alone, radiation therapy alone, and no treatment, respectively. The OS was significantly different between surgery alone and surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.014) and radiation therapy alone and no treatment (p < 0.0001). Use of surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy conferred the greatest benefit on OS (HR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.34-0.47), followed by surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.44-0.54) and radiation therapy alone (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59-0.77) compared with no treatment, on multivariate analysis. Propensity score adjusted hazard ratios (controlling for age, race/ethnicity, stage, and year of diagnosis) were also significant (surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy vs. surgery alone (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96); radiation therapy alone vs. no treatment (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76)). Conclusions: The study results suggest that adjuvant and definitive radiation treatment prolong survival, although cure rates remain low. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologics to the treatment of

  18. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Methods Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. Results The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. Conclusion The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department. PMID:26451241

  19. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  20. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation Therapy (Brachytherapy) Systemic Radiation Therapy Coping With Radiation Treatment Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is made ...

  1. [Salvage treatments following prostate radiation therapy: role of the urologist].

    PubMed

    Soulié, M; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    The management of recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy or brachytherapy is non-standardized and rapidly evolving. Local recurrence is observed on average in 30% of cases several years following irradiation. A key challenge is to determine the site of recurrence and imaging (MRI and PET choline) coupled to prostate biopsies are important to confirm the local character. Salvage therapy performed by the urologist can then control the situation. Radical prostatectomy subject to strict technical conditions is one of the most efficient local treatments, however it comes at the cost of significant urinary morbidity; minimally invasive therapies (focused ultrasound and cryotherapy) have also their place in specific indications. Each clinical situation should be discussed in pluridisciplinary meetings integrating the oncologic and functional status at recurrence, the risk/benefit ratio of each treatment, the patient's wishes and probability of survival.

  2. Radiation therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Janean L

    2010-04-01

    Although the diagnosis of cancer is relatively uncommon in horses, tumors do occur in this species. Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy are traditional cancer treatments in all species. In equine patients, surgery has often been the only treatment offered; however, not all tumors can be controlled with surgery alone. In small animal oncology, newer and better therapies are in demand and available. Radiation therapy is often used to control or palliate tumors locally, especially to satisfy clients who demand sophisticated treatments. The large size of equine patients can make radiation therapy difficult, but it is a valuable tool for treating cancer and should not be overlooked when treating horses.

  3. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H. Omar Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  4. Understanding Radiation Therapy: A Guide for Patients and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Treatments and Side Effects Treatment Types Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy is one of the most ... it works and what to expect. Learn About Radiation Therapy Radiation Therapy Basics External Beam Radiation Therapy ...

  5. [Treatment of radiation burns with surgery and cell therapy. A report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Bey, Eric; Duhamel, Patrick; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; de Revel, Thierry; Carsin, Hervé; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of severe radiation burns remains a difficult challenge. Conventional surgical treatment (excision, skin grafting, skin or muscle flaps) often fails to prevent unpredictable and uncontrolled extension of the necrotic process. We report two clinical cases in which surgery was combined with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy. Clinical outcome was good and there was no recurrence of radiation inflammatory waves observed in the first patient after one year. This novel multi-disciplinary therapeutic approach, combining physical techniques, modern plastic surgery and cell therapy should improve the medical management of severe localized radiation burns.

  6. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  7. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Matthew T; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Mamtani, Ronac; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Fraker, Douglas L; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network--recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

  9. Influence of planning time and treatment complexity on radiation therapy errors.

    PubMed

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Zeng, Jing; Carlson, Joshua; Spady, Phil; Jordan, Loucille; Kane, Gabrielle; Ford, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning is a complex process with potential for error. We hypothesized that shorter time from simulation to treatment would result in rushed work and higher incidence of errors. We examined treatment planning factors predictive for near-miss events. Treatments delivered from March 2012 through October 2014 were analyzed. Near-miss events were prospectively recorded and coded for severity on a 0 to 4 scale; only grade 3-4 (potentially severe/critical) events were studied in this report. For 4 treatment types (3-dimensional conformal, intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT], neutron), logistic regression was performed to test influence of treatment planning time and clinical variables on near-miss events. There were 2257 treatment courses during the study period, with 322 grade 3-4 near-miss events. SBRT treatments had more frequent events than the other 3 treatment types (18% vs 11%, P = .04). For the 3-dimensional conformal group (1354 treatments), univariate analysis showed several factors predictive of near-miss events: longer time from simulation to first treatment (P = .01), treatment of primary site versus metastasis (P < .001), longer treatment course (P < .001), and pediatric versus adult patient (P = .002). However, on multivariate regression only pediatric versus adult patient remained predictive of events (P = 0.02). For the intensity modulated radiation therapy, SBRT, and neutron groups, time between simulation and first treatment was not found to be predictive of near-miss events on univariate or multivariate regression. When controlling for treatment technique and other clinical factors, there was no relationship between time spent in radiation treatment planning and near-miss events. SBRT and pediatric treatments were more error-prone, indicating that clinical and technical complexity of treatments should be taken into account when targeting safety interventions. Copyright © 2015 American

  10. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  11. Radiation therapy, an important mode of treatment for head and neck chemodectomas.

    PubMed

    Verniers, D A; Keus, R B; Schouwenburg, P F; Bartelink, H

    1992-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1990, 22 patients with 44 chemodectomas in the head and neck region were seen at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam. All patients were treated with radiation therapy (17 patients with radiation therapy only and 5 in combination with surgery). One patient was treated two times with an interval of 12 years at each side of the neck. Standard dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. A radiation portal arrangement with oblique fields with paired wedges was used most frequently. The follow-up period ranged from 1 year to 20 years. Two recurrences at 2 and 9 years after treatment were observed. The actuarial local control rate was 88% at 10 years follow-up. Comparison of the results of surgery and radiotherapy demonstrates that radiation therapy is an effective treatment modality without mutilation or severe late morbidity for chemodectomas in the head and neck region.

  12. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, Charles; Lang, Philippe; Dessard-Diana, Bernadette; Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  13. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of sarcoma of soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tepper, J.E.; Suit, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The data presented indicate that the combination of function-preserving surgery and radiation therapy is of value in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity. Local control is obtained in approximately 85% of patients and with survival results comparable to those obtained in patients treated with radical surgery. The one randomized series of patients treated with conservative resection and radiation compared to amputation has shown no difference in overall survival. These local control results have been obtained while maintaining good functional results. Combined local resection and radiation is an appropriate treatment option in a large proportion of patients with soft tissue sarcomas.

  14. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hälg, R A; Besserer, J; Boschung, M; Mayer, S; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U

    2014-05-21

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  15. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, R. A.; Besserer, J.; Boschung, M.; Mayer, S.; Lomax, A. J.; Schneider, U.

    2014-05-01

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  16. Radiation therapy: appropriateness review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Review of the appropriateness of radiation therapy services for the Finger Lakes Region was based on the standards adopted by the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency (FLHSA) Executive Committee. The standards were developed to address considerations of availability, accessibility, acceptability, continuity, need, financial viability, cost effectiveness, and quality. The FLHSA found that megavoltage radiation therapy services currently being provided are appropriate for residents of the Finger Lakes Region. The overall pattern of performance was satisfactory. The following were among the findings: (1) radiation therapy services are accessible to patients in terms of travel time, hours of operation, and referral source; (2) all regional equipment meets minimum standards for source axis distance and rotational capability; (3) the nine megavoltage radiation therapy units meet the needs of both the regional population and the substantial number of persons from adjacent areas who travel to the Region for radiation therapy services; (4) minimum utilization standards for cases and treatments are met or nearly met by all institutional providers; (5) the two private providers of radiation therapy services are underutilized; and (6) each institutional provider's cost per treatment falls within the accepted range.

  17. The Treatment Responses in Cases of Radiation Therapy to Portal Vein Thrombosis in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-J.; Hsu, H.-C.; Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Huang, E.-Y.; Fang, F.-M.; Lu, S.-N.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To review the response to radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and determine the factors favoring its efficacy. Methods and Materials: Patients with HCC and PVT referred for radiation therapy between 1997 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had undergone treatment to primary HCC before radiation or had extrahepatic metastasis were excluded. A radiation dose of 60 Gy with 2 to 3Gy per fraction was prescribed. Clinical features before therapy were investigated, and the most significant imaging change after radiotherapy was regarded as the treatment response. Survival times were compared and the hazard ratios of independent variables were determined. Results: The treatment response rate of the 326 patients included in the study was 25.2% (n = 82). The median survival times were 13.3, 11.6, 9.0, 4.5, and 2.1 months for complete response, partial response, vascular transformation, no response, and the lost follow-up patients, respectively. Statistically significant differences in survival were not found among responder groups (p = 0.224-0.916) but were found between responders and nonresponders (p = 0.002). The most significant independent variables associated with survival (p < 0.001) were performance status and radiation dose. Minor independent factors were ascites, alfa-fetoprotein, albumin, and HBsAg (p = 0.009-0.038). In patients with favorable performance status, those with no more than one minor risk factor had a superior prognosis after radiation therapy (p = 0.013). This result was verified by a review of similar patients in 2006. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for selected HCC patients with PVT.

  18. Nonisocentric Treatment Strategy for Breast Radiation Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Horst, Kathleen C.; Bush, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a nonisocentric treatment strategy as a special form of station parameter optimized radiation therapy, to improve sparing of critical structures while preserving target coverage in breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials To minimize the volume of exposed lung and heart in breast irradiation, we propose a novel nonisocentric treatment scheme by strategically placing nonconverging beams with multiple isocenters. As its name suggests, the central axes of these beams do not intersect at a single isocenter as in conventional breast treatment planning. Rather, the isocenter locations and beam directions are carefully selected, in that each beam is only responsible for a certain subvolume of the target, so as to minimize the volume of irradiated normal tissue. When put together, the beams will provide an adequate coverage of the target and expose only a minimal amount of normal tissue to radiation. We apply the nonisocentric planning technique to 2 previously treated clinical cases (breast and chest wall). Results The proposed nonisocentric technique substantially improved sparing of the ipsilateral lung. Compared with conventional isocentric plans using 2 tangential beams, the mean lung dose was reduced by 38% and 50% using the proposed technique, and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving ≥20 Gy was reduced by a factor of approximately 2 and 3 for the breast and chest wall cases, respectively. The improvement in lung sparing is even greater compared with volumetric modulated arc therapy. Conclusions A nonisocentric implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy has been proposed for breast radiation therapy. The new treatment scheme overcomes the limitations of existing approaches and affords a useful tool for conformal breast radiation therapy, especially in cases with extreme chest wall curvature. PMID:24606852

  19. Nonisocentric Treatment Strategy for Breast Radiation Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang Xing, Lei; Horst, Kathleen C.; Bush, Karl

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To propose a nonisocentric treatment strategy as a special form of station parameter optimized radiation therapy, to improve sparing of critical structures while preserving target coverage in breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: To minimize the volume of exposed lung and heart in breast irradiation, we propose a novel nonisocentric treatment scheme by strategically placing nonconverging beams with multiple isocenters. As its name suggests, the central axes of these beams do not intersect at a single isocenter as in conventional breast treatment planning. Rather, the isocenter locations and beam directions are carefully selected, in that each beam is only responsible for a certain subvolume of the target, so as to minimize the volume of irradiated normal tissue. When put together, the beams will provide an adequate coverage of the target and expose only a minimal amount of normal tissue to radiation. We apply the nonisocentric planning technique to 2 previously treated clinical cases (breast and chest wall). Results: The proposed nonisocentric technique substantially improved sparing of the ipsilateral lung. Compared with conventional isocentric plans using 2 tangential beams, the mean lung dose was reduced by 38% and 50% using the proposed technique, and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving ≥20 Gy was reduced by a factor of approximately 2 and 3 for the breast and chest wall cases, respectively. The improvement in lung sparing is even greater compared with volumetric modulated arc therapy. Conclusions: A nonisocentric implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy has been proposed for breast radiation therapy. The new treatment scheme overcomes the limitations of existing approaches and affords a useful tool for conformal breast radiation therapy, especially in cases with extreme chest wall curvature.

  20. [Brain metastases: Focal treatment (surgery and radiation therapy) and cognitive consequences].

    PubMed

    Reygagne, Emmanuelle; Du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Berger, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases represent the first cause of malignant brain tumor. Without radiation therapy, prognosis was poor with fast neurological deterioration, and a median overall survival of one month. Nowadays, therapeutic options depend on brain metastases presentation, extra brain disease, performance status and estimated prognostic (DS GPA). Therefore, for oligometastatic brain patients with a better prognosis, this therapeutic modality is controversial. In fact, whole-brain radiation therapy improves neurological outcomes, but it can also induce late neuro-cognitive sequelae for long-term survivors of brain metastases. Thus, in this strategy for preserving good cognitive functions, stereotactic radiation therapy is a promising treatment. Delivering precisely targeted radiation in few high-doses in one to four brain metastases, allows to reduce radiation damage to normal tissues and it should allow to decrease radiation-induced cognitive decline. In this paper, we will discuss about therapeutic strategies (radiation therapy and surgery) with their neuro-cognitive consequences for brain metastases patients and future concerning preservation of cognitive functions. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of functional imaging in treatment plan optimization of stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Jumeau, Raphael; Deantonio, Letizia; Adib, Salim; Godin, Sarah; Zeverino, Michele; Moeckli, Raphael; Bourhis, Jean; Prior, John O; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2016-10-13

    We report the first known instance of the clinical use of 99mTc-mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for the optimization of radiotherapy treatment planning and for the follow-up of acute toxicity in a patient undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. In our experience, HBS allowed the identification and the sparing of more functioning liver areas, thus potentially reducing the risk of radiation-induced liver toxicity.

  2. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Edward W.; Jung, David L.; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H.; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. Methods: A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Conclusion: Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine. PMID:27260562

  3. Molecular PET/CT imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Habib; Vees, Hansjörg; Wissmeyer, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) during the past decade has evolved rapidly from that of a pure research tool to a methodology of enormous clinical potential. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET is currently the most widely used probe in the diagnosis, staging, assessment of tumor response to treatment, and radiation therapy planning because metabolic changes generally precede the more conventionally measured parameter of change in tumor size. Data accumulated rapidly during the last decade, thus validating the efficacy of FDG imaging and many other tracers in a wide variety of malignant tumors with sensitivities and specificities often in the high 90 percentile range. As a result, PET/computed tomography (CT) had a significant impact on the management of patients because it obviated the need for further evaluation, guided further diagnostic procedures, and assisted in planning therapy for a considerable number of patients. On the other hand, the progress in radiation therapy technology has been enormous during the last two decades, now offering the possibility to plan highly conformal radiation dose distributions through the use of sophisticated beam targeting techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using tomotherapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, and many other promising technologies for sculpted three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution. The foundation of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy lies in the use of advanced imaging technology for improved definition of tumor target volumes, thus relating the absorbed dose information to image-based patient representations. This review documents technological advancements in the field concentrating on the conceptual role of molecular PET/CT imaging in radiation therapy treatment planning and related image processing issues with special emphasis on segmentation of medical images for the purpose of defining target volumes. There is still much more work to be done and many of

  4. Radiation therapy for the treatment of skin Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tsao, May N; Sinclair, Emily; Assaad, Dalal; Fialkov, Jeff; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions are purplish, reddish blue or dark brown/black macules, plaques or nodules which involve the skin and occasionally internal organs. Most patients with KS have a long indolent chronic course. A retrospective review was undertaken for all KS skin patients treated with radiotherapy at a tertiary cancer centre from Jan. 2, 1999 to Dec. 31, 2014 (inclusive). A total of 47 patients with KS (43 classical, 0 African, 1 iatrogenic, 3 AIDS related) were seen in the multidisciplinary clinic. Out of this group, 17 patients (5 females and 12 males, 14 classical, 0 African, 0 iatrogenic, 3 AIDS related) with 97 KS skin sites were treated with local external beam radiotherapy. An additional 18 skin sites were treated with repeat radiotherapy. The radiotherapy dose ranged from 6 Gy in 1 fraction to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with the most common dose fractionation scheme being 8 Gy in 1 fraction or 20 Gy in 5 daily fractions. For the previously untreated KS sites, 87% responded to radiation [30% complete response (CR) and 57% partial response (PR)]. Thirteen percent of KS sites treated with radiation progressed. For the skin sites which were treated with repeat radiotherapy, 0% showed CRs, 50% PRs and 50% had continued progression. The majority of KS skin lesions (87%) responded to radiotherapy. Patients experience minimal side effects from the palliative radiation regimens used. KS skin lesions which progress despite radiation are unlikely to show CR with repeat radiotherapy. In our experience 50% of skin KS will have partial regression with repeat radiotherapy and 50% will have continued progression.

  5. Hypofractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    Hypofractionated radiation refers to the use of fewer, larger-dose radiation treatments that are usually given over a shorter time period compared to conventional radiation fraction sizes. Randomized trials of hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (WBI) have demonstrated comparable outcomes as conventional fractionation. For a higher-risk population for local recurrence, a phase 3 trial by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) is currently studying hypofractionated WBI with a concurrent tumor bed boost over 3 weeks. Accelerated partial breast irradiation limits radiation to the region of the tumor bed for 1-3 weeks and is the subject of an ongoing randomized trial by the National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project and RTOG. Questions remain for hypofractionation about optimal patient selection, radiation techniques, and the risk of late toxicity. But results from current trials could make hypofractionation more widely accepted for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

  6. The use of megavoltage radiation therapy in the treatment of thymomas in rabbits: 19 cases.

    PubMed

    Andres, K M; Kent, M; Siedlecki, C T; Mayer, J; Brandão, J; Hawkins, M G; Morrisey, J K; Quesenberry, K; Valli, V E; Bennett, R A

    2012-06-01

    An overall median survival time (MST) and prognostic factors in rabbits with thymomas treated with megavoltage radiation therapy (RT) were determined in this multi-institutional retrospective case analysis. Medical records for 19 rabbits with suspected or confirmed thymomas treated with RT were evaluated for data including signalment, haematological and serum biochemistry abnormalities, presence of pleural effusion, radiation plan, body weight, total radiation dose and institution administering RT. Statistical significance of these factors related to overall survival was assessed. An overall MST for all 19 rabbits was 313 days; exclusion of 3 rabbits that died acutely during the first 14 days of RT yielded a MST of 727 days. The only factor associated with a significantly decreased survival time was having a body weight lower than mean body weight of 1.57 kg. Radiation treatment-associated complications were infrequent and included radiation-induced myocardial failure, radiation pneumonitis and alopecia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Hydrogen therapy may be an effective and specific novel treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cui, Jianguo; Sun, Quan; Cai, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the universe, however, it is seldom regarded as a therapeutic gas. Recent studies show that inhaled hydrogen gas (H(2)) has antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion injury and stroke by selectively reducing hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. It is also well known that more than a half of the ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals. Studies have show that reducing hydroxyl radicals can significantly improve the protection of cells from radiation damage. In like manner, we hypothesize that hydrogen therapy may be an effective, specific and unique treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

  9. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, Stefania; Nigro, Roberta; Oliviero, Caterina; Marchioni, Chiara; Esposito, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Mancosu, Pietro; Marino, Carmelo; Russo, Serenella; Stasi, Michele; Strigari, Lidia; Veronese, Ivan; Landoni, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  10. Late effects of radiation therapy in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Fraass, B.A.; Glatstein, E.

    1982-04-01

    In the last two decades, a considerable amount of clinical and experimental animal data has been accumulated regarding the tolerance of the major normal tissues and organs traversed by the radiation beams in treating Hodgkin's disease. Typically, the tolerance of several tissues and organs must be considered in designing the very large radiation portals such as the mantle. Today, sophisticated machinery such as computerized tomography scanners, simulators, computers, and linear accelerators are available to improve the radiation planning and treatment of Hodgkin's disease. In this paper, researchers discuss the late effects of radiation therapy to the lung, heart, thyroid, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and the gonads of adults with Hodgkin's disease. Emphasis is placed on our recommendations for modifications of radiation technique to improve the complication-free cure rate.

  11. Review of Fast Monte Carlo Codes for Dose Calculation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement in radiation therapy is a fast and accurate treatment planning system. This system, using computed tomography (CT) data, direction, and characteristics of the beam, calculates the dose at all points of the patient's volume. The two main factors in treatment planning system are accuracy and speed. According to these factors, various generations of treatment planning systems are developed. This article is a review of the Fast Monte Carlo treatment planning algorithms, which are accurate and fast at the same time. The Monte Carlo techniques are based on the transport of each individual particle (e.g., photon or electron) in the tissue. The transport of the particle is done using the physics of the interaction of the particles with matter. Other techniques transport the particles as a group. For a typical dose calculation in radiation therapy the code has to transport several millions particles, which take a few hours, therefore, the Monte Carlo techniques are accurate, but slow for clinical use. In recent years, with the development of the ‘fast’ Monte Carlo systems, one is able to perform dose calculation in a reasonable time for clinical use. The acceptable time for dose calculation is in the range of one minute. There is currently a growing interest in the fast Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and there are many commercial treatment planning systems that perform dose calculation in radiation therapy based on the Monte Carlo technique. PMID:22606661

  12. Treatment failure prediction for head-and-neck cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, H; Khouri, L; Lopes, M C; Dias, J; Ferreira, B

    2016-06-01

    Treatment outcome prediction is an important emerging topic in oncologic care. To support radiation oncologists on their decisions, with individualized, tailored treatment regimens increasingly becoming the standard of care, accurate tools to predict tumour response to treatment are needed. The goal of this work is to identify the most determinant factor(s) for treatment response aiming to develop prediction models that robustly estimate tumour response to radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. A population-based cohort study was performed on 92 patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiation from 2007 until 2014 at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Coimbra (IPOCFG). Correlation analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis were conducted in order to explore the predictive power of the considered predictors. Performance of the models is expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. A nomogram to predict treatment failure was developed. Significant prognostic factors for treatment failure, after multivariate regression, were older age, non-concomitant radiation therapy and larger primary tumour volume. A regression model with these predictors revealed an AUC of .78 for an independent data set. For patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with definitive radiation, we have developed a prediction nomogram based on models that presented good discriminative ability in making predictions of tumour response to treatment. The probability of treatment failure is higher for older patients with larger tumours treated with non-concomitant radiation. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning solution for kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonier, Marcus; Chu, William; Lalani, Nafisha; Erler, Darby; Cheung, Patrick; Korol, Renee

    2016-01-01

    To develop a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning solution in the treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-arc VMAT plans (n = 5) were compared with clinically delivered step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with planning target volume coverage normalized between techniques. Target volume conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) dose, treatment time, and monitor units were compared. A VMAT planning solution, created from a combination of arc settings and optimization constraints, auto-generated treatment plans in a single optimization. The treatment planning solution was evaluated on 15 consecutive patients receiving kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy. Treatment time was reduced from 13.0 ± 2.6 to 4.0 ± 0.9 minutes for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. The VMAT planning solution generated treatment plans with increased target homogeneity, improved 95% conformity index, and a reduced maximum point dose to nearby OARs but with increased intermediate dose to distant OARs. The conformity of the 95% isodose improved from 1.32 ± 0.39 to 1.12 ± 0.05 for IMRT and VMAT treatment plans, respectively. Evaluation of the planning solution showed clinically acceptable dose distributions for 13 of 15 cases with tight conformity of the prescription isodose to the planning target volume of 1.07 ± 0.04, delivering minimal dose to OARs. The introduction of a stereotactic body radiation therapy VMAT treatment planning solution improves the efficiency of planning and delivery time, producing treatment plans of comparable or superior quality to IMRT in the case of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions.

  14. Treatment planning in the radiation therapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeth, J.M.; Meyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of aspects involved in the most advanced radiotherapy techniques, and examines in detail their application in planning and delivering optimal treatments in a large number of different forms of cancer. Coverage is given to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, carcinoma of the lung, breast cancer, cancers of the genitourinary system, tumors of the central nervous system, cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, stomach and rectum, soft tissue sarcomas, pediatric radiotherapy, Hodgkin's disease, and finally non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A general discussion concludes the text.

  15. Metformin and improved treatment outcomes in radiation therapy - A review.

    PubMed

    Samsuri, Nur Atiqah Binte; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2017-04-01

    Metformin, a primary treatment for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, is associated with improved outcomes for diabetic cancer patients fuelling further investigation on its mechanisms of action. The radiosensitising properties of metformin are increasingly reported in pre-clinical studies. This review discusses whether metformin should be offered to radiotherapy (RT) cancer patients as a means to improve their treatment outcomes. A database search was conducted for articles published with metformin as the main intervention between 2010 and 2016. Three groups of RT cancer patients were analysed: diabetic patients using metformin, diabetic patients not using metformin and non-diabetic patients not using metformin. Data on survival and recurrence metrics were extracted. Thirteen studies were included. Conflicting evidence exists with regards to the impact of metformin administration on recurrence and survival outcomes following radiotherapy. Three studies reported improved tumour response determined by recurrence rates while five studies did not observe differences or metformin use was not the associated reason. One study revealed inconsistent tumour response results. Metformin was reported as improving survival outcomes in 2 studies and not improving outcomes in 5 studies. 4 studies showed indefinite results. Although metformin may improve tumour response in the non-randomized, retrospective studies analysed, it may not necessarily confer survival benefits. Future prospective and randomised trials are required to translate the positive impact of metformin documented in pre-clinical and retrospective studies into improve management of RT cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  17. A treatment planning methodology for sequentially combining radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) and external radiation therapy (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sébastien; He, Bin; Esaias, Caroline E; Frey, Eric C; Loeb, David M; Wahl, Richard L; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate 3-D dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning methodology, using the patient-specific 3-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods The biological effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (DRPT) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent two-Gray-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTDRPT map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTDRPT. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed which would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTDsum to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results The average voxel NTDRPT to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (1-85 Gy range); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTDRPT from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTDsum to tumor was 71.5 Gy (40-135 Gy range) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTDsum equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions A methodology which enables real time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded. PMID:20950958

  18. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  19. Primary treatment of stage III ovarian carcinoma with sequential chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Reid, G C; Roberts, J A; Hopkins, M P; Schoeppel, S L; Perez-Tamayo, C; Drescher, C; Chamberlain, D; Morley, G W

    1993-06-01

    A prospective phase II clinical treatment trial of 13 patients with previously untreated optimal surgically resected (< or = 1 cm stage III ovarian carcinoma was conducted at the University of Michigan Hospitals. The treatment regimen after surgical resection consisted of chemotherapy followed by whole abdomen and pelvic radiation therapy. Chemotherapy consisted of four cycles of 50 mg/m2 cisplatin and 1000 mg/m2 cytoxan. This was followed by whole abdomen radiation therapy with a planned total dose of 30 Gy to the whole abdomen and then a 20-Gy boost to the pelvis. Six of 13 patients received a paraaortic radiation boost. There was minimal acute toxicity, but delayed toxicity was encountered with 38% of patients developing a bowel obstruction. Nine patients had reassessment laparotomy: 5 second-look laparotomies and 4 laparotomies for bowel obstruction. Two of these 9 patients died of septic complications after surgery. Nine patients died with disease, 1 patient is alive with advanced disease, and only 3 patients are alive with no evidence of disease. Actuarial 3-year survival and progression-free interval was 26 and 20%, respectively. Primary treatment consisting of sequential chemotherapy and whole abdomen radiation in the dose and scheme utilized did not improve the survival over what could be expected utilizing one of these treatments alone. It was associated with increased delayed toxicity.

  20. Treatment of an amelanotic melanoma using radiation therapy in a lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Dominguez, Pedro; Hanzlik, Kim; Sikarskie, James G; Agnew, Dalen; Bergin, Ingrid; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kitchell, Barbara E; McNiel, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    A 15-yr-old, male lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi) presented with a mass caudal to the right ear. Cytology suggested a sarcoma. Surgical removal was attempted. Histology was consistent with a soft tissue sarcoma. The mass recurred within 331 days post operation. Radiation therapy was initiated. Computed tomography was used for staging in conjunction with three-dimensional computerized treatment planning software to permit accurate lesion localization and to optimize normal tissue sparing. A total dose of 6,480 cGy was administered in 24 fractions over 46 days. Transient hind limb paresis developed during the course of the radiation therapy, but resolved after 7 days with prednisone treatment. Minimal acute radiation toxicity was observed. The mass responded with at least a 90% reduction in volume following radiation treatment. The animal survived 266 days from the initiation of treatment. On necropsy, a small mass and granulation tissue were found at the site of the initial neoplasm, indicating good regional control of the tumor; however, extensive metastases to the spleen and liver were present. Immunohistochemically, the original, recurrent, and metastatic populations were strongly positive for HMB 45 and weakly positive for S-100, and the final diagnosis was metastatic amelanotic melanoma.

  1. Hypofractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of canine thymoma: Retrospective study of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Goto, Sho; Murakami, Mami; Kawabe, Mifumi; Iwasaki, Ryota; Heishima, Kazuki; Sakai, Hiroki; Mori, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Thymomas are one of the most common tumors of the cranial mediastinum in dogs; however there is limited information available on the use of radiation therapy for treating this neoplasm. Objectives of the current retrospective observational study were to describe outcomes and side effects of a hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in a group of dogs with confirmed thymoma. A total of eight dogs were included. To generate individualized treatment plans, we designed the planning target volume according to the limits on mean lung dose and the percentage of the total lung volume exceeding 20 Gy (V20). The total administered dose was 48-49 Gy, with one fraction per week for a total of six to seven fractions. After therapy, two dogs achieved complete responses, two achieved partial responses, and the disease remained stable in two. Two dogs died during the radiation therapy protocol and were not classified. The median mean lung dose and V20 were 6.0 Gy (range: 3.1-15.0 Gy) and 12.4% (range: 2.3-27.5%), respectively. The overall response rate was 50.0%, and the median time to response following treatment initiation was 22 days (range: 14-115 days). Acute and late side effects were common in the skin and/or lung and were self-limiting or asymptomatic. The median survival time was not reached (range: 8-1128 days) and the 1 year survival rate was 75.0%. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was well tolerated in this sample of dogs with thymoma and may be considered when owners decline surgical treatment or the tumor is deemed unresectable. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Radiation therapy in the locoregional treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran, Meena S

    2015-03-01

    This Review assesses the relevant data and controversies regarding the use of radiotherapy for, and locoregional management of, women with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In view of the strong association between BRCA1 and TNBC, knowledge of baseline mutation status can be useful to guide locoregional treatment decisions. TNBC is not a contraindication for breast conservation therapy because data suggest increased locoregional recurrence risks (relative to luminal subtypes) with breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. Although a boost to the tumour bed should routinely be considered after whole breast radiation therapy, TNBC should not be the sole indication for post-mastectomy radiation, and accelerated delivery methods for TNBC should be offered on clinical trials. Preliminary data implying a relative radioresistance for TNBC do not imply radiation omission because radiation provides an absolute locoregional risk reduction. At present, the integration of subtypes in locoregional management decisions is still in its infancy. Until level 1 data supporting treatment decisions based on subtypes are available, standard locoregional management principles should be adhered to. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The peer review system (PRS) for quality assurance and treatment improvement in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh H. T.; Kapoor, Rishabh; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2012-02-01

    Peer reviews are needed across all disciplines of medicine to address complex medical challenges in disease care, medical safety, insurance coverage handling, and public safety. Radiation therapy utilizes technologically advanced imaging for treatment planning, often with excellent efficacy. Since planning data requirements are substantial, patients are at risk for repeat diagnostic procedures or suboptimal therapeutic intervention due to a lack of knowledge regarding previous treatments. The Peer Review System (PRS) will make this critical radiation therapy information readily available on demand via Web technology. The PRS system has been developed with current Web technology, .NET framework, and in-house DICOM library. With the advantages of Web server-client architecture, including IIS web server, SOAP Web Services and Silverlight for the client side, the patient data can be visualized through web browser and distributed across multiple locations by the local area network and Internet. This PRS will significantly improve the quality, safety, and accessibility, of treatment plans in cancer therapy. Furthermore, the secure Web-based PRS with DICOM-RT compliance will provide flexible utilities for organization, sorting, and retrieval of imaging studies and treatment plans to optimize the patient treatment and ultimately improve patient safety and treatment quality.

  4. Review of treatment assessment using DCE-MRI in breast cancer radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet; Chang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    As a noninvasive functional imaging technique, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is being used in oncology to measure properties of tumor microvascular structure and permeability. Studies have shown that parameters derived from certain pharmacokinetic models can be used as imaging biomarkers for tumor treatment response. The use of DCE-MRI for quantitative and objective assessment of radiation therapy has been explored in a variety of methods and tumor types. However, due to the complexity in imaging technology and divergent outcomes from different pharmacokinetic approaches, the method of using DCE-MRI in treatment assessment has yet to be standardized, especially for breast cancer. This article reviews the basic principles of breast DCE-MRI and recent studies using DCE-MRI in treatment assessment. Technical and clinical considerations are emphasized with specific attention to assessment of radiation treatment response. PMID:25332905

  5. Treatment Effects and Sequelae of Radiation Therapy for Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Tomita, Naoto; Iijima, Yasuhito; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Minagawa, Yumiko; Ogino, Ichiro; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Among extranodal lymphomas, orbital mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a relatively rare presentation. We performed a review to ascertain treatment efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy for orbital MALT lymphoma. We also evaluated changes in visual acuity after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with orbital MALT lymphoma underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. Clinical stages at diagnosis were stage I{sub E}A in 29 patients and stage II{sub E}A in 1 patient. Total doses of 28.8 to 45.8 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 15 to 26 fractions (median, 16 fractions) were delivered to the tumors. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period of 2 to 157 months (median, 35 months) after treatment. Two patients had relapses that arose in the cervical lymph node and the ipsilateral palpebral conjunctiva outside the radiation field at 15 and 67 months after treatment, respectively. The 5-year local progression-free and relapse-free rates were 100% and 96%, respectively. All 30 patients are presently alive; the overall and relapse-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 96%, respectively. Although 5 patients developed cataracts of grade 2 at 8 to 45 months after irradiation, they underwent intraocular lens implantation, and their eyesight recovered. Additionally, there was no marked deterioration in the visual acuity of patients due to irradiation, with the exception of cataracts. No therapy-related toxicity of grade 3 or greater was observed. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was effective and safe for patients with orbital MALT lymphoma. Although some patients developed cataracts after irradiation, visual acuity was well preserved.

  6. Combined Hypofractionated Radiation and Hormone Therapy for the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yassa, Michael; Fortin, Bernard; Fortin, Marie-Andree; Lambert, Carole; Van Nguyen, Thu; Bahary, Jean-Paul

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Because of the low alpha/beta value of prostate cancer, a therapeutic gain may be possible with a hypofractionated radiation scheme, and this gain may be further increased with the adjunct of hormone therapy. A Phase II study was undertaken to study the toxicity of such a treatment. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were recruited for this study. Neoadjuvant and concomitant hormone therapy consisted of one injection of leuprolide acetate (4-month preparation) and 1 month of oral nonsteroidal, anti-androgen medication starting on the day of the injection. Radiation treatment was started 8 weeks after the injection and patients received 57 Gy in 19 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 46 months. The treatment was well tolerated and no interruptions occurred. The majority (59%) had Grade 0 or 1 acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, whereas 36% had Grade 2 and 5% had Grade 3 acute GU toxicity. Only Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. All chronic toxicity was of Grade 1 or 2 except for 3 patients (8%) with Grade 3 toxicity. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of patients had no long-term side effects from the treatment. At time of analysis, 79% showed no sign of treatment failure. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiation with neoadjuvant and concomitant hormone therapy is well tolerated with no significant short- or long-term morbidity. Control for this risk group is good, and comparative Phase III studies should be undertaken to determine whether this treatment is superior to new evolving treatments.

  7. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT).

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients' average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V18Gy), stomach (mean and V20Gy), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V18Gy), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V20Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V15Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Published by

  8. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  9. Effect of distance to radiation treatment facility on use of radiation therapy after mastectomy in elderly women

    SciTech Connect

    Punglia, Rinaa S. . E-mail: rpunglia@lroc.harvard.edu; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Earle, Craig C.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We sought to study the effect of distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility on the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in elderly women. Methods and Materials: Using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we analyzed 19,787 women with Stage I or II breast cancer who received mastectomy as definitive surgery during 1991 to 1999. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of distance with receipt of PMRT after adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Results: Overall 2,075 patients (10.5%) treated with mastectomy received PMRT. In addition to cancer and patient characteristics, in our primary analysis, increasing distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving PMRT (OR 0.996 per additional mile, p = 0.01). Secondary analyses revealed that the decline in PMRT use appeared at distances of more than 25 miles and was statistically significant for those patients living more than 75 miles from the nearest radiation facility (odds of receiving PMRT of 0.58 [95% CI 0.34-0.99] vs. living within 25 miles of such a facility). The effect of distance on PMRT appeared to be more pronounced with increasing patient age (>75 years). Variation in the effect of distance on radiation use between regions of the country and nodal status was also identified. Conclusions: Oncologists must be cognizant of the potential barrier to quality care that is posed by travel distance, especially for elderly patients; and policy makers should consider this fact in resource allocation decisions about radiation treatment centers.

  10. MO-D-BRB-00: Pediatric Radiation Therapy Planning, Treatment, and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Most Medical Physicists working in radiotherapy departments see few pediatric patients. This is because, fortunately, children get cancer at a rate nearly 100 times lower than adults. Children have not smoked, abused alcohol, or been exposed to environmental carcinogens for decades, and of course, have not fallen victim to the aging process. Children get very different cancers than adults. Breast or prostate cancers, typical in adults, are rarely seen in children but instead a variety of tumors occur in children that are rarely seen in adults; examples are germinomas, ependymomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, which require treatment of the child’s brain or neuroblastoma, requiring treatment in the abdomen. The treatment of children with cancer using radiation therapy is one of the most challenging planning and delivery problems facing the physicist. This is because bones, brain, breast tissue, and other organs are more sensitive to radiation in children than in adults. Because most therapy departments treat mostly adults, when the rare 8 year-old patient comes to the department for treatment, the physicist may not understand the clinical issues of his disease which drive the planning and delivery decisions. Additionally, children are more prone than adults to developing secondary cancers after radiation. For bilateral retinoblastoma for example, an irradiated child has a 40% chance of developing a second cancer by age 50. The dosimetric tradeoffs made during the planning process are complex and require careful consideration for children treated with radiotherapy. In the first presentation, an overview of childhood cancers and their corresponding treatment techniques will be given. These can be some of the most complex treatments that are delivered in the radiation therapy department. These cancers include leukemia treated with total body irradiation, medulloblastoma, treated with craniospinal irradiation plus a conformal boost to the posterior fossa

  11. Prevention and treatment of complications of selective internal radiation therapy: Expert guidance and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sangro, Bruno; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Bester, Lourens; Bilbao, Jose I; Coldwell, Douglas M; Flamen, Patrick; Kennedy, Andrew; Ricke, Jens; Sharma, Ricky A

    2017-04-13

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT or radioembolisation) by intraarterial injection of radioactive yttrium-90 ((90) Y)-loaded microspheres is increasingly used for the treatment of patients with liver metastases or primary liver cancer. The high-dose beta-radiation penetrates an average of only 2.5 mm from the source so that its effects are limited to the site of delivery. However the off-target diversion of (90) Y microspheres to tissues other than the tumor may lead to complications. The most prominent ones include: radiation gastritis and gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers, cholecystitis, radiation pneumonitis, and radioembolisation-induced liver disease (REILD). Complications may occur despite careful pre-treatment planning and SIRT demands an expert multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach in order to provide comprehensive care for patients. This review provides recommendations to MDTs on the optimal medical processes in order to ensure the safe delivery of SIRT. Based on the best available published evidence and expert opinion, we recommend the most appropriate strategies for the prevention, early diagnosis and management of potential radiation injury to the liver and to other organs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a novel two dimensional diode array the ''magic plate'' as a radiation detector for radiation therapy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Fuduli, I.; Carolan, M.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) utilizes the technology of multileaf collimators to deliver highly modulated and complex radiation treatment. Dosimetric verification of the IMRT treatment requires the verification of the delivered dose distribution. Two dimensional ion chamber or diode arrays are gaining popularity as a dosimeter of choice due to their real time feedback compared to film dosimetry. This paper describes the characterization of a novel 2D diode array, which has been named the ''magic plate'' (MP). It was designed to function as a 2D transmission detector as well as a planar detector for dose distribution measurements in a solid water phantom for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment delivery. Methods: The prototype MP is an 11 x 11 detector array based on thin (50 {mu}m) epitaxial diode technology mounted on a 0.6 mm thick Kapton substrate using a proprietary ''drop-in'' technology developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong. A full characterization of the detector was performed, including radiation damage study, dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with CC13 ion chamber and build up characteristics with a parallel plane ion chamber measurements, dose linearity, energy response and angular response. Results: Postirradiated magic plate diodes showed a reproducibility of 2.1%. The MP dose per pulse response decreased at higher dose rates while at lower dose rates the MP appears to be dose rate independent. The depth dose measurement of the MP agrees with ion chamber depth dose measurements to within 0.7% while dose linearity was excellent. MP showed angular response dependency due to the anisotropy of the silicon diode with the maximum variation in angular response of 10.8% at gantry angle 180 deg. Angular dependence was within 3.5% for the gantry angles {+-} 75 deg. The field size dependence of the MP at isocenter agrees with ion chamber measurement to within 1.1%. In

  13. Expanding the therapeutic index of radiation therapy by combining in situ gene therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Teh, Bin S; Timme, Terry L; Fujita, Tetsuo; Satoh, Takefumi; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Vlachaki, Maria T; Amato, Robert J; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian

    2006-02-01

    The advances in radiotherapy (3D-CRT, IMRT) have enabled high doses of radiation to be delivered with the least possible associated toxicity. However, the persistence of cancer (local recurrence after radiotherapy) despite these increased doses as well as distant failure suggesting the existence of micro-metastases, especially in the case of higher risk disease, have underscored the need for continued improvement in treatment strategies to manage local and micro-metastatic disease as definitively as possible. This has prompted the idea that an increase in the therapeutic index of radiotherapy might be achieved by combining it with in situ gene therapy. The goal of these combinatorial therapies is to maximize the selective pressure against cancer cell growth while minimizing treatment-associated toxicity. Major efforts utilizing different gene therapy strategies have been employed in conjunction with radiotherapy. We reviewed our and other published clinical trials utilizing this combined radio-genetherapy approach including their associated pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo models. The use of in situ gene therapy as an adjuvant to radiation therapy dramatically reduced cell viability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. No significant worsening of the toxicities normally observed in single-modality approaches were identified in Phase I/II clinical studies. Enhancement of both local and systemic T-cell activation was noted with this combined approach suggesting anti-tumor immunity. Early clinical outcome including biochemical and biopsy data was very promising. These results demonstrate the increased therapeutic efficacy achieved by combining in situ gene therapy with radiotherapy in the management of local prostate cancer. The combined approach maximizes tumor control, both local-regional and systemic through radio-genetherapy induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity.

  14. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems.

  15. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  16. Radiation therapy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Théon, A P

    1998-12-01

    This article covers the principles and applications of radiation therapy in horses. The goal in treating tumors by irradiation is tumor control with minimum treatment complications. Various treatment techniques are available to achieve this goal. The prognosis depends on many factors such as the extent and location of the tumor, tumor type and tumor cell proliferation. Radiation therapy is a very effective treatment modality for equine tumors but logistical reasons limit its impact in equine oncology.

  17. A prospective randomized comparison of radiation therapy plus lonidamine versus radiation therapy plus placebo as initial treatment of clinically localized but nonresectable nonsmall cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Scarantino, C.W.; McCunniff, A.J.; Evans, G.; Young, C.W.; Paggiarino, D.A.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was, by means of a multicenter, prospective randomized, placebo-controlled study, to assess the impact of adding the radiation-enhancing agent lonidamine to standard {open_quotes}curative-intent{close_quotes} radiation therapy upon overall survival, progression-free survival, and local progression-free survival of patients with clinically localized but nonresectable nonsmall cell lung cancer. Lonidamine, or the lonidamine-placebo, was administered at a dose of 265 mg/m{sup 2} in three divided daily doses. Drug therapy began 2 days prior to the initiation of radiation therapy and continued until progression of disease mandated a change in therapy. The radiation therapy dose was 55-60 Gy, at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy and five treatments per week. Patients with clinical Stage II or III nonsmall cell lung cancer were stratified within the treatment center, and within two histologic strata: epidermoid vs. other nonsmall cell cancers. A total of 310 patients were enlisted on study, 152 on the placebo arm and 158 on the lonidamine arm. The median survival durations were 326 and 392 days for the placebo and lonidamine-treated groups respectively, p = 0.41 for a comparison of the survival curves. Median progression-free survival and median local progression-free survival durations were 197 days and 341 days for placebo + radiation therapy vs. 230 days and 300 days for lonidamine + radiation therapy; p-values for the respective curves were 0.75 and 0.42. Although there were proportionately more lonidamine-treated patients than placebo-treated patients demonstrating continued local control in excess of 12 months, the numbers of patients still at risk after 24 months were too small for meaningful statistical analysis. This multicenter Phase III study failed to demonstrate a significant advantage in the lonidamine-treated population in overall patient survival, in progression-free survival, or in the median duration of local control. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Wang, Dian; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Kirsch, David G.; Roberge, David; Salerno, Kilian; Deville, Curtiland; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; O'Sullivan, Brian; Petersen, Ivy A.; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Abrams, Ross A.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  19. Role of the technical aspects of hypofractionated radiation therapy treatment of prostate cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Stefania; Nigro, Roberta; Oliviero, Caterina; Marchioni, Chiara; Esposito, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Mancosu, Pietro; Marino, Carmelo; Russo, Serenella; Stasi, Michele; Strigari, Lidia; Veronese, Ivan; Landoni, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessments of Sequential Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Boost (SqIB) Treatments Using HART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    A retrospective study was pursued to evaluate the SqIB treatments performed on ten head and neck cancer patients(n=10).Average prescription doses (PDs) of 39 Gy,15Gy and 17.8Gy were delivered consecutively from larger to smaller planning target volumes(ptvs) in three different treatment plans using 6 MV X-ray photon beams from a Linear accelerator (SLA Linac, Elekta) on BID weak on-weak off schedules. These plans were statistically evaluated on basis of plan indices (PIs),dose response of targets and critical structures, and dose tolerance(DT) of various organs utilizing the DVH analysis automated software known as Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy-HART(S.Jang et al., 2008, Med Phys 35, p.2812). Mean SqIB PIs were found consistent with the reported values for varying radio-surgical systems.The 95.5%(n=10)of each ptvs and the gross tumor volume also received 95% (n=10)of PDs in treatments. The average volume of ten organs (N=10) affected by each PDs shrank with decreasing size of ptvs in above plans.A largest volume of Oropharynx (79%,n=10,N=10) irradiated at PD, but the largest volume of Larynx (98%, n=10, N=10) was vulnerable to DT of structure (TD50).Thus, we have demonstrated the efficiency and accuracy of HART in the assessment of Linac based plans in radiation therapy treatments of cancer.

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of liver tumors: post-treatment appearances and evaluation of treatment response: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Mustafa M; Merrell, Kenneth W; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Mounajjed, Taofic; Olivier, Kenneth R; Fidler, Jeff L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a noninvasive treatment technique for selected patients with primary liver tumors and liver-confined oligometastatic disease. Recently, SBRT has emerged as an alternative treatment option in non-surgical candidates and in whom percutaneous treatment methods are not possible or contraindicated. The experience with SBRT continues to grow. There are currently no imaging guidelines for assessment of tumor response and follow-up schedule following SBRT. SBRT produces characteristic radiation-induced changes in the treated tumor and surrounding liver parenchyma. Knowledge of these changes is essential in the interpretation of follow-up imaging and assessment of treatment response. In this review, we will describe the CT, MRI, and PET imaging findings following SBRT of both the targeted liver tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma.

  2. SU-D-BRD-05: Decision Opportunities in Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W.T.; Siebers, J.V.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A method to reveal tradeoffs in radiation therapy treatments is introduced in order to aid in clinical, patient-specific decision making. Methods: A clinically acceptable treatment plan was varied for two patients, a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer case and a pituitary case, in order to reveal decision opportunities. Plans were optimized such that non-zero dose-volume objectives were defined for all organs at risk (OARS). At fixed planning target volume (PTV) dose, a single OAR is sacrificed, i.e. the weight of the dose volume objective is deceased, and potential dosimetric benefits in other regions of interest are identified. If tradeoffs are identified, plans are stored and presented as decision opportunities. Results: Clinically relevant tradeoffs were revealed by sacrificing individual OARs. The SBRT lung case was planned according to the Radiotherapy-Oncology Group (RTOG) 0813 protocol, but by violating the high-dose protocol objective (>2 cm from the PTV) in the patient's lung, mean heart dose was reduced by 1.7 Gy and the great vessel V20 was reduced from 42% to 2%. Tradeoffs in dose to the chestwall and heart were also revealed, an increase of 6 Gy in chestwall-Dmax reduces heart mean dose by 0.9 Gy and mean dose to the great vessels by 2.6 Gy. For the pituitary tumor, sacrificing the right parotid gland (increasing mean dose from 7.8 Gy to 14.1 Gy) spares the temporal lobes bilaterally (V20 is reduced by 4%) and left parotid mean dose is reduced from 6.4 Gy to 5.2 Gy. Conclusion: Clinical tradeoffs in radiation therapy treatment planning are revealed by sacrificing individual OARS. By revealing these tradeoffs, decision making in plan selection is simplified and can be considered in the context of patient-specific quality of life.

  3. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  4. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Gozde; Kiratli, Hayyam; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa; Tarlan, Bercin; Mocan, Burce Ozgen; Zorlu, Faruk

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  7. Cellular Therapies for Treatment of Radiation Injury: Report from a NIH/NIAID and IRSN Workshop

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, Andrea L.; Tamarat, Radia; Rios, Carmen I.; Benderitter, Marc; Czarniecki, Christine W.; Allio, Theresa C.; Macchiarini, Francesca; Maidment, Bert W.; Jourdain, Jean-Rene

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing concern over the possibility of a radiological or nuclear incident occurring somewhere in the world. Intelligence agencies frequently report that terrorist groups and rogue nations are seeking to obtain radiological or nuclear weapons of mass destruction. In addition, there exists the real possibility that safety of nuclear power reactors could be compromised by natural (such as the tsunami and subsequent Fukushima accident in Japan in March, 2011) or accidental (Three Mile Island, 1979 and Chernobyl, 1986) events. Although progress has been made by governments around the world to prepare for these events, including the stockpiling of radiation countermeasures, there are still challenges concerning care of patients injured during a radiation incident. Because the deleterious and pathological effects of radiation are so broad, it is desirable to identify medical countermeasures that can have a beneficial impact on several tissues and organ systems. Cellular therapies have the potential to impact recovery and tissue/organ regeneration for both early and late complications of radiation exposure. These therapies, which could include stem or blood progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) or cells derived from other tissues (e.g., endothelium or placenta), have shown great promise in treating other nonradiation injuries to and diseases of the bone marrow, skin, gastrointestinal tract, brain, lung and heart. To explore the potential use of these therapies in the treatment of victims after acute radiation exposure, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases cosponsored an international workshop in July, 2015 in Paris, France with the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire. The workshop included discussions of data available from testing in preclinical models of radiation injury to different organs, logistics associated with the practical use of cellular therapies for a mass casualty incident

  8. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... than in African-Americans. TYPES OF SKIN CANCER Basal cell carcinoma: This is the most common form of skin ... epidermis ). Radiation therapy is very effective for treating basal cell cancers that have not spread elsewhere. Other common treatments ...

  9. Surgical treatment and radiation therapy of frontal lobe meningiomas in 7 dogs.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Ane; Moissonnier, Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Devauchelle, Patrick; Blot, Stéphane

    2011-07-01

    The cases of 7 adult dogs with generalized seizures managed by surgical excision and radiation therapy for frontal lobe meningiomas were reviewed. The neurological examination was unremarkable in 6 of the 7 dogs. Five dogs were operated on using a bilateral transfrontal sinus approach and 2 using a unilateral sinotemporal approach to the frontal lobe. One dog was euthanized 14 d after surgery; radiation therapy was initiated 3 wk after surgery in the remaining 6 dogs. Long-term follow-up consisted of neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) scan after radiation therapy. The mean survival time for dogs that had surgery and radiation therapy was 18 mo after surgery. Frontal lobe meningiomas have been associated with poor prognosis. However, the surgical approaches used in these cases, combined with radiation therapy, allow a survival rate for frontal lobe meningiomas similar to that for meningiomas located over the cerebral convexities.

  10. Surgical treatment and radiation therapy of frontal lobe meningiomas in 7 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Ane; Moissonnier, Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Devauchelle, Patrick; Blot, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    The cases of 7 adult dogs with generalized seizures managed by surgical excision and radiation therapy for frontal lobe meningiomas were reviewed. The neurological examination was unremarkable in 6 of the 7 dogs. Five dogs were operated on using a bilateral transfrontal sinus approach and 2 using a unilateral sinotemporal approach to the frontal lobe. One dog was euthanized 14 d after surgery; radiation therapy was initiated 3 wk after surgery in the remaining 6 dogs. Long-term follow-up consisted of neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) scan after radiation therapy. The mean survival time for dogs that had surgery and radiation therapy was 18 mo after surgery. Frontal lobe meningiomas have been associated with poor prognosis. However, the surgical approaches used in these cases, combined with radiation therapy, allow a survival rate for frontal lobe meningiomas similar to that for meningiomas located over the cerebral convexities. PMID:22210938

  11. Flattening filter-free linac improves treatment delivery efficiency in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brendan M; Fiveash, John B; Popple, Richard A; Clark, Grant M; Thomas, Evan M; Minnich, Douglas J; Jacob, Rojymon; Spencer, Sharon A; Bonner, James A; Dobelbower, Michael C

    2013-05-06

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) employs precision target tracking and image-guidance techniques to deliver ablative doses of radiation to localized malignancies; however, treatment with conventional photon beams requires lengthy treatment and immobilization times. The use of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams operating at higher dose rates can shorten beam-on time, and we hypothesize that it will shorten overall treatment delivery time. A total of 111 lung and liver SBRT cases treated at our institution from July 2008 to July 2011 were reviewed and 99 cases with complete data were identified. Treatment delivery times for cases treated with a FFF linac versus a conventional dose rate linac were compared. The frequency and type of intrafraction image guidance was also collected and compared between groups. Three hundred and ninety-one individual SBRT fractions from 99 treatment plans were examined; 36 plans were treated with a FFF linac. In the FFF cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) treatment time (time elapsed from beam-on until treatment end) and patient's immobilization time (time from first alignment image until treatment end) was 11.44 (± 6.3) and 21.08 (± 6.8) minutes compared to 32.94 (± 14.8) and 47.05 (± 17.6) minutes for the conventional cohort (p < 0.01 for all values). Intrafraction-computed tomography (CT) was used more often in the conventional cohort (84% vs. 25%; p < 0.05), but use of orthogonal X-ray imaging remained the same (16% vs. 19%). For lung and liver SBRT, a FFF linac reduces treatment and immobilization time by more than 50% compared to a conventional linac. In addition, treatment with a FFF linac is associated with less physician-ordered image guidance, which contributes to further improvement in treatment delivery efficiency.

  12. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD30+ Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lund, Molly W.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (CALCL) is a relatively rare and indolent variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). This report examines the response of localized disease to radiation alone. Methods: The Yale Cancer Center records were examined, and all patients with CTCL from January 1, 2001, to September 1, 2006, evaluated in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology were identified. Only those patients with localized or single CALCL lesions, no clinical evidence or history of lymphomatoid papulosis, no history of other CTCLs, no history of other skin disorders, lack of lymph node involvement, unambiguous pathology reports, and treatment with radiation alone were included. Results: Eight patients were identified. Median age was 67 years, and gender was split evenly. Patients received radiation ranging from 34 to 44 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Most patients (5 of 8) received 40 Gy, using 6 to 9 MeV electrons with 0.5 to 2 cm of bolus. All patients had a complete response. All patients were without evidence of disease at the most recent follow-up (median follow-up, 12 months). Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and the only recorded toxicity was Grade I to II dermatitis. Conclusions: Radiation therapy alone for localized CALCL is very well tolerated and clinical response is excellent. A dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions seems to be well tolerated and effective in inducing a complete response. Lower doses may be effective in achieving the same result, but data are not available. Longer follow-up is necessary before conclusions regarding durable disease-free survival can be made.

  13. Radiation Therapy Field Extent for Adjuvant Treatment of Axillary Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Ballo, Matthew T.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Ross, Merrick I.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment-related outcomes and toxicity for patients with axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to either the axilla only or both the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (extended field [EF]). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 200 consecutive patients treated with postoperative RT for axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received postoperative hypofractionated RT for high-risk features; 95 patients (48%) received RT to the axilla only and 105 patients (52%) to the EF. Results: At a median follow-up of 59 months, 111 patients (56%) had sustained relapse, and 99 patients (50%) had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 51%, 43%, and 46%, respectively. The 5-year axillary control rate was 88%. There was no difference in axillary control rates on the basis of the treated field (89% for axilla only vs. 86% for EF; p = 0.4). Forty-seven patients (24%) developed treatment-related complications. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, only treatment with EF irradiation was significantly associated with increased treatment-related complications. Conclusions: Adjuvant hypofractionated RT to the axilla only for metastatic malignant melanoma with high-risk features is an effective method to control axillary disease. Limiting the radiation field to the axilla only produced equivalent axillary control rates to EF and resulted in lower treatment-related complication rates.

  14. Radiation therapy for epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, clinical and treatment factors associated with outcome.

    PubMed

    Myerson, R J; Kong, F; Birnbaum, E H; Fleshman, J W; Kodner, I J; Picus, J; Ratkin, G A; Read, T E; Walz, B J

    2001-10-01

    In recent years, treatment with combined chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for epidermoid carcinoma of the anus. However, optimal radiotherapy techniques and doses are not well established. During the period 1975-1997, 106 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal underwent radiation therapy. Treatment policies evolved from radiation therapy alone or with surgery, to combined chemotherapy and radiation followed by surgery, to combined chemotherapy and radiation. Overall 74% of patients were NED (no evidence of disease) at last follow-up. The most important clinical correlate with ultimate freedom from disease (includes the contribution of salvage surgery) was extent of disease. The 5-year ultimate freedom from disease was 87+/-5% for T1/T2N0, 78+/-10% for T3N0 (15% salvaged by surgery), and 43+/-10% for either T4N0 or any N+ lesions (P<0.001, Tarone-Ware). There was no difference between planned vs. expectant surgery (5-year ultimate NED: 67+/-11% planned surgery vs. 73+/-5% expectant surgery). The most important correlate with late toxicity was a history of major pelvic surgery (surgical vs. non-surgical group: P=0.013, Fisher's exact test, two-tailed summation). Thirty-three additional malignancies have been seen in 26 patients. The most common additional malignancies were gynecologic (nine cases), head and neck (six cases), and lung cancer (five cases). For T1/T2N0 disease, moderate doses of radiation combined with chemotherapy provided adequate treatment. T4N0 and N+ lesions are the most appropriate candidates for investigational protocols evaluating dose intensification. T3N0 tumors may also be appropriate for investigation; however, dose intensification may ultimately prove counterproductive if the cure rate is not improved and salvage surgery is rendered more difficult. The volume of irradiated small bowel should be minimized for patients who have a past history of major pelvic surgery or who (because of locally advanced

  15. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can include incontinence (inability to control urination) and impotence (inability to achieve erection). More recently, several centers ... Radiation therapy (either external radiation or brachytherapy) causes impotence in some men. The rate of impotence is ...

  16. Improving efficiency and safety in external beam radiation therapy treatment delivery using a Kaizen approach.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Ajay; Adair, Nilda; O'Brien, Mildred; Naparstek, Nikoleta; Cangelosi, Thomas; Zuvic, Petrina; Joseph, Sherin; Meier, Jason; Bloom, Beatrice; Potters, Louis

    2017-06-29

    Modern external beam radiation therapy treatment delivery processes potentially increase the number of tasks to be performed by therapists and thus opportunities for errors, yet the need to treat a large number of patients daily requires a balanced allocation of time per treatment slot. The goal of this work was to streamline the underlying workflow in such time-interval constrained processes to enhance both execution efficiency and active safety surveillance using a Kaizen approach. A Kaizen project was initiated by mapping the workflow within each treatment slot for 3 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators. More than 90 steps were identified, and average execution times for each were measured. The time-consuming steps were stratified into a 2 × 2 matrix arranged by potential workflow improvement versus the level of corrective effort required. A work plan was created to launch initiatives with high potential for workflow improvement but modest effort to implement. Time spent on safety surveillance and average durations of treatment slots were used to assess corresponding workflow improvements. Three initiatives were implemented to mitigate unnecessary therapist motion, overprocessing of data, and wait time for data transfer defects, respectively. A fourth initiative was implemented to make the division of labor by treating therapists as well as peer review more explicit. The average duration of treatment slots reduced by 6.7% in the 9 months following implementation of the initiatives (P = .001). A reduction of 21% in duration of treatment slots was observed on 1 of the machines (P < .001). Time spent on safety reviews remained the same (20% of the allocated interval), but the peer review component increased. The Kaizen approach has the potential to improve operational efficiency and safety with quick turnaround in radiation therapy practice by addressing non-value-adding steps characteristic of individual department workflows. Higher effort opportunities are

  17. Treatment paradigms for pituitary adenomas: defining the roles of radiosurgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Sheehan, Jason P

    2014-05-01

    Pituitary adenomas represent one of the most common types of intracranial tumors. While their macroscopic appearance and anatomical location are relatively homogeneous, pituitary tumors have the potential to generate a wide variety of clinical sequelae. Treatment options for pituitary tumors include medical therapy, microscopic or endoscopic surgical resection, radiosurgery, radiation therapy, or observation depending on the biochemical profile and clinical status of the patient. Radiosurgery and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) are most commonly as adjunctive treatments following incomplete surgical resection leaving residual tumor, tumor recurrence, or failure of medical therapy. We present a comprehensive literature review of the radiosurgery series for pituitary tumors including nonfunctioning adenomas, ACTH- and GH-secreting adenomas, and prolactinomas. While postradiosurgery radiographic tumor control for nonfunctioning adenomas is excellent, typically around 90 %, the rates of biochemical remission for functioning adenomas are lower than the tumor control rates. The highest endocrine remission rates are achieved patients with Cushing’s disease and the lowest in those with prolactinomas. Although EBRT has been largely supplanted by radiosurgery for the vast majority of pituitary adenomas cases, there remains a role for EBRT in select cases involving large tumor volumes in close proximity to critical neural structures. By far the most common complication after radiosurgery or EBRT is delayed hypopituitarism followed by cranial neuropathies. The effect of suppressive medications on radiosurgery outcomes remains controversial. Due to the rare but well-documented occurrence of late recurrence following endocrine remission, long-term and rigorous clinical and radiographic follow-up is necessary for all pituitary adenoma patients treated with radiosurgery or EBRT.

  18. Involved site radiation therapy for the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Portlock, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy technology has permitted the development of new treatment planning techniques. Involved field, involved node, and involved site radiotherapy fields are discussed and compared. Indications for and implications of combined modality therapy are examined, particularly as pertinent to the adolescent and young adult population. PMID:26767184

  19. Treatment of advanced canine anal sac adenocarcinoma with hypofractionated radiation therapy: 77 cases (1999-2013).

    PubMed

    McQuown, B; Keyerleber, M A; Rosen, K; McEntee, M C; Burgess, K E

    2017-09-01

    Currently no standard of care exists for advanced, inoperable or metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma (ASAC). The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the role of hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in 77 dogs with measurable ASAC. A total of 38% of dogs experienced a partial response to RT. For dogs presenting with clinical signs related to the tumour, improvement or resolution of signs was noted in 63%. For dogs presenting with hypercalcemia of malignancy, resolution was noted in 31% with RT alone and an additional 46% with radiation, prednisone, and/or bisphosphonates. Median overall survival was 329 days (range: 252-448 days). Median progression free survival was 289 days (range: 224-469). There was no difference in survival based on radiation protocol, use of chemotherapy, previous surgery or advanced stage. Radiation toxicities were mild and infrequent. Hypofractionated RT is well tolerated and is applicable in the treatment of advanced primary, locoregional or metastatic ASAC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis: Results of a National Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Micke, Oliver; Berger, Bernhard; Eich, Hans T.; Ackermann, Hanns

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy in Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) conducted a pattern-of-care study (PCS) to analyze the radiation therapy (RT) practice for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). Methods and Materials: In 2007, a structured questionnaire to assess the number of patients, the pretreatments, the RT indication, technique, target volume concepts, outcome data, and possible early or late toxicity was circulated to 227 institutions. Results: Until August 2008, a response was available from 189 institutions (83.2 %), of whom 19 (10.0 %) experienced RT for PVNS. Complete clinical information was available for 41 patients from 14 RT departments. Thirty patients (73.2 %) received postsurgical RT because of primary incomplete resection, 11 patients (26.8 %) as an adjunct after complete resections of recurrences or unclear resection status. The total doses ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median, 36 Gy), the median single dose was 2.0 Gy. Local control was achieved 95.1%, and 82.9% had no or only slight functional impairment. The early and late toxicity was mild ({<=}RTOG Grade II). Conclusions: Radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVNS in the postoperative setting after incomplete resection, and also as a salvage option for treatment of recurrences it provides a high rate of local control.

  1. Toward Patient-Specific, Biologically Optimized Radiation Therapy Plans for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, David; Holdsworth, Clay; Rockne, Russell C.; Trister, Andrew D.; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Stewart, Robert D.; Phillips, Mark; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a method of generating patient-specific, biologically-guided radiotherapy dose plans and compare them to the standard-of-care protocol. Methods and Materials We integrated a patient-specific biomathematical model of glioma proliferation, invasion and radiotherapy with a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm for intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization to construct individualized, biologically-guided plans for 11 glioblastoma patients. Patient-individualized, spherically-symmetric simulations of the standard-of-care and optimized plans were compared in terms of several biological metrics. Results The integrated model generated spatially non-uniform doses that, when compared to the standard-of-care protocol, resulted in a 67% to 93% decrease in equivalent uniform dose to normal tissue, while the therapeutic ratio, the ratio of tumor equivalent uniform dose to that of normal tissue, increased between 50% to 265%. Applying a novel metric of treatment response (Days Gained) to the patient-individualized simulation results predicted that the optimized plans would have a significant impact on delaying tumor progression, with increases from 21% to 105% for 9 of 11 patients. Conclusions Patient-individualized simulations using the combination of a biomathematical model with an optimization algorithm for radiation therapy generated biologically-guided doses that decreased normal tissue EUD and increased therapeutic ratio with the potential to improve survival outcomes for treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24265748

  2. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in radiotherapy

  3. Conformal external beam radiation or selective internal radiation therapy-a comparison of treatment outcomes for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T; Miccio, Joseph A; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Ryu, Samuel; Stessin, Alexander M

    2016-06-01

    Non-operative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has expanded significantly with the use of selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) mostly with yttrium 90 ((90)Y) tagged microspheres and highly conformal external beam radiation therapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to treat unresectable liver tumors for local tumor control. SBRT is a noninvasive procedure using external radiation source under image guidance, while SIRT delivers radioactive particles by transarterial radioembolization (TARE). However, the survival benefits of SBRT versus SIRT have never been compared. The aim of the present study is to compare the outcomes of overall and disease specific survival (DSS) using SIRT versus SBRT to treat HCC. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database [2004-2011] was queried for cases of unresectable HCC. Patients with missing data and those who received surgery were excluded from the study. A total of 189 patients with unresectable HCC were identified and used for statistical analysis, with 112 receiving SBRT and 77 receiving SIRT. Overall and disease-specific survival was compared using multivariable cox proportional hazard models. After adjusting for confounding factors (age at diagnosis, gender, race, grade, stage, AFP level and type of surgery), there were no significant difference in overall survival (OS) [hazard ratio (HR), 0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.49-1.07; P=0.1077] and DSS (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46-1.05; P=0.0880) for SIRT compared to SBRT. However, patients with elevated AFP level were associated with higher death risk (P=0.0459) and disease specific death risk (P=0.0233) than those with AFP within normal limits in both treatment groups. The retrospective analysis serves as the first comparison of SIRT to SBRT in treatment of unresectable HCC. Our findings suggest both treatment approaches result in similar outcomes in overall and disease-specific survival benefit. Future prospective randomized

  4. Enhancing radiation therapy for patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brian M; Ligon, Keith L; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-05-01

    Radiation therapy has been the foundation of therapy following maximal surgical resection in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma for decades and the primary therapy for unresected tumors. Using the standard approach with radiation and temozolomide, however, outcomes are poor, and glioblastoma remains an incurable disease with the majority of recurrences and progression within the radiation treatment field. As such, there is much interest in elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to radiation therapy and in developing novel approaches to overcoming this treatment resistance.

  5. Advances in treatment techniques: stereotactic body radiation therapy and the spread of hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Brian D; Miften, Moyed; Rabinovitch, Rachel A

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential component of the management of many cancers. Traditionally, a course of external bream RT often involved daily treatments for a duration of 6 weeks or longer in some instances. Now, however, emerging clinical evidence indicates that, for some common cancers, the total length of treatment can be substantially shortened, offering convenience to patients and opportunities for resource utilization efficiencies. This trend toward so-called hypofractionated RT has been supported by hypothesis-driven clinical research guided by a combination of radiobiological and clinical insights and technological enhancements. The present review presents the rationale behind and current status of hypofractionation for prostate, breast, and medically inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  6. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  7. The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Chance; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an

  8. Nutrient Restriction and Radiation Therapy for Cancer Treatment: When Less Is More

    PubMed Central

    Champ, Colin E.; Baserga, Renato; Mishra, Mark V.; Jin, Lianjin; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR), or a diet modification aiming to reduce the total intake of calories by 20%–40%, has been shown to increase longevity across multiple species. Recently, there has been growing interest in investigating the potential role of CR as a treatment intervention for age-related diseases, such as cancer, because an increasing body of literature has demonstrated a metabolic component to both carcinogenesis and tumor progression. In fact, many of the molecular pathways that are altered with CR are also known to be altered in cancer. Therefore, manipulation of these pathways using CR can render cancer cells, and most notably breast cancer cells, more susceptible to standard cytotoxic treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. In this review article we demonstrate the laboratory and clinical evidence that exists for CR and show compelling evidence through the molecular pathways CR induces about how it may be used as a treatment in tandem with radiation therapy to improve our rates of disease control. PMID:23299773

  9. Factors associated with program utilization of radiation therapy treatment for VHA and medicare dually enrolled patients.

    PubMed

    French, Dustin D; Bradham, Douglas D; Campbell, Robert R; Haggstrom, David A; Myers, Laura J; Chumbler, Neale R; Hagan, Michael P

    2012-08-01

    We examine how distance to a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facility, patient hometown classification (e.g., small rural town), and service-connected disability are associated with veterans' utilization of radiation therapy services across the VHA and Medicare. In 2008, 45,914 dually-enrolled veteran patients received radiation therapy. Over 3-quarters (35,513) of the patients received radiation therapy from the Medicare program. Younger age, male gender, shorter distance to a VHA facility, and VHA priority or disability status increased the odds of utilizing the VHA. However, veterans residing in urban areas were less likely to utilize the VHA. Urban dwelling patients' utilization of Medicare instead of the VHA suggests a complex decision that incorporates geographic access to VHA services, financial implications of veteran priority status, and the potential availability of multiple sources of radiation therapy in competitive urban markets.

  10. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  11. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Farrey, Karl J.; Rash, Carla C.; Heimann, Ruth; Chmura, Steven J. . E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade {>=}3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose.

  12. Successful imiquimod treatment of multiple basal cell carcinomas after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Mirjam; Urosevic, Mirjana; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Dummer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of a 55-year-old male patient who developed five basal cell carcinomas 23 years after radiation therapy of Hodgkin's disease. In 1980 he received radiation therapy twice. Due to relapses, he was treated with aggressive polychemotherapy and underwent autologous stem cell transplantation, which then led to complete remission. Until now he is in complete remission. However, multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas have developed on irradiation fields that have been successfully treated by imiquimod.

  13. DICOM-based computer-aided evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Fion W. K.; Law, Maria Y. Y.

    2011-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has gained popularity in the treatment of cancers because of its excellent local control with decreased normal tissue complications. Yet, computer planning for the treatment relies heavily on human inspection of resultant radiation dose distribution within the irradiated region of the body. Even for experienced planners, comparison of IMRT plans is definitely cumbersome and not error-free. To solve this problem, a computer-aided decision-support system was built for automatic evaluation of IMRT plans based on the DICOM standard. A DICOM based IMRT plan with DICOM and DICOM-RT objects including CT images, RT Structure Set, RT Dose and RT Plan were retrieved from the Treatment Planning System for programming. Utilizing the MATLAB program language, the decoding-encoding software applications were developed on the basis of the DICOM information object definitions. After tracing the clinical workflow and understanding the needs and expectations from radiation oncologists, a set of routines were written to parse key data items such as isodose curves, region of interests, dose-volume histogram from the DICOM-RT objects. Then graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were created to allow planners to query for parameters such as overdose or underdose areas. A total of 30 IMRT plans were collected in a Department of Clinical Oncology for systematic testing of the DICOM-based decision-support system. Both structural and functional tests were implemented as a major step on the road to software maturity. With promising test results, this decision-support system could represent a major breakthrough in the routine IMRT planning workflow.

  14. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Systematic measurements of whole-body dose distributions for various treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Contemporary radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, could increase the radiation-induced malignancies because of the increased beam-on time, i.e., number of monitor units needed to deliver the same dose to the target and the larger volume irradiated with low doses. In this study, whole-body dose distributions from typical radiotherapy patient plans using different treatment techniques and therapy machines were measured using the same measurement setup and irradiation intention. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from 6 MV beams were compared in terms of treatment technique (3D-conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical TomoTherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, hard wedges, and flattening filter-free radiotherapy) and therapy machine (Elekta, Siemens and Varian linear accelerators, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy). Results: Close to the target, the doses from intensity-modulated treatments (including flattening filter-free) were below the dose from a static treatment plan, whereas the CyberKnife showed a larger dose by a factor of two. Far away from the treatment field, the dose from intensity-modulated treatments showed an increase in dose from stray radiation of about 50% compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. For the flattening filter-free photon beams, the dose from stray radiation far away from the target was slightly lower than the dose from a static treatment. The CyberKnife irradiation and the treatment using hard wedges increased the dose from stray radiation by nearly a factor of three compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. Conclusions: This study showed that the dose outside of the treated volume is influenced by several sources. Therefore, when comparing different treatment techniques

  16. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  18. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Rautiainen, Noora; Sellman, Jaana; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti; Rihkanen, Heikki; Laranne, Jussi; Kleemola, Leenamaija; Wigren, Tuija; Sala, Eeva; Lindholm, Paula; Grenman, Reidar; Joensuu, Heikki

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO{sub 2} laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option.

  19. Computer-aided beam arrangement based on similar cases in radiation treatment-planning databases for stereotactic lung radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Magome, Taiki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hirata, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided method for determination of beam arrangements based on similar cases in a radiotherapy treatment-planning database for stereotactic lung radiation therapy. Similar-case-based beam arrangements were automatically determined based on the following two steps. First, the five most similar cases were searched, based on geometrical features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. Second, five beam arrangements of an objective case were automatically determined by registering five similar cases with the objective case, with respect to lung regions, by means of a linear registration technique. For evaluation of the beam arrangements five treatment plans were manually created by applying the beam arrangements determined in the second step to the objective case. The most usable beam arrangement was selected by sorting the five treatment plans based on eight plan evaluation indices, including the D95, mean lung dose and spinal cord maximum dose. We applied the proposed method to 10 test cases, by using an RTP database of 81 cases with lung cancer, and compared the eight plan evaluation indices between the original treatment plan and the corresponding most usable similar-case-based treatment plan. As a result, the proposed method may provide usable beam arrangements, which have no statistically significant differences from the original beam arrangements (P > 0.05) in terms of the eight plan evaluation indices. Therefore, the proposed method could be employed as an educational tool for less experienced treatment planners.

  20. Treatment burden in stage I seminoma: a comparison of surveillance and adjuvant radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Eric; Warde, Padraig; Jewett, Michael; Panzarella, Tony; O'Malley, Martin; Sweet, Joan; Moore, Malcolm; Sturgeon, Jeremy; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Chung, Peter

    2013-12-01

    To examine the management and outcomes of patients with stage I seminoma and to relate these to overall treatment burden. A total of 764 patients with stage I seminoma underwent surveillance or adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) at a single institution. First relapse on surveillance was managed with RT alone, or with combination chemotherapy (ChT) for more extensive recurrence. Second relapse was managed with ChT. Relapse after adjuvant RT was treated with ChT. The treatment burden was measured, according to the specific treatment undertaken after orchiectomy, by defining treatment episodes as follows: surgery - one episode; one course of RT - one episode; one course of ChT - one episode. In all, 484 patients underwent surveillance and 280 received adjuvant RT. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 98.6 and 97.7% for surveillance, and 97.2 and 91.4% for adjuvant RT. A total of 72 (15%) patients in the surveillance group relapsed; treatment for relapse was RT (n = 56), ChT (n = 15) and surgery (n = 1). Second relapse occurred in six patients; these patients were treated with ChT. Of the patients in the adjuvant RT group, 14 (5%) relapsed: salvage treatment was 10 - ChT (n = 10) surgery (n = 1) and further RT (n = 3). The overall treatment burden represented by number of treatment episodes per patient was 0.16 in the surveillance group and 1.05 in the adjuvant RT group. Surveillance reduces the overall treatment burden in patients with stage I seminoma and is the preferred management option. The selective use of RT at first relapse for patients on surveillance leads to a similar requirement for subsequent ChT to that for patients on adjuvant RT. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  1. Steroid treatment increases the recurrence of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Otani, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ito, Yuri; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Inaji, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an important complication of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Unfortunately, conventional corticosteroid therapy is frequently associated with relapses. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of steroid treatment in patients with RIOP. In total, 26 patients diagnosed with RIOP from among 2404 women who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer were included and classified into steroid (n = 7) and nonsteroid (n = 19) groups. Serum, sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage composition; subjective symptoms (cough, fever, and dyspnea); migratory progression; and RIOP relapse were compared between the groups. Treatment type did not affect the duration of the subjective symptoms, which was 1.6 and 1.7 months for the steroid and nonsteroid groups, respectively. In contrast, RIOP relapse and new pulmonary lesions developed in five patients in the steroid group and only three patients in the nonsteroid group (P = 0.014). By assessing RIOP duration as the time to resolution of symptoms and discontinuation of therapy, the median duration of RIOP was significantly longer in the steroid (17.1 months) than that in the nonsteroid group (2.3 months, P = 0.005), primarily because of frequent relapses. After remission, persistent pulmonary dysfunction did not occur in the nonsteroid group. This single-center retrospective study demonstrates that steroid therapy results in frequent relapses and significantly prolongs RIOP duration. Corticosteroid treatment is considered a critical factor in RIOP recurrence. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  3. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams.

    PubMed

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2010-10-01

    Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and lateral

  4. Quantifying public radiation exposure related to lutetium-177 octreotate therapy for the development of a safe outpatient treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Craig; Cruz, Kyle; Stodilka, Robert; Zabel, Pamela; Wolfson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Radionuclide therapies, including treatment of neuroendocrine tumors with lutetium-177 (Lu-177) octreotate, often involve hospital admission to minimize radiation exposure to the public. Overnight admission due to Lu-177 octreotate therapy incurs additional cost for the hospital and is an inconvenience for the patient. This study endeavors to characterize the potential radiation risk to caregivers and the public should Lu-177 octreotate therapies be performed on an outpatient basis. Dose rate measurements of radiation emanating from 10 patients were taken 30 min, 4, and 20 h after initiation of Lu-177 octreotate therapy. Instadose radiation dose measurement monitors were also placed around the patients' rooms to assess the potential cumulative radiation exposure during the initial 30 min-4 h after treatment (simulating the hospital-based component of the outpatient model) as well as 4-20 h after treatment (simulating the discharged outpatient portion). The mean recorded dose rate at 30 min, 4, and 20 h after therapy was 20.4, 14.0, and 6.6 μSv/h, respectively. The majority of the cumulative dose readings were below the minimum recordable threshold of 0.03 mSv, with a maximum dose recorded of 0.18 mSv. Given the low dose rate and cumulative levels of radiation measured, the results support that an outpatient Lu-177 octreotate treatment protocol would not jeopardize public safety. Nevertheless, the concept of ALARA still requires that detailed radiation safety protocols be developed for Lu-177 octreotate outpatients to minimize radiation exposure to family members, caregivers, and the general public.

  5. Computer-aided analysis of star shot films for high-accuracy radiation therapy treatment units.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Tom; Penne, Rudi; Verellen, Dirk; Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Leysen, Katrien; Vandevondel, Iwein; Poels, Kenneth; Reynders, Truus; Gevaert, Thierry; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Boussaer, Marlies; Cosentino, Dorian; Garibaldi, Cristina; Solberg, Timothy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-21

    As mechanical stability of radiation therapy treatment devices has gone beyond sub-millimeter levels, there is a rising demand for simple yet highly accurate measurement techniques to support the routine quality control of these devices. A combination of using high-resolution radiosensitive film and computer-aided analysis could provide an answer. One generally known technique is the acquisition of star shot films to determine the mechanical stability of rotations of gantries and the therapeutic beam. With computer-aided analysis, mechanical performance can be quantified as a radiation isocenter radius size. In this work, computer-aided analysis of star shot film is further refined by applying an analytical solution for the smallest intersecting circle problem, in contrast to the gradient optimization approaches used until today. An algorithm is presented and subjected to a performance test using two different types of radiosensitive film, the Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and the ISP EBT2 radiochromic film. Artificial star shots with a priori known radiation isocenter size are used to determine the systematic errors introduced by the digitization of the film and the computer analysis. The estimated uncertainty on the isocenter size measurement with the presented technique was 0.04 mm (2σ) and 0.06 mm (2σ) for radiographic and radiochromic films, respectively. As an application of the technique, a study was conducted to compare the mechanical stability of O-ring gantry systems with C-arm-based gantries. In total ten systems of five different institutions were included in this study and star shots were acquired for gantry, collimator, ring, couch rotations and gantry wobble. It was not possible to draw general conclusions about differences in mechanical performance between O-ring and C-arm gantry systems, mainly due to differences in the beam-MLC alignment procedure accuracy. Nevertheless, the best performing O-ring system in this study, a BrainLab/MHI Vero system

  6. Computer-aided analysis of star shot films for high-accuracy radiation therapy treatment units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depuydt, Tom; Penne, Rudi; Verellen, Dirk; Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Leysen, Katrien; Vandevondel, Iwein; Poels, Kenneth; Reynders, Truus; Gevaert, Thierry; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Boussaer, Marlies; Cosentino, Dorian; Garibaldi, Cristina; Solberg, Timothy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    As mechanical stability of radiation therapy treatment devices has gone beyond sub-millimeter levels, there is a rising demand for simple yet highly accurate measurement techniques to support the routine quality control of these devices. A combination of using high-resolution radiosensitive film and computer-aided analysis could provide an answer. One generally known technique is the acquisition of star shot films to determine the mechanical stability of rotations of gantries and the therapeutic beam. With computer-aided analysis, mechanical performance can be quantified as a radiation isocenter radius size. In this work, computer-aided analysis of star shot film is further refined by applying an analytical solution for the smallest intersecting circle problem, in contrast to the gradient optimization approaches used until today. An algorithm is presented and subjected to a performance test using two different types of radiosensitive film, the Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and the ISP EBT2 radiochromic film. Artificial star shots with a priori known radiation isocenter size are used to determine the systematic errors introduced by the digitization of the film and the computer analysis. The estimated uncertainty on the isocenter size measurement with the presented technique was 0.04 mm (2σ) and 0.06 mm (2σ) for radiographic and radiochromic films, respectively. As an application of the technique, a study was conducted to compare the mechanical stability of O-ring gantry systems with C-arm-based gantries. In total ten systems of five different institutions were included in this study and star shots were acquired for gantry, collimator, ring, couch rotations and gantry wobble. It was not possible to draw general conclusions about differences in mechanical performance between O-ring and C-arm gantry systems, mainly due to differences in the beam-MLC alignment procedure accuracy. Nevertheless, the best performing O-ring system in this study, a BrainLab/MHI Vero system

  7. Orthovoltage radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo simulation: treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wanbao; Raeside, David E.

    1997-12-01

    Dose distributions that result from treating a patient with orthovoltage beams are best determined with a treatment planning system that uses the Monte Carlo method, and such systems are not readily available. In the present work, the Monte Carlo method was used to develop a computer code for determining absorbed dose distributions in orthovoltage radiation therapy. The code was used in planning treatment of a patient with a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Two lateral high-energy photon beams supplemented by an anterior orthovoltage photon beam were utilized in the treatment plan. For the clinical case and radiation beams considered, a reasonably uniform dose distribution is achieved within the target volume, while the dose to the lens of each eye is 4 - 8% of the prescribed dose. Therefore, an orthovoltage photon beam, when properly filtered and optimally combined with megavoltage beams, can be effective in the treatment of cancers below the skin, providing that accurate treatment planning is carried out to establish with accuracy and precision the doses to critical structures.

  8. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  9. Translational Treatment Paradigm for Managing Non-Unions Secondary to Radiation Injury Utilizing Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Angiogenic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donneys, Alexis; Blough, Jordan T.; Nelson, Noah S.; Perosky, Joseph E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Kang, Stephen Y.; Felice, Peter A.; Figueredo, Christian; Peterson, Jonathan R.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Levi, Benjamin; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bony non-unions arising in the aftermath of collateral radiation injury are commonly managed with vascularized free tissue transfers. Unfortunately, these procedures are invasive and fraught with attendant morbidities. This study investigates a novel, alternative treatment paradigm utilizing adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) combined with angiogenic deferoxamine (DFO) in the rat mandible. Methods Rats were exposed to a bioequivalent dose of radiation and mandibular osteotomy. Those exhibiting non-unions were subsequently treated with surgical debridement alone or debridement plus combination therapy. Radiographic and biomechanical outcomes were assessed after healing. Results Significant increases in biomechanical strength and radiographic metrics were observed in response to combination therapy (p<0.05). Importantly, combined therapy enabled a 65% reduction in persisting non-unions when compared to debridement alone. Conclusions We support the continued investigation of this promising combination therapy in its potential translation for the management of radiation-induced bony pathology. PMID:25917284

  10. Radiation therapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Jeffrey; Vitolo, Viviana; Vischioni, Barbara; Iannalfi, Alberto; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Orecchia, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) are rare tumours with an annual reported incidence of 2.7 per million persons. In spite of improvements in both diagnostic imaging and therapeutic strategies, patients afflicted by RPS still have poor prognoses. There are currently many different therapeutic strategies for these rare tumours and combining several different multi-modality strategies have not proved to have superior long-term clinical results. This review analyses the available published data and discusses multi-modality management of this rare entity. In particular, the role of radiation therapy, treatment-related side effects and the use of modern radiation treatment techniques will be discussed. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed in January 2011. Relevant international articles published from January 1980 to January 2011 were assessed. The keywords for search purposes were: retroperitoneum, sarcoma, radiotherapy, and radiation therapy. The search was limited to articles published in English. All articles were read in full by the authors and selected for inclusion based on relevance to this article. The addition of radiation therapy (RT) to wide surgical excision for RPS has improved local control rates when compared with surgery alone. Preoperative RT is preferred over postoperative RT. New types and delivery techniques in radiation therapy could further improve patient outcomes. Emerging therapies that employ charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions) are expected to be superior in sparing of normal tissues and efficacy over conventional photon therapy radiation, due to their physical and radiobiological properties.

  11. [Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in dogs and cats].

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Sylvia; Hein, Sven; Stopinski, Thaddeus; Koch, Johannes; Buecker, Arno; Treusacher, Hans-Peter; Schmachtenberg, Axel; Jansen, Thomas; Eble, Michael; Küpper, Wernen

    2003-01-01

    This study describes the experience with hypofractionated radiation therapy of squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma in dogs and cats. A total dose of 32-48 Gray (Gy) was delivered once a week in 8 Gy fractions. 34 animals in which a complete surgical excision was impossible were treated. There was no tumor detectable macroscopically in 14 patients at the beginning of radiation therapy. In 20 animals the median volume of the tumor was 9.9 cm3. The median survival times and the local tumor control of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral and nasal cavities and of the body are comparable to results which were reached with a Monday-Wednesday-Friday scheme. For the treatment of Melanoma the hypofractionated radiation therapy is first choice. There are no significant side effects. Late side effects did not occur. 88% of the owners are satisfied with this kind of treatment and would choose it again.

  12. The impact of respiratory motion and treatment technique on stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang Zhiheng; Chankong, Vira; Yin Fangfang

    2008-04-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which delivers a much higher fractional dose than conventional treatment in only a few fractions, is an effective treatment for liver metastases. For patients who are treated under free-breathing conditions, however, respiration-induced tumor motion in the liver is a concern. Limited clinical information is available related to the impact of tumor motion and treatment technique on the dosimetric consequences. This study evaluated the dosimetric deviations between planned and delivered SBRT dose in the presence of tumor motion for three delivery techniques: three-dimensional conformal static beams (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc (DARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five cases treated with SBRT for liver metastases were included in the study, with tumor motions ranging from 0.5 to 1.75 cm. For each case, three different treatment plans were developed using 3DCRT, DARC, and IMRT. The gantry/multileaf collimator (MLC) motion in the DARC plans and the MLC motion in the IMRT plans were synchronized to the patient's respiratory motion. Retrospectively sorted four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were used to determine patient-organ motion and to calculate the dose delivered during each respiratory phase. Deformable registration, using thin-plate-spline models, was performed to encode the tumor motion and deformation and to register the dose-per-phase to the reference phase images. The different dose distributions resulting from the different delivery techniques and motion ranges were compared to assess the effect of organ motion on dose delivery. Voxel dose variations occurred mostly in the high gradient regions, typically between the target volume and normal tissues, with a maximum variation up to 20%. The greatest CTV variation of all the plans was seen in the IMRT technique with the largest motion range (D99: -8.9%, D95: -8.3%, and D90: -6.3%). The greatest variation for all 3DCRT plans was less

  13. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  14. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  15. Successful Treatment of High Risk and Recurrent Pediatric Desmoids Using Radiation as a Component of Multimodality Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Andolino, David; Weinberg, Vivian; Missett, Brian T.; Law, Jason; Wara, William M.; O'Donnell, Richard J.; Matthay, Katherine K.; DuBois, Steven G.; Goldsby, Robert; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiation therapy (RT) as a component of multimodality therapy for pediatric desmoids. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children diagnosed between 1987 and 2005 were identified. Median age at start of treatment was 13 years (range, 2-21). Primary therapy consisted of resection alone (10), resection + external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (5), resection + chemotherapy (CT; 3), EBRT alone (1), and CT alone (2). Results: The median follow-up from start of treatment is 75.7 months (range, 16-162). Examining patients with gross total resections (GTRs) (-) margins and those who had GTRs (+) margins followed by EBRT, only 2 of 7 failed primary treatment. Conversely, 13 of 14 patients with other primary treatments failed locally. Of the 15 patients who recurred, only 1 patient had a GTR (-) margins. Seven of these patients had salvage therapy that did not include RT, and of these only 2 have no evidence of disease (NED) at last follow-up. In contrast, the remaining 8 patients received RT as a component of their final salvage therapy and 7 of these are NED at last follow-up. At last follow-up, no patient has died, although toxicities of therapy have occurred. Conclusions: Local control is difficult to achieve in pediatric patients with desmoids. In the setting in which negative surgical margins cannot be achieved, RT plays a key role in achieving NED status. Even after multiple recurrences, successful salvage is achievable, particularly when high-dose focal therapy is incorporated.

  16. Microenvironment and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Itasaka, Satoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Dependency on tumor oxygenation is one of the major features of radiation therapy and this has led many radiation biologists and oncologists to focus on tumor hypoxia. The first approach to overcome tumor hypoxia was to improve tumor oxygenation by increasing oxygen delivery and a subsequent approach was the use of radiosensitizers in combination with radiation therapy. Clinical use of some of these approaches was promising, but they are not widely used due to several limitations. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is activated by hypoxia and induces the expression of various genes related to the adaptation of cellular metabolism to hypoxia, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells and angiogenesis, and so forth. HIF-1 is a potent target to enhance the therapeutic effects of radiation therapy. Another approach is antiangiogenic therapy. The combination with radiation therapy is promising, but several factors including surrogate markers, timing and duration, and so forth have to be optimized before introducing it into clinics. In this review, we examined how the tumor microenvironment influences the effects of radiation and how we can enhance the antitumor effects of radiation therapy by modifying the tumor microenvironment. PMID:23509762

  17. Intelligence-guided beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An intelligence guided approach based on fuzzy inference system (FIS) was proposed to automate beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The model of FIS is built on inference rules in describing the relationship between dose quality of IMRT plan and irradiated region of anatomical structure. Dose quality of IMRT plan is quantified by the difference between calculated and constraint doses of the anatomical structures in an IMRT plan. Irradiated region of anatomical structure is characterized by the metric, covered region of interest, which is the region of an anatomical structure under radiation field while beam's eye-view is conform to target volume. Initially, an IMRT plan is created with a single beam. The dose difference is calculated for the input of FIS and the output of FIS is obtained with processing of fuzzy inference. Later, a set of candidate beams is generated for replacing the current beam. This process continues until no candidate beams is found. Then the next beam is added to the IMRT plan and optimized in the same way as the previous beam. The new beam keeps adding to the IMRT plan until the allowed beam number is reached. Two spinal cases were investigated in this study. The preliminary results show that dose quality of IMRT plans achieved by this approach is better than those achieved by the default approach with equally spaced beam setting. It is effective to find the optimal beam combination of IMRT plan with the intelligence-guided approach.

  18. Radiation therapy combined with Adriamycin or 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    One hundred fifty-seven patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma were randomly allocated to therapy with radiation and 5-fluorouracil or radiation and Adriamycin (doxorubicin). A total of 138 of 143 analyzable patients have died, and no differences in the relative survival impact of the treatments have been observed. Toxicity on the Adriamycin arm was more substantial and primarily attributable to Adriamycin chemotherapy after the completion of radiotherapy.

  19. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K.; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  20. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... temporary, it can be permanent. Sore Mouth and Tooth Decay The tissues of the mouth may be sore ... and there may be an increased risk of tooth decay if a child received radiation therapy to the ...

  1. Radiation therapy for intrahepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Quick, Allison M; Lo, Simon S; Mayr, Nina A; Kim, Edward Y

    2009-10-01

    Historically, radiation was not used in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastasis because of the low tolerance of the liver to radiation. More recently, improvements in radiation delivery using advanced techniques, such as 3D conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, proton-beam therapy and internal radiation therapy, have enabled partial and selective irradiation of the liver with promising response rates and toxicity profiles. This review will discuss the different techniques of radiation that can now be used to treat intrahepatic malignancies and the important clinical studies in the medical literature.

  2. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    SciTech Connect

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Canyilmaz, Fatih; Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Aynaci, Osman; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment.

  3. [The role of external beam radiation therapy in the adjuvant treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis].

    PubMed

    Heyd, R; Seegenschmiedt, M H; Micke, O

    2011-12-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder arising from synovial cells of the tendon sheets and joint capsules. The potential value of external beam radiation therapy in the interdisciplinary management of PVNS is demonstrated by a comprehensive literature review on the clinical use of radiotherapy and the results of national patterns of care study (PCS) which was conducted by the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy in Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) in 2008-2009. A structured questionnaire was mailed to all 227 RT institutions in Germany to assess all previous treatments, the RT indication and techniques, the rate of local control, the functional outcome and the possible adverse effects related to the use of external beam radiation therapy (RT). For comparison of the clinical outcome data, a systematic literature research in several international electronic databases and a conventional library search were performed to identify publications addressing the use of RT for PVNS. Based on an overall response rate of 83.2%, the PCS was nationally representative. Ten percent of institutions presented clinical experience with the use of RT for PVNS; from this database a total of 41 treated sites from 14 institutions were evaluable for long-term analysis. The primary therapeutic approach was cytoreductive surgery in all cases. In cases of residual tissue or complete resection of extensive local recurrences, RT was applied in 39 cases (95.1%). An excellent or good functional outcome was noted in 34 cases (82.9%). The use of RT was not associated with early or late toxicity larger than RTOG grade II. The literature review identified 19 published studies (1940-2009) which represented a total of 140 cases or patients, respectively. After follow-up periods ranging from 1-250 months and administration of total doses in the range of 16-50 Gy the overall rate of local control was 84.5%. Both the results of the national PCS and the literature review

  4. Compliance to radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients and impact on treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, B C; Sá-Couto, P; Lopes, M C; Khouri, L

    2016-07-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate head and neck cancer (HNC) patient's compliance to the planned radiation therapy (RT) using the department policy established in 2005 at IPOCFG and to estimate the impact on treatment outcome due to failure in receiving RT as prescribed. 359 HNC patients irradiated from 2007 to 2013 were included in this study. Patient cohort was divided into Group 1: patients receiving RT as prescribed and Group 2: patients that interrupted or suspended RT. Group Tox is the subgroup of patients that interrupted RT due to toxicity or intercurrent disease. Number and causes for treatment interruptions were assessed. The cumulative incidence of locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for Groups 1 and 2 was determined. Cox regression was performed to investigate potential hazard factors and logistic regression was made to determine risk factors related to treatment interruptions. Major causes for treatment interruptions were toxicity plus intercurrent disease (41.7 %) and public holidays (30.1 %). 10.3 % of the patients interrupted 3-9 days. Significant differences in survival distributions of the LRC between Groups 1 and 2, of up to 19 %, were found in the subgroup of patients with N2-3 tumours, for post-operative RT and for concomitant RT. Treatment breaks larger than two days had an almost fourfold increased risk of poorer LRC and DFS. Twin accelerators and treating on public holidays are effective measures minimizing RT breaks. For HNC, patient compliance is mostly limited by RT side-effects. Efforts to maintain RT biological effective dose in HNC must be always undertaken.

  5. Intensity modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the treatment of high grade glioma: a dosimetric comparison.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shannon M; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Kachris, Stefanos; Vogds, Betty J; DeRouen, Melissa; Gittleman, Alicia E; DeWyngaert, Keith; Vlachaki, Maria T

    2007-04-19

    The present study compared the dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) techniques in patients treated for high-grade glioma. A total of 20 patients underwent computed tomography treatment planning in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Prescription dose and normal-tissue constraints were identical for the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. The prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy delivered at 1.8 Gy per fraction using 4-10 MV photons. Normal-tissue dose constraints were 50-54 Gy for the optic chiasm and nerves, and 55-60 Gy for the brainstem. The IMRT plan yielded superior target coverage as compared with the 3D-CRT plan. Specifically, minimum and mean planning target volume cone down doses were 54.52 Gy and 61.74 Gy for IMRT and 50.56 Gy and 60.06 Gy for 3D-CRT (p < or = 0.01). The IMRT plan reduced the percent volume of brainstem receiving a dose greater than 45 Gy by 31% (p = 0.004) and the percent volume of brain receiving a dose greater than 18 Gy, 24 Gy, and 45 Gy by 10% (p = 0.059), 14% (p = 0.015), and 40% (p < or = 0.0001) respectively. With IMRT, the percent volume of optic chiasm receiving more than 45 Gy was also reduced by 30.40% (p = 0.047). As compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly increased the tumor control probability (p < or = 0.005) and lowered the normal-tissue complication probability for brain and brainstem (p < 0.033). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy improved target coverage and reduced radiation dose to the brain, brainstem, and optic chiasm. With the availability of new cancer imaging tools and more effective systemic agents, IMRT may be used to intensify tumor doses while minimizing toxicity, therefore potentially improving outcomes in patients with high-grade glioma.

  6. Treatment of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Sadanori

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Radiation exposure as a result of radiation treatment, accident, or terrorism may cause serious problems such as deficiency due to necrosis or loss of function, fibrosis, or intractable ulcers in the tissues and organs. When the skin, bone, oral mucous membrane, guts, or salivary glands are damaged by ionizing radiation, the management and treatment are very lengthy and difficult. Critical Issues: In severe and irreversible injuries, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. Several surgical procedures, such as debridement, skin grafting, and local and free-vascularized flaps, are widely used. Recent Advances: In specific cases of major morbidity or in high-risk patients, a newly developed therapy using a patient's own stem cells is safe and effective. Adipose tissue, normally a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which are similar to those from the bone marrow, can be harvested, since the procedure is easy, and abundant tissue can be obtained with minimal invasiveness. Future Directions: Based on the molecular basis of radiation injuries, several prospective treatments are under development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms focus on an individual's sensitivity to radiation in radiogenomics, and the pathology of radiation fibrosis or the effect of radiation on wound healing is being studied and will lead to new insight into the treatment of radiation injuries. Protectors and mitigators are being actively investigated in terms of the timing of administration or dose. PMID:24761339

  7. Radiation therapy at the end of life: a population-based study examining palliative treatment intensity.

    PubMed

    Kress, Marie-Adele Sorel; Jensen, Roxanne E; Tsai, Huei-Ting; Lobo, Tania; Satinsky, Andrew; Potosky, Arnold L

    2015-01-13

    To examine factors associated with the use of radiation therapy (RT) at the end of life in patients with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) - Medicare database, patients were over age 65 and diagnosed between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2011 with any stage of cancer when the cause of death, as defined by SEER, was cancer; or with stage 4 cancer, who died of any cause. We employed multiple logistic regression models to identify patient and health systems factors associated with palliative radiation use. 50% of patients received RT in the last 6 months of life. RT was used less frequently in older patients and in non-Hispanic white patients. Similar patterns were observed in the last 14 days of life. Chemotherapy use in the last 6 months of life was strongly correlated with receiving RT in the last 6 months (OR 2.72, 95% CI: 2.59-2.88) and last 14 days of life (OR 1.55, 95% CI: 1.40-1.66). Patients receiving RT accrued more emergency department visits, radiographic exams and physician visits (all comparisons p < 0.0001). Among patients with breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer, palliative RT use was common. End-of-life RT correlated with end-of-life chemotherapy use, including in the last 14 days of life, when treatment may cause increased treatment burden without improved quality of life. Research is needed optimize the role and timing of RT in palliative care.

  8. [The future of hyperbaric oxygen therapy: added value in the treatment of late radiation injury?].

    PubMed

    van Geel, A N Bert; Poortmans, Philip; Koppert, Linetta B

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence for the benefit of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in late radiation tissue injury (LRTI) affecting the head, neck and lower bowel, but there is little evidence for or against the benefit in other tissues (e.g. the breast) affected by LRTI. There is a need for large prospective trials including quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies, because hyperbaric oxygen therapy is becoming more popular.

  9. Distributed approximation of Pareto surfaces in multicriteria radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2013-06-01

    We consider multicriteria radiation therapy treatment planning by navigation over the Pareto surface, implemented by interpolation between discrete treatment plans. Current state of the art for calculation of a discrete representation of the Pareto surface is to sandwich this set between inner and outer approximations that are updated one point at a time. In this paper, we generalize this sequential method to an algorithm that permits parallelization. The principle of the generalization is to apply the sequential method to an approximation of an inexpensive model of the Pareto surface. The information gathered from the model is sub-sequently used for the calculation of points from the exact Pareto surface, which are processed in parallel. The model is constructed according to the current inner and outer approximations, and given a shape that is difficult to approximate, in order to avoid that parts of the Pareto surface are incorrectly disregarded. Approximations of comparable quality to those generated by the sequential method are demonstrated when the degree of parallelization is up to twice the number of dimensions of the objective space. For practical applications, the number of dimensions is typically at least five, so that a speed-up of one order of magnitude is obtained.

  10. Procedure for unmasking localization information from ProstaScint scans for prostate radiation therapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    DeWyngaert, J. Keith . E-mail: keith.dewyngaert@med.nyu.edu; Noz, Marilyn E.; Ellerin, Bruce; Kramer, Elissa L.; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a method to extract the meaningful biologic information from {sup 111}In-radiolabeled capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) SPECT scans for use in radiation therapy treatment planning by removing that component of the {sup 111}In SPECT images associated with normal structures. Methods and materials: We examined 20 of more than 80 patients who underwent simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 111}In SPECT scans, which were subsequently registered to the corresponding CT/MRI scans.A thresholding algorithm was used to identify {sup 99m}Tc uptake associated with blood vessels and CT electron density associated with bone marrow. Corresponding voxels were removed from the {sup 111}In image set. Results: No single threshold value was found to be associated with the {sup 99m}Tc uptake that corresponded to the blood vessels. Intensity values were normalized to a global maximum and, as such, were dependent upon the quantity of {sup 99m}Tc pooled in the bladder. The reduced ProstaScint volume sets were segmented by use of a thresholding feature of the planning system and superimposed on the CT/MRI scans. Conclusions: ProstaScint images are now closer to becoming a biologically and therapeutically useful and accurate image set. After known sources of normal intensity are stripped away, the remaining areas that demonstrate uptake may be segmented and superimposed on the treatment-planning CT/MRI volume.

  11. Automatic MRI Atlas-Based External Beam Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jason; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Greer, Peter B.; Fripp, Jurgen; Denham, James; Ourselin, Sébastien; Salvado, Olivier

    Prostate radiation therapy dose planning currently requires computed tomography (CT) scans as they contain electron density information needed for patient dose calculations. However magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images have significantly superior soft-tissue contrast for segmenting organs of interest and determining the target volume for treatment. This paper describes work on the development of an alternative treatment workflow enabling both organ delineation and dose planning to be performed using MRI alone. This is achieved by atlas based segmentation and the generation of pseudo-CT scans from MRI. Planning and dosimetry results for three prostate cancer patients from Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital (Australia) are presented supporting the feasibility of this workflow. Good DSC scores were found for the atlas based segmentation of the prostate (mean 0.84) and bones (mean 0.89). The agreement between MRI/pseudo-CT and CT planning was quantified by dose differences and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi values indicate that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions are equivalent.

  12. [Radiation therapy and cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Serafim, P; Fonseca, G; Oliveira, A; Fernandes, T

    1999-05-01

    The number of patients with cardiac pacemakers submitted annually to radiation therapy is increasing. Radiation therapy causes interference in the normal functioning processes, directly by chemical changes in the structure of the device and also by electromagnetic disturbances generated in the process of treatment. The changes in the technology used in the manufacture of cardiac pacemakers after the 70's, with the introduction of complementary metal-oxide semi-conductors (CMOS) in the circuits, drastically increased the chance of dangerous interference in the normal function of cardiac pacemakers occurring when in contact with an ionizing radiation source. The authors briefly describe the mechanisms underlying the radio-induced damage usually observed. A review of the literature on this issue is made and solutions are pointed out to perform safe radiation therapy and minimize the risk of device malfunction.

  13. Radiation therapy in the treatment of HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Donato, Vittorio; Guarnaccia, Roberta; Dognini, Jessica; de Pascalis, Giovanni; Caruso, Cristina; Bellagamba, Rita; Morrone, Aldo

    2013-05-01

    mask, 200 cGy per fraction and a total dose of 24 and 30 Gy, respectively. A patient with a single bone lesion on the spinal column was treated with irradiation using 6 Mev photon regimen, 300 cGy per fraction and a total dose of 30 Gy. At the time of reporting, 14 patients were alive and four patients had died. One patient died due to complications from HIV infection. The follow-up from the end of the treatment ranged from four to 124 months (mean=51.17 months). The overall survival for the group was 88.8% at one year. The mean overall survival was 57.4 months. A complete response was achieved for 31 lesions (83.8 %); a partial response with a tumor regression was observed for six lesions (16.2 %). No relapses were observed during the period of follow-up, but we observed new lesions in one patient. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale we observed erythematic and dry desquamation (grade 1) in eight sites (21%); in only one patient (2.6%) did stomatitis occur (grade 1). Good cosmetic results were described for 25 (65.7%) out of 31 lesions. Effective palliative action was obtained for all lesions except for two (5.2%) located in a vertebra and hard palate. RT will be a mainstay of cure for this group of patients especially when of young age and the will to preserve the cosmetic appearance is a primary need.

  14. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  15. A concurrent ultra-fractionated radiation therapy and temozolomide treatment: A promising therapy for newly diagnosed, inoperable glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, P; Quillien, V; Faure, G; Bernier, V; Noel, G; Quetin, P; Gorlia, T; Carnin, C; Pedeux, R

    2016-03-15

    We report on a phase II clinical trial to determine the effect of a concurrent ultra-fractionated radiotherapy and temozolomide treatment in inoperable glioblastoma patients. A phase II study opened; patients over 18 years of age who were able to give informed consent and had histologically proven, newly diagnosed inoperable diagnosed and supratentorial glioblastoma were eligible. Three doses of 0.75 Gy spaced apart by at least 4 hr were delivered daily, 5 days a week for six consecutive weeks for a total of 67.5 Gy. Chemotherapy was administered during the same period, which consisted of temozolomide given at a dose of 75 mg/m(2) for 7 days a week. After a 4-week break, chemotherapy was resumed for up to six cycles of adjuvant temozolomide treatment, given every 28 days, according to the standard 5-day regimen. Tolerance and toxicity were the primary endpoints; survival and progression-free survival were the secondary endpoints. In total, 40 patients were enrolled in this study, 29 men and 11 women. The median age was 58 years, and the median Karnofsky performance status was 80. The concomitant ultra-fractionated radiotherapy and temozolomide treatment was well tolerated. Complete responses were seen in four patients, and partial responses were reported in seven patients. The median survival from the initial diagnosis was 16 months. Several long-term survivors were noted. Concurrent ultra-fractionated radiation therapy and temozolomide treatment are well accepted by the patients. The results showed encouraging survival rates for these unfavorable patients.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-05-01

    We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A "plan of the day" radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Combined radiation and hyperthermia: comparison of two treatment schedules based on data from a registry established by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG).

    PubMed

    Luk, K H; Francis, M E; Perez, C A; Johnson, R J

    1984-06-01

    A registry established by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group provides data for assessing the impact of clinical heating in a set of non-randomized patients treated with hyperthermia in participating member institutions from 1/77 to 6/81. This analysis focuses on tumor response when localized hyperthermia is produced by microwave and applied pursuant to two distinctly different treatment schedules. Hyperthermia treatments were biweekly and combined with daily radiation treatments in one patient group, and combined with biweekly radiation treatment in another. Sample X consists of 65 patients who received a course of therapy using combined hyperthermia and radiation in consecutive treatment sessions each separated by at least 48 hours, but no more than 96 hours. Sample Y consists of 34 patients who received further radiation after the start of a course of combined therapy--either between or at the end of a series of combined treatment sessions. The average length of heat treatment was 72 minutes for Sample X and 32 minutes for Sample Y patients. None of the patients received concurrent chemotherapy; all received between 3 and 13 hyperthermia treatments; all had superficial, measurable tumors. On the average, Sample X patients received 704 total minutes of heat compared to Sample Y patients who received 233 total minutes of heat. Total tumor radiation doses ranged from 17.0 Gy to 44.0 Gy among Sample X patients with 92.3% receiving radiation at either 3 Gy or 4 Gy per fraction. In Sample Y the range for total tumor dose was 16.0 Gy to 70.2 Gy with 73.4% of the patients receiving radiation at 2.5 Gy or less per fraction. Generally, the two treatment schedules achieved similar levels of tumor response. Among treated tumors in Sample X and Sample Y, complete regression rates were 52.4 and 61.8%, respectively, and partial regression rates were 16.9 and 14.7%. Adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in both samples responded well to these combined treatments. Only in

  18. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  19. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that can ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ...

  20. Multibeam tomotherapy: A new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, Nils; Mueller, Reinhold G.

    2007-10-15

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of {+-}36 deg. . Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of 'step and shoot' MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as 'multibeam tomotherapy.' Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The 'Multifocal MLC-positioning' algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  1. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  2. An investigation of PRESAGE® 3D dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT radiation therapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jake; Juang, Titania; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize three formulations of PRESAGE® dosimeters (DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX) and to identify optimal readout timing and procedures for accurate in-house 3D dosimetry. The optimal formulation and procedure was then applied for the verification of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment technique. PRESAGE® formulations were studied for their temporal stability post-irradiation, sensitivity, and linearity of dose response. Dosimeters were read out using a high-resolution optical-CT scanner. Small volumes of PRESAGE® were irradiated to investigate possible differences in sensitivity for large and small volumes (‘volume effect’). The optimal formulation and read-out technique was applied to the verification of two patient treatments: an IMRT plan and a VMAT plan. A gradual decrease in post-irradiation optical-density was observed in all formulations with DEA-1 exhibiting the best temporal stability with less than 4% variation between 2-22 h post-irradiation. A linear dose response at the 4 h time point was observed for all formulations with an R2 value >0.99. A large volume effect was observed for DEA-1 with sensitivity of the large dosimeter being ~63% less than the sensitivity of the cuvettes. For the IMRT and VMAT treatments, the 3D gamma passing rates for 3%/3 mm criteria using absolute measured dose were 99.6 and 94.5% for the IMRT and VMAT treatments, respectively. In summary, this work shows that accurate 3D dosimetry is possible with all three PRESAGE® formulations. The optimal imaging windows post-irradiation were 3-24 h, 2-6 h, and immediately for the DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX formulations, respectively. Because of the large volume effect, small volume cuvettes are not yet a reliable method for calibration of larger dosimeters to absolute dose. Finally, PRESAGE® is observed to be a useful method of 3D verification when careful consideration is given

  3. An investigation of PRESAGE® 3D dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT radiation therapy treatment verification

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jake; Juang, Titania; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize three formulations of PRESAGE® dosimeters (DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX) and to identify optimal readout timing and procedures for accurate in-house 3D dosimetry. The optimal formulation and procedure was then applied for the verification of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment technique. PRESAGE® formulations were studied for their temporal stability postirradiation, sensitivity, and linearity of dose response. Dosimeters were read out using a high-resolution optical-CT scanner. Small volumes of PRESAGE® were irradiated to investigate possible differences in sensitivity for large and small volumes (‘volume effect’). The optimal formulation and read-out technique was applied to the verification of two patient treatments: an IMRT plan and a VMAT plan. A gradual decrease in post-irradiation optical-density was observed in all formulations with DEA-1 exhibiting the best temporal stability with less than 4% variation between 2–22 h post-irradiation. A linear dose response at the 4 h time point was observed for all formulations with an R2 value >0.99. A large volume effect was observed for DEA-1 with sensitivity of the large dosimeter being ~63% less than the sensitivity of the cuvettes. For the IMRT and VMAT treatments, the 3D gamma passing rates for 3%/3 mm criteria using absolute measured dose were 99.6 and 94.5% for the IMRT and VMAT treatments, respectively. In summary, this work shows that accurate 3D dosimetry is possible with all three PRESAGE® formulations. The optimal imaging windows post-irradiation were 3–24 h, 2–6 h, and immediately for the DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX formulations, respectively. Because of the large volume effect, small volume cuvettes are not yet a reliable method for calibration of larger dosimeters to absolute dose. Finally, PRESAGE® is observed to be a useful method of 3D verification when careful consideration is given to the

  4. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy in the treatment of local recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yosef, Rami; Vigler, Nili; Inbar, Moshe; Vexler, Akiva

    2004-07-01

    Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy was shown to be more effective in local recurrent breast cancer than radiotherapy alone, but its use is limited due to technical difficulties, stringent reimbursement policies and because it is time consuming. To report our experience with a simple and convenient XRT + HT delivery system. XRT was delivered through either electron or photon beams (total dose 30-40 Gy in previously irradiated fields or 50-70 Gy in non-irradiated fields). Hyperthermia was delivered by a dedicated HT device operating at 915 MHz. The heating session lasted 45 minutes. The maximal tumor surface temperature was set at 45 degrees C and modified according to patient comfort. No intratumoral (invasive) thermometry was used. At least two HT sessions were scheduled to each HT field during the entire XRT treatment period. Tumor response was evaluated every 3 months after completion of treatment. The overall survival was measured from XRT + HT initiation until the last follow-up. Fifteen women underwent 114 HT treatments delivered through 28 HT fields. Twenty-four HT fields (15 patients) were previously irradiated. There was complete infield response in 10 fields (6 patients), partial response in 8 fields (4 patients), no response or progressive disease in 4 fields (3 patients), and no parameters in 6 fields (5 patients). Eighteen fields (64%) had complete or partial response. Seven patients had outfield recurrence despite wide XRT + HT fields. Ulceration was the only major side effect (three patients, three fields). The combined HT+XRT delivery system, with no invasive thermometry, is a simple and effective method for treating local recurrent breast cancer.

  5. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia; White, Benjamin M

    2016-05-01

    To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left-right, anterior-posterior, superior-inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose-volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal cancer may reduce radiation treatment-related toxicity. Copyright

  6. Maximizing the probability of satisfying the clinical goals in radiation therapy treatment planning under setup uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, Albin Hårdemark, Björn; Forsgren, Anders

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a method that maximizes the probability of satisfying the clinical goals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments subject to setup uncertainty. Methods: The authors perform robust optimization in which the clinical goals are constrained to be satisfied whenever the setup error falls within an uncertainty set. The shape of the uncertainty set is included as a variable in the optimization. The goal of the optimization is to modify the shape of the uncertainty set in order to maximize the probability that the setup error will fall within the modified set. Because the constraints enforce the clinical goals to be satisfied under all setup errors within the uncertainty set, this is equivalent to maximizing the probability of satisfying the clinical goals. This type of robust optimization is studied with respect to photon and proton therapy applied to a prostate case and compared to robust optimization using an a priori defined uncertainty set. Results: Slight reductions of the uncertainty sets resulted in plans that satisfied a larger number of clinical goals than optimization with respect to a priori defined uncertainty sets, both within the reduced uncertainty sets and within the a priori, nonreduced, uncertainty sets. For the prostate case, the plans taking reduced uncertainty sets into account satisfied 1.4 (photons) and 1.5 (protons) times as many clinical goals over the scenarios as the method taking a priori uncertainty sets into account. Conclusions: Reducing the uncertainty sets enabled the optimization to find better solutions with respect to the errors within the reduced as well as the nonreduced uncertainty sets and thereby achieve higher probability of satisfying the clinical goals. This shows that asking for a little less in the optimization sometimes leads to better overall plan quality.

  7. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  8. Applications of Machine Learning for Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamoto, Takahiro

    Radiation therapy has been highly advanced as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) by making advantage of image engineering technologies. Recently, novel frameworks based on image engineering technologies as well as machine learning technologies have been studied for sophisticating the radiation therapy. In this review paper, the author introduces several researches of applications of machine learning for radiation therapy. For examples, a method to determine the threshold values for standardized uptake value (SUV) for estimation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in positron emission tomography (PET) images, an approach to estimate the multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors between treatment plans and radiation delivery time, and prediction frameworks for esophageal stenosis and radiation pneumonitis risk after radiation therapy are described. Finally, the author introduces seven issues that one should consider when applying machine learning models to radiation therapy.

  9. PITASOR epidemiological study: prevalence, incidence and treatment of anaemia in radiation therapy oncology departments in Spain.

    PubMed

    Samper Ots, Pilar M; Muñoz, Julia; Biete, Albert; Ortiz, María José; Acuña, María; Cabrera, Joaquín; López Carrizosa, Concepción; Bayo, Eloisa; Herruzo, Ismael; Pérez, María Mar; Domínguez, Miguel A; Morillo Macías, Virginia; Mira, Moisés; Pérez Casas, Ana María; Sevillano, María Mar; García Ríos, Isabel; Andreu, Francisco; Sotoca, Amalia; Álvarez, Ana; López, Escarlata; Pérez Escutia, María Ángeles; Loayza Villaroel, Armando

    2011-05-01

    Anemia is the most common haematological complication in cancer patients. Analysis of the incidence, prevalence and treatment of anemia in oncologic patients treated in Radiation Oncology Departments in Spain (ROD) and monitoring of the existing recommendations for the treatment of anemia. Observational, prospective, multicenter study which involved 19 Spanish ROD. The study was approved by the CEIC Central Defense Hospital. 477 patients with solid tumors, subsidiary of RT with radical intent referred to such centers within a period of one month (5/5/09 to 5/6/09) and gave their consent to participate in the study. We gathered the main characteristics of patients and their oncologic disease. All patients underwent a determination of Hb levels before RT, upon reaching 25-35 Gy and at the end treatment. In patients with anemia we assessed the existence of related symptoms and its treatment. Basal situation: The prevalence of anemia was 34.8% (166 patients). Mean Hb in patients with anemia was 11.17 ± 1.07 g/dl. Anemia-related symptoms were present in 34% of the patients. Anemia predisposing factors were: stage of the disease, previously received chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy. 39% (66 patients) received anemia treatment, with a mean Hb of 10.43 ± 1.04 g/dl. During RT: The prevalence of anemia was 38.9% (182 patients) with a mean Hb of 11.24 ± 1.21 g/dl. Predisposing factors for anemia during RT treatment were: age, male sex, chemotherapy prior to RT, basal anemia and chemotherapy during RT. 36.3% (66 patients) had anemia-related symptoms. 34.6% (63 patients) with a mean Hb of 10.5 ± 1.37 g/dl received treatment for anemia. The prevalence of anemia at the end of the RT was 38.1% (177 patients) with a mean Hb of 11.19 ± 1.18 g/dl. The predisposing factors for the appearance of anemia at the end of RT were: male sex, anemia at basal situation and during treatment and chemotherapy during RT. 34% (61 patients) had anemia-related symptoms and 73 patients (41

  10. Gold-Loaded Polymeric Micelles for Computed Tomography-Guided Radiation Therapy Treatment and Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have generated interest as both imaging and therapeutic agents. AuNPs are attractive for imaging applications since they are nontoxic and provide nearly three times greater X-ray attenuation per unit weight than iodine. As therapeutic agents, AuNPs can sensitize tumor cells to ionizing radiation. To create a nanoplatform that could simultaneously exhibit long circulation times, achieve appreciable tumor accumulation, generate computed tomography (CT) image contrast, and serve as a radiosensitizer, gold-loaded polymeric micelles (GPMs) were prepared. Specifically, 1.9 nm AuNPs were encapsulated within the hydrophobic core of micelles formed with the amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-capralactone). GPMs were produced with low polydispersity and mean hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 25 to 150 nm. Following intravenous injection, GPMs provided blood pool contrast for up to 24 h and improved the delineation of tumor margins via CT. Thus, GPM-enhanced CT imaging was used to guide radiation therapy delivered via a small animal radiation research platform. In combination with the radiosensitizing capabilities of gold, tumor-bearing mice exhibited a 1.7-fold improvement in the median survival time, compared with mice receiving radiation alone. It is envisioned that translation of these capabilities to human cancer patients could guide and enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy. PMID:24377302

  11. Phase II Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial of conventional radiation therapy followed by treatment with recombinant interferon-{beta} for supratentorial glioblastoma: Results of RTOG 9710

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, Howard . E-mail: hcolman@mdanderson.org; Berkey, Brian A.; Maor, Moshe H.; Groves, Morris D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Vermeulen, Sandra; Mehta, Minesh P.; Yung, W.K. Alfred

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human interferon {beta}-1a (rhIFN-{beta}), when given after radiation therapy, improves survival in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: After surgery, 109 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma were enrolled and treated with radiation therapy (60 Gy). A total of 55 patients remained stable after radiation and were treated with rhIFN-{beta} (6 MU/day i.m., 3 times/week). Outcomes were compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group glioma historical database. Results: RhIFN-{beta} was well tolerated, with 1 Grade 4 toxicity and 8 other patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity. Median survival time (MST) of the 55 rhIFN-{beta}-treated patients was 13.4 months. MST for the 34 rhIFN-{beta}-treated in RPA Classes III and IV was 16.9 vs. 12.4 months for historical controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89-1.81). There was also a trend toward improved survival across all RPA Classes comparing the 55 rhIFN-{beta} treated patients and 1,658 historical controls (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.94-1.63). The high rate of early failures (54/109) after radiation and before initiation of rhIFN-{beta} was likely caused by stricter interpretation of early radiographic changes in the current study. Matched-pair and intent-to-treat analyses performed to try to address this bias showed no difference in survival between study patients and controls. Conclusion: RhIFN-{beta} given after conventional radiation therapy was well tolerated, with a trend toward survival benefit in patients who remained stable after radiation therapy. These data suggest that rhIFN-{beta} warrants further evaluation in additional studies, possibly in combination with current temozolomide-based regimens.

  12. Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) alone versus WBRT and radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chirag G; Pricola, Katie; Sarmiento, J Manuel; Garg, Sachin K; Bryant, Andrew; Black, Keith L

    2017-09-25

    Historically, whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has been the main treatment for brain metastases. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) delivers high-dose focused radiation and is being increasingly utilized to treat brain metastases. The benefit of adding SRS to WBRT is unclear. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 9, 2012. To assess the efficacy of WBRT plus SRS versus WBRT alone in the treatment of adults with brain metastases. For the original review, in 2009 we searched the following electronic databases: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CancerLit in order to identify trials for inclusion in this review. For the first update the searches were updated in May 2012.For this update, in May 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase in order to identify trials for inclusion in the review. We restricted the review to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared use of WBRT plus SRS versus WBRT alone for upfront treatment of adults with newly diagnosed metastases (single or multiple) in the brain resulting from any primary, extracranial cancer. We used the generic inverse variance method, random-effects model in Review Manager 5 for the meta-analysis. We identified three studies and one abstract for inclusion but we could only include two studies, with a total of 358 participants in a meta-analysis. This found no difference in overall survival (OS) between the WBRT plus SRS and WBRT alone groups (hazard ratio (HR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65 to 1.02; 2 studies, 358 participants; moderate-quality evidence). For participants with one brain metastasis median survival was significantly longer in the WBRT plus SRS group (6.5 months) versus WBRT group (4.9 months; P = 0.04). Participants in the WBRT plus SRS group had decreased local failure compared to participants who received WBRT alone (HR 0.27, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.52; 2 studies, 129 participants; moderate-quality evidence). Furthermore, we observed an improvement in

  13. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  14. [Advanced radiation therapy project for cancer treatment--from Hokkaido to the world, the world access to Hokkaido].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    Cancer is the most major cause of death in Japan recently. In this symposium, we explained advanced treatment technology for cancer treatment, now used and that will be used in near future at the Hokkaido University Hospital. Intensity Moderated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) are considered to be the most promising and advanced technologies for cancer treatment. Various kinds of radiation treatment equipment and methods have been developed and constructed at the Hokkaido University. One of the most worlds wide famous one is the real time tumor tracking radiotherapy system. The FIRST (Funding for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology) Program has been supporting us to produce cutting-edge technology. We hope that this symposium would help the audience to understand the latest technology for cancer treatment especially in the field of radiation therapy and also we wish the audience would recognize the importance of the research aspect that have been performed at Hokkaido University and its Hospital.

  15. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. P13.25A RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN THE INVERSE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY AND THE FIELD IN FIELD INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, A.; Dirican, B.; Kara, E.

    2014-01-01

    For critical structures the use of maximum or mean dose limits in the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization is not very meaningful. The dose-volume limits and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) which is defined as the uniform dose that would lead to the same effect as the given non-uniform dose in as particular organ are combined to analyze the volume effect. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the DVH which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Uniform EUD irradiation of an OAR results in the same NTCP as the original non-homogeneous distribution. The NTCP equation is therefore represented as a function of EUD. The inverse equation expresses EUD as a function of NTCP. Expressing NTCP in terms of EUD represents a step toward simplifying the conceptual framework for modeling probability of expected complications. The aim of this study is to compare radiobiological effects between the fif IMRT and inverse IMRT for treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM) using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Five representative patients treated with definitive radiation using IMRT at our clinic in the last two year were selected for treatment planning study. Criteria for inclusion were glioblastoma . The normal tissues (Organ at Risk, OaR) contoured included brain-stem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, right-left cohclea and whole brain. Brain was defined as total brain tissue minus the PTV. Two different radiation therapy techniques; inverse IMRT and FiF IMRT treatment plans were optimised with the prescription dose 60 Gy/30 fractions. All those calculations and IMRT optimizations were performed using the Prowess Panther DAQ TPS with 6 MV,Siemens Artiste, MLC with 160 leaves and evaluated by using EUD and NTCP models. In the present study, target dose

  17. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jin; Bender, Edward; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  18. SU-C-19A-05: Treatment Chairs for Modern Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Court, L; Fullen, D; Tharp, K; Palmer, J; Ungchusri, G; Reyes, L; Tong, T; Nguyen, S; Phillips, T; Balter, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Treating patients in a seated position has potential advantages including improved comfort, increased lung volume, and reduced respiratory motion. We compared chair designs for head and neck, thoracic and breast patients for use with either IGRT linacs or a proposed low-cost fixed horizontal beam-line machine. Methods: Three treatment chairs were designed and constructed. Two of the chairs are based on a massage-chair, with the patient angled slightly forwards and knee rests used to minimize intra-fraction slouch. The third chair design is more conventional; the patient is angled backwards, with indexed positioning devices and the ability to attach thermoplastic masks. Patient geometries, including PTV location and patient sizes, were extracted from 137 CTs of past patients were used to model the probability of collision between the patient and the linac for various seated positions. All chairs were designed around the weight limits for couches on our linacs. At the time of writing we have just received IRB approval for imaging studies to evaluate comfort, and intra- and interfraction reproducibility. Results: The geometric analysis showed that head and neck patients and thoracic patients could be treated without collision. However, there is very limited space between the patient and the treatment/imaging devices, so careful design of the chair is essential. The position of the treatment target and extended arm positioning means that this is a particular concern for thoracic and breast patients. This was demonstrated for one of the prototype chairs designed for breast treatment where the arm holders would collide with the kV detector. The extra clearance of a dedicated fixed-beam linac would overcome these difficulties. Intra- and inter-fraction reproducibility results will be presented at the meeting. Conclusion: To take advantage of the clinical advantages of seated treatments, appropriate treatment chairs are needed. A dedicate fixed-beam linac may

  19. A dosimetric and treatment efficiency evaluation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for peripheral lung cancer using flattening filter free beams

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dan-Li; Ma, Chang-chun; Peng, Xun; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate potential dosimetric benefits and treatment efficiency of dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCA), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and double partial arcs Rapidarc (RA) techniques in the treatment of early-stage peripheral lung cancer using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Twenty early-stage peripheral lung cancer patients were selected. For each patient, DCA, IMRT and RA plans were created to meet Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915 objectives with 48 Gy covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in 4 fractions. PTV coverage, organs at risk (OARs) doses, planning time, monitor units (MU) and treatment time were evaluated. RA was significantly better than DCA for PTV coverage. RA provided a lower V32Gy to chest wall and less V20Gy to lung over those of DCA and IMRT. For other OARs, there is no significant difference among all three techniques. DCA plans showed significantly less planning time, shorter treatment time and lower MU number than those of RA and IMRT. RA provides a superior dosimetric benefit to DCA and IMRT in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer using SBRT with FFF beams. Considering the MU number, planning time and treatment efficiency, DCA technique is an effective treatment strategy. PMID:27655715

  20. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Horick, Nora; Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; O'Toole, Jean A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Specht, Michelle C.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema.

  1. The impact of radiation therapy on the risk of lymphedema after treatment for breast cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Laura E G; Miller, Cynthia L; Horick, Nora; Skolny, Melissa N; Jammallo, Lauren S; Sadek, Betro T; Shenouda, Mina N; O'Toole, Jean A; MacDonald, Shannon M; Specht, Michelle C; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2014-03-01

    Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Potential for an Enhanced Role for MRI in Radiation-therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, P.; Liney, G. P.; Holloway, L.; Walker, A.; Barton, M.; Delaney, G. P.; Vinod, S.; Tomé, W.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future

  3. Radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp: treatment outcomes of total scalp irradiation with X-rays and electrons.

    PubMed

    Hata, Masaharu; Wada, Hidefumi; Ogino, Ichiro; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Kasuya, Takeo; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-10-01

    Wide surgical excision is the standard treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp, but many patients are inoperable. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Seventeen patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp underwent radiation therapy with total scalp irradiation. Four patients had cervical lymph node metastases, but none had distant metastases. A median initial dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the entire scalp. Subsequently, local radiation boost to the tumor sites achieved a median total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Fourteen of the 17 patients developed recurrences during the median follow-up period of 14 months after radiation therapy; 7 had recurrences in the scalp, including primary tumor progression in 2 patients and new disease in 5, and 12 patients developed distant metastases. The primary progression-free, scalp relapse-free, and distant metastasis-free rates were 86, 67, and 38 % at 1 year and 86, 38, and 16 % at 3 years, respectively. Thirteen patients died; the overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 73 % at 1 year and 23 and 44 % at 3 years, respectively. The median survival time was 16 months. There were no therapy-related toxicities ≥ grade 3. Total scalp irradiation is safe and effective for local tumor control, but a dose of ≤ 50 Gy in conventional fractions may be insufficient to eradicate microscopic tumors. For gross tumors, a total dose of 70 Gy, and > 70 Gy for tumors with deep invasion, is recommended.

  4. Whole breast radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer cells from growing and dividing, and leads to cell death. ... healthy cells. The death of healthy cells can lead to side effects. These side effects depend on the dose of radiation and how often you have the therapy. Side ...

  5. A Unifying Probabilistic Bayesian Approach to Derive Electron Density from MRI for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-01-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for 8 patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as ROC's for bone detection (HU>200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p=2×10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p=2×10-6) and 282 without density correction (p=5×10-6). For 90% sensitivity in bone

  6. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  7. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  8. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Penninkhof, Joan; Spadola, Sara; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet; Lanconelli, Nico; Heijmen, Ben

    2017-06-01

    Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angles and patient anatomy. For patients with isocenter optimization, 847 IMRT plans were considered. Adding isocenter position optimization next to beam angle optimization had a small impact on the final plan quality. A method is proposed for individualized selection of beam angles in tangential breast IMRT. This may be especially important for patients with cardiac risk factors or an enhanced risk for the development of contralateral breast cancer

  9. Continued Development Of An Inexpensive Simulator Based CT Scanner For Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschmann, K. R.; Parker, D. L.; Smith, V.

    1982-11-01

    An abundant number of different CT scanner models has been developed in the past ten years, meeting increasing standards of performance. From the beginning they remained a comparatively expensive piece of equipment. This is due not only to their technical complexity but is also due to the difficulties involved in assessing "true" specifications (avoiding "overde-sign"). Our aim has been to provide, for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning, a low cost CT scanner system featuring large freedom in patient positioning. We have taken advantage of the concurrent tremendously increased amount of knowledge and experience in the technical area of CT1 . By way of extensive computer simulations we gained confidence that an inexpensive C-arm simulator gantry and a simple one phase-two pulse generator in connection with a standard x-ray tube could be used, without sacrificing image quality. These components have been complemented by a commercial high precision shaft encoder, a simple and effective fan beam collimator, a high precision, high efficiency, luminescence crystal-silicon photodiode detector with 256 channels, low noise electronic preamplifier and sampling filter stages, a simplified data aquisition system furnished by Toshiba/ Analogic and an LSI 11/23 microcomputer plus data storage disk as well as various smaller interfaces linking the electrical components. The quality of CT scan pictures of phantoms,performed by the end of last year confirmed that this simple approach is working well. As a next step we intend to upgrade this system with an array processor in order to shorten recon-struction time to one minute per slice. We estimate that the system including this processor could be manufactured for a selling price of $210,000.

  10. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  11. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. Methods: A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. Results: The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. Conclusions: The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the

  12. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Daniel H; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H

    2014-07-01

    Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the technical basis for the clinical

  13. Continuous-time method and its discretization to inverse problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving box-constrained inverse problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on the idea of continuous dynamical methods and split-feasibility algorithms. Our method can compute a feasible solution without the second derivative of an objective function, which is required for gradient-based optimization algorithms. We prove theoretically that a double Kullback-Leibler divergence can be used as the Lyapunov function for the IMRT planning system.

  14. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and typically one to two years of clinical physics training. They are certified by the American Board of Radiology or the American Board of Medical Physics . Radiation Therapist Radiation therapists work with radiation oncologists. ...

  15. Comparison of 2 Common Radiation Therapy Techniques for Definitive Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Juloori, Aditya; Allen, Pamela K.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; O'Reilly, Michael; Welsh, James; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Two choices are widely used for radiation delivery, 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). No randomized comparisons have been conducted in the setting of lung cancer, but theoretical concerns suggest that IMRT may negatively impact disease control. We analyzed a large cohort of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) patients treated before and after institutional conversion from 3DCRT to IMRT to compare outcomes. Methods and Materials: Patients with LS-SCLC treated with definitive radiation at our institution between 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Both multivariable Cox regression and propensity score matching were used to compare oncologic outcomes of 3DCRT and IMRT in the context of other clinically relevant covariables. Acute and chronic toxicities associated with the 2 techniques were compared using Fisher exact and log–rank tests, respectively. Results: A total of 223 patients were treated during the study period, with 119 receiving 3DCRT and 104 receiving IMRT. Their median age was 64 years (range, 39-90 years). Median follow-up times for 3DCRT and IMRT were 27 months (range, 2-147 months) and 22 months (range, 4-83 months), respectively. Radiation modality was not associated with differences in overall survival or disease-free survival in either multivariable or propensity score-matched analyses. IMRT patients required significantly fewer percutaneous feeding tube placements (5% vs 17%, respectively, P=.005). Conclusions: IMRT was not associated with worse oncologic outcomes than those of 3DCRT. IMRT was associated with a lower rate of esophagitis-related percutaneous feeding tube placements.

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® external-beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Mahmoud, Omar; Merrick, Gregory; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Arterbery, V Elayne; Ciezki, Jay P; Frank, Steven J; Mohler, James Lloyd; Moran, Brian J; Rosenthal, Seth A; Rossi, Carl J; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Image-based radiation treatment planning and localization have contributed to better targeting of the prostate and sparing of normal tissues. Guidelines are needed to address radiation dose delivery, including patient setup and immobilization, target volume definition, treatment planning, treatment delivery methods, and target localization. Guidelines for external-beam radiation treatment planning have been updated and are presented here. The use of appropriate doses, simulation techniques, and verification of field setup are essential for the accurate delivery of radiation therapy. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  17. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  18. The effects of combined treatment with ionizing radiation and indocyanine green-mediated photodynamic therapy on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Montazerabadi, Ali Reza; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad Hossein; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Aledavood, Amir

    2012-04-02

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of indocyanine green as a sensitizer in both photodynamic and radiation therapy on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells line. The cells were incubated with indocyanine green at different concentrations for 24h and were then exposed in the independent treatment groups to a non-coherent light at different fluence rates and X-ray ionizing radiation at different dose rates. In addition, combination effects of this chemo, photo, and radiotherapy were evaluated. The percentage of the cell survival was investigated using the MTT assay. The results showed that indocyanine green had no significant cytotoxic effects up to 100 μM but as a photosensitizer had a strong cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Despite, indocyanine green could not act as a radiosensitizer. Furthermore, it is surprising to find that 50 μM of indocyanine green in combination with light at 60 J/cm(2) and 4 Gy of X-ray radiation astonishingly killed cancer cells and reduced the percentage of viable cancer cells to be 3.42%. According to the findings, we observed the same efficacy of treatment by adding a low dose of radiation and reducing light fluence rate. In fact, it appears from our data that the adverse effects of photodynamic therapy can be partially abated without reducing the efficacy of treatment. Obviously, this new therapeutic avenue in breast cancer therapy could be worth further investigation and elucidation and should be tested in vivo models for being applied in human therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperthermia in combination with radiation therapy for treatment of advanced inoperable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Iemwananonthachai, Nantakan; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Sukkasem, Maturoth

    2003-08-01

    Twelve breast cancer patients with locally advanced inoperable lesions were studied. Six cases had received chemotherapy, 6 had not. Most of the tumors were ulcerative lesions with an average size of 11.5 cm. The patients were treated with 43 degrees C hyperthermia once or twice a week together with radiation at a dose of 20-70 Gy. Six of them were also treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Two cases responded completely (17%) and 10 cases responded partially (83%). The result indicates that the combination of hyperthermia and radiation, with or without chemotherapy, might be a good treatment option for locally advanced inoperable breast cancer, especially for patients who have had failure or contraindication to chemotherapy. It is an effective treatment for palliation of local symptoms, showing a tendency to achieve local control of large, ulcerative advanced breast lesions especially when such treatment is followed by salvage surgery.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  1. Development of an autonomous treatment planning strategy for radiation therapy with effective use of population-based prior data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Dong, Peng; Liu, Hongcheng; Xing, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Current treatment planning remains a costly and labor intensive procedure and requires multiple trial-and-error adjustments of system parameters such as the weighting factors and prescriptions. The purpose of this work is to develop an autonomous treatment planning strategy with effective use of prior knowledge and in a clinically realistic treatment planning platform to facilitate radiation therapy workflow. Our technique consists of three major components: (i) a clinical treatment planning system (TPS); (ii) a formulation of decision-function constructed using an assemble of prior treatment plans; (iii) a plan evaluator or decision-function and an outer-loop optimization independent of the clinical TPS to assess the TPS-generated plan and to drive the search toward a solution optimizing the decision-function. Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines for querying and interacting with the TPS. These subroutines are called back in the outer-loop optimization program to navigate the plan selection process through the solution space iteratively. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by using clinical prostate and head-and-neck cases. An autonomous treatment planning technique with effective use of an assemble of prior treatment plans is developed to automatically maneuver the clinical treatment planning process in the platform of a commercial TPS. The process mimics the decision-making process of a human planner and provides a clinically sensible treatment plan automatically, thus reducing/eliminating the tedious manual trial-and-errors of treatment planning. It is found that the prostate and head-and-neck treatment plans generated using the approach compare favorably with that used for the patients' actual treatments. Clinical inverse treatment planning process can be automated effectively with the guidance of an assemble of prior treatment plans. The approach has the potential to

  2. SU-E-T-56: Brain Metastasis Treatment Plans for Contrast-Enhanced Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Obeid, L; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Vautrin, M; Benkebil, M; Sihanath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iodine-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of an iodinated contrast agent in brain tumors with irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays. The aim of this study is to compare dynamic stereotactic arc-therapy and iodineenhanced SSRT. Methods: Five patients bearing brain metastasis received a standard helical 3D-scan without iodine. A second scan was acquired 13 min after an 80 g iodine infusion. Two SSRT treatment plans (with/without iodine) were performed for each patient using a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning system (TPS) based on the ISOgray TPS. Ten coplanar beams (6×6 cm2, shaped with collimator) were simulated. MC statistical error objective was less than 5% in the 50% isodose. The dynamic arc-therapy plan was achieved on the Iplan Brainlab TPS. The treatment plan validation criteria were fixed such that 100% of the prescribed dose is delivered at the beam isocentre and the 70% isodose contains the whole target volume. The comparison elements were the 70% isodose volume, the average and maximum doses delivered to organs at risk (OAR): brainstem, optical nerves, chiasma, eyes, skull bone and healthy brain parenchyma. Results: The stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy remains the best technique in terms of dose conformation. Iodine-enhanced SSRT presents similar performances to dynamic arc-therapy with increased brainstem and brain parenchyma sparing. One disadvantage of SSRT is the high dose to the skull bone. Iodine accumulation in metastasis may increase the dose by 20–30%, allowing a normal tissue sparing effect at constant prescribed dose. Treatment without any iodine enhancement (medium-energy stereotactic radiotherapy) is not relevant with degraded HDVs (brain, parenchyma and skull bone) comparing to stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy. Conclusion: Iodine-enhanced SSRT exhibits a good potential for brain metastasis treatment regarding the dose distribution and OAR criteria.

  3. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis—Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao; Ramana, Gogula Venkat; Rani, Pingali Usha; Mohan, Iyyapu Krishna; Suman, Avula; Roy, Priyadarshni

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (S-phase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine). Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this condition, but

  4. A review of segmentation and deformable registration methods applied to adaptive cervical cancer radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Soumya; Holloway, Lois; Lim, Karen; Chan, Philip; Veera, Jacqueline; Vinod, Shalini K; Liney, Gary; Greer, Peter B; Dowling, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Manual contouring and registration for radiotherapy treatment planning and online adaptation for cervical cancer radiation therapy in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) are often necessary. However manual intervention is time consuming and may suffer from inter or intra-rater variability. In recent years a number of computer-guided automatic or semi-automatic segmentation and registration methods have been proposed. Segmentation and registration in CT and MRI for this purpose is a challenging task due to soft tissue deformation, inter-patient shape and appearance variation and anatomical changes over the course of treatment. The objective of this work is to provide a state-of-the-art review of computer-aided methods developed for adaptive treatment planning and radiation therapy planning for cervical cancer radiation therapy. Segmentation and registration methods published with the goal of cervical cancer treatment planning and adaptation have been identified from the literature (PubMed and Google Scholar). A comprehensive description of each method is provided. Similarities and differences of these methods are highlighted and the strengths and weaknesses of these methods are discussed. A discussion about choice of an appropriate method for a given modality is provided. In the reviewed papers a Dice similarity coefficient of around 0.85 along with mean absolute surface distance of 2-4mm for the clinically treated volume were reported for transfer of contours from planning day to the treatment day. Most segmentation and non-rigid registration methods have been primarily designed for adaptive re-planning for the transfer of contours from planning day to the treatment day. The use of shape priors significantly improved segmentation and registration accuracy compared to other models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The ketogenic diet is an effective adjuvant to radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Fenton, Kathryn E; Preul, Mark C; Rho, Jong M; Lynch, Andrew; Stafford, Phillip; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that alters metabolism by increasing the level of ketone bodies in the blood. KetoCal® (KC) is a nutritionally complete, commercially available 4:1 (fat:carbohydrate+protein) ketogenic formula that is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for the management of refractory pediatric epilepsy. Diet-induced ketosis causes changes to brain homeostasis that have potential for the treatment of other neurological diseases such as malignant gliomas. We used an intracranial bioluminescent mouse model of malignant glioma. Following implantation animals were maintained on standard diet (SD) or KC. The mice received 2×4 Gy of whole brain radiation and tumor growth was followed by in vivo imaging. Animals fed KC had elevated levels of β-hydroxybutyrate (p = 0.0173) and an increased median survival of approximately 5 days relative to animals maintained on SD. KC plus radiation treatment were more than additive, and in 9 of 11 irradiated animals maintained on KC the bioluminescent signal from the tumor cells diminished below the level of detection (p<0.0001). Animals were switched to SD 101 days after implantation and no signs of tumor recurrence were seen for over 200 days. KC significantly enhances the anti-tumor effect of radiation. This suggests that cellular metabolic alterations induced through KC may be useful as an adjuvant to the current standard of care for the treatment of human malignant gliomas.

  6. A software tool to automatically assure and report daily treatment deliveries by a cobalt-60 radiation therapy device.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deshan; Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Li, Harold H; Liu, Shi; Li, Xiaoling; Rodriguez, Vivian; Mutic, Sasa; Kashani, Rojano

    2016-05-08

    The aims of this study were to develop a method for automatic and immediate verification of treatment delivery after each treatment fraction in order to detect and correct errors, and to develop a comprehensive daily report which includes delivery verification results, daily image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) review, and information for weekly physics reviews. After systematically analyzing the requirements for treatment delivery verification and understanding the available information from a commercial MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment machine, we designed a procedure to use 1) treatment plan files, 2) delivery log files, and 3) beam output information to verify the accuracy and completeness of each daily treatment delivery. The procedure verifies the correctness of delivered treatment plan parameters including beams, beam segments and, for each segment, the beam-on time and MLC leaf positions. For each beam, composite primary fluence maps are calculated from the MLC leaf positions and segment beam-on time. Error statistics are calculated on the fluence difference maps between the plan and the delivery. A daily treatment delivery report is designed to include all required information for IGRT and weekly physics reviews including the plan and treatment fraction information, daily beam output information, and the treatment delivery verification results. A computer program was developed to implement the proposed procedure of the automatic delivery verification and daily report generation for an MRI guided radiation therapy system. The program was clinically commissioned. Sensitivity was measured with simulated errors. The final version has been integrated into the com-mercial version of the treatment delivery system. The method automatically verifies the EBRT treatment deliveries and generates the daily treatment reports. Already in clinical use for over one year, it is useful to facilitate delivery error detection, and to expedite physician daily IGRT review and

  7. Microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Wagner, Hans-Peter; Archer, David W.; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Di Michiel, Marco; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Brauer, Elke; Spanne, Per O.; Gebbers, Jan-Olef; Dixon, Keith; Blattmann, Hans

    1999-10-01

    The central nervous system of vertebrates, even when immature, displays extraordinary resistance to damage by microscopically narrow, multiple, parallel, planar beams of x rays. Imminently lethal gliosarcomas in the brains of mature rats can be inhibited and ablated by such microbeams with little or no harm to mature brain tissues and neurological function. Potentially palliative, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in human infants under three years of age is so fraught with the danger of disrupting the functional maturation of immature brain tissues around the targeted tumor that it is implemented infrequently. Other kinds of therapy for such tumors are often inadequate. We suggest that microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) might help to alleviate the situation. Wiggler-generated synchrotron x-rays were first used for experimental microplanar beam (microbeam) radiation therapy (MRT) at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source in the early 1990s. We now describe the progress achieved in MRT research to date using immature and adult rats irradiated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, and investigated thereafter at the Institute of Pathology of the University of Bern.

  8. Radiation therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, K E; Giraud, P

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with radiation has always been a technical challenge. For many years, conventional radiation therapy was delivered after extrapleural pneumonectomy with acceptable results. Novel radiation treatment techniques, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were introduced, but the early experience with IMRT demonstrated troubling toxicity. Recent reports from institutions have demonstrated that with greater experience, IMRT, both in the setting of extrapleural pneumonectomy or pleurectomy, can be delivered safely. A recent study, SAKK 17/04, questions the role of using radiation after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  9. PET-based radiation therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Speirs, Christina K; Grigsby, Perry W; Huang, Jiayi; Thorstad, Wade L; Parikh, Parag J; Robinson, Clifford G; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we review the literature on the use of PET in radiation treatment planning, with an emphasis on describing our institutional methodology (where applicable). This discussion is intended to provide other radiation oncologists with methodological details on the use of PET imaging for treatment planning in radiation oncology, or other oncologists with an introduction to the use of PET in planning radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-03-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  11. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.

  12. Comparing Intelligence Quotient Change After Treatment With Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ris, M. Douglas; Grosshans, David R.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Paulino, Arnold C.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Moore, Bartlett D.; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G.; Stancel, Heather H.; Mahajan, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Compared with photon radiation (XRT), proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) reduces dose to normal tissues, which may lead to better neurocognitive outcomes. We compared change in intelligence quotient (IQ) over time in pediatric patients with brain tumors treated with PBRT versus XRT. Patients and Methods IQ scores were available for 150 patients (60 had received XRT, 90 had received PBRT). Linear mixed models examined change in IQ over time since radiation therapy (RT) by RT group, controlling for demographic/clinical characteristics. Craniospinal and focal RT subgroups were also examined. Results In the PBRT group, no change in IQ over time was identified (P = .130), whereas in the XRT group, IQ declined by 1.1 points per year (P = .004). IQ slopes did not differ between groups (P = .509). IQ was lower in the XRT group (by 8.7 points) versus the PBRT group (P = .011). In the craniospinal subgroup, IQ remained stable in both the PBRT (P = .203) and XRT groups (P = .060), and IQ slopes did not differ (P = .890). IQ was lower in the XRT group (by 12.5 points) versus the PBRT group (P = .004). In the focal subgroup, IQ scores remained stable in the PBRT group (P = .401) but declined significantly in the XRT group by 1.57 points per year (P = .026). IQ slopes did not differ between groups (P = .342). Conclusion PBRT was not associated with IQ decline or impairment, yet IQ slopes did not differ between the PBRT and XRT groups. It remains unclear if PBRT results in clinically meaningful cognitive sparing that significantly exceeds that of modern XRT protocols. Additional long-term data are needed to fully understand the neurocognitive impact of PBRT in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. PMID:26811522

  13. Comparing Intelligence Quotient Change After Treatment With Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kahalley, Lisa S; Ris, M Douglas; Grosshans, David R; Okcu, M Fatih; Paulino, Arnold C; Chintagumpala, Murali; Moore, Bartlett D; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G; Stancel, Heather H; Mahajan, Anita

    2016-04-01

    Compared with photon radiation (XRT), proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) reduces dose to normal tissues, which may lead to better neurocognitive outcomes. We compared change in intelligence quotient (IQ) over time in pediatric patients with brain tumors treated with PBRT versus XRT. IQ scores were available for 150 patients (60 had received XRT, 90 had received PBRT). Linear mixed models examined change in IQ over time since radiation therapy (RT) by RT group, controlling for demographic/clinical characteristics. Craniospinal and focal RT subgroups were also examined. In the PBRT group, no change in IQ over time was identified (P = .130), whereas in the XRT group, IQ declined by 1.1 points per year (P = .004). IQ slopes did not differ between groups (P = .509). IQ was lower in the XRT group (by 8.7 points) versus the PBRT group (P = .011). In the craniospinal subgroup, IQ remained stable in both the PBRT (P = .203) and XRT groups (P = .060), and IQ slopes did not differ (P = .890). IQ was lower in the XRT group (by 12.5 points) versus the PBRT group (P = .004). In the focal subgroup, IQ scores remained stable in the PBRT group (P = .401) but declined significantly in the XRT group by 1.57 points per year (P = .026). IQ slopes did not differ between groups (P = .342). PBRT was not associated with IQ decline or impairment, yet IQ slopes did not differ between the PBRT and XRT groups. It remains unclear if PBRT results in clinically meaningful cognitive sparing that significantly exceeds that of modern XRT protocols. Additional long-term data are needed to fully understand the neurocognitive impact of PBRT in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Neutron Beam Radiation Therapy: An Overview of Treatment and Oral Complications When Treating Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Sikes, Justin; Namaranian, Parshan; Laramore, George; Dillon, Jasjit K

    2016-04-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding the oral complications of neutron radiotherapy, with an associated lack of guidelines for their management. The purpose of this study was to review the indications, dosing, prognosis, and oral complications of neutron radiotherapy for salivary gland malignancies. This is a retrospective case series of patients with salivary gland malignancies treated with neutron radiotherapy by the Radiation Oncology Department at the University of Washington from 1997 to 2006. Variables included patient demographics, tumor staging and characteristics, operative treatment, final diagnosis, operative and pathologic findings (ie, perineural invasion, lymph node involvement, and skull base invasion), dosing, complications, and locoregional control and survival rates. Data were extracted from patients' charts and by telephone for follow-up and quality-of-life information. The sample was composed of 140 patients (49% men, 51% women) with a mean age of 53 years (standard deviation, 15 yr). Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the submandibular gland was the most common tumor type and location. Post-treatment trismus occurred in 56%. Acute mucositis and xerostomia occurred in approximately 88 and 89% of patients, respectively. Osteoradionecrosis was reported in 5.7% of patients. The 6-year survival rate was 58% and the 6-year locoregional control was 72%. The current standard neutron dose for head and neck tumors is 1.15 neutron Gray (nGy) 4 times per week for 4 weeks (total, 18.4 nGy), which is an equivalent amount of radiation as the standard 60 to 70 Gy given for 6 to 7 weeks with conventional photon radiation. The 6-year overall survival of 58% found in this study compares favorably to the survival rate reported in the literature for traditional photon radiation treatment of advanced salivary gland tumors. The dental profession should be educated regarding neutron radiotherapy and its indications, dosing methods, and oral complications

  15. SU-E-T-410: Evaluation of Treatment Modalities for Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mohatt, D; Malhotra, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and verify the accuracy of alternative treatment modalities for stereotactic lung therapy with end-to-end testing. We compared three dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) and 10 MV FFF photons. Methods: A QUASAR respiratory motion phantom was utilized with custom ion chamber and gafchromatic EBT2 film inserts. The phantom contained a low density lung medium with a cylindrical polystyrene tumor (35 cc). Pseudo representative structures for various organs at risk (OAR) were created. All treatment plans were created using Eclipse ver. 11 using the same image and structure sets, and delivered via Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator equipped with high definition MLC. Evaluation of plan quality followed ROTG 0813 criterion for conformity index (CI100%), high dose spillage, D2cm, and R50%. Results: All treatment plans met the OAR dose constraints per protocol and could be delivered without any beam hold offs or other interlocks and hence were deemed clinically safe. For equivalent beam energies, target conformity was improved for all modalities when switching to FFF mode. Treatment efficiency increased for VMAT FFF by a factor of 3–4 over IMRT, and up to factor of 7 when compared to 3DCRT. Pass rates were > 97% for all treatment using gamma criteria of 3%, 3mm. Absolute dose at iso-center was verified with ion chamber, and found to be within 2% of the treatment planning system. Conclusion: The higher dose rate associated with FFF not only reduces delivery times, but in most cases enhances plan quality. The one modality with succeeding best results for all RTOG criterions was VMAT 6 MV FFF. This end-to-end testing provides necessary confidence in the entire dose delivery chain for lung SBRT patients.

  16. Use of Combination Thermal Therapy and Radiation in Breast Conserving Treatment of Extensive Intraductal Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-11

    technique for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer using thermal therapy ( hyperthermia ). The contract will also support a clinical study of the safety and...no major blood vessels that carry away heat from the breast tissue, reducing the ability to deliver therapeutic heat. d. The hyperthermia target volume...the breast ultrasound applicator. Some of the results from the theoretical simulations will be presented at the North American Hyperthermia Society

  17. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 53: quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B; Doppke, K; Hunt, M; Kutcher, G; Starkschall, G; Stern, R; Van Dyke, J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, the sophistication and complexity of clinical treatment planning and treatment planning systems has increased significantly, particularly including three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems, and the use of conformal treatment planning and delivery techniques. This has led to the need for a comprehensive set of quality assurance (QA) guidelines that can be applied to clinical treatment planning. This document is the report of Task Group 53 of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a comprehensive but viable program of quality assurance for modern radiotherapy treatment planning. The scope of the QA needs for treatment planning is quite broad, encompassing image-based definition of patient anatomy, 3D beam descriptions for complex beams including multileaf collimator apertures, 3D dose calculation algorithms, and complex plan evaluation tools including dose volume histograms. The Task Group recommends an organizational framework for the task of creating a QA program which is individualized to the needs of each institution and addresses the issues of acceptance testing, commissioning the planning system and planning process, routine quality assurance, and ongoing QA of the planning process. This report, while not prescribing specific QA tests, provides the framework and guidance to allow radiation oncology physicists to design comprehensive and practical treatment planning QA programs for their clinics.

  18. Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer: A local center's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shixiu . E-mail: wushixiu@medmail.com.cn; Xie Congying; Jin Xiance; Zhang Ping

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, toxicity, and clinical efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Method and Materials: Seventy-five patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique. Daily fraction of 2.5 Gy and 2.0 Gy were prescribed to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical tumor volume (CTV) to a total dose of 70 Gy and 56 Gy, respectively, in 38 days. In 24 of these patients, GTV was boosted to 80 Gy. Quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy was performed by assessing excretion uptake and excretion index of parotid glands. Results: In dosimetry, the mean doses delivered to the GTV, CTV1, and CTV2 were 68.1 Gy, 58.7 Gy, and 54.3 Gy, respectively. An average of 1% of the GTV and 3% of the CTV received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, whereas the mean doses delivered to the organ at risk were kept below tolerance limits. The mean doses to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotids were 31.1 Gy and 21.9 Gy, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy showed excretion index and uptake index decreased by 44.6% and 28.3%, respectively, in ipsilateral parotid (p < 0.05), whereas no significant decline in contralateral parotid was observed. Acute toxicities were well tolerated, except for the relatively high incidence of severe mucositis. No Grade 4 side effect occurred. With a median follow-up of 23.8 months (range, 10-39 months), the 2-year local progression-free, local-regional progression-free, and distant metastasis-free survival were 97.26%, 87.21%, and 82.03%, respectively. The 2-year overall survival was 86.81%. Conclusions: Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy yielded superior dose distribution over conventional radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and could be delivered with acceptable toxicity and risky organ sparing. Dose

  19. Motion-compensated estimation of delivered dose during external beam radiation therapy: implementation in Philips' Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Shyam; Parikh, Parag; Noel, Camille; Meltsner, Michael; Bzdusek, Karl; Kaus, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent research efforts investigating dose escalation techniques for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have demonstrated great benefit when high-dose hypofractionated treatment schemes are implemented. The use of these paradigms emphasizes the importance of smaller treatment margins to avoid high dose to surrounding normal tissue or organs at risk (OARs). However, tighter margins may lead to underdosage of the target due to the presence of organ motion. It is important to characterize organ motion and possibly account for it during treatment delivery. The need for real-time localization of dynamic targets has encouraged the use and development of more continuous motion monitoring systems such as kilo-voltage/fluoroscopic imaging, electromagnetic tracking, and optical monitoring systems. This paper presents the implementation of an algorithm to quantify translational and rotational interfractional and intrafractional prostate motion and compute the dosimetric effects of these motion patterns. The estimated delivered dose is compared with the static plan dose to evaluate the success of delivering the plan in the presence of prostate motion. The method is implemented on a commercial treatment planning system (Pinnacle(3), Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Philips Healthcare) and is termed delivered dose investigational tool (DiDIT). The DiDIT implementation in Pinnacle(3) is validated by comparisons with previously published results. Finally, different workflows are discussed with respect to the potential use of this tool in clinical treatment planning. The DiDIT dose estimation process took approximately 5-20 min (depending on the number of fractions analyzed) on a Pinnacle(3) 9.100 research version running on a Dell M90 system (Dell, Inc., Round Rock, TX, USA) equipped with an Intel Core 2 Duo processor (Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The DiDIT implementation in Pinnacle(3) was found

  20. Brain tumor target volume determination for radiation therapy treatment planning through the use of automated MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzara, Gloria Patrika

    Radiation therapy seeks to effectively irradiate the tumor cells while minimizing the dose to adjacent normal cells. Prior research found that the low success rates for treating brain tumors would be improved with higher radiation doses to the tumor area. This is feasible only if the target volume can be precisely identified. However, the definition of tumor volume is still based on time-intensive, highly subjective manual outlining by radiation oncologists. In this study the effectiveness of two automated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) segmentation methods, k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) and Knowledge-Guided (KG), in determining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) of brain tumors for use in radiation therapy was assessed. Three criteria were applied: accuracy of the contours; quality of the resulting treatment plan in terms of dose to the tumor; and a novel treatment plan evaluation technique based on post-treatment images. The kNN method was able to segment all cases while the KG method was limited to enhancing tumors and gliomas with clear enhancing edges. Various software applications were developed to create a closed smooth contour that encompassed the tumor pixels from the segmentations and to integrate these results into the treatment planning software. A novel, probabilistic measurement of accuracy was introduced to compare the agreement of the segmentation methods with the weighted average physician volume. Both computer methods under-segment the tumor volume when compared with the physicians but performed within the variability of manual contouring (28% +/- 12% for inter-operator variability). Computer segmentations were modified vertically to compensate for their under-segmentation. When comparing radiation treatment plans designed from physician-defined tumor volumes with treatment plans developed from the modified segmentation results, the reference target volume was irradiated within the same level of conformity. Analysis of the plans based on post-treatment

  1. From chemotherapy to target therapies associated with radiation in the treatment of NSCLC: a durable marriage?

    PubMed

    Alongi, Filippo; Arcangeli, Stefano; Ramella, Sara; Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Borghetti, Paolo; D'angelillo, Rolando; Ricchetti, Francesco; Maddalo, Marta; Mazzola, Rosario; Trovò, Marco; Russi, Elvio; Magrini, Stefano Maria

    2017-02-01

    The integration between radiotherapy and drugs, from chemotherapy to recently available target therapies, continues to have a relevant role in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Aim of the present review is to evaluate the promising and emerging application of the best interaction between new drugs and new modalities of radiotherapy. Areas covered: We searched Medline, Google Scholar, PubMed, ProQuest Dissertation, and Theses databases for reports published in English. A study was included when it reported on cancer-related radiotherapy and included patients with NSCLC treated with chemo and/or target therapies. Review articles were excluded from the analysis. Expert commentary: Chemo-radiotherapy still represents the standard of choice in locally advanced NSCLC, while to date the addition of target therapies to chemo-radiotherapy did not demonstrate any robust advantage in this stage of disease. Considering the absence of randomized controlled trials, the role of target therapies in early stage adjuvant NSCLC is not yet recommended in clinical practice. On the contrary, in the setting of oligometastatic and oligoprogressive disease, new molecules demonstrated to be safe and effective, opening to a promising and emerging application of the best interaction between new drugs and new modalities of radiotherapy.

  2. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Calypso system, 3) whether Beacon® Transponder is of benefit in pelvic radiation therapy following prostatectomy, 4) whether hypofractionated treatment...goals. This study is expected to enroll a combined total of 20 subjects from both centers. Task 4. A Hypofractionated IMRT Therapy in...metastatic lesions in the liver with hypofractionated radiation therapy. Based on review of the current patient population, it has been

  3. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui; Jones, Timothy G.; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J.; Stewart, Robert D.; Lee, Andrew; Vassiliev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality. PMID:25920039

  4. Efficacy of External Beam Radiation-Based Treatment plus Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associated with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Yang; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common event in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The optimal treatment for these patients remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective review of 149 patients who had unresectable HCC associated with PVTT between January 2005 and December 2012 was performed. Outcomes related to external beam radiation-based treatment were measured, and clinicopathological features and parameters affecting prognosis were analyzed as well. Results. The radiotherapeutic response of PVTT was an important element that affected the overall treatment response of HCC. Serum α-fetoprotein < 400 ng/mL, the presence of a radiotherapeutic response on PVTT, and receiving additional locoregional therapy were significant prognostic factors affecting the survival of patients. Patients who had received additional locoregional therapy obtained a better outcome, and six of them were eventually able to undergo surgical management with curative intent. Conclusion. The outcome of HCC associated with PVTT remains pessimistic. In addition to the current recommended treatment using sorafenib, a combination of external beam radiotherapy targeting PVTT and locoregional therapy for intrahepatic HCC might be a promising strategy for patients who had unresectable HCC with PVTT. This approach could perhaps offer patients a favorable outcome as well as a possible cure with following surgical management. PMID:27999803

  5. MINERVA: a multi-modality plugin-based radiation therapy treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Wemple, C A; Wessol, D E; Nigg, D W; Cogliati, J J; Milvich, M; Fredrickson, C M; Perkins, M; Harkin, G J; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Lehmann, J; Flickinger, T; Pletcher, D; Yuan, A; DeNardo, G L

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the INEEL, MSU, LLNL and UCD have undertaken development of MINERVA, a patient-centric, multi-modal, radiation treatment planning system, which can be used for planning and analysing several radiotherapy modalities, either singly or combined, using common treatment planning tools. It employs an integrated, lightweight plugin architecture to accommodate multi-modal treatment planning using standard interface components. The design also facilitates the future integration of improved planning technologies. The code is being developed with the Java programming language for interoperability. The MINERVA design includes the image processing, model definition and data analysis modules with a central module to coordinate communication and data transfer. Dose calculation is performed by source and transport plugin modules, which communicate either directly through the database or through MINERVA's openly published, extensible markup language (XML)-based application programmer's interface (API). All internal data are managed by a database management system and can be exported to other applications or new installations through the API data formats. A full computation path has been established for molecular-targeted radiotherapy treatment planning, with additional treatment modalities presently under development.

  6. Partial breast radiation therapy - external beam

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoma of the breast - partial radiation therapy; Partial external beam radiation - breast; Intensity-modulated radiation therapy - breast cancer; IMRT - breast cancer WBRT; Adjuvant partial breast - IMRT; APBI - ...

  7. Severe coronary artery disease after radiation therapy of the chest and mediastinum: clinical presentation and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Orzan, F; Brusca, A; Conte, M R; Presbitero, P; Figliomeni, M C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define the clinical and angiographic features and the therapeutic problems in patients with coronary artery disease after therapeutic irradiation of the chest. DESIGN--An observational retrospective study. SETTING--The cardiac catheterisation laboratory, university medical school. PATIENTS--15 subjects (8 men and 7 women, aged 25-56 years, mean 44) examined in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, who had significant coronary artery disease years after having radiation treatment to the chest and anterior mediastinum. In the early stages of the study angiography was performed because of typical symptoms of ischaemic heart disease. Later on it was performed because of a high index of suspicion in people with signs of extensive radiation heart damage. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Clinical and electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemic heart disease; echocardiographic signs of pericardial, myocardial or valvar involvement; angiographic evidence of coronary arterial stenosis, with special attention to the ostia; haemodynamic and angiographic signs of pericardial, myocardial, and valvar disease. Survival and symptomatic and functional status were ascertained after medical or surgical treatment. RESULTS--The patients were relatively young and had no risk factors. Seven patients had no signs or symptoms of ischaemic heart disease. Ten patients had ostial stenosis, which was associated with extensive involvement of other cardiac structures in nine of them. Seven required surgical treatment for coronary artery disease. Two died, one at surgery and the other one six months later. Five patients had complications associated with irradiation. CONCLUSIONS--Coronary arterial disease can be reasonably ascribed to the effects of chest irradiation when the patients are young and free from risk factors, especially if the obstructions are ostial and there is important damage to other cardiac structures. In patients with damage to other cardiac structures angina and infarction

  8. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  9. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references.

  10. Future radiation therapy: photons, protons and particles.

    PubMed

    Allison, Ron R; Sibata, Claudio; Patel, Rajen

    2013-04-01

    Radiation therapy plays a critical role in the current management of cancer patients. The most common linear accelerator-based treatment device delivers photons of radiation. In an ever more precise fashion, state-of-the-art technology has recently allowed for both modulation of the radiation beam and imaging for this treatment delivery. This has resulted in better patient outcome with far fewer side effects than were achieved even a decade ago. Recently, a push has begun for proton therapy, which may have clinical advantage in select indications, although significant limitations for these devices have become apparent. In addition, currently, heavy particle therapy has been touted as a potential means to improve cancer patient outcomes. This article will highlight current benefits and drawbacks to modern radiation therapy and speculate on future tools that will likely dramatically improve radiation oncology.

  11. Radiation therapy treatment plan optimization accounting for random and systematic patient setup uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joseph Andrew

    2011-12-01

    External-beam radiotherapy is one of the primary methods for treating cancer. Typically a radiotherapy treatment course consists of radiation delivered to the patient in multiple daily treatment fractions over 6--8 weeks. Each fraction requires the patient to be aligned with the image acquired before the treatment course used in treatment planning. Unfortunately, patient alignment is not perfect and results in residual errors in patient setup. The standard technique for dealing with errors in patient setup is to expand the volume of the target by some margin to ensure the target receives the planned dose in the presence of setup errors. This work develops an alternative to margins for accommodating setup errors in the treatment planning process by directly including patient setup uncertainty in IMRT plan optimization. This probabilistic treatment planning (PTP) operates directly on the planning structure and develops a dose distribution robust to variations in the patient position. Two methods are presented. The first method includes only random setup uncertainty in the planning process by convolving the fluence of each beam with a Gaussian model of the distribution of random setup errors. The second method builds upon this by adding systematic uncertainty to optimization by way of a joint optimization over multiple probable patient positions. To assess the benefit of PTP methods, a PTP plan and a margin-based plan are developed for each of the 28 patients used in this study. Comparisons of plans show that PTP plans generally reduce the dose to normal tissues while maintaining a similar dose to the target structure when compared to margin-based plans. Physician assessment indicates that PTP plans are generally preferred over margin-based plans. PTP methods shows potential for improving patient outcome due to reduced complications associated with treatment.

  12. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes ... your fluid intake. • Treat the skin exposed to radiation with special care. Stay out of the sun, ...

  13. Radiation Oncology Treatment Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients to be advocates. View more information Treatment Team Quick Links Meet the Treatment Team Radiation Oncologist ... as medical oncologists and surgeons to maximize radiation’s effectiveness. Radiation oncologists are the only physicians with the ...

  14. Radiation therapy technolgoy manpower survey.

    PubMed

    Marschke, C H

    1976-01-01

    A survey of 270 radiation therapy facilities in the United States in 1975 was made by the University of Vermont to identify needs in terms of curriculum, new or expanded programs and radiation therapy technology manpower. From the 64 per cent return there is evidence to support the current "Essentials," and to increase educational opportunities for potential radiation therapy technologists to satisfy the demand for more certified technologists as expressed by those who responded.

  15. A characterization of robust radiation therapy treatment planning methods-from expected value to worst case optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, Albin

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To characterize a class of optimization formulations used to handle systematic and random errors in radiation therapy, and to study the differences between the methods within this class. Methods: The class of robust methods that can be formulated as minimax stochastic programs is studied. This class generalizes many previously used methods, ranging between optimization of the expected and the worst case objective value. The robust methods are used to plan intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatments for a case subject to systematic setup and range errors, random setup errors with and without uncertain probability distribution, and combinations thereof. As reference, plans resulting from a conventional method that uses a margin to account for errors are shown. Results: For all types of errors, target coverage robustness increased with the conservativeness of the method. For systematic errors, best case organ at risk (OAR) doses increased and worst case doses decreased with the conservativeness. Accounting for random errors of fixed probability distribution resulted in heterogeneous dose. The heterogeneities were reduced when uncertainty in the probability distribution was accounted for. Doing so, the OAR doses decreased with the conservativeness. All robust methods studied resulted in more robust target coverage and lower OAR doses than the conventional method. Conclusions: Accounting for uncertainties is essential to ensure plan quality in complex radiation therapy such as IMPT. The utilization of more information than conventional in the optimization can lead to robust target coverage and low OAR doses. Increased target coverage robustness can be achieved by more conservative methods.

  16. External and internal radiation therapy: past and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Enferadi, Milad; Shirazi, Alireza

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. Treatment modalities comprise radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy can be performed by using external or internal radiation therapy. However, each method has its unique properties which undertakes special role in cancer treatment, this question is brought up that: For cancer treatment, whether external radiation therapy is more efficient or internal radiation therapy one? To answer this question, we need to consider principles and structure of individual methods. In this review, principles and application of each method are considered and finally these two methods are compared with each other.

  17. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer High-Dose Chemotherapy and ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  18. [Urethral stricture after radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, C M; Engel, O; Fisch, M; Kluth, L A

    2017-03-01

    Radiation-induced urethral stricture occurs most often due to radiation for prostate cancer. It is one of the most common side effects of radiotherapy. Stricture rates are lowest in patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy, occur more frequently in those who require brachytherapy and show highest stricture rates in patients receiving a combination of external beam radiation and brachytherapy. Strictures are mostly located at the bulbomembranous part of the urethra. Diagnostic work-up should include basic urologic work-up, ultrasound, uroflowmetric assessment, urethroscopy, retrograde urethrogram and voiding cystourethrography. Endoscopic management such as dilatation and internal urethrotomy has been proposed in short strictures. However these therapies have a high risk for recurrence. The success rate of urethroplasty is higher. Success rates of primary end-to-end anastomosis (EPA) have been reported to be 70-95 %; rates of incontinence are 7-40 %. While success rates of buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU) range from 71-78 %, postoperative incontinence occurs in 10.5-44 %. Usually, postoperative incontinence can successfully be treated with an artificial urinary sphincter. It seems like EPA is the treatment of choice for short urethral strictures, whereas BMGU is indicated in longer, more complex strictures. Patients should be counselled with regard to length and location of strictures as well as with regard to postoperative incontinence.

  19. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kham; Cummings, David; Lanza, Vincent C.; Morris, Kathleen; Wang, Congjun; Sutton, Jordan; Garcia, John

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume.

  20. Decision support tools for proton therapy ePR: intelligent treatment planning navigator and radiation toxicity tool for evaluating of prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh H.; Deshpande, Ruchi; Liu, Brent J.

    2010-03-01

    The electronic patient record (ePR) has been developed for prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The ePR has functionality to accept digital input from patient data, perform outcome analysis and patient and physician profiling, provide clinical decision support and suggest courses of treatment, and distribute information across different platforms and health information systems. In previous years, we have presented the infrastructure of a medical imaging informatics based ePR for PT with functionality to accept digital patient information and distribute this information across geographical location using Internet protocol. In this paper, we present the ePR decision support tools which utilize the imaging processing tools and data collected in the ePR. The two decision support tools including the treatment plan navigator and radiation toxicity tool are presented to evaluate prostate cancer treatment to improve proton therapy operation and improve treatment outcomes analysis.

  1. A novel linear programming approach to fluence map optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, H Edwin; Ahuja, Ravindra K; Dempsey, James F; Kumar, Arvind; Li, Jonathan G

    2003-11-07

    We present a novel linear programming (LP) based approach for efficiently solving the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence-map optimization (FMO) problem to global optimality. Our model overcomes the apparent limitations of a linear-programming approach by approximating any convex objective function by a piecewise linear convex function. This approach allows us to retain the flexibility offered by general convex objective functions, while allowing us to formulate the FMO problem as a LP problem. In addition, a novel type of partial-volume constraint that bounds the tail averages of the differential dose-volume histograms of structures is imposed while retaining linearity as an alternative approach to improve dose homogeneity in the target volumes, and to attempt to spare as many critical structures as possible. The goal of this work is to develop a very rapid global optimization approach that finds high quality dose distributions. Implementation of this model has demonstrated excellent results. We found globally optimal solutions for eight 7-beam head-and-neck cases in less than 3 min of computational time on a single processor personal computer without the use of partial-volume constraints. Adding such constraints increased the running times by a factor of 2-3, but improved the sparing of critical structures. All cases demonstrated excellent target coverage (> 95%), target homogeneity (< 10% overdosing and < 7% underdosing) and organ sparing using at least one of the two models.

  2. Axillary sampling in the definitive treatment of breast cancer by radiation therapy and lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.M.; Botnick, L.E.; Weinstein, M.; Harris, J.R.; Koufman, C.; Silen, W.; Hellman, S.

    1983-03-01

    Between January, 1967 and July, 1980, 176 women who were referred to the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (JCRT) for definitive breast irradiation underwent low axillary dissection. A typical operative technique is described. The dissection stops short of the axillary vein although the vein is usually visualized. One hundred thirty-two axillae were thought to be N/sub 0/ or N/sub 1a/. Forty-six axillae were felt to be N/sub 1b/. Seventeen percent of the T/sub 1/ N/sub 0/ patients had pathologically positive nodes. Twenty-seven percent of the T/sub 2/ N/sub 0/ patients had positive nodes. When 5 or less nodes were removed at axillary sampling the incidence of nodal involvement was very low. There were no differences in nodal positivity when comparing under quadrant to lower or central lesions. Ninety-four percent of axillae with N/sub 1b/ lesions were pathologically confirmed. The complication rate for this procedure was low. There was 5 transient non-surgical complications and 1 cellulitis resulting in a frozen shoulder, which required corrective surgery. There were no cases of moderate or severe arm edema. Axillary sampling is compared to axillary dissection as a diagnostic procedure. Axillary sampling may underestimate the true pathologic positive rate, but diagnostic accuracy appears excellent if level 1 and 2 nodes are sampled.

  3. Development of the Midwest Proton Radiation Institute for the treatment of cancer and other diseases using proton radiation therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, John M.

    2003-02-10

    The Indiana University Cyclotron Facility houses three research accelerators (a 205-MeV cyclotron, a 240-MeV synchrotron, and a 500-MeV synchrotron) with space to carry out a program of fundamental and applied research including nuclear and accelerator physics, materials science, radiation biology, and proton therapy. Twelve thousand square feet associated with the 205-MeV machine is being converted into a regional proton therapy center. This center is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of treatments, and research in the development of new treatments. There will be three patient treatment rooms and an outpatient clinic. During the funding period the following activities were undertaken: construction and commissioning of the T0 Achromat; design, construction, and commissioning of the Trunk Line; design of the Energy Selection Line for all three treatment rooms; construction of the Energy Selection Line to the first treatment room; and design of the Dose Delivery System for the Large Field Line. A detailed description of each of these activities is given.

  4. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD

  5. Clinical trials with cyclophosphamide and misonidazole combination for maintaining treatment after radiation therapy of lung carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Busutti, L.; Breccia, A.; Stagni, G.; Gattavecchia

    1984-09-01

    Fifteen patients with inoperable non oat cell lung carcinoma, who had already been treated with telecobalt therapy in the mediastinum-hilar region, were treated with continuing therapy with misonidazole (MISO) and cyclophosphamide (Cy). MISO was administered in single doses of 1000 mg/m/sup 2/ and 500 mg/m/sup 2/, orally. Cy was administered in single doses of 500 mg/m/sup 2/ and 250 mg/m/sup 2/, i.v. This treatment was given every 4 weeks. All patients (15/15) suffered from hyporexia, nausea and vomiting within 48 hours from administration; furthermore, 2 patients had hemoragic cystitis, 2 had peripheral neurotoxicity, 3 had fever, and 2 had serious nervous depression. Leukopenia occurred in all patients immediately after drug administration, although it was not present in any patient by the time of the next administration. This clinical trial was concluded in December 1981. The follow-up at 18 months shows 7/15 cases of relapse. Eight of 15 patients are alive with progression of disease from 8 to 18 months.

  6. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments for Prostate Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    Studies have shown that as many as 8 out of 10 men had prostate cancer by age 80.Prostate cancer begins with small changes (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia(PIN)) in size and shape of prostate gland cells,known as prostate adenocarcinoma.With advent in technology, prostate cancer has been the most widely used application of IMRT with the longest follow-up periods.Prostate cancer fits the ideal target criteria for IMRT of adjacent sensitive dose-limiting tissue (rectal, bladder).A retrospective study was performed on 10 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation to a limited pelvic field with a standard 4 field arrangements at dose 45 Gy, and an IMRT boost field to a total isocenter dose of 75 Gy.Plans were simulated for 4 field and the supplementary IMRT treatments with proposed dose delivery at 1.5 Gy/fraction in BID basis.An automated DVH analysis software, HART (S. Jang et al., 2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812)was used to perform DVH assessments in IMRT plans.A statistical analysis of dose coverage at targets in prostate gland and neighboring critical organs,and the plan indices(homogeneity, conformality etc) evaluations were also performed using HART extracted DVH statistics.Analyzed results showed a better correlation with the proposed outcomes (TCP, NTCP) of the treatments.

  7. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  8. Doses to Carotid Arteries After Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Is Stroke Still a Late Effect of Treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Brodin, Patrick; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at an increased risk of stroke because of carotid artery irradiation. However, for early-stage HL involved node radiation therapy (INRT) reduces the volume of normal tissue exposed to high doses. Here, we evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and proton therapy (PT) delivered as INRT along with the extensive mantle field (MF) by comparing doses to the carotid arteries and corresponding risk estimates. Methods and Materials: We included a cohort of 46 supradiaphragmatic stage I-II classical HL patients. All patients were initially treated with chemotherapy and INRT delivered as 3D-CRT (30 Gy). For each patient, we simulated MF (36 Gy) and INRT plans using VMAT and PT (30 Gy). Linear dose-response curves for the 20-, 25-, and 30-year risk of stroke were derived from published HL data. Risks of stroke with each technique were calculated for all patients. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean doses to the right and left common carotid artery were significantly lower with modern treatment compared with MF, with substantial patient variability. The estimated excess risk of stroke after 20, 25, and 30 years was 0.6%, 0.86%, and 1.3% for 3D-CRT; 0.67%, 0.96%, and 1.47% for VMAT; 0.61%, 0.96%, and 1.33% for PT; and 1.3%, 1.72%, and 2.61% for MF. Conclusions: INRT reduces the dose delivered to the carotid arteries and corresponding estimated risk of stroke for HL survivors. Even for the subset of patients with lymphoma close to the carotid arteries, the estimated risk is low.

  9. Glass Microspheres 90Y Selective Internal Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy as First-Line Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Du, Fanny Le; Rayar, Michel; Rolland, Yan; Beuzit, Luc; Boudjema, Karim; Rohou, Tanguy; Latournerie, Marianne; Campillo-Gimenez, Boris; Garin, Etienne; Boucher, Eveline

    2015-11-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma's incidence is increasing. We studied the efficacy of Y selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) as first-line treatment, with chemotherapy, and compared with the results of chemotherapy alone. We retrospectively studied data from patients treated at our institution with glass microspheres SIRT for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma as part of first-line treatment in combination with chemotherapy. We compared results with those of similar patients treated in the ABC-02 study (a study in advanced biliary tract cancer that defined the current standard chemotherapy), assessed as not progressing after the first evaluation. We assessed progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-four patients were treated with SIRT. Chemotherapy was given concomitantly in 10 (42%), as induction before SIRT in 13 (54%) or after SIRT in 1 (4%). Grade 3 adverse events were reported in 1 (4%). Median PFS after SIRT was 10.3 months. Longer PFS was observed when chemotherapy was given concomitantly than when chemotherapy was given before SIRT, with respective median of 20.0 versus 8.8 months (P = 0.001). Median OS after SIRT was not reached. Eleven patients went to surgery (46%). Thirty-three patients in ABC-02 had locally advanced nonextrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, not progressing after first evaluation. From the start of any treatment, the median PFS was 16.0 months in our cohort versus 11.3 months in ABC-02 (P = 0.25), whereas the median OS was significantly higher in our cohort, not reached versus 17.9 months, respectively (P = 0.026). Selective internal radiation therapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy seems a promising strategy as first-line treatment for unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  10. [Therapy of radiation enteritis--current challenges].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Sinkó, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Zaránd, Attila; Teknos, Dániel

    2011-07-10

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most feared complications after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy. The incidence varies from 0.5 to 5%. It is not rare that the slowly progressing condition will be fatal. During a period of 13 years 24 patients were operated due to the complication of radiation enteritis. Despite different types of surgery repeated operation was required in 25% of cases and finally 4 patients died. Analyzing these cases predisposing factors and different therapeutic options of this condition are discussed. Treatment options of radiation induced enteritis are limited; however, targeted therapy significantly improves the outcome. Cooperation between oncologist, gastroenterologist and surgeon is required to establish adequate therapeutic plan.

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  12. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  13. Evaluation of Planned Treatment Breaks During Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: Update of RTOG 92-08

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre Garcia, Miguel; John, Madhu; Krieg, Richard; Pinover, Wayne; Myerson, Robert; Willett, Christopher

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 92-08 began as a single arm, Phase II trial for patients with anal cancer consisting of radiation (RT) + 5-flourouracil + mitomycin-C with a mandatory 2-week break and was amended after completion to evaluate the same treatment regimen without a treatment break. Long-term efficacy and late toxicity reporting are the specific aims of this study. Methods and Materials: Survivals were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall survival (OS) was compared with RTOG 87-04 with the log-rank test. Time to local failure, regional failure, locoregional failure (LRF), distant metastases, second primary, and colostomy failure were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. LRF was compared with RTOG 87-04 using the Gray's test. Results: Forty-seven patients entered in the mandatory treatment break cohort. The study was reopened in 1995 to the no mandatory treatment break cohort completing accrual with 20 patients in 1996. Of 67 total patients, 1 patient in the mandatory treatment break portion of the study did not receive any protocol treatment and is excluded from analyses. After adjusting for tumor size, neither cohort showed a statistically significant difference in OS or LRF compared with the RTOG 87-04 mitomycin-C arm. No patient in either cohort experienced a Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences were seen in OS or LRF when compared to the mitomycin-C arm of RTOG 87-04, but the sample sizes for the mandatory break cohort and the no mandatory break cohort are small. Late toxicity was low and similar for the treatment cohorts.

  14. Radiation Therapy Physics, 3rd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendee, William R.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, Eric G.

    2004-08-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an updated and expanded section on computer applications in radiation therapy and electron beam therapy, and features enhanced user-friendliness and visual appeal with a new, easy-to-follow format, including sidebars and a larger trim size. With its user-friendly presentation and broad, comprehensive coverage of radiotherapy physics, this Third Edition doubles as a medical text and handy professional reference.

  15. Head and Neck Margin Reduction With Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Robustness of Treatment Plans Against Anatomy Changes.

    PubMed

    van Kranen, Simon; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Wolf, Annelisa; Damen, Eugène; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2016-11-01

    We set out to investigate loss of target coverage from anatomy changes in head and neck cancer patients as a function of applied safety margins and to verify a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based adaptive strategy with an average patient anatomy to overcome possible target underdosage. For 19 oropharyngeal cancer patients, volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plans (2 arcs; simultaneous integrated boost, 70 and 54.25 Gy; 35 fractions) were automatically optimized with uniform clinical target volume (CTV)-to-planning target volume margins of 5, 3, and 0 mm. We applied b-spline CBCT-to-computed tomography (CT) deformable registration to allow recalculation of the dose on modified CT scans (planning CT deformed to daily CBCT following online positioning) and dose accumulation in the planning CT scan. Patients with deviations in primary or elective CTV coverage >2 Gy were identified as candidates for adaptive replanning. For these patients, a single adaptive intervention was simulated with an average anatomy from the first 10 fractions. Margin reduction from 5 mm to 3 mm to 0 mm generally led to an organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose (Dmean) sparing of approximately 1 Gy/mm. CTV shrinkage was mainly seen in the elective volumes (up to 10%), likely related to weight loss. Despite online repositioning, substantial systematic errors were present (>3 mm) in lymph node CTV, the parotid glands, and the larynx. Nevertheless, the average increase in OAR dose was small: maximum of 1.2 Gy (parotid glands, Dmean) for all applied margins. Loss of CTV coverage >2 Gy was found in 1, 3, and 7 of 73 CTVs, respectively. Adaptive intervention in 0-mm plans substantially improved coverage: in 5 of 7 CTVs (in 6 patients) to <2 Gy of initially planned. Volumetric modulated arc therapy head and neck cancer treatment plans with 5-mm margins are robust for anatomy changes and show a modest increase in OAR dose. Margin reduction improves OAR sparing with approximately 1

  16. Comparison of Predicted Excess Secondary Malignancies Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Treatment of Stage I Seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Charles B.; Kramer, Kevin; O’Meara, William P.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Belard, Arnaud; McDonough, James; O’Connell, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Photon radiotherapy has been standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single dose carboplatin and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns of acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this IRB-approved study, we compare photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and predict rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material CT images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapy. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues except the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119cGy vs. 768cGy, p<0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/yr were predicted with photons compared with protons for the stomach (4.11; 95% CI=3.22–5.01), large bowel (0.81; CI=0.39–1.01), and bladder (0.03; CI=0.01–0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for the pancreas (0.02; CI=−0.01–0.06). Conclusions For patients with stage I seminoma, proton therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients with a life expectancy of 40 years from the time of radiation treated with protons instead of photons. Protons also allowed significant sparing of most critical structures

  17. Cost-effectiveness landscape analysis of treatments addressing xerostomia in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasportas, Laura S; Hosford, Drew N; Sodini, Maria A; Waters, Dale J; Zambricki, Elizabeth A; Barral, Joëlle K; Graves, Edward E; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud

    2013-07-01

    Head and neck (H&N) radiation therapy (RT) can induce irreversible damage to the salivary glands thereby causing long-term xerostomia or dry mouth in 68%-85% of the patients. Not only does xerostomia significantly impair patients' quality-of-life (QOL) but it also has important medical sequelae, incurring high medical and dental costs. In this article, we review various measures to assess xerostomia and evaluate current and emerging solutions to address this condition in H&N cancer patients. These solutions typically seek to accomplish 1 of the 4 objectives: (1) to protect the salivary glands during RT, (2) to stimulate the remaining gland function, (3) to treat the symptoms of xerostomia, or (4) to regenerate the salivary glands. For each treatment, we assess its mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, clinical utilization, and cost. We conclude that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is both the most widely used prevention approach and the most cost-effective existing solution and we highlight novel and promising techniques on the cost-effectiveness landscape. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  19. SU-F-R-56: Early Assessment of Treatment Response During Radiation Therapy Delivery for Esophageal Cancer Using Quantitative CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D; Chen, X; Li, X; Wu, H; Wang, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of assessing treatment response using CTs during delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer. Methods: Daily CTs acquired using a CT-on-Rails during the routine CT-guided RT for 20 patients with stage II to IV esophageal cancers were analyzed. All patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and IMRT of 45–50 Gy in 25 fractions, and were followed up for two years. Contours of GTV, spinal cord, and non-specified tissue (NST) irradiated with low dose were generated on each daily CT. A series of CT-texture metrics including Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, standard derivation (STD), entropy, and energy were obtained in these contours on each daily CT. The changes of these metrics and GTV volume during RT delivery were calculated and correlated with treatment outcome. Results: Changes in CT texture (e.g., HU histogram) in GTV and spinal cord (but not in NST) were observed during RT delivery and were consistently increased with radiation dose. For the 20 cases studied, the mean HU in GTV was reduced on average by 4.0HU from the first to the last fractions, while 8 patients (responders) had larger reductions in GTV mean HU (average 7.8 HU) with an average GTV reduction of 51% and had increased consistently in GTV STD and entropy with radiation dose. The rest of 12 patients (non-responders) had lower reductions in GTV mean HU (average 1.5HU) and almost no change in STD and entropy. For the 8 responders, 2 experienced complete response, 7 (88%) survived and 1 died. In contrast, for the 12 non-responders, 4 (33%) survived and 8 died. Conclusion: Radiation can induce changes in CT texture in tumor (e.g., mean HU) during the delivery of RT for esophageal cancer. If validated with more data, such changes may be used for early prediction of RT response for esophageal cancer.

  20. On the accuracy of a moving average algorithm for target tracking during radiation therapy treatment delivery

    PubMed Central

    George, Rohini; Suh, Yelin; Murphy, Martin; Williamson, Jeffrey; Weiss, Elizabeth; Keall, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Real-time tumor targeting involves the continuous realignment of the radiation beam with the tumor. Real-time tumor targeting offers several advantages such as improved accuracy of tumor treatment and reduced dose to surrounding tissue. Current limitations to this technique include mechanical motion constraints. The purpose of this study was to investigate an alternative treatment scenario using a moving average algorithm. The algorithm, using a suitable averaging period, accounts for variations in the average tumor position, but respiratory induced target position variations about this average are ignored during delivery and can be treated as a random error during planning. In order to test the method a comparison between five different treatment techniques was performed: (1) moving average algorithm, (2) real-time motion tracking, (3) respiration motion gating (at both inhale and exhale), (4) moving average gating (at both inhale and exhale) and (5) static beam delivery. Two data sets were used for the purpose of this analysis: (a) external respiratory-motion traces using different coaching techniques included 331 respiration motion traces from 24 lung-cancer patients acquired using three different breathing types [free breathing (FB), audio coaching (A) and audio-visual biofeedback (AV)]; (b) 3D tumor motion included implanted fiducial motion data for over 160 treatment fractions for 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients obtained from the Cyberknife Synchrony. The metrics used for comparison were the group systematic error (M), the standard deviation (SD) of the systematic error (Σ) and the root mean square of the random error (σ). Margins were calculated using the formula by Stroom et al. [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 43(4), 905–919 (1999)]: 2Σ+0.7σ. The resultant calculations for implanted fiducial motion traces (all values in cm) show that M and Σ are negligible for moving average algorithm, moving average gating, and real-time tracking (i

  1. On the accuracy of a moving average algorithm for target tracking during radiation therapy treatment delivery.

    PubMed

    George, Rohini; Suh, Yelin; Murphy, Martin; Williamson, Jeffrey; Weiss, Elizabeth; Keall, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Real-time tumor targeting involves the continuous realignment of the radiation beam with the tumor. Real-time tumor targeting offers several advantages such as improved accuracy of tumor treatment and reduced dose to surrounding tissue. Current limitations to this technique include mechanical motion constraints. The purpose of this study was to investigate an alternative treatment scenario using a moving average algorithm. The algorithm, using a suitable averaging period, accounts for variations in the average tumor position, but respiratory induced target position variations about this average are ignored during delivery and can be treated as a random error during planning. In order to test the method a comparison between five different treatment techniques was performed: (1) moving average algorithm, (2) real-time motion tracking, (3) respiration motion gating (at both inhale and exhale), (4) moving average gating (at both inhale and exhale) and (5) static beam delivery. Two data sets were used for the purpose of this analysis: (a) external respiratory-motion traces using different coaching techniques included 331 respiration motion traces from 24 lung-cancer patients acquired using three different breathing types [free breathing (FB), audio coaching (A) and audio-visual biofeedback (AV)]; (b) 3D tumor motion included implanted fiducial motion data for over 160 treatment fractions for 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients obtained from the Cyberknife Synchrony. The metrics used for comparison were the group systematic error (M), the standard deviation (SD) of the systematic error (sigma) and the root mean square of the random error (sigma). Margins were calculated using the formula by Stroom et al. [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 43(4), 905-919 (1999)]: 2sigma + 0.7sigma. The resultant calculations for implanted fiducial motion traces (all values in cm) show that M and sigma are negligible for moving average algorithm, moving average gating, and real

  2. Toward 3D dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments with plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, M.; Gingras, L.; Archambault, L.; Beddar, S.; Beaulieu, L.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a novel two Dimensional Plastic Scintillation Detector (2D-PSD) array designed to measure dose distributions generated by high energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators. This study aim to demonstrate that the dose distribution in the irradiated volume is not modified by the presence of several hundred plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs). The 2D-PSD consists of 781 PSDs inserted in a plastic water slab. The dose distributions measured with the 2D-PSD were compared to calculations from a treatment planning system (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems) and with measurements taken with an ionization chambers array (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry). Furthermore, a clinical head and neck IMRT plan was delivered on the 2D-PSD. A good agreement is obtained between the measured and planned dose distributions. The results show that the 2D arrangement presented in this work is water equivalent and transparent to x-ray radiation. As a consequence, our design could be extended to multiple detection planes, opening the possibility for 3D dosimetry with PSDs.

  3. Application of a 3D volumetric display for radiation therapy treatment planning I: quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Kirk, Michael Collins; Napoli, Josh; Stutsman, Sandy; Zusag, Tom; Khelashvili, Gocha; Chu, James

    2009-07-17

    To design and implement a set of quality assurance tests for an innovative 3D volumetric display for radiation treatment planning applications. A genuine 3D display (Perspecta Spatial 3D, Actuality-Systems Inc., Bedford, MA) has been integrated with the Pinnacle TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Madison WI), for treatment planning. The Perspecta 3D display renders a 25 cm diameter volume that is viewable from any side, floating within a translucent dome. In addition to displaying all 3D data exported from Pinnacle, the system provides a 3D mouse to define beam angles and apertures and to measure distance. The focus of this work is the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for 3D displays and specific 3D planning issues as guided by AAPM Task Group Report 53. A series of acceptance and quality assurance tests have been designed to evaluate the accuracy of CT images, contours, beams, and dose distributions as displayed on Perspecta. Three-dimensional matrices, rulers and phantoms with known spatial dimensions were used to check Perspecta's absolute spatial accuracy. In addition, a system of tests was designed to confirm Perspecta's ability to import and display Pinnacle data consistently. CT scans of phantoms were used to confirm beam field size, divergence, and gantry and couch angular accuracy as displayed on Perspecta. Beam angles were verified through Cartesian coordinate system measurements and by CT scans of phantoms rotated at known angles. Beams designed on Perspecta were exported to Pinnacle and checked for accuracy. Dose at sampled points were checked for consistency with Pinnacle and agreed within 1% or 1 mm. All data exported from Pinnacle to Perspecta was displayed consistently. The 3D spatial display of images, contours, and dose distributions were consistent with Pinnacle display. When measured by the 3D ruler, the distances between any two points calculated using Perspecta agreed with Pinnacle within the measurement error.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Octo- and Nonagenarians for the Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Meredith; Hope, Andrew; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mantel, Frederick; Peulen, Heike; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Ye, Hong; Grills, Inga S

    2017-07-15

    To determine the safety and efficacy of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in octo- and nonagenarians and to compare their outcomes with those of younger patients. Patients with primary lung cancer treated with SBRT were identified from a multi-institutional (5 institutions) database of 1083 cases. Details of patient factors, treatment specifics, toxicity, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the database. All events were calculated from the end of radiation therapy. Estimates of local recurrence, regional recurrence, and distant metastases were calculated using the competing risk method. Cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Outcomes were compared for those aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine associations with CSS and OS in patients aged ≥80 years. The median (range) follow-up was 1.7 (1-10) years, and median age was 75 (41-94) years. There were 305 patients aged <70 years (28%), 448 aged 70 to 79 years (41%), and 330 aged ≥80 years (30%). There was no difference in 2-year local recurrence (4.2% vs 5.4% vs 3.7%, respectively, P=.7), regional recurrence (10.4% vs 7.8% vs 5.3%, P=.1), distant metastases (12.2% vs 7.7% vs 9.5%, P=.2), or CSS (90.6% vs 90.3% vs 90.4%, P=.6). Those aged ≥80 years had significantly lower 2-year OS (73.6% vs 67.2% vs 63.3%, P<.01). The grade 3+ pneumonitis rate was 1.3% versus 1.6% versus 1.5% (P=1.0) in patients aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates for patients aged <70, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years were 1.3%, 2.5%, and 2.4% (P=.01), respectively. In patients aged ≥80 years OS was associated with T category (hazard ratio 1.7; P<.01). Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a safe treatment modality in elderly patients (aged ≥80 years). Despite larger tumor volumes, the tumor control outcomes were comparable to those in younger

  5. Statistical Modeling of the Eye for Multimodal Treatment Planning for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Intraocular Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rueegsegger, Michael B.; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Pica, Alessia; Amstutz, Christoph A.; Rudolph, Tobias; Aebersold, Daniel; Kowal, Jens H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Ocular anatomy and radiation-associated toxicities provide unique challenges for external beam radiation therapy. For treatment planning, precise modeling of organs at risk and tumor volume are crucial. Development of a precise eye model and automatic adaptation of this model to patients' anatomy remain problematic because of organ shape variability. This work introduces the application of a 3-dimensional (3D) statistical shape model as a novel method for precise eye modeling for external beam radiation therapy of intraocular tumors. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentations were compared for 17 patients, based on head computed tomography (CT) volume scans. A 3D statistical shape model of the cornea, lens, and sclera as well as of the optic disc position was developed. Furthermore, an active shape model was built to enable automatic fitting of the eye model to CT slice stacks. Cross-validation was performed based on leave-one-out tests for all training shapes by measuring dice coefficients and mean segmentation errors between automatic segmentation and manual segmentation by an expert. Results: Cross-validation revealed a dice similarity of 95% {+-} 2% for the sclera and cornea and 91% {+-} 2% for the lens. Overall, mean segmentation error was found to be 0.3 {+-} 0.1 mm. Average segmentation time was 14 {+-} 2 s on a standard personal computer. Conclusions: Our results show that the solution presented outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy, reliability, and robustness. Moreover, the eye model shape as well as its variability is learned from a training set rather than by making shape assumptions (eg, as with the spherical or elliptical model). Therefore, the model appears to be capable of modeling nonspherically and nonelliptically shaped eyes.

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy use for the localized treatment of thyroid cancer: Nationwide practice patterns and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Paolo; Robinson, Timothy J; Youngwirth, Linda M; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of randomized data, the optimal approach to adjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced thyroid cancer remains unclear. We employed a large retrospective analysis to assess the best available evidence of a potential beneficial impact of intensity-modulated versus 3D-conformal radiotherapy (IMRT vs. 3D-CT). Retrospective analysis of adult thyroid cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2011 within the National Cancer Database. Among patients treated with radiation therapy (N = 855), the use of IMRT (N = 437) increased among both comprehensive and academic centers (both p < 0.001), but not community hospitals (p = 0.43). Receipt of IMRT was associated with adverse clinical factors in multivariable analysis, including positive surgical margins, non-DTC histologies, and nodal metastases (all p < 0.001). IMRT use was associated with a significantly higher dose of radiation (60.7 vs. 52.4 Gy, p < 0.001). In multivariable analyses, receipt of IMRT demonstrated a trend toward improved overall survival (HR, 0.67; 95 % CI, 0.40-1.10; p = 0.115). This study presents the largest cohort to date examining receipt of IMRT in patients with locally advanced thyroid cancer and demonstrates an association between IMRT, treatment at a tertiary care center, higher total dose, and comparable or superior outcomes compared to patients treated with 3D conformal techniques despite more adverse disease features. In the absence of adequately powered prospective randomized trials, our retrospective analysis provides empirical evidence to support the use in these patients of dose escalation and IMRT, particularly at tertiary care centers.

  7. Neuralgic amyotrophy in association with radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Malow, B.A.; Dawson, D.M. )

    1991-03-01

    We describe 4 patients with Hodgkin's disease who developed neuralgic amyotrophy in the setting of radiation therapy. In contrast to tumor progression or radiation plexopathy, the symptom onset was abrupt and occurred within days to weeks of receiving radiation treatments. There is an association between Hodgkin's disease, radiation therapy, and neuralgic amyotrophy.

  8. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  9. A Phase I Study of the Combination of Sorafenib With Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Primary and Recurrent High-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Sheng, Zhi; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Dougherty, Erin; Marinucchi, Michelle; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Hegarty, Sarah; Hyslop, Terry; Andrews, David W.; Glass, Jon; Friedman, David P.; Green, Michael R.; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite recent advances in the management of high-grade and recurrent gliomas, survival remains poor. Antiangiogenic therapy has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of high-grade gliomas both in preclinical models and in clinical trials. We sought to determine the safety and maximum tolerated dose of sorafenib when combined with both radiation and temozolomide in the primary setting or radiation alone in the recurrent setting. Methods and Materials: This was a preclinical study and an open-label phase I dose escalation trial. Multiple glioma cell lines were analyzed for viability after treatment with radiation, temozolomide, or sorafenib or combinations of them. For patients with primary disease, sorafenib was given concurrently with temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) and 60 Gy radiation, for 30 days after completion of radiation. For patients with recurrent disease, sorafenib was combined with a hypofractionated course of radiation (35 Gy in 10 fractions). Results: Cell viability was significantly reduced with the combination of radiation, temozolomide, and sorafenib or radiation and sorafenib. Eighteen patients (11 in the primary cohort, 7 in the recurrent cohort) were enrolled onto this trial approved by the institutional review board. All patients completed the planned course of radiation therapy. The most common toxicities were hematologic, fatigue, and rash. There were 18 grade 3 or higher toxicities. The median overall survival was 18 months for the entire population. Conclusions: Sorafenib can be safely combined with radiation and temozolomide in patients with high-grade glioma and with radiation alone in patients with recurrent glioma. The recommended phase II dose of sorafenib is 200 mg twice daily when combined with temozolomide and radiation and 400 mg with radiation alone. To our knowledge, this is the first publication of concurrent sorafenib with radiation monotherapy or combined with radiation and temozolomide.

  10. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiation therapy of right sided breast cancer with and without flattening filter - A treatment planning study.

    PubMed

    Maier, Johannes; Knott, Bernadette; Maerz, Manuel; Loeschel, Rainer; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara

    2016-08-31

    The aim of the study was to compare the two irradiation modes with (FF) and without flattening filter (FFF) for three different treatment techniques for simultaneous integrated boost radiation therapy of patients with right sided breast cancer. An Elekta Synergy linac with Agility collimating device is used to simulate the treatment of 10 patients. Six plans were generated in Monaco 5.0 for each patient treating the whole breast and a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) volume: intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and a tangential arc VMAT (tVMAT), each with and without flattening filter. Plan quality was assessed considering target coverage, sparing of the contralateral breast, the lungs, the heart and the normal tissue. All plans were verified by a 2D-ionisation-chamber-array and delivery times were measured and compared. The Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis with a significance level of 0.05. Significantly best target coverage and homogeneity was achieved using VMAT FFF with V95% = (98.7 ± 0.8) % and HI = (8.2 ± 0.9) % for the SIB and V95% = (98.3 ± 0.7) % for the PTV, whereas tVMAT showed significantly lowest doses to the contralateral organs at risk with a Dmean of (0.7 ± 0.1) Gy for the contralateral lung, (1.0 ± 0.2) Gy for the contralateral breast and (1.4 ± 0.2) Gy for the heart. All plans passed the gamma evaluation with a mean passing rate of (99.2 ± 0.8) %. Delivery times were significantly reduced for VMAT and tVMAT but increased for IMRT, when FFF was used. Lowest delivery times were observed for tVMAT FFF with (1:20 ± 0:07) min. Balancing target coverage, OAR sparing and delivery time, VMAT FFF and tVMAT FFF are considered the preferable of the investigated treatment options in simultaneous integrated boost irradiation of right sided breast cancer for the combination of an Elekta Synergy linac with Agility and the treatment planning

  11. An imaging-based tumour growth and treatment response model: Investigating the effect of tumour oxygenation on radiation therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A multiscale tumour simulation model employing cell-line-specific biological parameters and functional information derived from pre-therapy PET/CT imaging data was developed to investigate effects of different oxygenation levels on the response to radiation therapy. For each tumour voxel, stochastic simulations were performed to model cellular growth and therapeutic response. Model parameters were fitted to published preclinical experiments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using the obtained parameters, the model was applied to a human HNSCC case to investigate effects of different uniform and non-uniform oxygenation levels and results were compared for treatment efficacy. Simulations of the preclinical studies showed excellent agreement with published data and underlined the model’s ability to quantitatively reproduce tumour behaviour within experimental uncertainties. When using a simplified transformation to derive non-uniform oxygenation levels from molecular imaging data, simulations of the clinical case showed heterogeneous tumour response and variability in radioresistance with decreasing oxygen levels. Once clinically validated, this model could be used to transform patient-specific data into voxel-based biological objectives for treatment planning and to investigate biologically optimized dose prescriptions. PMID:18677042

  12. Temperature mapping and thermal dose calculation in combined radiation therapy and 13.56 MHz radiofrequency hyperthermia for tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Kyung; Prasad, Bibin; Kim, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the synergistic effect of radiotherapy and radiofrequency hyperthermia therapy in the treatment of lung and liver cancers, we studied the mechanism of heat absorption and transfer in the tumor using electro-thermal simulation and high-resolution temperature mapping techniques. A realistic tumor-induced mouse anatomy, which was reconstructed and segmented from computed tomography images, was used to determine the thermal distribution in tumors during radiofrequency (RF) heating at 13.56 MHz. An RF electrode was used as a heat source, and computations were performed with the aid of the multiphysics simulation platform Sim4Life. Experiments were carried out on a tumor-mimicking agar phantom and a mouse tumor model to obtain a spatiotemporal temperature map and thermal dose distribution. A high temperature increase was achieved in the tumor from both the computation and measurement, which elucidated that there was selective high-energy absorption in tumor tissue compared to the normal surrounding tissues. The study allows for effective treatment planning for combined radiation and hyperthermia therapy based on the high-resolution temperature mapping and high-precision thermal dose calculation.

  13. Double-flash, large-fraction radiation therapy as palliative treatment of malignant superior vena cava syndrome in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lonardi, Federico; Gioga, Gloria; Agus, Graziella; Coeli, Manuela; Campostrini, Franco

    2002-03-01

    Rapid control of symptoms is mandatory in cancer-induced superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), but older patients often do not tolerate aggressive approaches. In order to maximize symptom relief and minimize treatment-related discomfort of aged patients in poor health we adopted a short-course, large-fraction radiation therapy (RT) schedule. Twenty-three consecutive patients aged over 70 who were suffering from solid-malignancy-related SVCS were enrolled. A total dose of 12 Gy was given in two 6-Gy fractions, 1 week apart, mainly in an out-patient setting. Completion of therapy to give up to 37-40 Gy was planned in the best-responding patients. Symptom relief was experienced by 8 patients as early as 4-5 days after the first fraction. The overall response rate was 87%. Despite some mild systemic side effects (chest pain, fever) reported by 5 patients (22%), overall toxicity was negligible. Short-course, double-flash RT stands as an effective and safe tool in the palliative treatment of malignant SVCS in older patients. Fractions larger than 6 Gy can be avoided in order to minimize side and toxic effects.

  14. SU-E-T-607: Performance Quantification of the Nine Detectors Used for Dosimetry Measurements in Advanced Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, M; Stathakis, S; Jurkovic, I; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify performance of the nine detectors used for dosimetry measurements in advanced radiation therapy treatments. Methods: The 6 MV beam was utilized for measurements of the field sizes with the lack of lateral charge particle equilibrium. For dose fidelity aspect, energy dependence was studied by measuring PDD and profiles at different depths. The volume effect and its influence on the measured dose profiles have been observed by measuring detector’s response function. Output factor measurements with respect to change in energy spectrum have been performed and collected data has been analyzed. The linearity of the measurements with the dose delivered has been evaluated and relevant comparisons were done. Results: The measured values of the output factors with respect to change in energy spectrum indicated presence of the energy dependence. The detectors with active volume size ≤ 0.3 mm3 maximum deviation from the mean is 5.6% for the field size 0.5 x 0.5 cm2 while detectors with active volume size > 0.3 mm3 have maximum deviation from the mean 7.1%. Linearity with dose at highest dose rate examined for diode detectors showed maximum deviation of 4% while ion chambers showed maximum deviation of 2.2%. Dose profiles showed energy dependence at shallow depths (surface to dmax) influenced by low energy particles with 12 % maximum deviation from the mean for 5 mm2 field size. In relation to Monte Carlo calculation, the detector’s response function σ values were between (0.42±0.25) mm and (1.2±0.25) mm. Conclusion: All the detectors are appropriate for the dosimetry measurements in advanced radiation therapy treatments. The choice of the detectors has to be determined by the application and the scope of the measurements in respect to energy dependence and ability to accurately resolve dose profiles as well as to it’s intrinsic characteristics.

  15. Radiation therapy for widespread actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Dinehart, Scott M; Graham, Matt; Maners, Ann

    2011-07-01

    To profile 16 patients with widespread and resistant actinic keratoses (AKs) treated with radiation therapy. Chart review and phone interviews of 16 patients who were treated with radiation therapy between 2003 and 2010. A specialized dermatological practice primarily treating patients with skin cancer. The study population at the time of treatment was aged 70 to 87 with a mean age of 79.6 years and included 14 men and two women. Patients were followed at two weeks and six months after treatment to assess clinical outcome. All adverse effects were recorded. Patients were contacted for phone interview to assess patient satisfaction after treatment. Patients all had significant reduction of AKs in the radiation field with a majority (90%) reporting they were "very satisfied" with their treatment outcome. Of 16 patients at two weeks post-treatment, 13 had complete clinical resolution of their AK after radiation therapy. Three of 16 patients had significant reduction (50-99%) in AK in the treatment field. Patients reported improved quality of life, a reduced need for frequent clinic visits, and long-term remission from the development of new AKs within the treatment field. Patients meeting suggested specific criteria developed by the authors may be treated successfully with radiation therapy with good outcomes at six-month follow up and high levels of patient satisfaction.

  16. [A randomized study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three dimensional conformal radiation therapy for pelvic radiation in patients of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ni, J; Yin, Z M; Yuan, S H; Liu, N F; Li, L; Xu, X X; Lou, H M

    2017-03-25

    Objective: To study the difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pelvic radiation of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor. Methods: A prospective investigation study was conducted on 183 patients of post-operative patients with whole pelvic radiation therapy of cervical cancer or endometrial cancer in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital [IMRT group (n=85) and 3D-CRT group (n=98)] from Oct. 2015 to Oct. 2016. The two groups received same dose (45 Gy in 25 fractions). Comparison of two groups with radiation dosimetry:the score according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute radiation injury grading standards before and after radiotherapy reaction, the score from functional assessment of cancer therapy scale-cervix (FACT-Cx) scale and expanded prostate cancer index composite for clinical practice (EPIC-CP) scale were also analyzed. Results: (1) There were no significant effect with age, culture level, family economic condition and ratio of radiochemotherapy between two groups (all P>0.05). (2) Dosimetric comparison for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: the average dose of planning target volume (PTV) decreased (46.1±0.4) vs (46.4±0.5) Gy, V(45) dose percentage increased (95.2±1.0) % vs (93.3±2.0) %, intestinal bag dose of V(4)0 decreased (24.4±6.8) % vs (36.5±15.9) %, rectal V(40) dose percentage decreased (73.9±12.3) % vs (85.4±8.4) %, and lower rectal V(45) dose percentage (32.8±13.4) % vs (71.5±13.7) %, bladder V(40) dose percentage decreased (55.5±13.0) % vs (84.4±13.0) %. Bone marrow V(20) lower: (67.9±5.4) % vs (79.5±6.6) %, V(1)0 lower: (82.1±6.0) % vs (86.3±6.6) %; there were significant differences (all P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the dose of V(45) in the intestinal pouch and bladder (P>0.05). (3) Acute radiation injury classification for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: big or small intestine: Ⅱ-Ⅲ reaction [13% (11/85) vs 24% (24/98); χ(2

  17. A method for evaluating treatment quality using in vivo EPID dosimetry and statistical process control in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Greer, Peter B; Simpson, John; Zwan, Benjamin J; Middleton, Richard H

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Due to increasing complexity, modern radiotherapy techniques require comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes, that to date generally focus on the pre-treatment stage. The purpose of this paper is to provide a method for an individual patient treatment QA evaluation and identification of a "quality gap" for continuous quality improvement. Design/methodology/approach A statistical process control (SPC) was applied to evaluate treatment delivery using in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. A moving range control chart was constructed to monitor the individual patient treatment performance based on a control limit generated from initial data of 90 intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and ten volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient deliveries. A process capability index was used to evaluate the continuing treatment quality based on three quality classes: treatment type-specific, treatment linac-specific, and body site-specific. Findings The determined control limits were 62.5 and 70.0 per cent of the χ pass-rate for IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. In total, 14 patients were selected for a pilot study the results of which showed that about 1 per cent of all treatments contained errors relating to unexpected anatomical changes between treatment fractions. Both rectum and pelvis cancer treatments demonstrated process capability indices were less than 1, indicating the potential for quality improvement and hence may benefit from further assessment. Research limitations/implications The study relied on the application of in vivo EPID dosimetry for patients treated at the specific centre. Sampling patients for generating the control limits were limited to 100 patients. Whilst the quantitative results are specific to the clinical techniques and equipment used, the described method is generally applicable to IMRT and VMAT treatment QA. Whilst more work is required to determine the level of clinical significance, the

  18. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 106 particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 105 particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation time

  19. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 10(6) particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 10(5) particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation

  20. Hypofractionation in radiation therapy and its impact

    SciTech Connect

    Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert

    2008-01-15

    A brief history of the underlying principles of the conventional fractionation in radiation therapy is discussed, followed by the formulation of the hypothesis for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Subsequently, consequences of the hypothesis for SBRT dose shaping and dose delivery techniques are sketched. A brief review of the advantages of SBRT therapy in light of the existing experience is then provided. Finally, the need for new technological developments is advocated to make SBRT therapies more practical, safer, and clinically more effective. It is finally concluded that hypofractionated SBRT treatment will develop into a new paradigm that will shape the future of radiation therapy by providing the means to suppress the growth of most carcinogen-induced carcinomas and by supporting the cure of the disease.

  1. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  2. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y; Cao, M; Han, F; Santhanam, A; Neylon, J; Gomez, C; Kaprealian, T; Sheng, K; Agazaryan, N; Low, D; Hu, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.

  3. Conformal orbit sparing radiation therapy: a treatment option for advanced skin cancer of the parotid and ear region.

    PubMed

    Foley, Heath; Hopley, Shane; Brown, Elizabeth; Bernard, Anne; Foote, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    New surgical methods have enabled resection of previously in-operable tumours in the region of the parotid gland and ear. This has translated to deeper target volumes being treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. Due to the limitations of existing conformal techniques, alternative planning approaches are required to cover the target volume with appropriate sparing of adjacent critical structures. Although intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may be able to achieve these goals compared with the existing conformal method, a new orbital sparing radiation therapy (OSRaT) technique was evaluated as an alternative conformal planning process. The study objective was to evaluate the dosimetry of three planning methods: pre-existing conformal, IMRT and OSRaT techniques. Ten patients were planned retrospectively using the existing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), IMRT and OSRaT techniques. Dosimetry was analysed using the homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), the volume of planning target volumes (PTV) under and over treated by the 95% isodose and dose to critical structures. OSRaT achieved superior 95% coverage of the high-dose PTV while delivering HI similar to IMRT for intermediate and high-dose PTVs. The CI for the high-dose PTV was comparable between the three techniques, however IMRT was statistically better for the low- and intermediate dose PTVs. All three techniques showed adequate orbital sparing, however OSRaT and IMRT achieved this with less under dosing of the PTVs. For the treatment of patients with advanced skin cancer of the parotid and ear, both IMRT and the OSRaT techniques are viable options.

  4. Multicriteria Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Locally Advanced Cancer of the Pancreatic Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S. Craft, David L.; Carlsson, Fredrik; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) affords the potential to decrease radiation therapy-associated toxicity by creating highly conformal dose distributions. However, the inverse planning process can create a suboptimal plan despite meeting all constraints. Multicriteria optimization (MCO) may reduce the time-consuming iteration loop necessary to develop a satisfactory plan while providing information regarding trade-offs between different treatment planning goals. In this exploratory study, we examine the feasibility and utility of MCO in physician plan selection in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: The first 10 consecutive patients with LAPC treated with IMRT were evaluated. A database of plans (Pareto surface) was created that met the inverse planning goals. The physician then navigated to an 'optimal' plan from the point on the Pareto surface at which kidney dose was minimized. Results: Pareto surfaces were created for all 10 patients. A physician was able to select a plan from the Pareto surface within 10 minutes for all cases. Compared with the original (treated) IMRT plans, the plan selected from the Pareto surface had a lower stomach mean dose in 9 of 10 patients, although often at the expense of higher kidney dose than with the treated plan. Conclusion: The MCO is feasible in patients with LAPC and allows the physician to choose a satisfactory plan quickly. Generally, when given the opportunity, the physician will choose a plan with a lower stomach dose. The MCO enables a physician to provide greater active clinical input into the IMRT planning process.

  5. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  6. SU-E-T-03: 3D GPU-Accelerated Secondary Checks of Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Redundant treatment verifications in conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques are traditionally performed with single point calculations. New solutions can replace these checks with 3D treatment plan verifications. This work describes a software tool (Mobius3D, Mobius Medical Systems) that uses a GPU-accelerated collapsed cone algorithm to perform 3D independent verifications of TPS calculations. Methods: Mobius3D comes with reference beam models for common linear accelerators. The system uses an independently developed collapsed cone algorithm updated with recent enhancements. 144 isotropically-spaced cones are used for each voxel for calculations. These complex calculations can be sped up by using GPUs. Mobius3D calculate dose using DICOM information coming from TPS (CT, RT Struct, RT Plan RT Dose). DVH-metrics and 3D gamma tests can be used to compare both TPS and secondary calculations. 170 patients treated with all common techniques as 3DCFRT (including wedged), static and dynamic IMRT and VMAT have been successfully verified with this solution. Results: Calculation times are between 3–5 minutes for 3DCFRT treatments and 15–20 for most complex dMLC and VMAT plans. For all PTVs mean dose and 90% coverage differences are (1.12±0.97)% and (0.68±1.19)%, respectively. Mean dose discrepancies for all OARs is (0.64±1.00)%. 3D gamma (global, 3%/3 mm) analysis shows a mean passing rate of (97.8 ± 3.0)% for PTVs and (99.0±3.0)% for OARs. 3D gamma pasing rate for all voxels in CT has a mean value of (98.5±1.6)%. Conclusion: Mobius3D is a powerful tool to verify all modalities of radiation therapy treatments. Dose discrepancies calculated by this system are in good agreement with TPS. The use of reference beam data results in time savings and can be used to avoid the propagation of errors in original beam data into our QA system. GPU calculations permit enhanced collapsed cone calculations with reasonable calculation times.

  7. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc (Full VMAT). All plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions. Target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were compared across techniques. PTV coverage was almost identical for all approaches. The whole lung V10Gy was significantly lower with CP VMAT plans than with NCP VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences in the mean lung dose, V5Gy, V20Gy or V40Gy were observed. Full VMAT increased mean contralateral lung V5Gy by 12.57% and 9.15% when compared with NCP VMAT and CP VMAT, respectively. Although NCP VMAT plans best achieved the dose-volume constraints for mediastinal OARs, the absolute differences in dose were small when compared with CP VMAT. These results suggest that partial-arc VMAT may be preferable to minimize unnecessary exposure to the contralateral lung, and use of NCP VMAT should be considered when the dose-volume constraints are not achieved by CP VMAT. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma: Optimal treatment strategies based on liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Po-Ming; Chung, Na-Na; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chang, Feng-Ling; Jang, Chin-Jyh; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Aim To discuss current dosage for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and suggest alternative treatment strategies according to liver segmentation as defined by the Couinaud classification. Background SBRT is a safe and effective alternative treatment for HCC patients who are unable to undergo liver ablation/resection. However, the SBRT fractionation schemes and treatment planning strategies are not well established. Materials and methods In this article, the latest developments and key findings from research studies exploring the efficacy of SBRT fractionation schemes for treatment of HCC are reviewed. Patients’ characteristics, fractionation schemes, treatment outcomes and toxicities were compiled. Special attention was focused on SBRT fractionation approaches that take into consideration liver segmentation according to the Couinaud classification and functional hepatic reserve based on Child–Pugh (CP) liver cirrhosis classification. Results The most common SBRT fractionation schemes for HCC were 3 × 10–20 Gy, 4–6 × 8–10 Gy, and 10 × 5–5.5 Gy. Based on previous SBRT studies, and in consideration of tumor size and CP classification, we proposed 3 × 15–25 Gy for patients with tumor size <3 cm and adequate liver reserve (CP-A score 5), 5 × 10–12 Gy for patients with tumor sizes between 3 and 5 cm or inadequate liver reserve (CP-A score 6), and 10 × 5–5.5 Gy for patients with tumor size >5 cm or CP-B score. Conclusions Treatment schemes in SBRT for HCC vary according to liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve. Further prospective studies may be necessary to identify the optimal dose of SBRT for HCC. PMID:26696781

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 32: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Peripheral Lung Lesion: Treatment Planning and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Shuying; Oliver, Michael; Wang, Xiaofang

    2014-08-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), due to its high precision for target localizing, has become widely used to treat tumours at various locations, including the lungs. Lung SBRT program was started at our institution a year ago. Eighteen patients with peripheral lesions up to 3 cm diameter have been treated with 48 Gy in 4 fractions. Based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) simulation, internal target volume (ITV) was delineated to encompass the respiratory motion of the lesion. A margin of 5 mm was then added to create the planning target volume (PTV) for setup uncertainties. There was no expansion from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV). Pinnacle 9.6 was used as the primary treatment planning system. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, with one or two coplanar arcs, generally worked well. For quality assurance (QA), each plan was exported to Eclipse 10 and dose calculation was repeated. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and organs at risk (OARs) were then compared between the two treatment planning systems. Winston-Lutz tests were carried out as routine machine QA. Patient-specific QA included ArcCheck measurement with an insert, where an ionization chamber was placed at the centre to measure dose at the isocenter. For the first several patients, and subsequently for the plans with extremely strong modulation, Gafchromic film dosimetry was also employed. For each patient, a mock setup was scheduled prior to treatments. Daily pre- and post-CBCT were acquired for setup and assessment of intra-fractional motion, respectively.

  10. A randomized prospective study of rehabilitation therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Shen, Q; Wang, Y; Lu, K; Wang, Y; Peng, Y

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of rehabilitation therapy on radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. 43 NPC patients after radiotherapy were included. Patients were randomly assigned to either the rehabilitation group or a control group. Both groups were subjected to routine treatment, while the rehabilitation group also received rehabilitation therapy for 3 months. The severity of dysphagia was assessed using the water swallow test, while trismus was evaluated with the LENT/SOMA score and the interincisor distance (IID). The water swallow test, the LENT/SOMA score, as well as IID for both groups before and after treatment were analyzed and compared. After treatment, the rehabilitation group displayed a significant improvement in swallowing function, while the control group did not. The efficacy rate (percentage of patients with excellent or effective results) of rehabilitation group was higher than that of control group (77% vs. 43%), and the difference was statistically significant (ϰ(2) = 5.32, p = 0.02). IID pretreatment and posttreatment did not show much difference in the rehabilitation group, while in the control group IID significantly decreased posttreatment (1.1 ± 0.36 cm vs.1.8 ± 0.56 cm, p = 0.001). Although the mean IID in patients of both groups decreased after the 3 month follow-up, the decrease in the rehabilitation group was less than that of the control group (0.19 ± 0.5 cm vs. 0.69 ± 0.56 cm, p = 0.004 ). The efficacy rate of trismus in the rehabilitation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (64% vs. 28%, ϰ(2) = 5.31, p = 0.02). Rehabilitation training can improve swallow function and slow down the progress of trismus in NPC patients following radiotherapy.

  11. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ayakawa, Shiho; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Akihiro; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Baba, Fumiya; Yanagi, Takeshi; Sugie, Chikao; Kataoka, Hiromi; Mimura, Mikio

    2012-06-12

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12-69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be

  12. Treatment planning systems for external whole brain radiation therapy: With and without MLC (multi leaf collimator) optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiyono, T.; Budi, W. S.; Hidayanto, E.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy for brain malignancy is done by giving a dose of radiation to a whole volume of the brain (WBRT) followed by a booster at the primary tumor with more advanced techniques. Two external radiation fields given from the right and left side. Because the shape of the head, there will be an unavoidable hotspot radiation dose of greater than 107%. This study aims to optimize planning of radiation therapy using field in field multi-leaf collimator technique. A study of 15 WBRT samples with CT slices is done by adding some segments of radiation in each field of radiation and delivering appropriate dose weighting using a TPS precise plan Elekta R 2.15. Results showed that this optimization a more homogeneous radiation on CTV target volume, lower dose in healthy tissue, and reduced hotspots in CTV target volume. Comparison results of field in field multi segmented MLC technique with standard conventional technique for WBRT are: higher average minimum dose (77.25% ± 0:47%) vs (60% ± 3:35%); lower average maximum dose (110.27% ± 0.26%) vs (114.53% ± 1.56%); lower hotspot volume (5.71% vs 27.43%); and lower dose on eye lenses (right eye: 9.52% vs 18.20%); (left eye: 8.60% vs 16.53%).

  13. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  14. Verification of planning target volume settings in volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy by using in-treatment 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using "pre-3D" CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A practical method of modeling a treatment couch using cone-beam computed tomography for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and RapidArc treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Aldosary, Ghada; Nobah, Ahmad; Al-Zorkani, Faisal; Devic, Slobodan; Moftah, Belal

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a treatment couch on dose perturbation is not always fully considered in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). In the course of inverse planning radiotherapy techniques, beam parameter optimization may change in the absence of the couch, causing errors in the calculated dose distributions. Although modern treatment planning systems (TPS) include data for the treatment couch components, they are not manufactured identically. Thus, variations in their Hounsfield unit (HU) values may exist. Moreover, a radiotherapy facility may wish to have a third-party custom tabletop installed that is not included by the TPS vendor. This study demonstrates a practical and simple method of acquiring reliable computed tomography (CT) data for the treatment couch and shows how the absorbed dose calculated with the modeled treatment couch can differ from that with the default treatment couch found in the TPS. We also experimentally verified that neglecting to incorporate the treatment couch completely in the treatment planning process might result in dose differences of up to 9.5% and 7.3% for 4-MV and 10-MV photon beams, respectively. Furthermore, 20 RapidArc and IMRT cases were used to quantify the change in calculated dose distributions caused by using either the default or modeled couch. From 2-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array measurements, we observed large dose distribution differences between the measurements and calculations when the couch was omitted that varied according to the planning technique and anatomic site. Thus, incorporating the treatment couch in the dose calculation phase of treatment planning significantly decreases dose calculation errors.

  16. Review of image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Djemil, Toufik; Macklis, Roger M

    2007-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy represents a new paradigm in the field of high-precision radiation medicine. A synthesis of recent technological advances in medical imaging and conformal radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy represents a further expansion in the recent push for maximizing targeting capabilities with high-intensity radiation dose deposition limited to the true target structures, while minimizing radiation dose deposited in collateral normal tissues. By improving this targeting discrimination, the therapeutic ratio may be enhanced significantly. The principle behind image-guided radiation therapy relies heavily on the acquisition of serial image datasets using a variety of medical imaging platforms, including computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. These anatomic and volumetric image datasets are now being augmented through the addition of functional imaging. The current interest in positron-emitted tomography represents a good example of this sort of functional information now being correlated with anatomic localization. As the sophistication of imaging datasets grows, the precise 3D and 4D positions of the target and normal structures become of great relevance, leading to a recent exploration of real- or near-real-time positional replanning of the radiation treatment localization coordinates. This 'adaptive' radiotherapy explicitly recognizes that both tumors and normal tissues change position in time and space during a multiweek course of treatment, and even within a single treatment fraction. As targets and normal tissues change, the attenuation of radiation beams passing through these structures will also change, thus adding an additional level of imprecision in targeting unless these changes are taken into account. All in all, image-guided radiation therapy can be seen as further progress in the development of minimally invasive highly targeted cytotoxic therapies with the goal of substituting remote

  17. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-07

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  18. Liver Selective Internal Radiation Therapy with (90)Y resin microspheres: comparison between pre-treatment activity calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, M; Smadja, C; Faraggi, M; Orio, S; Petitguillaume, A; Desbrée, A; Ghazzar, N

    2014-11-01

    Different methods to calculate (90)Y resin microspheres activity for Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) were compared. Such comparison is not yet available and is needed in clinical practice to optimize patient specific treatment planning. 32 (99m)Tc-macroagregates (MAA) evaluations were performed, followed by 26 treatments. Four methods to calculate (90)Y-activity were applied retrospectively: three based on Body Surface Area and one based on MIRD formalism, partition model (PM). Relationships between calculated activities, lung breakthrough (LB), the activity concentration ratio between lesions and healthy liver (T/N) and tumour involvement were investigated, where lobar and whole liver treatments were analysed separately. Without attenuation correction, overestimation of LB was 65%. In any case, the estimated lungs' doses remained below 30 Gy. Thus, the maximal injectable activity (MIA) is not limited by lungs' irradiation. Moreover, LB was not significantly related to T/N, neither to tumour involvement nor radiochemical purity (RP). Differences in calculated activity with the four methods were extremely large, in particular they were greater between BSA-based and PM activities for lobar treatments (from -85% to 417%) compared to whole liver treatments (from -49% to 61%). Two values of T/N ratio were identified as thresholds: for BSA-based methods, healthy liver doses are much higher than 30 Gy when T/N < 3; for PM, tumour doses are higher than 120 Gy when T/N > 4. As PM accounts for uptake ratio between normal and tumour liver, this method should be employed over BSA-based methods. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M.; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L.; Valdivieso, Manlio F.; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A.; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A.; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Fernando F. de; Puri, Dev R.; Zhung, Joanne; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Hunt, Margie; Stambuk, Hilda; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment in 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1

  1. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle(3), Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  2. TH-A-BRF-01: A Probabilistic Bayesian Approach to Derive Electron Density From MRI for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Gudur, M; Hara, W; Wang, L; Xing, L; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation for patient simulation and treatment planning in radiation therapy, due to its superior soft tissue contrast as compared to CT. An MRI based simulation will reduce cost and simplify clinical workflow with zero ionizing radiation. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information. The purpose of this work is to develop a reliable method to derive electron density from MRI. Methods: We adopt a probabilistic Bayesian approach for electron density mapping based on T1-weighted head MRI. For each voxel, we compute conditional probability of electron densities given its: (1) T1 intensity and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of test patient and atlas. Intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior probability density function whose mean gives the electron density. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as ROC's for bone detection (HU>200) were calculated for 8 patients. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). Results: The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 132, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p=10{sup −3}), 371 for the intensity approach (p=10{sup −5}) and 282 without density correction (p=2×10{sup −4}). For 90% sensitivity in bone detection, the proposed method had a specificity of 85% and that for deformable registration, intensity and without density correction are 80%, 24% and 10% respectively. Conclusion: The proposed unifying method provides accurate electron density estimation and bone detection from MRI of the head with highly heterogeneous regions. This paves the way for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup in MRI-based treatment

  3. A global quality assurance system for personalized radiation therapy treatment planning for the prostate (or other sites)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Obioma; Sihono, Dwi Seno K.; Schneider, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-09-01

    likely dose that OARs will receive before treatment planning. This prospective knowledge could be used to implement a global quality assurance system for personalized radiation therapy treatment planning.

  4. Use of PET/CT and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma Metastases.

    PubMed

    Selmic, Laura Elizabeth; Griffin, Lynn R; Nolan, Michael W; Custis, James; Randall, Elissa; Withrow, Stephen J

    This case report describes the use of two new concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma (OSA) in one dog. The dog was initially presented for positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) as full-body staging following amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy for treatment of OSA of the proximal tibia. The initial PET/CT did not show evidence of metastatic disease. Six mo after OSA, diagnosis pulmonary metastatic nodules were identified and oral toceranib phosphate was initiated. Twelve mo postdiagnosis the dog developed neck pain and non-ambulatory tetraparesis and was diagnosed with a C7 vertebral metastatic lesion based on magnetic resonance imaging. A second PET/CT was performed to screen for further metastatic lesions, and a nodule within the right ischium was identified. The C7 and ischial lesions were treated with stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Sixteen mo postdiagnosis, a third PET/CT was performed due to increasing size of the pulmonary nodules and a right-sided liver metastasis was detected. The liver mass was treated with SRT. The PET/CT scans facilitated identification of gross metastatic lesions that were subsequently treated with SRT, which resulted in clinical improvement of the dog's neurological signs.

  5. A framework for the implementation of new radiation therapy technologies and treatment techniques in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derek W; Shulman, Adam; Hudson, Alana; Smith, Wendy; Fisher, Brandon; Hollon, Jon; Pipman, Yakov; Van Dyk, Jacob; Einck, John

    2014-11-01

    We present a practical, generic, easy-to-use framework for the implementation of new radiation therapy technologies and treatment techniques in low-income countries. The framework is intended to standardize the implementation process, reduce the effort involved in generating an implementation strategy, and provide improved patient safety by reducing the likelihood that steps are missed during the implementation process. The 10 steps in the framework provide a practical approach to implementation. The steps are, 1) Site and resource assessment, 2) Evaluation of equipment and funding, 3) Establishing timelines, 4) Defining the treatment process, 5) Equipment commissioning, 6) Training and competency assessment, 7) Prospective risk analysis, 8) System testing, 9) External dosimetric audit and incident learning, and 10) Support and follow-up. For each step, practical advice for completing the step is provided, as well as links to helpful supplementary material. An associated checklist is provided that can be used to track progress through the steps in the framework. While the emphasis of this paper is on addressing the needs of low-income countries, the concepts also apply in high-income countries. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  7. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Francis X; Buscombe, John R

    2017-10-01

    Primary and secondary liver malignancies are common and associated with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice; however, many patients have unresectable disease. In these cases, several liver directed therapies are available, including selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). SIRT is a multidisciplinary treatment involving nuclear medicine, interventional radiology and oncology. High doses of localised internal radiation are selectively delivered to liver tumour tissues, with relative sparing of adjacent normal liver parenchyma. Side effects are minimal and radiation protection measures following treatment are straightforward. In patients who have progressed following chemotherapy, clinical trials demonstrate prolonged liver progression-free survival. SIRT is offered at 10 centres in England via the NHS England Commissioning through Evaluation programme and is approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for certain liver malignancies. SIRT holds unique promise for personalised treatment of liver tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  9. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Spanne, Per O.

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  10. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-09-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

  11. Utility of Normal Tissue-to-Tumor {alpha}/{beta} Ratio When Evaluating Isodoses of Isoeffective Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Jin Jianyue; Chang, Albert J.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the effect of the number of fractions on normal tissue sparing for equivalent tumor control in radiation therapy plans by using equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) isoeffect calculations. Methods and Materials: The simple linear quadratic (LQ) model was assumed to be valid up to 10 Gy per fraction. Using the model, we formulated a well-known mathematical equality for the tumor prescription dose and probed and solved a second mathematical problem for normal tissue isoeffect. That is, for a given arbitrary relative isodose distribution (treatment plan in percentages), 2 isoeffective tumor treatment regimens (N fractions of the dose D and n fractions of the dose d) were denoted, which resulted in the same BED (corresponding to 100% prescription isodose). Given these situations, the LQ model was further exploited to mathematically establish a unique relative isodose level, z (%), for the same arbitrary treatment plan, where the BED to normal tissues was also isoeffective for both fractionation regimens. Results: For the previously stated problem, the relative isodose level z (%), where the BEDs to the normal tissue were also equal, was defined by the normal tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratio divided by the tumor {alpha}/{beta} times 100%. Fewer fractions offers a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue located outside the isodose surface, z, whereas more fractions offer a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue within the isodose surface, z. Conclusions: Relative isodose-based treatment plan evaluations may be useful for comparing isoeffective tumor regimens in terms of normal tissue effects. Regions of tissues that would benefit from hypofractionation or standard fractionation can be identified.

  12. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered ‘in air’ and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  13. Early Assessment of Treatment Responses During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Using Quantitative Analysis of Daily Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jijo; Yang, Cungeng; Wu, Hui; Tai, An; Dalah, Entesar; Zheng, Cheng; Johnstone, Candice; Kong, Feng-Ming; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X Allen

    2017-06-01

    To investigate early tumor and normal tissue responses during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer using quantitative analysis of daily computed tomography (CT) scans. Daily diagnostic-quality CT scans acquired using CT-on-rails during CT-guided RT for 20 lung cancer patients were quantitatively analyzed. On each daily CT set, the contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and lungs were generated and the radiation dose delivered was reconstructed. The changes in CT image intensity (Hounsfield unit [HU]) features in the GTV and the multiple normal lung tissue shells around the GTV were extracted from the daily CT scans. The associations between the changes in the mean HUs, GTV, accumulated dose during RT delivery, and patient survival rate were analyzed. During the RT course, radiation can induce substantial changes in the HU histogram features on the daily CT scans, with reductions in the GTV mean HUs (dH) observed in the range of 11 to 48 HU (median 30). The dH is statistically related to the accumulated GTV dose (R(2) > 0.99) and correlates weakly with the change in GTV (R(2) = 0.3481). Statistically significant increases in patient survival rates (P=.038) were observed for patients with a higher dH in the GTV. In the normal lung, the 4 regions proximal to the GTV showed statistically significant (P<.001) HU reductions from the first to last fraction. Quantitative analysis of the daily CT scans indicated that the mean HUs in lung tumor and surrounding normal tissue were reduced during RT delivery. This reduction was observed in the early phase of the treatment, is patient specific, and correlated with the delivered dose. A larger HU reduction in the GTV correlated significantly with greater patient survival. The changes in daily CT features, such as the mean HU, can be used for early assessment of the radiation response during RT delivery for lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David; Cavillon, Fabrice; Lacornerie, Thomas; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  15. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  16. A randomized trial comparing combination electron-beam radiation and chemotherapy with topical therapy in the initial treatment of mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.; Steinberg, S.M.; Stocker, J.L.; Ihde, D.C.; Fischmann, A.B.; Glatstein, E.J.; Schechter, G.P.; Phelps, R.M.; Foss, F.M.; )

    1989-12-28

    Mycosis fungoides is a T-cell lymphoma that arises in the skin and progresses at highly variable rates. Nonradomized studies have suggested that early aggressive therapy may improve the prognosis in this usually fatal disease. We studied 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, who, after complete staging, were randomly assigned to receive either combination therapy, consisting of 3000 cGy of electron-beam radiation to the skin combined with parenteral chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, etoposide, and vincristine (n = 52) or sequential topical treatment (n = 51). The prognostic factors were well balanced in the two groups. Combined therapy produced considerable toxicity: 12 patients required hospitalization for fever and transient neutropenia, 5 had congestive heart failure, and 2 were later found to have acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Patients receiving combined therapy had a significantly higher rate of complete response, documented by biopsy, than patients receiving conservative therapy (38 percent vs. 18 percent; P = 0.032). After a median follow-up of 75 months, however, there was no significant difference between the treatment groups in disease-free or overall survival. We conclude that early aggressive therapy with radiation and chemotherapy does not improve the prognosis for patients with mycosis fungoides as compared with conservative treatment beginning with sequential topical therapies.

  17. Revisiting fetal dose during radiation therapy: evaluating treatment techniques and a custom shield.

    PubMed

    Owrangi, Amir M; Roberts, Donald A; Covington, Elizabeth L; Hayman, James A; Masi, Kathryn M; Lee, Choonik; Moran, Jean M; Prisciandaro, Joann I

    2016-09-08

    To create a comprehensive dataset of peripheral dose (PD) measurements from a new generation of linear accelerators with and without the presence of a newly designed fetal shield, PD measurements were performed to evaluate the effects of depth, field size, distance from the field edge, collimator angle, and beam modi-fiers for common treatment protocols and modalities. A custom fetal lead shield was designed and made for our department that allows external beam treatments from multiple angles while minimizing the need to adjust the shield during patient treatments. PD measurements were acquired for a comprehensive series of static fields on a stack of Solid Water. Additionally, PDs from various clinically relevant treatment scenarios for pregnant patients were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom that was abutted to a stack of Solid Water. As expected, the PD decreased as the distance from the field edge increased and the field size decreased. On aver-age, a PD reduction was observed when a 90° collimator rotation was applied and/or when the tertiary MLCs and jaws defined the field aperture. However, the effect of the collimator rotation (90° versus 0°) in PD reduction was not found to be clini-cally significant when the tertiary MLCs were used to define the field aperture. In the presence of both the MLCs and the fetal shield, the PD was reduced by 58% at a distance of 10 cm from the field edge. The newly designed fetal shield may effectively reduce fetal dose and is relatively easy to setup. Due to its design, we are able to use a broad range of treatment techniques and beam angles. We believe the acquired comprehensive PD dataset collected with and without the fetal shield will be useful for treatment teams to estimate fetal dose and help guide decisions on treat-ment techniques without the need to perform pretreatment phantom measurements. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. [Low-energy wideband electromagnetic radiation and manual therapy in the treatment of neurological manifestations of spinal osteochondrosis].

    PubMed

    Afoshin, S A; Gerasimenko, M Iu

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the advanced technique of low-energy wideband electromagnetic radiation improves vascular tonicity and peripheral circulation while a modified technique of manual therapy facilitates movements in the affected part of the spine and reduces tonicity of the muscles involved in the pathological process.

  19. Combination Therapy with Zoledronic Acid and Parathyroid Hormone Improves Bone Architecture and Strength following a Clinically-Relevant Dose of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Local Treatment of Canine Osteosarcoma in Athymic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Ryan C.; Custis, James T.; Ehrhart, Nicole P.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Condon, Keith W.; Gookin, Sara E.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies using definitive-intent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for the local treatment of canine osteosarcoma (OSA) have shown canine patients achieving similar median survival times as the current standard of care (amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy). Despite this, there remains an unacceptable high risk of pathologic fracture following radiation treatment. Zoledronic acid (ZA) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are therapeutic candidates for decreasing this fracture risk post-irradiation. Due to differing mechanisms, we hypothesized that the combined treatment with ZA and PTH would significantly improve bone healing more than ZA or PTH treatment alone. Using an orthotopic model of canine osteosarcoma in athymic rats, we evaluated bone healing following clinically-relevant doses of radiation therapy (12 Gy x 3 fractions, 36 Gy total). Groups included 36 Gy SRT only, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA and PTH, 36 Gy SRT plus PTH, and 36 Gy SRT plus localized PTH treatment. Our study showed significant increases in bone volume and increased polar moments of inertia (in the distal femoral metaphysis) 8 weeks after radiation in the combined (ZA/PTH) treatment group as compared to radiation treatment alone. Histomorphometric analysis revealed evidence of active mineralization at the study endpoint as well as successful tumor-cell kill across all treatment groups. This work provides further evidence for the expanding potential indications for ZA and PTH therapy, including post-irradiated bone disease due to osteosarcoma. PMID:27332712

  20. Combination Therapy with Zoledronic Acid and Parathyroid Hormone Improves Bone Architecture and Strength following a Clinically-Relevant Dose of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Local Treatment of Canine Osteosarcoma in Athymic Rats.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ryan C; Custis, James T; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Ehrhart, E J; Condon, Keith W; Gookin, Sara E; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies using definitive-intent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for the local treatment of canine osteosarcoma (OSA) have shown canine patients achieving similar median survival times as the current standard of care (amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy). Despite this, there remains an unacceptable high risk of pathologic fracture following radiation treatment. Zoledronic acid (ZA) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are therapeutic candidates for decreasing this fracture risk post-irradiation. Due to differing mechanisms, we hypothesized that the combined treatment with ZA and PTH would significantly improve bone healing more than ZA or PTH treatment alone. Using an orthotopic model of canine osteosarcoma in athymic rats, we evaluated bone healing following clinically-relevant doses of radiation therapy (12 Gy x 3 fractions, 36 Gy total). Groups included 36 Gy SRT only, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA and PTH, 36 Gy SRT plus PTH, and 36 Gy SRT plus localized PTH treatment. Our study showed significant increases in bone volume and increased polar moments of inertia (in the distal femoral metaphysis) 8 weeks after radiation in the combined (ZA/PTH) treatment group as compared to radiation treatment alone. Histomorphometric analysis revealed evidence of active mineralization at the study endpoint as well as successful tumor-cell kill across all treatment groups. This work provides further evidence for the expanding potential indications for ZA and PTH therapy, including post-irradiated bone disease due to osteosarcoma.

  1. Feasibility of a Mobile Application to Enhance Swallowing Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiation-Based Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Starmer, Heather M; Abrams, Rina; Webster, Kimberly; Kizner, Jennifer; Beadle, Beth; Holsinger, F Christopher; Quon, Harry; Richmon, Jeremy

    2017-09-30

    Dysphagia following treatment for head and neck cancer is one of the most significant morbidities impacting quality of life. Despite the value of prophylactic exercises to mitigate the impact of radiation on long-term swallowing function, adherence to treatment is limited. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of a mobile health application to support patient adherence to swallowing therapy during radiation-based treatment. 36 patients undergoing radiation therapy were provided with the Vibrent™ mobile application as an adjunct to standard swallowing therapy. The application included exercise videos, written instructions, reminders, exercise logging, and educational content. 80% of participants used the app during treatment and logged an average of 102 exercise sessions over the course of treatment. 25% of participants logged at least two exercise sessions per day over the 7-week treatment period, and 53% recorded at least one session per day. Exit interviews regarding the patient experience with the Vibrent™ mobile application were largely positive, but also provided actionable strategies to improve future versions of the application. The Vibrent™ mobile application appears to be a tool that can be feasibly integrated into existing patient care practices and may assist patients in adhering to treatment recommendations and facilitate communication between patients and providers between encounters.

  2. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  3. Intensity-modulated arc therapy to improve radiation dose delivery in the treatment of abdominal neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gains, Jennifer E; Stacey, Christopher; Rosenberg, Ivan; Mandeville, Henry C; Chang, Yen-Ch'ing; D'Souza, Derek; Moroz, Veronica; Wheatley, Keith; Gaze, Mark N

    2013-03-01

    The standard European radiotherapy technique for children with neuroblastoma is a conventional parallel opposed pair. This frequently results in compromise on planning target volume coverage to stay within normal tissue tolerances. This study investigates the use of an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) technique to improve dose distribution and allow better protocol compliance. Among 20 previously treated patients, ten had received the full prescribed dose with conventional planning (protocol compliant) and ten had a compromise on planning target volume coverage (protocol noncompliant). All patients were replanned with IMAT. Dosimetric parameters of the conventional radiotherapy and IMAT were compared. The dose received by 98% of the planning target volume, homogeneity and conformity indices were all improved with IMAT (p < 0.001). IMAT would have enabled delivery of the full protocol dose in eight out of ten protocol-noncompliant patients. IMAT may improve outcomes through improved protocol compliance and better dose distributions.

  4. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc (Full VMAT). All plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions. Target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were compared across techniques. PTV coverage was almost identical for all approaches. The whole lung V10Gy was significantly lower with CP VMAT plans than with NCP VMAT plans, whereas no significant differences in the mean lung dose, V5Gy, V20Gy or V40Gy were observed. Full VMAT increased mean contralateral lung V5Gy by 12.57% and 9.15% when compared with NCP VMAT and CP VMAT, respectively. Although NCP VMAT plans best achieved the dose–volume constraints for mediastinal OARs, the absolute differences in dose were small when compared with CP VMAT. These results suggest that partial-arc VMAT may be preferable to minimize unnecessary exposure to the contralateral lung, and use of NCP VMAT should be considered when the dose–volume constraints are not achieved by CP VMAT. PMID:26951076

  5. Reducing Patient Waiting Times for Radiation Therapy and Improving the Treatment Planning Process: a Discrete-event Simulation Model (Radiation Treatment Planning).

    PubMed

    Babashov, V; Aivas, I; Begen, M A; Cao, J Q; Rodrigues, G; D'Souza, D; Lock, M; Zaric, G S

    2017-06-01

    We analysed the radiotherapy planning process at the London Regional Cancer Program to determine the bottlenecks and to quantify the effect of specific resource levels with the goal of reducing waiting times. We developed a discrete-event simulation model of a patient's journey from the point of referral to a radiation oncologist to the start of radiotherapy, considering the sequential steps and resources of the treatment planning process. We measured the effect of several resource changes on the ready-to-treat to treatment (RTTT) waiting time and on the percentage treated within a 14 calendar day target. Increasing the number of dosimetrists by one reduced the mean RTTT by 6.55%, leading to 84.92% of patients being treated within the 14 calendar day target. Adding one more oncologist decreased the mean RTTT from 10.83 to 10.55 days, whereas a 15% increase in arriving patients increased the waiting time by 22.53%. The model was relatively robust to the changes in quantity of other resources. Our model identified sensitive and non-sensitive system parameters. A similar approach could be applied by other cancer programmes, using their respective data and individualised adjustments, which may be beneficial in making the most effective use of limited resources. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Scorsetti, Marta; Navarria, Piera; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Piergallini, Lorenzo; De Rose, Fiorenza; Ascolese, Annamaria; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report about clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in elderly patients. Methods: Patients with 1–4 inoperable metastases were treated with SBRT. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 75 Gy in 3–8 fractions. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique with flattening filter-free photon beams. The primary end points were in-field local control (LC) and toxicity. Secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: 82 patients with 111 total metastases were treated. Median age was 79 years. 64 patients (78%) had a single lesion; the remaining patients had 2–4 lesions. 16 (14.4%) lesions were localized in the abdomen, 50 (45.0%) in the liver and 45 (40.5%) in the lungs. Local response was observed for 87 lesions (78.4%) while local progression was observed in 24 lesions (21.6%). Actuarial 1-year LC was 86.8% ± 3.3%. Actuarial 1-year OS was 93.6% ± 2.7%. 2-year findings were 76.3% ± 4.4% and 72.0% ± 5.6%, respectively. Actuarial 1- and 2-year DSS results were 97.5% ± 2.0% and 81.6% ± 4.9%, respectively. Treatment-related Grade 2–3 toxicity was observed in five patients (4.2%); Grade 1 toxicity in seven patients (5.9%) and no toxicity was observed in 85.4% of the cases. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly with acceptable rates of LC and low treatment-related toxicity. Advances in knowledge: The use of SBRT for oligometastatic disease in the elderly can be considered as a valuable approach, particularly for patients with fragile status or refusing other approaches. PMID:26183933

  7. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Clerici, Elena; Navarria, Piera; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Piergallini, Lorenzo; De Rose, Fiorenza; Ascolese, Annamaria; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-09-01

    To report about clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of oligometastatic disease in elderly patients. Patients with 1-4 inoperable metastases were treated with SBRT. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 75 Gy in 3-8 fractions. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique with flattening filter-free photon beams. The primary end points were in-field local control (LC) and toxicity. Secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). 82 patients with 111 total metastases were treated. Median age was 79 years. 64 patients (78%) had a single lesion; the remaining patients had 2-4 lesions. 16 (14.4%) lesions were localized in the abdomen, 50 (45.0%) in the liver and 45 (40.5%) in the lungs. Local response was observed for 87 lesions (78.4%) while local progression was observed in 24 lesions (21.6%). Actuarial 1-year LC was 86.8% ± 3.3%. Actuarial 1-year OS was 93.6% ± 2.7%. 2-year findings were 76.3% ± 4.4% and 72.0% ± 5.6%, respectively. Actuarial 1- and 2-year DSS results were 97.5% ± 2.0% and 81.6% ± 4.9%, respectively. Treatment-related Grade 2-3 toxicity was observed in five patients (4.2%); Grade 1 toxicity in seven patients (5.9%) and no toxicity was observed in 85.4% of the cases. SBRT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for the treatment of oligometastatic disease in the elderly with acceptable rates of LC and low treatment-related toxicity. The use of SBRT for oligometastatic disease in the elderly can be considered as a valuable approach, particularly for patients with fragile status or refusing other approaches.

  8. Development of a Model to Study the Abscopal Effect: Combining Image-Guided Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Amanda

    Distant metastases are a limiting factor in cancer patient survival as they are least accessible to conventional therapies. Effective therapy should treat primary tumours and metastatic disease. Use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRx) enables high doses of radiation to be delivered for better tumour control while minimizing toxicity to healthy tissues. Systemic effects on distant non-irradiated tissues have been observed following IGRx. This phenomenon, termed the abscopal effect, is hypothesized to be mediated by the immune system. The inflammatory milieu generated following IGRx may activate immune cells to mount specific anti-tumour responses. The work described in this thesis aims to develop a model to study the abscopal effect, and evaluate the potential of combining IGRx and immunotherapy to enhance such distant tumour killing. Results from these studies may have clinical implications, where a combined IGRx and immunotherapy approach may prove useful in eliciting regression of local tumours and distant metastases.

  9. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  10. Guaranteed epsilon-optimal treatment plans with the minimum number of beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmand, Hamed; Winey, Brian; Craft, David

    2013-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is characterized by delivering a high amount of dose in a short period of time. In SBRT the dose is delivered using open fields (e.g., beam’s-eye-view) known as ‘apertures’. Mathematical methods can be used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) minimal. Two important elements of a treatment plan are quality and delivery time. Quality of a plan is measured based on the target coverage and dose to OARs. Delivery time heavily depends on the number of beams used in the plan as the setup times for different beam directions constitute a large portion of the delivery time. Therefore the ideal plan, in which all potential beams can be used, will be associated with a long impractical delivery time. We use the dose to OARs in the ideal plan to find the plan with the minimum number of beams which is guaranteed to be epsilon-optimal (i.e., a predetermined maximum deviation from the ideal plan is guaranteed). Since the treatment plan optimization is inherently a multi-criteria-optimization problem, the planner can navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus OARs sparing, and then use the proposed technique to reduce the number of beams while guaranteeing epsilon-optimality. We use mixed integer programming (MIP) for optimization. To reduce the computation time for the resultant MIP, we use two heuristics: a beam elimination scheme and a family of heuristic cuts, known as ‘neighbor cuts’, based on the concept of ‘adjacent beams’. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique on two clinical cases, a liver and a lung case. Based on our technique we propose an algorithm for fast generation of epsilon-optimal plans.

  11. Optimization of beam angles for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning using genetic algorithm on a distributed computing platform.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Daryl P; Brunner, Stephen; Jones, Matthew D; Malhotra, Harish K; Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    Planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment involves selection of several angle parameters as well as specification of structures and constraints employed in the optimization process. Including these parameters in the combinatorial search space vastly increases the computational burden, and therefore the parameter selection is normally performed manually by a clinician, based on clinical experience. We have investigated the use of a genetic algorithm (GA) and distributed-computing platform to optimize the gantry angle parameters and provide insight into additional structures, which may be necessary, in the dose optimization process to produce optimal IMRT treatment plans. For an IMRT prostate patient, we produced the first generation of 40 samples, each of five gantry angles, by selecting from a uniform random distribution, subject to certain adjacency and opposition constraints. Dose optimization was performed by distributing the 40-plan workload over several machines running a commercial treatment planning system. A score was assigned to each resulting plan, based on how well it satisfied clinically-relevant constraints. The second generation of 40 samples was produced by combining the highest-scoring samples using techniques of crossover and mutation. The process was repeated until the sixth generation, and the results compared with a clinical (equally-spaced) gantry angle configuration. In the sixth generation, 34 of the 40 GA samples achieved better scores than the clinical plan, with the best plan showing an improvement of 84%. Moreover, the resulting configuration of beam angles tended to cluster toward the patient's sides, indicating where the inclusion of additional structures in the dose optimization process may avoid dose hot spots. Additional parameter selection in IMRT leads to a large-scale computational problem. We have demonstrated that the GA combined with a distributed-computing platform can be applied to optimize gantry angle

  12. Guaranteed epsilon-optimal treatment plans with the minimum number of beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yarmand, Hamed; Winey, Brian; Craft, David

    2013-09-07

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is characterized by delivering a high amount of dose in a short period of time. In SBRT the dose is delivered using open fields (e.g., beam's-eye-view) known as 'apertures'. Mathematical methods can be used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) minimal. Two important elements of a treatment plan are quality and delivery time. Quality of a plan is measured based on the target coverage and dose to OARs. Delivery time heavily depends on the number of beams used in the plan as the setup times for different beam directions constitute a large portion of the delivery time. Therefore the ideal plan, in which all potential beams can be used, will be associated with a long impractical delivery time. We use the dose to OARs in the ideal plan to find the plan with the minimum number of beams which is guaranteed to be epsilon-optimal (i.e., a predetermined maximum deviation from the ideal plan is guaranteed). Since the treatment plan optimization is inherently a multi-criteria-optimization problem, the planner can navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus OARs sparing, and then use the proposed technique to reduce the number of beams while guaranteeing epsilon-optimality. We use mixed integer programming (MIP) for optimization. To reduce the computation time for the resultant MIP, we use two heuristics: a beam elimination scheme and a family of heuristic cuts, known as 'neighbor cuts', based on the concept of 'adjacent beams'. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique on two clinical cases, a liver and a lung case. Based on our technique we propose an algorithm for fast generation of epsilon-optimal plans.

  13. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne; Souhami, Luis; Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie; Sturgeon, Jeremy; Kassouf, Wassim

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  14. Treatment Outcomes in Stage I Lung Cancer: A Comparison of Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Varun; Crabtree, Traves D.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Broderick, Stephen R; Morgensztern, Daniel; Colditz, Graham A.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patel, Aalok; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relative roles of surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving particularly for marginally operable patients. Since there is limited prospective comparative data for these treatment modalities, we evaluated their relative use and outcomes at the population level using a national database. Methods Patient variables and treatment-related outcomes were abstracted for patients with clinical stage I NSCLC from the National Cancer Database. Patients receiving surgery were compared to those undergoing SBRT in exploratory unmatched and subsequent propensity matched analyses. Results Between 1998 and 2010, 117618 patients underwent surgery or SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC. Of these, 111731 (95%) received surgery while 5887 (5%) underwent SBRT. Patients in the surgery group were younger, more likely to be males, and had higher Charlson comorbidity scores. SBRT patients were more likely to have T1 (vs.T2) tumors and receive treatment at academic centers. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2596/109485 (2.4%). Median overall survival favored the surgery group in both unmatched (68.4 months vs. 33.3 months, p<.001) and matched analysis based on patient characteristics (62.3 months vs. 33.1months, p<.001). Disease specific survival was unavailable from the dataset. Conclusion In a propensity matched comparison, patients selected for surgery have improved survival compared with SBRT. In the absence of information on cause of death and with limited variables to characterize comorbidity, it is not possible to assess the relative contribution of patient selection or better cancer control towards the improved survival. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to optimize patient selection for SBRT in the high-risk surgical population. PMID:26334753

  15. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Transponder is of benefit in pelvic radiation therapy following prostatectomy, 4) whether hypofractionated treatment plans which are more beam on...centers. Task 4. A Hypofractionated IMRT Therapy in Patients with Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer Using the Calypso® 4D Localization System: A...Feasibility Study. We are awaiting the preliminary results from the RTOG 0415, which is a similar hypofractionated study (not using the Calypso

  16. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    whether Beacon® Transponder is of benefit in pelvic radiation therapy following prostatectomy, 4) whether hypofractionated treatment plans which...both centers. Task 4. A Hypofractionated IMRT Therapy in Patients with Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer Using the Calypso® 4D Localization System...A Feasibility Study. We are awaiting the preliminary results from the RTOG 0415, which is a similar hypofractionated study (not using the

  17. Anesthesia for intraoperative radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R.H.; Morrison, J.E. Jr.; Verbrugge, J.J.; Daniel, W.E.; Aarestad, N.O.; Burrington, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a relatively new mode of cancer treatment which is being used with increasing frequency. IORT presents several challenges to the anesthesiologist, including patients who are debilitated from their disease or chemotherapy, operations involving major tumor resections, intraoperative interdepartmental transport of patients, and remote monitoring of patients during electron beam therapy. This report discusses the anesthetic management of ten children undergoing IORT. With adequate preparation and interdepartmental communication, complications can be avoided during these challenging cases.

  18. Commissioning kilovoltage cone-beam CT beams in a radiation therapy treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Parham; Spezi, Emiliano

    2012-11-08

    The feasibility of accounting of the dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT in treatment planning has been discussed previously for a single cone-beam CT (CBCT) beam from one manufacturer. Modeling the beams and computing the dose from the full set of beams produced by a kilovoltage cone-beam CT system requires extensive beam data collection and verification, and is the purpose of this work. The beams generated by Elekta X-ray volume imaging (XVI) kilovoltage CBCT (kV CBCT) system for various cassettes and filters have been modeled in the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) and used to compute dose to stack and anthropomorphic phantoms. The results were then compared to measurements made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The agreement between modeled and measured depth-dose and cross profiles is within 2% at depths beyond 1 cm for depth-dose curves, and for regions within the beam (excluding penumbra) for cross profiles. The agreements between TPS-calculated doses, TLD measurements, and Monte Carlo simulations are generally within 5% in the stack phantom and 10% in the anthropomorphic phantom, with larger variations observed for some of the measurement/calculation points. Dose computation using modeled beams is reasonably accurate, except for regions that include bony anatomy. Inclusion of this dose in treatment plans can lead to more accurate dose prediction, especially when the doses to organs at risk are of importance.

  19. A case study of radiotherapy planning for Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy for the whole scalp with matching electron treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sponseller, Patricia; Paravathaneni, Upendra

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to communicate a technique to match an electron field to the dose distribution of an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan. A patient with multiple areas of squamous cell carcinoma over the scalp was treated using 60 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions to the entire scalp and first echelon nodes with multiple 6-MV photon fields. To deliver an adequate dose to the scalp, a custom 1.0-cm bolus helmet was fashioned using a solid piece of aquaplast. Along with the IMRT scalp treatment, a left zygoma area was treated with electrons matching the anterior border of the IMRT dose distribution. The border was matched by creating a left lateral field with the multileaf collimator shaped to the IMRT dose distribution. The result indicated an adequate dose to the skin match between the IMRT plan and the electron field. Results were confirmed using optically stimulated luminescence placed at the skin match area, so that the dose matched the prescription within 10%.

  20. Neutron Measurements for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, Nisy E.

    2000-04-21

    The beam-on time for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is increased significantly compared with conventional radiotherapy treatments. Further, the presence of beam modulation devices may potentially affect neutron production. Therefore, neutron measurements were performed for 15 MV photon beams on a Varian Clinac accelerator to determine the impact of IMRT on neutron dose equivalent to the patient.

  1. SU-D-BRD-04: The Impact of Automatic Radiation Therapy Plan Checks in Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Gopan, O; Yang, F; Ford, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The physics plan check verifies various aspects of a treatment plan after dosimetrists have finished creating the plan. Some errors in the plan which are caught by the physics check could be caught earlier in the departmental workflow. The purpose of this project was to evaluate a plan checking script that can be run within the treatment planning system (TPS) by the dosimetrists prior to plan approval and export to the record and verify system. Methods: A script was created in the Pinnacle TPS to automatically check 15 aspects of a plan for clinical practice conformity. The script outputs a list of checks which the plan has passed and a list of checks which the plan has failed so that appropriate adjustments can be made. For this study, the script was run on a total of 108 plans: IMRT (46/108), VMAT (35/108) and SBRT (27/108). Results: Of the plans checked by the script, 77/108 (71%) failed at least one of the fifteen checks. IMRT plans resulted in more failed checks (91%) than VMAT (51%) or SBRT (63%), due to the high failure rate of an IMRT-specific check, which checks that no IMRT segment < 5 MU. The dose grid size and couch removal checks caught errors in 10% and 14% of all plans – errors that ultimately may have resulted in harm to the patient. Conclusion: Approximately three-fourths of the plans being examined contain errors that could be caught by dosimetrists running an automated script embedded in the TPS. The results of this study will improve the departmental workflow by cutting down on the number of plans that, due to these types of errors, necessitate re-planning and re-approval of plans, increase dosimetrist and physician workload and, in urgent cases, inconvenience patients by causing treatment delays.

  2. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  3. Explicit optimization of plan quality measures in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Lovisa; Forsgren, Anders; Eriksson, Kjell; Hårdemark, Björn

    2017-06-01

    To formulate convex planning objectives of treatment plan multicriteria optimization with explicit relationships to the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics used in plan quality evaluation. Conventional planning objectives are designed to minimize the violation of DVH statistics thresholds using penalty functions. Although successful in guiding the DVH curve towards these thresholds, conventional planning objectives offer limited control of the individual points on the DVH curve (doses-at-volume) used to evaluate plan quality. In this study, we abandon the usual penalty-function framework and propose planning objectives that more closely relate to DVH statistics. The proposed planning objectives are based on mean-tail-dose, resulting in convex optimization. We also demonstrate how to adapt a standard optimization method to the proposed formulation in order to obtain a substantial reduction in computational cost. We investigated the potential of the proposed planning objectives as tools for optimizing DVH statistics through juxtaposition with the conventional planning objectives on two patient cases. Sets of treatment plans with differently balanced planning objectives were generated using either the proposed or the conventional approach. Dominance in the sense of better distributed doses-at-volume was observed in plans optimized within the proposed framework. The initial computational study indicates that the DVH statistics are better optimized and more efficiently balanced using the proposed planning objectives than using the conventional approach. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. SU-C-204-07: Radiation Therapy as a Potential Treatment for Obesity: Initial Data from a Preclinical Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Bradley, Y; Nodit, L; Bourgeois, A; Paxton, B; Arepally, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of Yttrium-90 (90Y) radionuclide therapy as a potential treatment for obesity in a porcine model. As the only appetite-stimulating hormone, localized targeting of ghrelin-producing X/A cells in the fundus of the stomach using 90Y may reduce serum ghrelin levels and decrease hunger. Methods: Under approval of the University of Tennessee IACUC, 8 young female pigs aged 12–13 weeks and weighing 21.8–28.1 Kg were included in this study. Six animals underwent transfemoral angiography as part of a two-day procedure involving: (1) infusion of 99mTc-MAA, followed by nuclear scintigraphy and contrast-enhanced CT for treatment-planning and (2) administration of resin 90Y microspheres into the stomach fundus. Calibrated 90Y activities were infused into the main left gastric and the gastric artery arising from the splenic to yield predetermined fundal absorbed doses. Control animals underwent a sham procedure with saline and contrast. Weekly animal weight and serum ghrelin were measured along with post-euthanasia histologic analyses of mucosal integrity and ghrelin immunoreactive cell-density. Results: 90Y radioembolization was administered to six pigs in dosages from 46.3 to 105.1 MBq resulting in average fundal absorbed doses between 35.5 and 91.9 Gy. No animal showed any signs of pain or GI complication through the duration of the study. Ghrelin immunoreactive cell-density was significantly lower in treated vs. control animals in both the stomach fundus (13.5 vs 34.8, P < 0.05) and body (11.2 vs 19.8, P < 0.05). A trend towards decreased weight gain in treated animals as well as a decrease in explanted stomach volume was also noted. Conclusion: The safety and technical feasibility of radiation therapy using 90Y radioembolization as a potential treatment for obesity has been demonstrated at fundal absorbed doses over 90 Gy. Preliminary data is suggestive of short-term safety and potential efficacy, however, further animal studies are

  5. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer.

  6. Building immunity to cancer with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Haikerwal, Suresh J; Hagekyriakou, Jim; MacManus, Michael; Martin, Olga A; Haynes, Nicole M

    2015-11-28

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic shift in the focus of cancer research toward understanding how the body's immune defenses can be harnessed to promote the effectiveness of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies. The ability of ionizing radiation to elicit anti-cancer immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth has led to the emergence of promising combination-based radio-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. Herein we review the immunoadjuvant properties of localized radiation therapy and discuss how technological advances in radio-oncology and developments in the field of tumor-immunotherapy have started to revolutionize the therapeutic application of radiotherapy.

  7. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  8. Eliminating Inconsistencies in Simulation and Treatment Planning Orders in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Brame, Ryan S.; Lindsey, Andrew; Dewees, Todd; Danieley, Jon; Labrash, Jason; Parikh, Parag; Bradley, Jeffrey; Zoberi, Imran; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To identify deficiencies with simulation and treatment planning orders and to develop corrective measures to improve safety and quality. Methods and Materials: At Washington University, the DMAIIC formalism is used for process management, whereby the process is understood as comprising Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Implement, and Control activities. Two complementary tools were used to provide quantitative assessments: failure modes and effects analysis and reported event data. The events were classified by the user according to severity. The event rates (ie, number of events divided by the number of opportunities to generate an event) related to simulation and treatment plan orders were determined. Results: We analyzed event data from the period 2008-2009 to design an intelligent SIMulation and treatment PLanning Electronic (SIMPLE) order system. Before implementation of SIMPLE, event rates of 0.16 (420 of 2558) for a group of physicians that were subsequently used as a pilot group and 0.13 (787 of 6023) for all physicians were obtained. An interdisciplinary group evaluated and decided to replace the Microsoft Word-based form with a Web-based order system. This order system has mandatory fields and context-sensitive logic, an ability to create templates, and enables an automated process for communication of orders through an enterprise management system. After the implementation of the SIMPLE order, the event rate decreased to 0.09 (96 of 1001) for the pilot group and to 0.06 (145 of 2140) for all physicians (P<.0001). The average time to complete the SIMPLE form was 3 minutes, as compared with 7 minutes for the Word-based form. The number of severe events decreased from 10.7% (45 of 420) and 12.1% (96 of 787) to 6.2% (6 of 96) and 10.3% (15 of 145) for the pilot group and all physicians, respectively. Conclusions: There was a dramatic reduction in the total and the number of potentially severe events through use of the SIMPLE system. In addition

  9. Eliminating inconsistencies in simulation and treatment planning orders in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Brame, Ryan S; Lindsey, Andrew; Dewees, Todd; Danieley, Jon; Labrash, Jason; Parikh, Parag; Bradley, Jeffrey; Zoberi, Imran; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-02-01

    To identify deficiencies with simulation and treatment planning orders and to develop corrective measures to improve safety and quality. At Washington University, the DMAIIC formalism is used for process management, whereby the process is understood as comprising Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Implement, and Control activities. Two complementary tools were used to provide quantitative assessments: failure modes and effects analysis and reported event data. The events were classified by the user according to severity. The event rates (ie, number of events divided by the number of opportunities to generate an event) related to simulation and treatment plan orders were determined. We analyzed event data from the period 2008-2009 to design an intelligent SIMulation and treatment PLanning Electronic (SIMPLE) order system. Before implementation of SIMPLE, event rates of 0.16 (420 of 2558) for a group of physicians that were subsequently used as a pilot group and 0.13 (787 of 6023) for all physicians were obtained. An interdisciplinary group evaluated and decided to replace the Microsoft Word-based form with a Web-based order system. This order system has mandatory fields and context-sensitive logic, an ability to create templates, and enables an automated process for communication of orders through an enterprise management system. After the implementation of the SIMPLE order, the event rate decreased to 0.09 (96 of 1001) for the pilot group and to 0.06 (145 of 2140) for all physicians (P<.0001). The average time to complete the SIMPLE form was 3 minutes, as compared with 7 minutes for the Word-based form. The number of severe events decreased from 10.7% (45 of 420) and 12.1% (96 of 787) to 6.2% (6 of 96) and 10.3% (15 of 145) for the pilot group and all physicians, respectively. There was a dramatic reduction in the total and the number of potentially severe events through use of the SIMPLE system. In addition, the order process has become more efficient and reliable

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  11. Overview of image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Li, T.-F.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Luxton, Gary; Koong, Albert

    2006-07-01

    Radiation therapy has gone through a series of revolutions in the last few decades and it is now possible to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution by using techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The improved dose conformity and steep dose gradients have necessitated enhanced patient localization and beam targeting techniques for radiotherapy treatments. Components affecting the reproducibility of target position during and between subsequent fractions of radiation therapy include the displacement of internal organs between fractions and internal organ motion within a fraction. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) uses advanced imaging technology to better define the tumor target and is the key to reducing and ultimately eliminating the uncertainties. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent advancements in IGRT and discussed various practical issues related to the implementation of the new imaging techniques available to radiation oncology community. We introduce various new IGRT concepts and approaches, and hope to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the emerging clinical IGRT technologies. Some important research topics will also be addressed.

  12. Effect of Treatment Modality on the Hypothalamic–Pituitary Function of Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy for Pituitary Adenomas: Hypothalamic Dose and Endocrine Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elson, Andrew; Bovi, Joseph; Kaur, Kawaljeet; Maas, Diana; Sinson, Grant; Schultz, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic–pituitary (HP) axis dysfunction. Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or gamma knife) on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-axis deficits after radiotherapy. Methods: Radiation plans of patients treated post-operatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT) (n = 11), TomoTherapy-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (n = 10), or gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 12) were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and post-radiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, and gonadotropins (follicle stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone) were assessed. Results: Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48%) patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72%) occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50%) occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5%) occurred in the gamma knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, gamma knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 vs. 26.8 Gy p = 0.02), DMax (49.8 vs. 39.1 Gy p = 0.04), and V12Gy (100 vs. 76% p = 0.004). Conclusion: Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using gamma knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively. PMID:24782984

  13. Y90 selective internal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward W; Thakor, Avnesh S; Tafti, Bashir A; Liu, David M

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver malignancies and liver metastases are affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Because of their late and advanced stage presentation, only 10% of patients can receive curative surgical treatment, including transplant or resection. Alternative treatments, such as systemic chemotherapy, ablative therapy, and chemoembolization, have been used with marginal survival benefits. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT), also known as radioembolization, is a compelling alternative treatment option for primary and metastatic liver malignancies with a growing body of evidence. In this article, an introduction to SIRT including background, techniques, clinical outcomes, and complications is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastrointestinal toxicity associated to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario López; Martín, Margarita Martín; Padellano, Laura Cerezo; Palomo, Alicia Marín; Puebla, Yamile Ibáñez

    2010-08-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with other treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy, increases locoregional control and survival in patients with thoracic, abdominal and pelvic malignancies. Nevertheless, significant clinical toxicity with combined treatments may be seen in these patients. With the advent of tridimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dose-volume histograms (DVH) can be generated to assess the dose received by the organs at risk. The possible relationship between these parameters and clinical, anatomical and, more recently, genetic factors has to be considered. Treatment options include initial conservative medical therapies, endoscopic procedures, hyperbaric oxygen and surgery. Some pharmacological agents to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity are under investigation.

  15. Rationale and evidence to combine radiation therapy and immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Dan; Pop, Laurentiu; Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Iyengar, Puneeth; Hannan, Raquibul

    2017-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapy exploits the immune system's ability to differentiate between tumor target cells and host cells. Except for limited success against a few tumor types, most immunotherapies have not achieved the desired clinical efficacy until recently. The field of cancer immunotherapy has flourished with a variety of new agents for clinical use, and remarkable progress has been made in the design of effective immunotherapeutic regimens. Furthermore, the therapeutic outcome of these novel agents is enhanced when combined with conventional cancer treatment modalities including radiotherapy (RT). An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the abscopal effect, an immunologic response occurring in cancer sites distant from irradiated areas. The present work reviews studies on the combination between RT and immunotherapy to induce synergistic and abscopal effects involved in cancer immunomodulation. Further insight into the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment, and their modulation by RT, may reveal the abscopal effect as a clinically relevant and reproducible event leading to improved cancer outcome.

  16. Choosing an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org; Mechalakos, James; Puri, Dev R.; Hunt, Margie

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: With the emerging use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer, selection of technique becomes a critical issue. The purpose of this article is to establish IMRT guidelines for head-and-neck cancer at a given institution. Methods and Materials: Six common head-and-neck cancer cases were chosen to illustrate the points that must be considered when choosing between split-field (SF) IMRT, in which the low anterior neck (LAN) is treated with an anterior field, and the extended whole-field (EWF) IMRT in which the LAN is included with the IMRT fields. For each case, the gross tumor, clinical target, and planning target volumes and the surrounding critical normal tissues were delineated. Subsequently, the SF and EWF IMRT plans were compared using dosimetric parameters from dose-volume histograms. Results: Target coverage and doses delivered to the critical normal structures were similar between the two different techniques. Cancer involving the nasopharynx and oropharynx are best treated with the SF IMRT technique to minimize the glottic larynx dose. The EWF IMRT technique is preferred in situations in which the glottic larynx is considered as a target, i.e., cancer of the larynx, hypopharynx, and unknown head-and-neck primary. When the gross disease extends inferiorly and close to the glottic larynx, EWF IMRT technique is also preferred. Conclusion: Depending on the clinical scenario, different IMRT techniques and guidelines are suggested to determine a preferred IMRT technique. We found that having this treatment guideline when treating these tumors ensures a smoother flow for the busy clinic.

  17. Montecarlo simulation code in optimisation of the IntraOperative Radiation Therapy treatment with mobile dedicated accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, M.; Agosteo, S.; Moretti, R.; Andreoli, S.

    2007-06-01

    The principle of optimisation of the EURATOM 97/43 directive foresees that for all medical exposure of individuals for radiotherapeutic purposes, exposures of target volumes shall be individually planned, taking into account that doses of non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable and consistent with the intended radiotherapeutic purpose of the exposure. Treatment optimisation has to be carried out especially in non conventional radiotherapic procedures, as Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) with mobile dedicated LINear ACcelerator (LINAC), which does not make use of a Treatment Planning System. IORT is carried out with electron beams and refers to the application of radiation during a surgical intervention, after the removal of a neoplastic mass and it can also be used as a one-time/stand alone treatment in initial cancer of small volume. IORT foresees a single session and a single beam only; therefore it is necessary to use protection systems (disks) temporary positioned between the target volume and the underlying tissues, along the beam axis. A single high Z shielding disk is used to stop the electrons of the beam at a certain depth and protect the tissues located below. Electron back scatter produces an enhancement in the dose above the disk, and this can be reduced if a second low Z disk is placed above the first. Therefore two protection disks are used in clinical application. On the other hand the dose enhancement at the interface of the high Z disk and the target, due to back scattering radiation, can be usefully used to improve the uniformity in treatment of thicker target volumes. Furthermore the dose above the disks of different Z material has to be evaluated in order to study the optimal combination of shielding disks that allow both to protect the underlying tissues and to obtain the most uniform dose distribution in target volumes of different thicknesses. The dose enhancement can be evaluated using the electron

  18. Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Treatment Setup of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Minsong; Lasley, Foster D.; Das, Indra J.; DesRosiers, Colleen M.; Slessinger, Eric D.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of rotational setup errors in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of liver tumors and to investigate whether translational shifts can compensate for rotation. Methods and Materials: The positioning accuracy in 20 patients with liver malignancies treated with SBRT was reevaluated offline by matching the patients' cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scans (n=75) to the planning CT scans and adjusting the 3 rotational angles (pitch, roll, and yaw). Systematic and random setup errors were calculated. The dosimetric changes caused by rotational setup errors were quantified for both simulated and observed patient rotations. Dose distributions recalculated on the rotated CT scans were compared with the original planned doses. Translational corrections were simulated based on manual translational registration of the rotated images to the original CT scans. The correction efficacy was evaluated by comparing the recalculated plans with the original plans. Results: The systematic rotational setup errors were -0.06 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.68 Degree-Sign , -0.29 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.62 Degree-Sign , and -0.24 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.61 Degree-Sign ; the random setup errors were 0.80 Degree-Sign , 1.05 Degree-Sign , and 0.61 Degree-Sign for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Analysis of CBCT images showed that 56.0%, 14.7%, and 1.3% of treated fractions had rotational errors of >1 Degree-Sign , >2 Degree-Sign , and >3 Degree-Sign , respectively, in any one of the rotational axes. Rotational simulations demonstrated that the reduction of gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage was <2% when rotation was <3 Degree-Sign . Recalculated plans using actual patient roll motions showed similar reduction (<2%) in GTV coverage. Translational corrections improved the GTV coverage to within 3% of the original values. For organs at risk (OAR), the dosimetric impact varied case by case. Conclusion: Actual rotational setup errors in SBRT for liver tumors are

  19. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-04-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens.

  20. Prolongation of Total Treatment Time Because of Infrequently Missed Days of Treatment Is Not Associated With Inferior Biochemical Outcome After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Liauw, Sun H.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Prolongation of treatment time with radiation therapy (RT) is associated with inferior disease control for many rapidly proliferating tumors, but it is uncertain whether the same effect is seen in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: 596 patients underwent with curative-intent RT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. By National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria, men were classified as having low-risk (30%), medium-risk (40%), or high-risk (30%) disease. The median RT dose was 72 Gy. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) was used in 45%. The idealized treatment time was defined as the total elapsed time (including weekends) to complete treatment if started on a Monday. Missed days of treatment, defined as the number of days beyond the idealized treatment time, was recorded for all patients. Missed days were added to the end of therapy resulting in a longer treatment time. Analysis was conducted for missed days and other standard prognostic variables against freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF). Results: The median number of missed days was 2 (range, -3 to 22). With a median follow-up of 51 months, men with 5 or more missed days had similar 4-year FFBF rates (79% vs. 83% in men with <5 missed days, p = 0.0809), especially in the subset of men receiving 74 Gy or greater (89% for both groups, p = 0.8008). Analysis of missed days was performed for the subsets of dose, ADT, and risk category. Men without ADT had a lower FFBF rate with more missed days (p = 0.0030), but this association was not seen in men treated to a dose of 74 Gy or greater (p = 0.7425). On multivariate analysis, dose (p = 0.0010), T stage (p = 0.0145), and prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) were associated with FFBF, but Gleason score (p = 0.1351) and missed days (p = 0.3767) were not. Conclusions: Slight prolongation of treatment time (e.g., {<=}7 days) was not associated with inferior FFBF, especially in men receiving an RT dose of 74 Gy or greater.

  1. The Evaluation and Study of Modern Radiation Dosimetry Methods as Applied to Advanced Radiation Therapy Treatments Using Intensity Modulated Megavoltage Photon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra K. K.

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate quasi-3D arrays for use with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and to determine their clinical relevance. This is achieved using a Delta4 from Scandidos and ArcCheck from Sun Nuclear and the associated software. While certain aspects of these devices and software have been previously evaluated, the main goal of this work is to evaluate the new aspects, such as reconstructing dose on a patient CT set, and extending the capabilities. This includes the capability to reconstruct the dose based on a helical delivery as well as studying the dose to a moving target using measurement-guided motion simulations. It was found that Sun Nuclear's ArcCheck/3DVH system exhibited excellent agreement for dose reconstruction for IMRT/VMAT using a traditional C-arm linear accelerator and stringent 2%/2mm comparison constraints. It also is a powerful tool for measurement-guided dose estimates for moving targets, allowing for many simulations to be performed based on one measurement and the target motion data. For dose reconstruction for a helical delivery, the agreement was not as good for the stringent comparison but was reasonable for the clinically acceptable 3%/3mm comparison. Scandidos' Delta4 shows good agreement with stringent 2%/2mm constraints for its dose reconstruction on the phantom. However, the dose reconstruction on the patient CT set was poor and needs more work. Overall, it was found that quasi-3D arrays are powerful tools for dose reconstruction and treatment plan comparisons. The ability to reconstruct the dose allows for a dose resolution comparable to the treatment plan, which negates the previous issues with inadequate sampling and resolution issues found when just comparing the diodes. The ability to quickly and accurately compare many plans and target motions with minimum setup makes the quasi-3D array an attractive tool for both commissioning and patient specific

  2. Sensitizing Osteosarcoma to Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Tewodros Kebede

    Several strategies to enhance the effects of radiation therapy are being explored for various cancers, with multiple molecular pathways and physical approaches suggested to play a role. One approach to improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in tumors is the use of radiosensitizing molecules. Among the key radiosensitizing molecules being explored in various cancers include pharmacologic inhibitors of DNA repair and gold nanoparticles that physically enhance the amount of radiation deposited inside cancer cells. The main goal of this thesis is to explore the role of DNA repair inhibition as a radiosensitizing strategy for osteosarcoma cells. Additionally, the thesis investigates the effects of particle size in the application of gold nanoparticles in osteosarcoma cells to help identify the key parameters relevant to choosing an effective gold nanoparticle-based radiosensitizer.

  3. [Efficacy and side-effects of docetaxel combined with cisplatin on the treatment of local advanced esophageal cancer with concomitant radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-rong; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Xin; Gu, Xiao-wei; Pan, Yu-kai

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the therapeutical effect and side-effect of docetaxel combined with cisplatin (DDP) on the treatment of local advanced esophageal cancer with concomitant radiation therapy. Ninety patients with LOCAL advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were divided into two groups: (DDP + 5-Fu) group and (docetaxel + DDP) group. Chemotherapy was carried out every 4 weeks for a total of 4 courses. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy/28FX. The median survival time of patients in the (DDP + 5-Fu) group was 16 months and that in (docetaxel + DDP) group was 21 months (P = 0.0278). The 3-year survival rate in the (docetaxel + DDP) group was obviously higher than that in the (DDP + 5-Fu) group (23.9% vs. 12.1%). The ORR in (docetaxel + DDP) group (84.5%) was significantly higher than that in the (DDP + 5-Fu) group (71.1%) (P = 0.025). No significant differences were observed in the incidence of side-effects in the two groups. The conventional dose chemotherapy of docetaxel + DDP with concomitant radiation therapy showed a better partial remission rate and long-term survival rate for the treatment of local advanced esophageal cancer than the traditional chemotherapy (DDP + 5-Fu) with concomitant radiation therapy and the side-effects are not increased.

  4. Dosimetric comparison study between intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal proton therapy for pelvic bone marrow sparing in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, William Y; Huh, Soon N; Liang, Yun; White, Greg; Nichols, R Charles; Watkins, W Tyler; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2010-08-15

    The objective was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal proton therapy (3DCPT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. In particular, each technique's ability to spare pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was of primary interest in this study. A total of six cervical cancer patients (3 postoperative and 3 intact) were planned and analyzed. All plans had uniform 1.0 cm CTV-PTV margin and satisfied the 95% PTV with 100% isodose (prescription dose = 45 Gy) coverage. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were analyzed for comparison. The overall PTV and PBM volumes were 1035.9 ± 192.2 cc and 1151.4 ± 198.3 cc, respectively. In terms of PTV dose conformity index (DCI) and dose homogeneity index (DHI), 3DCPT was slightly superior to IMRT with 1.00 ± 0.001, 1.01 ± 0.02, and 1.10 ± 0.02, 1.13 ± 0.01, respectively. In addition, 3DCPT demonstrated superiority in reducing lower doses (i.e., V30 or less) to PBM, small bowel and bladder. Particularly in PBM, average V10 and V20 reductions of 10.8% and 7.4% (p = 0.001 and 0.04), respectively, were observed. However, in the higher dose range, IMRT provided better sparing (> V30). For example, in small bowel and PBM, average reductions in V45 of 4.9% and 10.0% (p = 0.048 and 0.008), respectively, were observed. Due to its physical characteristics such as low entrance dose, spread-out Bragg peak and finite particle range of protons, 3DCPT illustrated superior target coverage uniformity and sparing of the lower doses in PBM and other organs. Further studies are, however, needed to fully exploit the benefits of protons for general use in cervical cancer.

  5. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katrina Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  6. An adaptive approach to metal artifact reduction in helical computed tomography for radiation therapy treatment planning: Experimental and clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdia, Mehran; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, an approach to metal artifact reduction is proposed that is practical for clinical use in radiation therapy. It is based on a new interpolation scheme of the projections associated with metal implants in helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. Methods and Materials: A three-step approach was developed consisting of an automatic algorithm for metal implant detection, a correction algorithm for helical projections, and a new, efficient algorithm for projection interpolation. The modified raw projection data are transferred back to the CT scanner device where CT slices are regenerated using the built-in reconstruction operator. The algorithm was tested on a CT calibration phantom in which the density of inserted objects are known and on clinical prostate cases with two hip prostheses. The results are evaluated using the CT number and shape of the objects. Results: The validations on a CT calibration phantom with various inserts of known densities show that the algorithm improved the overall image quality by restoring the shape and the representative CT number of the objects in the image. For the clinical hip replacement cases, a large fraction of the bladder, rectum, and prostate that were not visible on the original CT slices were recovered using the algorithm. Precise contouring of the target volume was thus feasible. Without this enhancement, physicians would have drawn bigger margins to be sure to include the target and, at the same time, could have prescribed a lower dose to keep the same level of normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: In both phantom experiment and patient studies, the algorithm resulted in significant artifact reduction with increases in the reliability of planning procedure for the case of metallic hip prostheses. This algorithm is now clinically used as a preprocessing before treatment planning for metal artifact reduction.

  7. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  8. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianliang; Li, Jie; Yuan, Ke; Yin, Gang; Wan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) combined with high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT) treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT) scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D2cc < 75 Gy and D2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT) only. Results The mean D90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82). For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D100%, and IRCTV D90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT) or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up are required to

  9. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, David B.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; King, Allison A.; Hollander, Abby S.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Park, T.S.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  10. Conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer: The impact of tumor regression.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Linda; van der Heide, Uulke A; Ketelaars, Martijn; de Kort, Gerard A P; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the impact of tumor regression on the dose within cervical tumors and surrounding organs, comparing conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the need for repeated treatment planning during irradiation. Fourteen patients with cervical cancer underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before treatment and once during treatment, after about 30 Gy. Target volumes and critical organs were delineated. First conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans were generated. To evaluate the impact of tumor regression, we calculated dose-volume histograms for these plans, using the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. Second conformal and IMRT plans were made based on the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. First and second plans were compared. The average volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (43 Gy) by the conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans was, respectively, for the bowel 626 cc, 427 cc, and 232 cc; for the rectum 101 cc, 90 cc, and 60 cc; and for the bladder 89 cc, 70 cc, and 58 cc. The volumes of critical organs at this dose level were significantly reduced using IMRT compared with conventional and conformal planning (p < 0.02 in all cases). After having delivered about 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, the primary gross tumor volumes decreased on average by 46% (range, 6.1-100%). The target volumes on the intratreatment MR images remained sufficiently covered by the 95% isodose. Second IMRT plans significantly diminished the treated bowel volume, if the primary gross tumor volumes decreased >30 cc. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is superior in sparing of critical organs compared with conventional and conformal treatment, with adequate coverage of the target volumes. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy remains superior after 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, despite tumor regression and internal organ motion. Repeated IMRT planning can improve the sparing of the bowel and rectum in

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Pulmonary Metastases from High Grade Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Niraj; Selch, Michael; Lee, Jay M.; Eilber, Fritz C.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Steinberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with high-grade sarcoma (HGS) frequently develop metastatic disease thus limiting their long-term survival. Lung metastases (LM) have historically been treated with surgical resection (metastasectomy). A potential alternative for controlling LM could be stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We evaluated the outcomes from our institutional experience utilizing SBRT. Methods. Sixteen consecutive patients with LM from HGS were treated with SBRT between 2009 and 2011. Routine radiographic and clinical follow-up was performed. Local failure was defined as CT progression on 2 consecutive scans or growth after initial shrinkage. Radiation pneumonitis and radiation esophagitis were scored using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) version 3.0. Results. All 16 patients received chemotherapy, and a subset (38%) also underwent prior pulmonary metastasectomy. Median patient age was 56 (12–85), and median follow-up time was 20 months (range 3–43). A total of 25 lesions were treated and evaluable for this analysis. Most common histologies were leiomyosarcoma (28%), synovial sarcoma (20%), and osteosarcoma (16%). Median SBRT prescription dose was 54 Gy (36–54) in 3-4 fractions. At 43 months, local control was 94%. No patient experienced G2-4 radiation pneumonitis, and no patient experienced radiation esophagitis. Conclusions. Our retrospective experience suggests that SBRT for LM from HGS provides excellent local control and minimal toxicity. PMID:24198717

  12. What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... wife and children.” U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About the treatment: What is external beam radiation therapy? ■ It is a common cancer treatment that ...

  13. [18F]FET-PET Imaging for Treatment and Response Monitoring of Radiation Therapy in Malignant Glioma Patients – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Götz, I.; Grosu, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of patients suffering from malignant glioma, it is a paramount importance to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumor on the one hand and to spare organs at risk at one the other in order to achieve a sufficient tumor control and to avoid severe side effects. New radiation therapy techniques have emerged like intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy that help facilitate this aim. In addition, there are advanced imaging techniques like Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT which can help localize the tumor with higher sensitivity, and thus contribute to therapy planning, tumor control, and follow-up. During follow-up care, it is crucial to differentiate between recurrence and treatment-associated, unspecific lesions, like radiation necrosis. Here, too, PET/CT can facilitate in differentiating tumor relapse from unspecific changes. This review article will discuss therapy response criteria according to the current imaging methods like Magnet resonance imaging, CT, and PET/CT. It will focus on the significance of PET in the clinical management for treatment and follow-up. PMID:23630666

  14. Radiation therapy - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... my fatigue? When should I call the doctor? Alternative Names What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy References National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people ...

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) uses linear ... and after this procedure? What is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and how is it used? Intensity-modulated ...

  16. Effect of overall treatment time on outcomes after concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Hsu Chuanchieh; Komaki, Ritsuko; Sause, William T.; Swann, R. Suzanne; Langer, Corey J.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Curran, Walter J.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether overall treatment time affects outcomes after definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from 3 prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials (RTOG 91-06, 92-04, and 94-10) in which immediate concurrent chemoradiation (cisplatin-based) was the primary therapy for good-performance status Stage III (and selected inoperable Stage II) NSCLC. 'Short' overall treatment time (per protocol) was defined as completing treatment within 5 days of plan; other patients were considered to have had 'prolonged' treatment time (protocol violation); treatment time was also analyzed as a continuous variable in a multivariate model. Actuarial analysis was performed for overall survival, progression-free survival, freedom from local-regional progression, and toxicity. Results: A total of 474 patients were analyzed. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.1 years. Treatment time was delivered per protocol in 387 (82%), whereas 87 patients (18%) had a prolonged treatment time. Long treatment time was significantly associated with severe acute esophagitis. Median survival was slightly better in patients completing treatment on time (19.5 months vs. 14.8 months), but this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.15) in the univariate analysis. However, in the multivariate analysis of treatment time as a continuous variable, prolonged treatment time was significantly associated with poorer survival (p = 0.02), indicating a 2% increase in the risk of death for each day of prolongation in therapy. Histology (squamous fared worse) and performance status were also significant in the multivariate model. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis demonstrates a correlation between prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment time and survival in patients with locally advanced NSCLC, even when concurrent chemotherapy is used. Further study of novel radiation

  17. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  18. Radiation therapy of esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-06-01

    Radiation therapy has been used extensively in the management of patients with cancer of the esophagus. It has demonstrated an ability to cure a small minority of patients. Cure is likely to be limited to patients who have lesions less than 5 cm in length and have minimal, if any, involvement of lymph nodes. Esophagectomy is likely to cure a similar, small percentage of patients with the same presentation of minimal disease but has a substantial acute postoperative mortality rate and greater morbidity than irradiation. Combining surgery and either preoperative or postoperative irradiation may cure a small percentage of patients beyond the number cured with either modality alone. Radiation has demonstrated benefit as an adjuvant to surgery following the resection of minimal disease. However, radiation alone has never been compared directly with surgery for the highly select, minimal lesions managed by surgery. Radiation provides good palliation of dysphagia in the majority of patients, and roughly one third may have adequate swallowing for the duration of their illness when ''radical'' doses have been employed. Surgical bypass procedures have greater acute morbidity but appear to provide more reliable, prolonged palliation of dysphagia. Several approaches to improving the efficacy of irradiation are currently under investigation. These approahces include fractionation schedules, radiosensitizers, neutron-beam therapy, and helium-ion therapy.

  19. Total Mastectomy or Breast Conservation Therapy? How Radiation Oncologist Accessibility Determines Treatment Choice and Quality: A SEER Data-base Analysis.

    PubMed

    Churilla, Thomas M; Donnelly, Patrick E; Leatherman, Erin R; Adonizio, Christian S; Peters, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Mastectomy and breast conservation therapy (BCT) are equivalent in survival for treatment of early stage breast cancer. This study evaluated the impact of radiation oncologist accessibility on choice of breast conserving surgery (BCS) versus mastectomy, and the appropriate receipt of radiotherapy after BCS. In the National Cancer Institute Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results data base, the authors selected breast cancer cases from 2004 to 2008 with the following criteria: T2N1M0 or less, lobular or ductal histology, and treatment with simple or partial mastectomy. We combined the Health Resources and Services Administration Area Resource File to define average radiation oncologist density (ROD) by county over the same time period. We evaluated tumor characteristics, demographic information, and ROD with respect to BCS rates and receipt of radiation therapy after BCS in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 118,773 cases analyzed, mastectomy was performed 33.2% of the time relative to BCS. After adjustment for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS versus mastectomy were directly associated with ROD (multiplicative change in odds for a single unit increase in ROD [95% CI] = 1.02 [1.01-1.03]; p < 0.001). Adjuvant radiation therapy was not administered in 28.2% of BCS cases. When adjusting for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS without adjuvant radiation were inversely associated with ROD (0.95 [0.94-0.97]; p < 0.001). We observed a direct relationship between ROD and BCS rates independent of demographic and tumor variables, and an inverse trend for omission of radiotherapy after BCS. Access to radiation oncologists may represent an important factor in surgical choice and receiving appropriate BCT in early stage breast cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Whole-body hybrid imaging concept for the integration of PET/MR into radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Oehmigen, Mark; Grueneisen, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale; Quick, Harald H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is based on multimodality imaging. With the recent availability of whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging new opportunities arise to improve target volume delineation in RT treatment planning. This, however, requires dedicated RT equipment for reproducible patient positioning on the PET/MR system, which has to be compatible with MR and PET imaging. A prototype flat RT table overlay, radiofrequency (RF) coil holders for head imaging, and RF body bridges for body imaging were developed and tested towards PET/MR system integration. Attenuation correction (AC) of all individual RT components was performed by generating 3D CT-based template models. A custom-built program for μ-map generation assembles all AC templates depending on the presence and position of each RT component. All RT devices were evaluated in phantom experiments with regards to MR and PET imaging compatibility, attenuation correction, PET quantification, and position accuracy. The entire RT setup was then evaluated in a first PET/MR patient study on five patients at different body regions. All tested devices are PET/MR compatible and do not produce visible artifacts or disturb image quality. The RT components showed a repositioning accuracy of better than 2 mm. Photon attenuation of  -11.8% in the top part of the phantom was observable, which was reduced to  -1.7% with AC using the μ-map generator. Active lesions of 3 subjects were evaluated in terms of SUVmean and an underestimation of  -10.0% and  -2.4% was calculated without and with AC of the RF body bridges, respectively. The new dedicated RT equipment for hybrid PET/MR imaging enables acquisitions in all body regions. It is compatible with PET/MR imaging and all hardware components can be corrected in hardware AC by using the suggested μ-map generator. These developments provide the technical and methodological basis for integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT planning.

  1. Whole-body hybrid imaging concept for the integration of PET/MR into radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Daniel H; Oehmigen, Mark; Grüneisen, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale; Quick, Harald H

    2016-05-07

    Modern radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is based on multimodality imaging. With the recent availability of whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging new opportunities arise to improve target volume delineation in RT treatment planning. This, however, requires dedicated RT equipment for reproducible patient positioning on the PET/MR system, which has to be compatible with MR and PET imaging. A prototype flat RT table overlay, radiofrequency (RF) coil holders for head imaging, and RF body bridges for body imaging were developed and tested towards PET/MR system integration. Attenuation correction (AC) of all individual RT components was performed by generating 3D CT-based template models. A custom-built program for μ-map generation assembles all AC templates depending on the presence and position of each RT component. All RT devices were evaluated in phantom experiments with regards to MR and PET imaging compatibility, attenuation correction, PET quantification, and position accuracy. The entire RT setup was then evaluated in a first PET/MR patient study on five patients at different body regions. All tested devices are PET/MR compatible and do not produce visible artifacts or disturb image quality. The RT components showed a repositioning accuracy of better than 2 mm. Photon attenuation of  -11.8% in the top part of the phantom was observable, which was reduced to  -1.7% with AC using the μ-map generator. Active lesions of 3 subjects were evaluated in terms of SUVmean and an underestimation of  -10.0% and  -2.4% was calculated without and with AC of the RF body bridges, respectively. The new dedicated RT equipment for hybrid PET/MR imaging enables acquisitions in all body regions. It is compatible with PET/MR imaging and all hardware components can be corrected in hardware AC by using the suggested μ-map generator. These developments provide the technical and methodological basis for integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT planning.

  2. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Baskar, Rajamanickam; Lee, Kuo Ann; Yeo, Richard; Yeoh, Kheng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division) potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed. PMID:22408567

  3. Radiation therapy in the management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pashtan, Itai; Oh, Kevin S; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy in the form of fractionated treatment or radiosurgery has an important role in the management of pituitary adenomas. Radiation is a reliable way of gaining local control for radiographically progressing pituitary adenomas. For functioning adenomas that are biochemically recurrent or persistent, radiation therapy is less consistent in offering biochemical normalization and often requires a latency period of years or decades. The decision of when to use radiation therapy is a delicate balance between its benefits and late sequelae, especially in the context of benign disease. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology hold the potential to minimize dose to uninvolved normal tissue and therefore reduce the risk of toxicity.

  4. [Effectiveness of ulcer treatment with electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency (EHF therapy) and some mechanism of its therapeutic action].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Teliaper, I I

    2002-01-01

    A clinical response to and some mechanisms of therapeutic action of extremely high frequency (EHF) therapy were studied in 132 patients with exacerbation of duodenal ulcer vs routine pharmacological treatment. EHF-therapy was used alone and in combination with famotidin (antisecretory drug) and norfloxacine (antibacterial drug). EHF monotherapy proved highly effective in duodenal ulcer exacerbation. It normalizes secretory and motor functions of the stomach, suppresses initially high activity of free radical lipid oxidation, corrects abnormal vegetative and psychoemotional status of the patients, moderately potentiates the antihelicobacter effect of antibacterial drugs. These effects are produced due to specific action of EHF therapy: mobilisation of sanogenesis mechanisms, correction of mechanisms of adaptive regulation and self regulation at different levels. Additional administration of antisecretory and antibacterial drugs improved immediate but deteriorates long-term response to EHF-therapy.

  5. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the ankle-radiation therapy as a primary treatment to reduce recurrence: a case report with 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Schnirring-Judge, Molly; Lin, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, benign, idiopathic proliferative disorder of the synovium that results in villous and or nodular formations that have been reported to manifest within joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. The overall incidence includes 2% to 10% that occur within the foot and ankle joints. PVNS has a high rate of recurrence and up to a 45% recurrence rate has been reported despite surgical intervention. Although traditional treatment for PVNS includes synovectomy with arthroplasty of the affected joint, radiation therapy is now suggested as an adjunctive therapy that is believed to reduce recurrence of the disease. We present a case of PVNS where the patient was treated in 2 stages: surgical resection of the tumor with arthroplasty of the ankle joint followed by radiation therapy. A retrospective review of the chart, radiographs, and MRIs was conducted for a 36-year-old, African American female who had been treated and followed for 8 years. Pathologic examination of the tumor confirmed the diagnosis of PVNS. No evidence of recurrent PVNS was identified in the long-term postoperative MRI examination. The fact that ancillary imaging examinations failed to reveal evidence of recurrence and that the patient expresses a very high patient satisfaction supports the potential benefit of adjunctive radiation therapy for this condition. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Local control and complications after radiation therapy for primary orbital lymphoma: A case for low-dose treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, K.J.; Martenson, J.A. Jr.; Garrity, J.A.; Kurtin, P.J.; Banks, P.M.; Chen, M.G.; Earle, J.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Orbital involvement at the time of initial presentation is unusual in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In an effort to identify potential ways of improving the radiotherapeutic management of this disease, the records of 22 patients were reviewed retrospectively. All had biopsy-proven orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the minimal, median, and maximal durations of follow-up in surviving patients were 4.8 years, 7.0 years, and 17.4 years, respectively. Permanent local control was achieved in 21 of the 22 patients (96%). Complications were scored according to a grading scheme in which grade 1 was the least significant complication and grade 4 was blindness as a result of radiation therapy. Of the 12 patients who received a radiation dose less than 35 Gy, 6 developed a grade 1 or grade 2 complication. Of the 10 patients treated with greater than or equal to 35 Gy, 6 experienced a complication, 1 of whom had a grade 4 complication resulting in blindness and another who developed a severe keratitis, which was scored as a grade 3 complication resulting in decreased visual acuity. At last follow-up, 10 patients were alive at 4.8 to 17.4 years after completion of radiation therapy, 4 had died of intercurrent disease at 3 months to 10.6 years, and 8 had died of disease at 3 months to 15.8 years. Actuarial survival for the entire group was 75% at 5 years and 48% at 10 years. Survival in patients with Stage I AE disease (lymphoma confined to orbit) at presentation was 87% at 5 years and 50% at 10 years, and survival in patients with Stage II A through Stage IV disease was 36% at 5 years and at 10 years. Primary orbital lymphoma is an indolent disease characterized by prolonged survival after radiation therapy. Excellent local control can be achieved with radiation doses of 20 Gy to 35 Gy. Higher doses may result in an increased risk of complications.

  7. Pulp innervation after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.C.; Chalian, V.A.; Shidnia, H.

    1986-12-01

    Decreased sensitivity was observed in teeth within and adjacent to an irradiated field. Mandibular teeth outside the field and distal to the irradiated mandibular nerve trunk showed an immediate decrease in sensitivity, Maxillary teeth outside the field showed a delayed decrease in sensitivity. Blood flow rates and nutrition were also related to time. Neurons are though to be relatively radio-resistant and few changes were seen histologically after radiation therapy. However, functional impairment was observed in histologically normal tissue.

  8. Dosimetric study for cervix carcinoma treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D intracavitary brachytherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Gang; Wang, Pei; Lang, Jinyi; Tian, Yin; Luo, Yangkun; Fan, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) boost technique (ICBT + IMRT) has been used in our hospital for advanced cervix carcinoma patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the four different boost techniques (the conventional 2D HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [CICBT], 3D optimized HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [OICBT], and IMRT-alone with the applicator in situ). Material and methods For 30 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, after the completion of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for whole pelvic irradiation 45 Gy/25 fractions, five fractions of ICBT + IMRT boost with 6 Gy/fractions for high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and 5 Gy/fractions for intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were applied. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired using an in situ CT/MRI-compatible applicator. The gross tumor volume (GTV), the high/intermediate-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV/IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured by CT scans. Results For ICBT + IMRT plan, values of D90, D100 of HRCTV, D90, D100, and V100 of IRCTV significantly increased (p < 0.05) in comparison to OICBT and CICBT. The D2cc values for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were significantly lower than that of CICBT and IMRT alone. In all patients, the mean rectum V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT and OICBT techniques were very similar but for bladder and sigmoid, the V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT were higher than that of OICBT. For the ICBT + IMRT plan, the standard deviations (SD) of D90 and D2cc were found to be lower than other three treatment plans. Conclusions The ICBT + IMRT technique not only provides good target coverage but also maintains low doses (D2cc) to the OAR. ICBT + IMRT is an optional technique to boost parametrial region or tumor of large size and irregular shape

  9. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    system, 3) whether Beacon® Transponder is of benefit in pelvic radiation therapy following prostatectomy, 4) whether hypofractionated treatment plans...enroll a combined total of up to 40 subjects from both centers. Task 4. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients with Favorable Risk Prostate...Cancer Using the Calypso® 4D Localization System. . The original hypofractionated trial listed under this task has been removed and replaced

  10. Localized fibrous mesothelioma of pleura following external ionizing radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbey, J.H.; Mueller, N.L.M.; Miller, R.R.; Nelems, B.

    1988-12-01

    Carcinogenesis is a well-known complication of radiation exposure. Ionizing radiation also leads to an increased incidence of benign tumors. A 36-year-old woman had a localized fibrous mesothelioma of the pleura and an ipsilateral breast carcinoma 23 years after receiving external radiation therapy for treatment of a chest wall keloid.

  11. Generalized morphea after breast cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kushi, Jonathan; Csuka, M E

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  12. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kushi, Jonathan; Csuka, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea. PMID:22937449

  13. Using decision analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre . E-mail: andre.konski@fccc.edu; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Feigenberg, Steven; Hanlon, Alexandra; Kulkarni, Sachin M.S.; Beck, J. Robert; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-10-01

    Background: The specific aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of a 70-year-old with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods: A Markov model was designed with the following states; posttreatment, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and death. Transition probabilities from one state to another were calculated from rates derived from the literature for IMRT and 3D-CRT. Utility values for each health state were obtained from preliminary studies of preferences conducted at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The analysis took a payer's perspective. Expected mean costs, cost-effectiveness scatterplots, and cost acceptability curves were calculated with commercially available software. Results: The expected mean cost of patients undergoing IMRT was $47,931 with a survival of 6.27 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The expected mean cost of patients having 3D-CRT was $21,865 with a survival of 5.62 QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness comparing IMRT with CRT was $40,101/QALYs. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 55.1% probability of IMRT being cost-effective at a $50,000/QALY willingness to pay. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was found to be cost-effective, however, at the upper limits of acceptability. The results, however, are dependent on the assumptions of improved biochemical disease-free survival with fewer patients undergoing subsequent salvage therapy and improved quality of life after the treatment. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, decision analysis can help inform physicians and health policy experts on the cost-effectiveness of emerging technologies.

  14. [Application of the PET for Radiation Therapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsumoto, Takuya; Tohyama, Naoki; Koyama, Kazuya; Kodama, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Hatano, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Because radiotherapy is local treatment, it is very important to define target volume and critical organs based on accurate lesion area. The PET using an index such as the SUV is quantifiable noninvasively with information of the molecular biology for individual case/lesion. In particular, PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) has been used for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of various tumors. The radiation therapy based on PET enables the treatment planning that reflected metabolic activity of the lesion. The PET produce an error by various factors, therefore, we must handle the PET image in consideration of this error when apply PET to radiotherapy.

  15. In vitro survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells following combined treatment with ionizing radiation and mitoxantrone-mediated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Montazerabadi, Ali Reza; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad Hossein; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Aledavood, Amir

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mitoxantrone (MX) as a sensitizer following combined treatment with ionizing radiation and photodynamic therapy in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Cells were incubated with MX at different concentrations for 90min and exposed to different fluence rates of non-coherent light and different dose rates of ionizing X-ray radiation in independent treatment groups. Additionally, the combined effects of chemotherapy, phototherapy, and radiotherapy were evaluated. The percent cell survival was investigated using the MTT assay. MX acted as both a photosensitizer and radiosensitizer. Furthermore, the use of 1μM MX in combination with PDT at 10J/Cm(2) and 4Gy of X-ray radiation strongly resulted in the death of cancer cells and reduced the percentage of viable cancer cells to 2.4±1.15. Our data demonstrated that the adverse effects of MX in combination with radiotherapy were partially abated, without a reduction in the efficacy of treatment. This new therapeutic avenue for breast cancer therapy merits further investigation using in vivo models for application in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protocol for the treatment of radiation injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, D.; Weiss, J. F.; Macvittie, T. J.; Pillai, M. V.

    Despite adequate precautionary measures and high-quality safeguard devices, many accidental radiation exposures continue to occur and may pose greater risks in the future, including radiation exposure in the space environment. The medical management of radiation casualties is of major concern to health care providers. Such medical management was addressed at The First Consensus Development Conference on the Treatment of Radiation Injuries, Washington, DC, 1989. The conference addressed the most appropriate treatment for the hematopoietic and infectious complications that accompany radiation injuries and for combined radiation and traumatic/burn injuries. Based on the evidence presented at the conference, a consensus statement was formulated by expert physicians and scientists. The recommended therapies, including a suggested algorithm incorporating these recommendations for the treatment of radiation injuries, will be discussed.

  17. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  18. [Reappraisal role of locoregional radiation therapy in metastatic cancers].

    PubMed

    Rancoule, Chloé; Pacaut-Vassal, Cécile; Vallard, Alexis; Mery, Benoite; Trone, Jane-Chloé; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Recent innovations in oncology area helped to improve the prognosis of certain cancers including metastatic ones with a decrease in mortality. Recommendations describe the treatment of metastatic cancer as systemic therapy or complementary care and the role of locoregional treatment in the treatment plan only occurs in a palliative context. Currently, in the clinical practice, out of "the evidence based medicine", an early locoregional therapy (surgery or radiation therapy) can be proposed in several cases of metastatic cancers. The aim of the present review is to describe the role of the primary tumor radiation therapy in metastatic disease. In metastatic breast, prostate, cervix, rectal or nasopharyngeal cancers, locoregional treatment including radiation therapy can, in some cases, be discussed and decided in MDT. Ongoing clinical trials in these locations should soon precise the benefit of this locoregional treatment. It will also be important to define the specific criteria in order to select patients who could benefit from this treatment.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in kVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Moti Raj; Mackenzie, Marc; Fallone, B. Gino; Rathee, Satyapal

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images of patients that are corrected by use of a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images: MVCT-NMAR. Methods and Materials: MVCT-NMAR was applied to images from 5 patients: 3 with dual hip prostheses, 1 with a single hip prosthesis, and 1 with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces and for radiation therapy dose calculations. They were compared against the corresponding images corrected by the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in a Phillips CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiation therapy. These improvements are significant, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in orthopedic metal artifact reduction corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. A large dose reduction was possible outside the planning target volume (eg, 59.2 Gy to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images were used in TomoTherapy treatment plans without directional blocks for a prostate cancer patient. Conclusions: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiation therapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for patients with metallic implants.

  20. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  1. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  2. Biologic mesh spacer placement facilitates safe delivery of dose-intense radiation therapy: A novel treatment option for unresectable liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Ismael, H N; Denbo, J; Cox, S; Crane, C H; Das, P; Krishnan, S; Schroff, R T; Javle, M; Conrad, C; Vauthey, J; Aloia, T

    2016-10-01

    Patients with unresectable liver tumors who fail initial treatment modalities have a poor prognosis (<1 yr). Although effective, delivery of high dose radiation therapy to these tumors is limited by proximity of radiosensitive bowel. We have previously reported that placement of a biologic mesh spacer (BMS) can effectively displace the bowel allowing for dose-intense radiation to be delivered with low short-term toxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess and report the long-term safety and oncologic outcomes of this cohort. From 2012 to 2014 seven patients with unresectable hepatic malignancy (6 IHCC, 1 CRLM) underwent BMS (acellular human dermis) placement (2 open, 5 MIS) prior to radiation therapy. Prospective registry data were reviewed for tumor and treatment details, progression, metastasis and survival. RTOG guidelines were used to define radiation toxicities. Mean patient age was 50.4 years (30-62 years) and 4 patients were male (57.1%). Prior to surgery, all patients had been treated for an average of 12.5 months with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and/or TACE. After surgery, all patients recovered well and received a mean radiation dose of 76.1 Gy (58.1-100 Gy) over 13-25 fractions. 1 patient received SBRT; 4 fractions, 10 Gy each. Maximum dose delivered was 100 Gy (Biologic Equivalent Dose of 140 Gy, α/β = 10). Mean time to initiation of radiation therapy was 24 days (12-48 days) from surgery. No significant GI toxicity was recorded, and no GI bleeding or ulcers were observed. Mean follow-up after XRT was 18.2 months (5.5-31 months). Three patients had no loco-regional progression of disease. 2 patients had infield progression of liver disease and another had progressive lymphadenopathy. 3 patients developed pulmonary metastasis, at a mean time to distant failure of 3 months. There are 4 survivors over 2-years from surgery. For patients with unresectable liver tumors, placement of a BMS enhances the safety and efficacy of high

  3. [Topics of radiation biology for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukari; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of radiation therapy (RT) have considerably improved treatment outcomes of various cancers. It is related to not only the technological progress in medical physics but also the analytical progress in radiation biological effectiveness. However, the treatment results of RT, especially in advanced cancer, are still insufficient, therefore it is necessary to establish a safety and more effective method for treating cancer. Understanding the radiation biology is essential to appreciate the effect of RT. Hence, we review the controversial point of RT for radiation biology and introduce the results of basic research.

  4. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The na