Science.gov

Sample records for radiation-induced malignant gliomas

  1. Radiation-Induced Autophagy Contributes to Cell Death and Induces Apoptosis Partly in Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Guk Heui; Bögler, Oliver; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Youn-Jae; Kim, Jong Heon; Gwak, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced autophagy has been shown to play two different roles, in malignant glioma (MG) cells, cytocidal or cytoprotective. However, neither the role of radiation-induced autophagy for cell death nor the existence of autophagy-induced apoptosis, a well-known cell-death pathway after irradiation, has been verified yet. Materials and Methods We observed both temporal and dose-dependent response patterns of autophagy and apoptosis to radiation in MG cell lines. Additionally, we investigated the role of autophagy in apoptosis through knockdown of autophagy-related proteins. Results Autophagic activity measured by staining of acidic vesicle organelles and Western blotting of LC-3 protein increased in proportion to radiation dose from day 1 to 5 after irradiation. Apoptosis measured by annexin-V staining and Western blotting of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase demonstrated relatively late appearance 3 days after irradiation that increased for up to 7 days. Blocking of pan-caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) did not affect apoptosis after irradiation, but silencing of Atg5 effectively reduced radiation-induced autophagy, which decreased apoptosis significantly. Inhibition of autophagy in Atg5 knockdown cells was shown to be beneficial for cell survival. Stable transfection of GFP-LC3 cells was observed after irradiation. Annexin-V was localized in cells bearing GFP-LC3 punctuated spots, indicating autophagy in immunofluorescence. Some of these punctuated GFP-LC3 bearing cells formed conglomerated spots and died in final phase. Conclusion These findings suggest that autophagy appears earlier than apoptosis after irradiation and that a portion of the apoptotic population that appears later is autophagy-dependent. Thus, autophagy is a pathway to cell death after irradiation of MG cells. PMID:25410762

  2. Radiation-Induced Malignant Gliomas: Is There a Role for Reirradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C. Mai, Wei Y.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Taher, Abida; Teh, Bin S.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To review the literature regarding the role of radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with radiation-induced malignant gliomas (RIMGs). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles dealing with RIMG was performed, yielding 52 articles with 92 patients available for review. Results: Initial tumor types treated with RT included brain tumor in 37 patients (40%), acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 33 (36%), benign disease in 11 (12%), and other in 11 (12%). Median time from RT to development of an RIMG was 8.75 years (range, 2.5-61 years). The RIMG occurred within 10 years after RT in 81% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, 59% of patients with brain/other, and 18% of patients with benign conditions (p = 0.002). Type of RIMG was glioblastoma in 69 (75%) and anaplastic astrocytoma in 23 (25%). One-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 29.3%, 7.3%, and 0% for patients with glioblastoma and 59.7%, 30.3%, and 20.2% for patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. For the 85 patients with data regarding treatment for RIMG, 35 underwent reirradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 30-76 Gy). For patients undergoing reirradiation, 1-, 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 58.9%, 20.5%, and 6.8%. For those not undergoing reirradiation, they were 15.1%, 3%, and 0% (p = 0.0009). Conclusions: The RIMG appeared earlier in patients treated for leukemia and lymphoma and latest for those treated for a benign condition. Patients who underwent reirradiation for RIMG have longer survival times compared with those not receiving RT.

  3. Radiation-induced meningiomas after BNCT in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Sogabe, S; Mizobichi, Y; Nakajima, K; Shinji, N; Nakagawa, Y

    2015-12-01

    Of the 180 patients with malignant brain tumors whom we treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) since 1968, only one (0.56%) developed multiple radiation-induced meningiomas. The parasagittal meningioma that had received 42 Gy (w) for BNCT showed more rapid growth on Gd-enhanced MRI scans and more atypical features on histopathologic studies than the temporal convexity tumor that had received 20 Gy (w). Long-term follow up MRI studies are necessary in long-survivors of malignant brain tumors treated by BNCT. PMID:26122975

  4. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Carter M; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A; Choi, Bryan D; Fecci, Peter E; Sampson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  5. Malignant glioma of the optic chiasm eight years after radiotherapy for prolactinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, T.J.; Kim, J.H.; Lesser, R.; Miller, J.M.; Abrahams, J.J.; Piepmeier, J.; Manuelidis, E.E.

    1988-12-01

    A 41-year-old man had rapidly progressive visual loss caused by a malignant glioma that developed in the optic chiasm eight years after radiation therapy for a recurrent prolactinoma. Radiation-induced glioma should be considered as a cause of progressive visual loss in patients who have received irradiation in the region of the sella turcica.

  6. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  7. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurushima, Hideo Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E.; Leong, Kam W.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

  8. Vaccine Therapies in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taemin; Sayegh, Eli T.; Fakurnejad, Shayan; Oyon, Daniel; Lamano, Jonathan Balquiedra; DiDomenico, Joseph David; Bloch, Orin; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a grade IV astrocytoma that is widely accepted in clinical neurosurgery as being an extremely lethal diagnosis. Long-term survival rates remain dismal and, even when tumors undergo gross resection with confirmation of total removal on neuroimaging, they invariably recur with even greater virulence. Standard therapeutic modalities as well as more contemporary treatments have largely resulted in disappointing improvements. However, the therapeutic potential of vaccine immunotherapy for malignant glioma should not be underestimated. In contrast to many of the available treatments, vaccine immunotherapy is unique because it offers the means of delivering treatment that is highly specific to both the patient and the tumor. Peptide, heat-shock proteins, and dendritic cell vaccines collectively encapsulate the majority of research efforts involving vaccine-based treatment modalities. In this review, important recent findings for these vaccine types are discussed in the context of ongoing clinical trials. Broad challenges to immunotherapy are also considered. PMID:25431096

  9. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L; Lulla, Rishi R; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Binder, David C; James, C David; Wainwright, Derek A

    2016-08-01

    The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6 mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1 y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13Rα2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatments with RINTEGA, Prophage Series G-100 and dendritic cells are explored. We conclude by proposing new strategies that are built on current vaccine technologies and improved upon with novel combinatorial approaches. PMID:27622066

  10. Economics of Malignant Gliomas: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Fitzner, Karen A.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Bennett, Charles L.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Trifilio, Steven M.; Grimm, Sean A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Haleem, Meraaj S.; Ray, Paul S.; McKoy, Judith M.; DeBoer, Rebecca; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; Deeb, Mohammed; McKoy, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 18,500 persons are diagnosed with malignant glioma in the United States annually. Few studies have investigated the comprehensive economic costs. We reviewed the literature to examine costs to patients with malignant glioma and their families, payers, and society. Methods: A total of 18 fully extracted studies were included. Data were collected on direct and indirect costs, and cost estimates were converted to US dollars using the conversion rate calculated from the study's publication date, and updated to 2011 values after adjustment for inflation. A standardized data abstraction form was used. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results: Before approval of effective chemotherapeutic agents for malignant gliomas, estimated total direct medical costs in the United States for surgery and radiation therapy per patient ranged from $50,600 to $92,700. The addition of temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab to glioblastoma treatment regimens has resulted in increased overall costs for glioma care. Although health care costs are now less front-loaded, they have increased over the course of illness. Analysis using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year suggests that the benefits of TMZ fall on the edge of acceptable therapies. Furthermore, indirect medical costs, such as productivity losses, are not trivial. Conclusion: With increased chemotherapy use for malignant glioma, the paradigm for treatment and associated out-of-pocket and total medical costs continue to evolve. Larger out-of-pocket costs may influence the choice of chemotherapeutic agents, the economic implications of which should be evaluated prospectively. PMID:25466707

  11. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  12. Clonal genomic alterations in glioma malignancy stages.

    PubMed

    James, C D; Carlbom, E; Dumanski, J P; Hansen, M; Nordenskjold, M; Collins, V P; Cavenee, W K

    1988-10-01

    Comparison of constitutional and tumor genotypes at chromosomal loci defined by restriction fragment length alleles has proven useful in determining the genomic position and tissue specificity of recessive mutations that predispose to cancer (Hansen, M.F., and Cavenee, W.K. Cancer Res., 47:5518-5527, 1987). Here we have applied this approach to 53 unrelated patients with glial tumors of varying histological malignancy grade. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 10 was observed in 28 of 29 tumors histologically classified as glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV) whereas no similar losses were observed in any of 22 gliomas of lower malignancy grade. Examination of restriction fragment length alleles on other chromosomes revealed that loss of sequences on chromosomes 13, 17, or 22 had occurred at nonrandom frequencies and in at least one instance of each malignancy grade of adult glioma. The tumors in which loss of constitutional heterozygosity was observed were composed of one or a mixture of glial cell subtypes displaying astrocytic, oligodendrocytic, and/or ependymal differentiation. These results demonstrate a close association of the loss of chromosome 10 sequences with the most malignant histological stage of glioma and that glioblastoma arises as the clonal expansion of an earlier staged precursor. Furthermore they suggest that glioblastoma is a common phenotypic and malignancy terminus for glial tumors of various cellular subtypes which is reached through a common molecular pathway. This approach which involves the identification of malignancy stage specific somatic losses of heterozygosity provides a genotypic, rather than phenotypic, analysis of tumor progression.

  13. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  14. Treatment of malignant gliomas: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Paccapelo, A; Piana, C; Rychlicki, F; Recchioni, M A; Salvolini, U; Ducati, A; Bonsignori, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the authors' experience with intra-arterial ACNU chemotherapy of malignant gliomas. The prognosis of cerebral malignant gliomas remains poor, whatever traditional therapy is applied. ACNU is a well tolerated nitrosourea with a strong antimitotic effect on neurogenic cells both in vitro and in vivo; this drug has enhanced efficacy when used at high concentrations, particularly as an intraarterial infusion. Seventy-six patients have been studied to date, 68 of whom are evaluable; these patients were treated by intra-arterial infusion of ACNU (100 mg/m2) every 6 weeks, with a mean of 2.5 courses per patient. The objective response (OR) was 28% and analysis of pretreatment factors revealed that survival was influenced by histological grade, other types of therapy applied, and age. In general IAC is well tolerated and the response and survival appear to be better than with systemic chemotherapy.

  15. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  16. Aberrant CpG Islands Hypermethylation Profiles in Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Ryeol; Kim, Ealmaan

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors analyzed whether the promoter hypermethylation of cancer-related genes was involved in the tumorigenesis of malignant gliomas. Methods A total of 29 patients received surgery and histologically confirmed to have malignant gliomas from January 2000 to December 2006. The promoter methylation status of several genes, which were reported to be frequently methylated in malignant gliomas, was investigated using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Results All cases of malignant gliomas represented the promoter hypermethylation in at least 2 or more genes tested. Of 29 tumors, 28 (96.55%) showed concurrent hypermethylation of 3 or more genes. Ras association domain family member 1, epithelial cadherin, O-6 methyl guanine DNA methyltransferase, thrombospondin 1, p14 and adenomatous polyposis coli were frequently methylated in high grade gliomas including glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Conclusion Aberrant hypermethylation profile was closely related with malignant gliomas suggesting that epigenetic change may play a role in the development of malignant gliomas. Two or three target genes may provide useful clues to the development of the useful prognostic as well as diagnostic assays for malignant gliomas. PMID:24926469

  17. Proton beam radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in glioma stem cells through reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Alan Mitteer, R; Wang, Yanling; Shah, Jennifer; Gordon, Sherika; Fager, Marcus; Butter, Param-Puneet; Jun Kim, Hyun; Guardiola-Salmeron, Consuelo; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Fan, Yi

    2015-09-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal of human malignancies. Most GBM tumors are refractory to cytotoxic therapies. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) significantly contribute to GBM progression and post-treatment tumor relapse, therefore serving as a key therapeutic target; however, GSCs are resistant to conventional radiation therapy. Proton therapy is one of the newer cancer treatment modalities and its effects on GSCs function remain unclear. Here, by utilizing patient-derived GSCs, we show that proton radiation generates greater cytotoxicity in GSCs than x-ray photon radiation. Compared with photon radiation, proton beam irradiation induces more single and double strand DNA breaks, less H2AX phosphorylation, increased Chk2 phosphorylation, and reduced cell cycle recovery from G2 arrest, leading to caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and cell apoptosis. Furthermore, proton radiation generates a large quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is required for DNA damage, cell cycle redistribution, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that proton radiation has a higher efficacy in treating GSCs than photon radiation. Our data reveal a ROS-dependent mechanism by which proton radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in GSCs. Thus, proton therapy may be more efficient than conventional x-ray photon therapy for eliminating GSCs in GBM patients.

  18. Neurosarcoidosis mimicking a malignant optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jeffrey M; Greiner, Francis G; Crowder, Jason B; Crowder, Jessica W; Quindlen, Eugene

    2008-09-01

    A 55-year-old African-American man developed progressive unilateral optic neuropathy and periocular pain. MRI showed thickening and enhancement of the mid-orbital segment of the ipsilateral optic nerve. Optic neuritis was diagnosed, and he was treated with corticosteroids without improvement. After being lost to follow-up, he returned with worsening vision in the affected eye, aggravated pain, and proptosis. MRI now showed thickening and enhancement of the entire orbital and intracranial segments of the optic nerve. Because the patient had no light perception vision in that eye and a malignant glioma was suspected, he underwent optic nerve biopsy that revealed non-caseating granulomas throughout the optic nerve tissue. CT body imaging failed to disclose other evidence of sarcoidosis. Neurosarcoidosis limited to the optic nerve is rare but should always be suspected in such circumstances. An exhaustive effort to find extracranial evidence for this diagnosis should be undertaken before resorting to optic nerve biopsy.

  19. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sadahiro; Kaneko, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  20. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Sadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  1. Malignant Glioma: Lessons from Genomics, Mouse Models, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; McKay, Renée M.; Parada, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    Eighty percent of malignant tumors that develop in the central nervous system are malignant gliomas, which are essentially incurable. Here, we discuss how recent sequencing studies are identifying unexpected drivers of gliomagenesis, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and the NF-κB pathway, and how genome-wide analyses are reshaping the classification schemes for tumors and enhancing prognostic value of molecular markers. We discuss the controversies surrounding glioma stem cells and explore how the integration of new molecular data allows for the generation of more informative animal models to advance our knowledge of glioma's origin, progression, and treatment. PMID:22464322

  2. Extra-Neural Metastases of Malignant Gliomas: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Beauchesne, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years— despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy—with a median survival of 9–12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases. PMID:24212625

  3. Glioma Stem Cell-Targeted Dendritic Cells as a Tumor Vaccine Against Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baowei; Liu, Baohui; Wu, Liquan; Tian, Daofeng; Guo, Zhentao; Yi, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cancer stem cells have recently been thought to be closely related to tumor development and reoccurrence. It may be a promising way to cure malignant glioma by using glioma stem cell-targeted dendritic cells as a tumor vaccine. In this study, we explored whether pulsing dendritic cells with antigens of glioma stem cells was a potent way to induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and anti-tumor immunity. Materials and Methods Cancer stem cells were cultured from glioma cell line U251. Lysate of glioma stem cells was obtained by the repeated freezing and thawing method. Dendritic cells (DCs) were induced and cultured from the murine bone marrow cells, the biological characteristics were detected by electron microscope and flow cytometry. The DC vaccine was obtained by mixing DCs with lysate of glioma stem cells. The DC vaccine was charactirizated through the mixed lymphocyte responses and cell killing experiment in vitro. Level of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the supernatant was checked by ELISA. Results After stimulation of lysate of glioma stem cell, expression of surface molecules of DC was up-regulated, including CD80, CD86, CD11C and MHC-II. DCs pulsed with lysate of glioma stem cells were more effective than the control group in stimulating original glioma cells-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responses, killing glioma cells and boosting the secretion of IFN-γ in vitro. Conclusion The results demonstrated DCs loaded with antigens derived from glioma stem cells can effectively stimulate naive T cells to form specific cytotoxic T cells, kill glioma cells cultured in vitro. PMID:23225804

  4. Plexin-B2 promotes invasive growth of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Le, Audrey P; Huang, Yong; Pingle, Sandeep C; Kesari, Santosh; Wang, Huaien; Yong, Raymund L; Zou, Hongyan; Friedel, Roland H

    2015-03-30

    Invasive growth is a major determinant of the high lethality of malignant gliomas. Plexin-B2, an axon guidance receptor important for mediating neural progenitor cell migration during development, is upregulated in gliomas, but its function therein remains poorly understood. Combining bioinformatic analyses, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry of patient samples, we demonstrate that Plexin-B2 is consistently upregulated in all types of human gliomas and that its expression levels correlate with glioma grade and poor survival. Activation of Plexin-B2 by Sema4C ligand in glioblastoma cells induced actin-based cytoskeletal dynamics and invasive migration in vitro. This proinvasive effect was associated with activation of the cell motility mediators RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, costimulation of Plexin-B2 and the receptor tyrosine kinase Met led to synergistic Met phosphorylation. In intracranial glioblastoma transplants, Plexin-B2 knockdown hindered invasive growth and perivascular spreading, and resulted in decreased tumor vascularity. Our results demonstrate that Plexin-B2 promotes glioma invasion and vascularization, and they identify Plexin-B2 as a potential novel prognostic marker for glioma malignancy. Targeting the Plexin-B2 pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach to curtail invasive growth of glioblastoma.

  5. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  6. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  7. Malignant glioma - timing of response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, L.E.; Fisher, B.J.; MacDonald, D.R.; Cairncross, J.G. London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario ); LeBer, D.V. ); Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr. )

    1993-04-02

    The response of malignant gliomas to radiation was examined retrospectively in 71 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas. Questions asked included frequency, timing and clinical significance of response. After surgery, all were treated with whole brain plus boost radiotherapy followed 8 weeks later by chemotherapy. The rate, degree, and timing of response to radiation were determined by comparing postoperative, end of radiation, and prechemotherapy CT scans on each patient. Postoperative residual tumor was evident on 63/71 postoperative scans. Twenty-two of 63 tumors (35%) had a partial or complete response to radiation. Twenty (32%) had responded by the end of radiation; 17 maximally. Six to 8 weeks later, three responding tumors had responded further and two previously stable ones had begun to respond. Only three tumors (5%) responded completely. A greater proportion of anaplastic gliomas than glioblastomas responded to radiation (52% vs. 26%). Protracted or delayed responses were only observed in patients with anaplastic glioma. Patients who responded to radiation did not live significantly longer than non-responders. However, tumor progression prior to chemotherapy was associated with significantly shorter survival. This CT scan-based analysis demonstrates that malignant gliomas are only moderately radioresponsive tumors and also demonstrates that response to radiation, if it is going to occur, is usually evident by the end of treatment. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. MR assessment of radiation-induced blood-brain barrier permeability changes in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Krueck, W.G. Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA ); Schmiedl, U.P.; Maravilla, K.R.; Starr, F.L.; Kenney, J. )

    1994-04-01

    To assess the potential of a T1-weighted, gadolinium-enhanced MR technique for quantifying radiation-induced changes of blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of stereotactically implanted intracerebral gliomas in rats. We calculated the gadolinium blood-to-tissue transport coefficient for gadopentetate dimeglumine from signal intensities in sequential MR images in nine control animals that were not irradiated and in five and three animals that had received 2500 cGy and 1500 cGy whole-brain irradiation, respectively, at 2 days before imaging. The average blood-to-tissue transport coefficient values were 9.76 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the control group, 23.41 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the 2500-cGy group, and 25.63 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the 1500-cGy group. Blood-to-tissue transport coefficients were significantly higher after irradiation, indicating increased radiation-induced blood-brain barrier permeability. Similar increased blood-brain barrier leakiness in brain tumors after high-dose irradiation has been shown by previous nuclear medicine studies using quantitative autoradiography. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR of brain gliomas is a sensitive method to document radiation-induced blood-brain barrier breakdown. Quantitative gadolinium-enhanced MR may become a useful tool for the management of patients with brain tumors undergoing radiation therapy. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Experience with irinotecan for the treatment of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Reardon, David A.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most commonly occurring primary malignant brain tumor. It is difficult to treat and is usually associated with an inexorable, rapidly fatal clinical course. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgical excision are core components in the management of malignant glioma. However, chemotherapy, even with the most active regimens currently available, achieves only modest improvement in overall survival. Novel agents and new approaches to therapy are required to improve clinical outcomes. Irinotecan, a first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer and an agent with high activity against solid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, is an inhibitor of topoisomerase I, a critical enzyme needed for DNA transcription. Irinotecan crosses the blood-brain barrier and, in preclinical investigations, has demonstrated cytotoxic activity against central nervous system tumor xenografts. Its antitumor activity has also been demonstrated against glioblastoma cells with multi-drug resistance. Studies in adult and pediatric patients with recurrent, intractable malignant glioma have evaluated irinotecan as monotherapy and in combination with other agents, including temozolomide, carmustine, thalidomide, and bevacizumab. Studies of irinotecan in combination with other medications, particularly temozolomide and bevacizumab, have yielded promising results. Irinotecan monotherapy has demonstrated efficacy; however, its efficacy appears to be enhanced when used in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. When administered concurrently with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs, the dosage must be increased to compensate for enhanced cytochrome CY3A4/5 enzyme activity. Toxicities associated with irinotecan have been manageable; the most important dose-limiting toxicities are neutropenia and diarrhea. Irinotecan-based chemotherapy of malignant glioma merits further study. PMID:18784279

  10. Risk of Radiation-Induced Malignancy With Heterotopic Ossification Prophylaxis: A Case–Control Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheybani, Arshin; TenNapel, Mindi J.; Lack, William D.; Clerkin, Patrick; Hyer, Daniel E.; Sun, Wenqing; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of radiation-induced malignancy after prophylactic treatment for heterotopic ossification (HO). Methods and Materials: A matched case–control study was conducted within a population-based cohort of 3489 patients treated either for acetabular fractures with acetabular open reduction internal fixation or who underwent total hip arthroplasty from 1990 to 2009. Record-linkage techniques identified patients who were diagnosed with a malignancy from our state health registry. Patients with a prior history of malignancy were excluded from the cohort. For each documented case of cancer, 2 controls were selected by stratified random sampling from the cohort that did not develop a malignancy. Matching factors were sex, age at time of hip treatment, and duration of follow-up. Results: A total of 243 patients were diagnosed with a malignancy after hip treatment. Five patients were excluded owing to inadequate follow-up time in the corresponding control cohort. A cohort of 238 cases (control, 476 patients) was included. Mean follow-up was 10 years, 12 years in the control group. In the cancer cohort, 4% of patients had radiation therapy (RT), compared with 7% in the control group. Of the 9 patients diagnosed with cancer after RT, none occurred within the field. The mean latency period was 5.9 years in the patients who received RT and 6.6 years in the patients who did not. Median (range) age at time of cancer diagnosis in patients who received RT was 62 (43-75) years, compared with 70 (32-92) years in the non-RT patients. An ad hoc analysis was subsequently performed in all 2749 patients who were not matched and found neither an increased incidence of malignancy nor a difference in distribution of type of malignancy. Conclusion: We were unable to demonstrate an increased risk of malignancy in patients who were treated with RT for HO prophylaxis compared with those who were not.

  11. Bright solitary waves in malignant gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, Víctor M.; Calvo, Gabriel F.; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Diego, David; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis

    2011-08-01

    We put forward a nonlinear wave model describing the fundamental dynamical features of an aggressive type of brain tumors. Our model accounts for the invasion of normal tissue by a proliferating and propagating rim of active glioma cancer cells in the tumor boundary and the subsequent formation of a necrotic core. By resorting to numerical simulations, phase space analysis, and exact solutions we prove that bright solitary tumor waves develop in such systems. Possible implications of our model as a tool to extract relevant patient specific tumor parameters in combination with standard preoperative clinical imaging are also discussed.

  12. Treatment With Bevacizumab Plus Carboplatin for Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Eric M.; Dosa, Edit; Kraemer, Dale F.; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), imaging responses, and toxicities of bevacizumab plus carboplatin for the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. The secondary objective was to estimate the agreement between post-contrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A retrospective analysis of 9 patients who received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously) and carboplatin (AUC 5 intravenously) for recurrent malignant glioma (World Health Organization grades III and IV) is presented. Eight of 9 patients received this regimen at first recurrence. Results The median age and Karnofsky performance score were 51 years and 70, respectively. For the 5 patients with grade III gliomas, the median PFS was 126 days, whereas median OS was not attained at 517 days of follow-up. Six-month PFS was 40%, whereas 6-month OS was 60%. For the 4 patients with grade IV gliomas, the median PFS was 216 days, whereas the median OS was not attained at 482 days of follow-up. Six-month PFS was 50%, whereas 6-month OS was 75%. The agreement between contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images to determine recurrence was moderate (kappa = 0.5714). Three patients had grade 3 and 4 toxicities including hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Patients who received the combination of bevacizumab plus carboplatin for recurrent malignant glioma had reasonable PFS, OS, and toxicities. The median OS in our series is promising at well over 1 year. Agreement between postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images is only moderate in the context of bevacizumab therapy. PMID:20559095

  13. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  14. The transcriptional coactivator TAZ regulates mesenchymal differentiation in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna P L; Salazar, Katrina L; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Wani, Khalida; Heathcock, Lindsey; Hollingsworth, Faith; James, Johanna D; Gumin, Joy; Diefes, Kristin L; Kim, Se Hoon; Turski, Alice; Azodi, Yasaman; Yang, Yuhui; Doucette, Tiffany; Colman, Howard; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Rao, Ganesh; Copray, Sjef; Vaillant, Brian D; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-12-15

    Recent molecular classification of glioblastoma (GBM) has shown that patients with a mesenchymal (MES) gene expression signature exhibit poor overall survival and treatment resistance. Using regulatory network analysis of available expression microarray data sets of GBM, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to be highly associated with the MES network. TAZ expression was lower in proneural (PN) GBMs and lower-grade gliomas, which correlated with CpG island hypermethylation of the TAZ promoter compared with MES GBMs. Silencing of TAZ in MES glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased expression of MES markers, invasion, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Conversely, overexpression of TAZ in PN GSCs as well as murine neural stem cells (NSCs) induced MES marker expression and aberrant osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation in a TEAD-dependent fashion. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that TAZ is directly recruited to a majority of MES gene promoters in a complex with TEAD2. The coexpression of TAZ, but not a mutated form of TAZ that lacks TEAD binding, with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) resulted in high-grade tumors with MES features in a murine model of glioma. Our studies uncover a direct role for TAZ and TEAD in driving the MES differentiation of malignant glioma.

  15. Relapse of herpes encephalitis induced by temozolomide-based chemoradiation in a patient with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaki; Miyake, Keisuke; Shinomiya, Aya; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamiya, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The authors report on a case of concurrent herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and malignant glioma. The co-occurrence of HSE and malignant glioma is very rare, but it can occur during glioma treatment. Both radiotherapy and chemoradiation with temozolomide can induce viral reactivation, leading to HSE relapse. Careful observation for HSE is necessary when administering chemoradiation to patients with a history of HSE. Antiviral therapy for HSE must be initiated immediately, and the chemoradiation for glioma should be stopped; however, it is not clear what antitumor therapy is optimal when HSE co-occurs during the treatment of glioma.

  16. Patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification in malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, G.; Maeda, T.; Waldman, F. M.; Davis, R. L.; Feuerstein, B. G.

    1996-01-01

    Amplification of the gene for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common finding in malignant gliomas. We found that 18 of 29 grade 3 and grade 4 gliomas had EGFR amplification when assayed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The amplification pattern suggests that the amplicon is contained within double minute chromosomes in most cases. EGFR copy number can differ by 20-fold in amplified cells within a single case. Polysomy 7 occurs frequently in both EGFR-amplified and -unamplified cells. More than one-third of the cases had < or = 10 percent of cells with amplified EGFR, and it is likely that these cases would not have been identified by methods that do not examine DNA on a cell by cell basis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8644846

  17. The Metabolomic Signature of Malignant Glioma Reflects Accelerated Anabolic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Bloom, Gregory; Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Forsyth, Peter; Gillies, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward understanding glioblastoma biology through large-scale genetic and protein expression analyses, little is known about the underlying metabolic alterations promoting their aggressive phenotype. We conducted global metabolomic profiling on patient-derived glioma specimens and identified specific metabolic programs differentiating low- and high-grade tumors, with the metabolic signature of glioblastoma reflecting accelerated anabolic metabolism. When coupled with transcriptional profiles, we identified the metabolic phenotype of the mesenchymal subtype to consist of accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate phosphoenolpyruvate and decreased pyruvate kinase activity. Unbiased hierarchical clustering of metabolomic profiles identified three subclasses, which we term energetic, anabolic, and phospholipid catabolism with prognostic relevance. These studies represent the first global metabolomic profiling of glioma, offering a previously undescribed window into their metabolic heterogeneity, and provide the requisite framework for strategies designed to target metabolism in this rapidly fatal malignancy. PMID:23026133

  18. Experimental approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Arko, Leopold; Katsyv, Igor; Park, Grace E.; Luan, William Patrick; Park, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, which include glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas, are the most common primary tumors of the brain. Over the past 30 years, the standard treatment for these tumors has evolved to include maximal safe surgical resection, radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. While the median survival of patients with glioblastomas has improved from 6 months to 14.6 months, these tumors continue to be lethal for the vast majority of patients. There has, however, been recent substantial progress in our mechanistic understanding of tumor development and growth. The translation of these genetic, epigenetic and biochemical findings into therapies that have been tested in clinical trials is the subject of this review. PMID:20546782

  19. Convection-enhanced delivery: targeted toxin treatment of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Sherr, Gregory T

    2006-04-15

    Historically, malignant gliomas are perhaps the most difficult intracranial neoplasms to treat. Surgery, radiation therapy, and traditional chemotherapy have not been able to significantly alter the course of this disease. By definition, these tumors are located in the protected space of the cranial vault, where the blood-brain barrier prevents most therapies from gaining access. Because of the difficulty in treating this disease, new, innovative treatments and alternative delivery techniques for those therapies are needed. Targeted toxins are fusion proteins that represent a novel medical treatment for these cancers that is under development. However, the efficacy of these agents is dependent on the method of delivery to the tumor. The administration of targeted toxins requires image-guided placement of catheters, either within the tumor or into the adjacent infiltrated brain, and positive pressure infusion. The term that has been applied to this microinfusion technique is convection-enhanced delivery (CED). This infusion method was first attempted via direct intratumoral infusion in nude mouse flank tumor models of human malignant glioma. After significant development of this delivery technique in animal models, the successful demonstration of in vivo efficacy of targeted toxins in Phase I and II clinical trials was reported. Currently, ongoing targeted toxin trials are being conducted at academic health centers to define the best clinical practice for CED. This work involves refining the details of delivery such as infusion rate, duration of treatment, and drug dosing. The early results of CED of targeted toxins supports their continued investigation, as few other treatment modalities have produced durable results in the fight against gliomas.

  20. Effects of radiotherapy after hyperbaric oxygenation on malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kohshi, K; Kinoshita, Y; Imada, H; Kunugita, N; Abe, H; Terashima, H; Tokui, N; Uemura, S

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this non-randomized trial was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy combined with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in patients with malignant glioma. Between 1987 and 1997, 29 patients in whom computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed post-operative residual tumours were locally irradiated with nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Treatments were consecutively combined with HBO at two institutions since 1991 and 1993. Fifteen patients were irradiated daily after HBO, and the periods of time from decompression to irradiation were within 15 and 30 min in 11 and four patients respectively. Fourteen other patients were treated without HBO. Tumour responses were assessed by CT or MRI scans and survival times were compared between the treated groups. In the HBO group, 11 of 15 patients (73%) showed ≥ 50% tumour regression. All responders were irradiated within 15 min after decompression. In the non-HBO group, four of 14 patients (29%) showed tumour regression. The median survivals in patients with and without HBO were 24 and 12 months, respectively, and were significantly different (P < 0.05). No serious side-effects were observed in the HBO patients. In conclusion, irradiation after HBO seems to be a useful form of treatment for malignant gliomas, but irradiation should be administered immediately after decompression. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390002

  1. Neutron interstitial brachytherapy for malignant gliomas: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Patchell, R.A.; Maruyama, Y.; Tibbs, P.A.; Beach, J.L.; Kryscio, R.J.; Young, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with malignant glioma were treated with implantation of the neutron-emitting element californium-252 (/sup 252/Cf) within 2 weeks after surgical debulking of the tumor. Implantation was performed using computerized tomography-guided placement of afterloading catheters, and the /sup 252/Cf sources were removed after approximately 300 neutron rads were delivered. Patients then received 6000 to 7000 conventional photon rads by external beam. The total photon-equivalent dose to the tumor ranged from 8100 to 9100 rads. The median survival time was 10 months, with 18-and 24-month survival rates of 28% and 19%, respectively. The results of reoperation or autopsy showed that patients had recurrence of the tumor but that radiation necrosis was restricted to the area of the original tumor. Serious complications occurred in five patients (9%) and consisted of wound infections in three, cerebral edema in one, and radiation necrosis beyond the original tumor margin in one. Previous studies using external-beam neutron radiation have shown that neutrons are capable of totally eradicating malignant gliomas; however, in most cases, unacceptable widespread radiation necrosis has resulted. Neutron implants are a logical way to increase the dose to the tumor and decrease the dose to normal brain. Interstitial neutron radiation can be given safely with /sup 252/Cf, and the survival results achieved by radiation alone using relatively low doses of interstitial neutron radiation from /sup 252/Cf implants plus conventional photon radiation were equal to the results attained with any currently available conventional therapy.

  2. Pseudoprogression in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Yokoyama, Kunio; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Matsui, Hideki; Ono, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Pseudoprogression has been recognized and widely accepted in the treatment of malignant gliomas, as transient increases in the volume of the enhanced area just after chemoradiotherapy, especially using temozolomide. We experienced a similar phenomenon in the treatment of malignant gliomas and meningiomas using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a cell-selective form of particle radiation. Here, we introduce representative cases and analyze the pathogenesis. Fifty-two cases of malignant glioma and 13 cases of malignant meningioma who were treated by BNCT were reviewed retrospectively mainly via MR images. Eleven of 52 malignant gliomas and 3 of 13 malignant meningiomas showed transient increases of enhanced volume in MR images within 3 months after BNCT. Among these cases, five patients with glioma underwent surgery because of suspicion of relapse. In histology, most of the specimens showed necrosis with small amounts of residual tumor cells. Ki-67 labeling showed decreased positivity compared with previous samples from the individuals. Fluoride-labeled boronophenylalanine PET was applied in four and two cases of malignant gliomas and meningiomas, respectively, at the time of transient increase of lesions. These PET scans showed decreased lesion:normal brain ratios in all cases compared with scans obtained prior to BNCT. With or without surgery, all lesions were decreased or stable in size during observation. Transient increases in enhanced volume in malignant gliomas and meningiomas immediately after BNCT seemed to be pseudoprogression. This pathogenesis was considered as treatment-related intratumoral necrosis in the subacute phase after BNCT. PMID:19289492

  3. Intra-arterial bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegarty, T.J.; Thornton, A.F.; Diaz, R.F.; Chandler, W.F.; Ensminger, W.D.; Junck, L.; Page, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.; Hood, T.W.; Stetson, P.L. )

    1990-08-01

    In the 1950's it was first observed that mammalian cells exposed to the halogenated deoxyuridines were more sensitive to ultraviolet light and radiation than untreated cells. This prompted early clinical trials with bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) which showed mixed results. More recently, several Phase I studies, while establishing the feasibility of continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of BUdR, have reported significant dose limiting skin and bone marrow toxicities and have questioned the optimal method of BUdR delivery. To exploit the high mitotic activity of malignant gliomas relative to surrounding normal brain tissue, we have developed a permanently implantable infusion pump system for safe, continuous intraarterial (IA) internal carotid BUdR delivery. Since July 1985, 23 patients with malignant brain tumors (18 grade 4, 5 grade 3) have been treated in a Phase I clinical trial using IA BUdR (400-600 mg/m2/day X 8 1/2 weeks) and focal external beam radiotherapy (59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/day in 6 1/2 weeks). Following initial biopsy/surgery the infusion pump system was implanted; BUdR infusion began 2 weeks prior to and continued throughout the 6 1/2 week course of radiotherapy. There have been no vascular complications. Side-effects in all patients have included varying degrees of anorexia, fatigue, ipsilateral forehead dermatitis, blepharitis, and conjunctivitis. Myelosuppression requiring dose reduction occurred in one patient. An overall Kaplan-Meier estimated median survival of 20 months has been achieved. As in larger controlled series, histologic grade and age are prognostically significant. We have shown in a Phase I study that IA BUdR radiosensitization is safe, tolerable, may lead to improved survival, and appears to be an efficacious primary treatment of malignant gliomas.

  4. Photochemical internalization for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Kharkhuu, Khishigzaya; Berg, Kristian; Hirschberg, Henry

    2007-02-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a technique to improve the utilization of macromolecules (e.g. chemotherapeutic agents) in cancer therapy in a site-specific manner. The concept is based on the use of specially designed photosensitizers which localize preferentially in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. Upon exposure to light the photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species such as singlet molecular oxygen. The photooxidation of the endocytic membranes leads to the release of the contents of the vesicles into the cytosol. In this way, macromolecules encapsulated by the vesicles will reach the cytosol and exert their biological activity instead of being degraded by lysosomal hydrolases. The utility of PCI for the treatment of malignant gliomas was investigated in vitro using an F98 rat glioma cell line. The cytotoxicity of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based PCI of bleomycin was compared to: (1) ALA-PDT, and (2) bleomycin. In all cases, monolayers were incubated in ALA, bleomycin, or ALA + bleomycin for 4 hours and were subsequently exposed to 635 nm light. Toxicity was evaluated using colony formation assays. F98 rat glioma cells in monolayer were found to be susceptible to the effects of both ALA-PDT and bleomycin. ALA-PDT was found to be particularly effective when light was delivered at a low irradiance of 5 mW cm -2. In this case, a radiant exposure of 20 J cm -2 resulted in only 4% survival. Bleomycin was found to be toxic at relatively low concentrations, incubation of F98 cells in 10 μg ml -1 for 4 hours resulted in 1% survival. The PCI effect was found to be negligible for the parameters investigated in the F98 cell line suggesting that: (1) the incubation time was sub-optimal and/or (2) ALA was inappropriate for this application.

  5. Molecularly targeted therapies for malignant glioma: rationale for combinatorial strategies

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Nikhil G; Pollack, Ian F

    2010-01-01

    Median survival of patients with malignant glioma (MG) from time of diagnosis is approximately 1 year, despite surgery, irradiation and conventional chemotherapy. Improving patient outcome relies on our ability to develop more effective therapies that are directed against the unique molecular aberrations within a patient’s tumor. Such molecularly targeted therapies may provide novel treatments that are more effective than conventional chemotherapeutics. Recently developed therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting several core glioma signaling pathways, including pathways mediated by growth-factors, PI3K/Akt/PTEN/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK and other vital pathways. However, given the molecular diversity, heterogeneity and diverging and converging signaling pathways associated with MG, it is unlikely that any single agent will have efficacy in more than a subset of tumors. Overcoming these therapeutic barriers will require multiple agents that can simultaneously inhibit these processes, providing a rationale for combination therapies. This review summarizes the currently implemented single-agent and combination molecularly targeted therapies for MG. PMID:19951140

  6. Practical guidelines for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, M C; Kormanik, P A

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of patients with malignant gliomas is palliative and encompasses surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Outcome measures have demonstrated improvement in both survival and neurologic performance in patients undergoing complete or near-complete tumor resection. After surgery, involved-field radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered to the tumor and to the tissue in a 3-cm radius surrounding the tumor) has been shown to further improve survival rates when given in a total dose of 6000-6500 cGy. Survival is further improved by the coadministration of the chemoradiopotentiator hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea). The role of adjuvant or boost stereotactic radiotherapy is unclear, despite its frequent use. In addition, adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival rates in approximately one-quarter of patients with glioblastoma multiforme and in the majority of patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. No a priori method exists, however, to predict which patient will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. As a consequence, all physiological young patients with good performance status or limited neurologic disability are treated with chemotherapy. The best results of adjuvant chemotherapy are achieved with a nitrosourea chemotherapy, either carmustine (BCNU) or a combination of procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU) and vincristine, known as PCV-3 therapy. Salvage chemotherapy is reserved for patients with tumor progression, some of whom benefit from a re-operation. Occasional patients with recurrent gliomas may be palliated by stereotactic radiotherapy. PMID:9499745

  7. Bevacizumab for Malignant Brain Gliomas. Which is the Current Evidence?

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Georgios V

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of innovative medications named focused treatments represents the consequence of a superior knowledge of the procedures implicated in the modification of physiological tissues in tumor. Focused treatment is known as the therapy which uses specific substances that affect selective mechanisms implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Angiogenesis is important for tumor development and distant metastatic disease and represents a significant aim for modern biological substances. Bevacizumab belongs to humanized recombinant antibody family which obviates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor fastening, and suspending genesis of new vessels and tumor development. Bevacizumab represents the primary antiangiogenic treatment authorized for usage in tumor and has FDA authorization to treat the recurrent glioblastoma multiform since 2009. Bevacizumab's efficiency for treating malignant brain gliomas along with correlated patent appliances related to this agent is discussed below. PMID:26256461

  8. MicroRNA profiling in the malignant progression of gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupak, E. V.; Veryaskina, Yu. A.; Titov, S. E.; Achmerova, L. G.; Stupak, V. V.; Ivanov, M. K.; Zhimulev, I. F.; Kolesnikov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    Wealth of data indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) are directly involved in carcinogenesis and that miRNA can, on their own, act as diagnostic and prognostic markers for various types of cancers, including gliomas. The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative analysis of expression profile for 10 microRNAs (miR-124, -125b, -16, -181b, -191, -21, -221, -223, -31, and -451) in surgical specimens of various hystotypes of glioimatissues vs adjacent normal tissues from the same patient (n = 77). The study identified specific microRNA expression profiles for different histotypes of tumors that are related to their degree of malignancy. We have outlined approaches to development of miRNA-based diagnostic and prognostic panel, which may be used to compensate for the lack of appropriate screening methods.

  9. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  10. Targeting Ras-RAF-ERK and its Interactive Pathways as a Novel Therapy for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lo, H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and the deadliest brain malignancies in adults. Despite the lack of a complete understanding of the biology of these tumors, significant advances have been made in the past decades. One of the key discoveries made in the area of malignant gliomas is that these tumors can be induced and maintained by aberrant signaling networks. In this context, the Ras pathway has been extensively exploited, from both basic and translational perspectives. Although somatic oncogenic mutations of Ras genes are frequent in several cancer types, early investigations on gliomas revealed disappointing facts that the Ras mutations are nearly absent in malignant gliomas and that the BRAF mutations are present in a very small percentage of gliomas. Therefore, the observed deregulation of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas is attributed to its upstream positive regulators, including, EGFR and PDGFR known to be highly active in the majority of malignant gliomas. In contrast to the initial negative results on the somatic mutations of H-Ras, K-Ras and BRAF, recent breakthrough studies on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas uncovered genetic alterations of the BRAF gene involving copy number gains and rearrangements. The 7q34 rearrangements result in a novel in-frame KIAA1549:BRAF fusion gene that possesses constitutive BRAF kinase activity resembling oncogenic BRAF (V600E). In light of the earlier findings and recent breakthroughs, this review summarizes our current understanding of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas and the outcome of preclinical and clinical studies that evaluated the efficacy of Ras-targeted therapy in malignant gliomas. PMID:20718706

  11. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  12. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas. PMID:25246577

  13. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Magnetic resonance analysis of malignant transformation in recurrent glioma

    PubMed Central

    Jalbert, Llewellyn E.; Neill, Evan; Phillips, Joanna J.; Lupo, Janine M.; Olson, Marram P.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) have a relatively long survival, and a balance is often struck between treating the tumor and impacting quality of life. While lesions may remain stable for many years, they may also undergo malignant transformation (MT) at the time of recurrence and require more aggressive intervention. Here we report on a state-of-the-art multiparametric MRI study of patients with recurrent LGG. Methods One hundred and eleven patients previously diagnosed with LGG were scanned at either 1.5 T or 3 T MR at the time of recurrence. Volumetric and intensity parameters were estimated from anatomic, diffusion, perfusion, and metabolic MR data. Direct comparisons of histopathological markers from image-guided tissue samples with metrics derived from the corresponding locations on the in vivo images were made. A bioinformatics approach was applied to visualize and interpret these results, which included imaging heatmaps and network analysis. Multivariate linear-regression modeling was utilized for predicting transformation. Results Many advanced imaging parameters were found to be significantly different for patients with tumors that had undergone MT versus those that had not. Imaging metrics calculated at the tissue sample locations highlighted the distinct biological significance of the imaging and the heterogeneity present in recurrent LGG, while multivariate modeling yielded a 76.04% accuracy in predicting MT. Conclusions The acquisition and quantitative analysis of such multiparametric MR data may ultimately allow for improved clinical assessment and treatment stratification for patients with recurrent LGG. PMID:26911151

  15. Misonidazole combined with hyperfractionation in the management of malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, D.S.; Urtasun, R.C.; Shin, K.H.; Geggie, P.H.S.; Thomas, H.; Muller, P.J.; Moody, J.; Tanasichuk, H.; Mielke, B.; Johnson, E.

    1984-09-01

    Multiple daily fractionated radiation therapy (MDF) may be more effective than conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CF) in the treatment of malignant glioma. The hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could be more effective when employed with small fractions of radiation every 4 hours to take advantage of the long half-life of the drug. To evaluate MDF and MDF in combination with MISO, a randomized prospective trial was initiated. Between January 1981, and December 1982, patients with histologically verified astrocytoma with anaplastic foci or glioblastoma multiforme were randomized to CF, MDF and MDF in combination with MISO. In January 1983, the CF arm was dropped and a high dose MDF arm added. CCNU chemotherapy was given at the time of tumor progression. Median survival was 29 weeks for CF, 45 weeks for MDF and 50 weeks for MDF plus MISO. Survival was significantly improved for patients treated with MDF compared to patients treated with CF. The addition of MISO to MDF did not result in further improvement in survival. Acute toxicity was acceptable.

  16. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Hyun, Jin-Won; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2011-07-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133{sup +} cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  17. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  18. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  19. Imidazoline I2 receptor density increases with the malignancy of human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Callado, L; Martin-Gomez, J; Ruiz, J; Garibi, J; Meana, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using the measurement of imidazoline I2 receptor expression to differentiate glial tumours from other types of brain tumours and for grading the different gliomas. Methods: The specific binding of [3H]idazoxan to imidazoline I2 receptors was measured in homogenates from human gliomas of different grades. Results: The density of imidazoline I2 receptors was significantly greater in the three types of malignant glial tumours than in postmortem control brain or non-glial tumours. The increase in density correlated with the malignancy grade of the gliomas. No significant differences in affinity values were observed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the density of imidazoline I2 receptors may be a useful radioligand parameter for the differentiation of glial tumours from other types of brain tumours and for grading the different gliomas. PMID:15090584

  20. The limited capacity of malignant glioma-derived exosomes to suppress peripheral immune effectors.

    PubMed

    Iorgulescu, J Bryan; Ivan, Michael E; Safaee, Michael; Parsa, Andrew T

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-derived microvesicular exosomes permit intercellular communication both locally and systemically by delivering a snapshot of the tumor cell's constituents. We thus investigated whether exosomes mediate malignant glioma's facility for inducing peripheral immunosuppression. In Western blot and RT-PCR analyses, glioma-derived exosomes displayed exosome-specific markers, but failed to recapitulate the antigen-presentation machinery, surface co-modulatory signals, or immunosuppressive mediator status of their parent tumor cells. Treatment with glioma-derived exosomes promoted immunosuppressive HLA-DR(low) monocytic phenotypes, but failed to induce monocytic PD-L1 expression or alter the activation of cytotoxic T-cells from patients' peripheral blood by FACS and RT-PCR analyses. Our results suggest that malignant glioma-derived exosomes are restricted in their capacity to directly prime peripheral immunosuppression.

  1. The Challenges and the Promise of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Malignant Gliomas1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxiang; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Hanchong; Yan, Yong; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most challenging forms of cancers to treat. Despite advances in conventional treatment, the outcome for patients remains almost universally fatal. This poor prognosis is due to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence after surgical removal. However, over the past decade, molecular targeted therapy has held the promise of transforming the care of malignant glioma patients. Significant progress in understanding the molecular pathology of gliomagenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotypes will open opportunities to rationally develop new molecular targeted therapy options. Recently, therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting pro-growth signaling mediated by receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, proangiogenic pathways, and several other vital intracellular signaling networks, such as proteasome and histone deacetylase. However, several factors such as cross-talk between the altered pathways, intratumoral molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) have limited the activity of single agents. Efforts are ongoing to study in depth the complex molecular biology of glioma, develop novel regimens targeting GSCs, and identify biomarkers to stratify patients with the individualized molecular targeted therapy. Here, we review the molecular alterations relevant to the pathology of malignant glioma, review current advances in clinical targeted trials, and discuss the challenges, controversies, and future directions of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:25810009

  2. Financial burden experienced by patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kumthekar, Priya; Stell, Becky V.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Helenowski, Irene B.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Grimm, Sean A.; Bennett, Charles L.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas (MGs) can encounter medical costs beyond what their insurance covers. The magnitude and type of costs experienced by patients are unknown. The purpose of this study was to have patients or their families report on the medical costs incurred during the patients MG treatment. Methods Patients with MG were eligible if they were within 6 months of diagnosis or tumor recurrence. Patients had to be ≥18 years of age, fluent in English, and not aphasic. Weekly logbooks were issued to patients for recording associated costs for ∼6 months or until tumor progression. “Out-of-pocket” (OOP) costs included medical and nonmedical expenses that were not reimbursed by insurance. Direct medical costs included hospital and physician bills. Direct nonmedical costs included transportation, parking, and other related items. Indirect medical costs included lost wages. Costs were analyzed to provide mean and medians with range of expenses. Results Forty-three patients provided cost data for a median of 12 weeks. There were 25 men and 18 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 24y–73y); 79% were married, and 49% reported annual income >$75 000. Health insurance coverage was preferred provider organizations for 58% of patients, and median deductible was $1 500. Median monthly OOP cost was $1 342 (mean, $2 451; range, $333.41–$17 267.16). The highest OOP median costs were medication copayments ($710; range, $0–13 611.20), transportation ($327; range, $0–$1 927), and hospital bill copayments ($403; range, $0–$4 000). Median lost wages were $7 500, and median lost days of work were 12.8. Conclusions OOP costs for MG patients can be significant and comprise direct and indirect costs across several areas. Informing patients about expected costs could limit additional duress and allow financial support systems to be implemented. PMID:26034619

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta and its implication in the malignancy of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Roy, Laurent-Olivier; Poirier, Marie-Belle; Fortin, David

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumors. They are characterized by enhanced growing capabilities, neoangiogenic proliferation, and extensive infiltration of the brain parenchyma, which make their complete surgical resection impossible. Together with transient and refractory responses to standard therapy, these aggressive neoplasms are incurable and present a median survival of 12 to 14 months. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine of which two of the three isoforms expressed in humans have been shown to be overexpressed proportionally to the histologic grade of glioma malignancy. The increase of chromosomal aberrations and genetic mutations observed in glioma cells turns TGF-β into an oncogene. For that reason, it plays critical roles in glioma progression through induction of several genes implicated in many carcinogenic processes such as proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. Consequently, investigators have begun developing innovative therapeutics targeting this growth factor or its signaling pathway in an attempt to hinder TGF-β's appalling effects in order to refine the treatment of malignant gliomas and improve their prognosis. In this paper, we extensively review the TGF-β-induced oncogenic pathways and discuss the diverse new molecules targeting this growth factor. PMID:24590691

  4. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T.; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K.; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W.; Borger, Darrell R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Iafrate, A. John; Cahill, Daniel P.; Chi, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. METHODS We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. RESULTS By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored “lineage-defining” mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P=.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations while IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months, P=.0011). CONCLUSION A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. PMID:24714777

  5. KCa3.1 channel inhibition sensitizes malignant gliomas to temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Alfonso; Chece, Giuseppina; Porzia, Alessandra; Esposito, Vincenzo; Santoro, Antonio; Salvati, Maurizio; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Ragozzino, Davide; Angelantonio, Silvia Di; Wulff, Heike; Catalano, Myriam; Limatola, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are among the most frequent and aggressive cerebral tumors, characterized by high proliferative and invasive indexes. Standard therapy for patients, after surgery and radiotherapy, consists of temozolomide (TMZ), a methylating agent that blocks tumor cell proliferation. Currently, there are no therapies aimed at reducing tumor cell invasion. Ion channels are candidate molecular targets involved in glioma cell migration and infiltration into the brain parenchyma. In this paper we demonstrate that: i) blockade of the calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 with TRAM-34 has co-adjuvant effects with TMZ, reducing GL261 glioma cell migration, invasion and colony forming activity, increasing apoptosis, and forcing cells to pass the G2/M cell cycle phase, likely through cdc2 de-phosphorylation; ii) KCa3.1 silencing potentiates the inhibitory effect of TMZ on glioma cell viability; iii) the combination of TMZ/TRAM-34 attenuates the toxic effects of glioma conditioned medium on neuronal cultures, through a microglia dependent mechanism since the effect is abolished by clodronate-induced microglia killing; iv) TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment increases the number of apoptotic tumor cells, and the mean survival time in a syngeneic mouse glioma model (C57BL6 mice implanted with GL261 cells); v) TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment reduces cell viability of GBM cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) freshly isolated from patients. Taken together, these data suggest a new therapeutic approach for malignant glioma, targeting both glioma cell proliferating and migration, and demonstrate that TMZ/TRAM-34 co-treatment affects both glioma cells and infiltrating microglia, resulting in an overall reduction of tumor cell progression. PMID:27096953

  6. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  7. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  8. Bevacizumab rescue therapy extends the survival in patients with recurrent malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Lai, Ming-Yao; Shan, Chang-Guo; Lian, Zong-De; Hong, Wei-Ping; Zhen, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Li-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Objective We retrospectively studied the efficacy of bevacizumab as salvage therapy for recurrent malignant glioma with a focus on the overall survival (OS). Methods Patients who received a therapy other than surgery for recurrent malignant glioma were included. Efficacy was evaluated using MRI. Neurological function was evaluated using the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO). The survival rate was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Fifty-one patients with recurrent glioma (31 grade III, 20 grade IV) were included. Among them, 22 subjects (43.1%) received bevacizumab. The median OS was 10.2 months (range, 1 to 27 months). Patients receiving bevacizumab had comparable OS (a median of 9.9 vs. 10.0 months) and similar 6-month survival rate (43% vs. 34%) to those who did not receive bevacizumab. A subgroup analysis failed to notice any significant difference in grade III glioma patients receiving bevacizumab vs. those who did not. The median survival was significantly longer at 8.9 months (range, 4 to 13 months) in grade IV glioma patients receiving bevacizumab than in those who did not (5.6 months, range, 2 to 7 months, P=0.042). The 6-month survival rate was higher (83%) in those who received bevacizumab than in those who did not (47%, P=0.046). No grade 3/4 adverse events were observed in any patient. Conclusions Bevacizumab, as a rescue therapy, provides a survival benefit for recurrent grade IV glioma. PMID:23592902

  9. DNA demethylating agents synergize with oncolytic HSV1 against malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Kasai, Kazue; Wagner, Benjamin; Haseley, Amy; Meisen, Hans; Bolyard, Chelsea; Mo, Xiaokui; Wehr, Allison; Lehman, Amy; Fernandez, Soledad; Kaur, Balveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oncolytic viruses (OV) based on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) are being utilized in clinical trials for a variety of cancers. The OV, rQNestin34.5, utilizes a nestin promoter/enhancer to selectively drive robust viral replication in malignant glioma cells. We have discovered that this promoter becomes extensively methylated in infected glioma cells, reducing OV efficacy. Experimental Design We utilized demethylating drugs (5-azacytidine), Decitabine or Valproic Acid (VPA) in both in vitro and in vivo malignant glioma models to determine if they improved the efficacy of rQNestin34.5 therapy. Results Utilization of demethylating agents, such as 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), improved OV replication and tumor cell lysis in vitro and, in fact, synergized pharmacologically by Chou-Talalay analysis. In vivo the combination of the demethylating agents, 5-Aza or Decitabine, with rQNestin34.5 significantly prolonged the survivorship of athymic mice harboring intracranial human glioma xenografts over single agent alone. Conclusion These results thus provide further justification for the exploration of demethylating agents when combined with the OV, rQNestin34.5, in preclinical therapeutics and possibly clinical trials for malignant glioma. PMID:24056786

  10. Mechanism for enhanced 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Kwon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Hyeonjin; Lee, Se-Hoon; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sunghyouk; Park, Chul-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has become the main treatment modality in malignant gliomas. However unlike glioblastomas, there are inconsistent result about fluorescence status in WHO grade III gliomas. Here, we show that mutational status of IDH1 is linked to 5-ALA fluorescence. Using genetically engineered malignant glioma cells harboring wild type (U87MG-IDH1WT) or mutant (U87MG-IDH1R132H) IDH1, we demonstrated a lag in 5-ALA metabolism and accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in U87MG-IDH1R132H cells. Next, we used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to screen for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-related metabolite changes caused by 5-ALA exposure. We observed low baseline levels of NADPH, an essential cofactor for the rate-limiting step of heme degradation, in U87MG-IDH1R132H cells. High levels of NADPH are required to metabolize excessive 5-ALA, giving a plausible reason for the temporarily enhanced 5-ALA fluorescence in mutant IDH1 cells. This hypothesis was supported by the results of metabolic screening in human malignant glioma samples. In conclusion, we have discovered a relationship between enhanced 5-ALA fluorescence and IDH1 mutations in WHO grade III gliomas. Low levels of NADPH in tumors with mutated IDH1 is responsible for the enhanced fluorescence. PMID:26008980

  11. Phase II Trial of Talampanel, a Glutamate Receptor Inhibitor, for Adults with Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Kreisl, Teri N.; Kim, Lyndon; Duic, J. Paul; Butman, John A.; Albert, Paul S.; Fine, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glioma cells secrete glutamate and also express AMPA glutamate receptors, which contribute to proliferation, migration and neurotoxicity of malignant gliomas. Talampanel is an oral AMPA receptor inhibitor with excellent CNS penetration and good tolerability in clinical trials for epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Methods: We conducted a phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy of talampanel in patients with recurrent malignant glioma as measured by 6-month progression free survival (PFS6). Results: Thirty patients (22 glioblastomas [GBM], 8 anaplastic gliomas [AG]; 63% men) with median age of 51 years (range, 20 to 67) and median KPS of 80 were included. Patients tolerated treatment well and most adverse events were mild and reversible; the most common toxicities were fatigue (27%), dizziness (23%) and ataxia (17%). There was only one partial response (5%) in the GBM stratum and none among AG patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 28 patients (93%) had died. The PFS6 was 4.6% for the initial 22 GBM patients and the study was terminated early due to treatment futility; PFS6 was 0% for 8 AG patients. Median PFS was 5.9 weeks for GBM and 8.9 weeks for AG patients. Median overall survival was 13 weeks for GBM and 14 months for AG patients. Conclusion: Talampanel was well tolerated but had no significant activity as a single agent in unselected recurrent malignant gliomas. PMID:20143438

  12. Fluorescence-guided resections and photodynamic therapy for malignant gliomas using 5-aminolevulinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert G.; Beck, Tobias; Beyer, Wolfgang; Pongratz, Thomas; Sroka, Ronald; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Stummer, Walter; Olzowy, Bernhard; Mehrkens, Jan H.; Tonn, Joerg C.; Reulen, Hans J.

    2005-04-01

    Oral application of 20 mg/kg bw of 5-aminolevulinic acid results in a highly specific accumulation of fluorescent and phototoxic Protoporphyrin IX in malignant glioma tissue. Surgical removal with fluorescence guidance is studied in a phase III clinical trial, adjuvant Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) to the surgical cavity is in phase II and for interstitial PDT of recurrent gliomas, a phase I/II study has started. Fluorescence guided resections have been shown to be safe and effective in augmenting neurosurgical removal of malignant gliomas in 52 consecutive patients. Intra-operative fluorescence spectroscopy showed statistically significant higher sensitizer accumulation in vital brain tumor versus the infiltration zone and in the infiltration zone versus adjacent normal brain, which contained very little PPIX. This is promisingly exploited for PDT - both to the surgical cavity by surface irradiation and for stereotactically guided interstitial irradiation.

  13. Convection enhanced delivery and in vivo imaging of polymeric nanoparticles for the treatment of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Nassir; Pytel, Peter; Cahill, Kirk E; Voce, David J; Kang, Shijun; Spretz, Ruben; Welp, Ulrich; Noriega, Sandra E; Nunez, Luis; Larsen, Gustavo F; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Yamini, Bakhtiar

    2013-01-01

    A major obstacle to the management of malignant glioma is the inability to effectively deliver therapeutic agent to the tumor. In this study, we describe a polymeric nanoparticle vector that not only delivers viable therapeutic, but can also be tracked in vivo using MRI. Nanoparticles, produced by a non-emulsion technique, were fabricated to carry iron oxide within the shell and the chemotherapeutic agent, temozolomide (TMZ), as the payload. Nanoparticle properties were characterized and subsequently their endocytosis-mediated uptake by glioma cells demonstrated. Convection enhanced delivery (CED) can disperse nanoparticles through the rodent brain and their distribution is accurately visualized by MRI. Infusion of nanoparticles does not result in observable animal toxicity relative to control. CED of TMZ bearing nanoparticles prolongs the survival of animals with intracranial xenografts compared to control. In conclusion, the described nanoparticle vector represents a unique multifunctional platform that can be used for image-guided treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:23891990

  14. MAGI3 negatively regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses malignant phenotypes of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuai; Meng, Ran; Fa, Pengyan; Zhao, Chunjuan; Liu, Hua; Song, Ran; Tao, Tao; Yang, Longyan; Dai, Jie; Wang, Songlin; Jiang, Wen G.; He, Junqi

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain malignancies and are associated with a poor prognosis. Here, we showed that the PDZ domain-containing protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 3 (MAGI3) was downregulated at the both mRNA and protein levels in human glioma samples. MAGI3 inhibited proliferation, migration, and cell cycle progression of glioma cells in its overexpression and knockdown studies. By using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we found that MAGI3 bound to β-catenin through its PDZ domains and the PDZ-binding motif of β-catenin. MAGI3 overexpression inhibited β-catenin transcriptional activity via its interaction with β-catenin. Consistently, MAGI3 overexpression in glioma cells C6 suppressed expression of β-catenin target genes including Cyclin D1 and Axin2, whereas MAGI3 knockdown in glioma cells U373 and LN229 enhanced their expression. MAGI3 overexpression decreased growth of C6 subcutaneous tumors in mice, and inhibited expression of β-catenin target genes in xenograft tumors. Furthermore, analysis based on the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) glioma dataset showed association of MAGI3 expression with overall survival and tumor grade. Finally, we demonstrated negative correlation between MAGI3 expression and activity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through GSEA of three public glioma datasets and immunohistochemical staining of clinical glioma samples. Taken together, these results identify MAGI3 as a novel tumor suppressor and provide insight into the pathogenesis of glioma. PMID:26452219

  15. A New Hope in Immunotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Adoptive T Cell Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dong-Sup; Shin, Hye-Jin; Hong, Yong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy emerged as a promising therapeutic approach to highly incurable malignant gliomas due to tumor-specific cytotoxicity, minimal side effect, and a durable antitumor effect by memory T cells. But, antitumor activities of endogenously activated T cells induced by immunotherapy such as vaccination are not sufficient to control tumors because tumor-specific antigens may be self-antigens and tumors have immune evasion mechanisms to avoid immune surveillance system of host. Although recent clinical results from vaccine strategy for malignant gliomas are encouraging, these trials have some limitations, particularly their failure to expand tumor antigen-specific T cells reproducibly and effectively. An alternative strategy to overcome these limitations is adoptive T cell transfer therapy, in which tumor-specific T cells are expanded ex vivo rapidly and then transferred to patients. Moreover, enhanced biologic functions of T cells generated by genetic engineering and modified immunosuppressive microenvironment of host by homeostatic T cell expansion and/or elimination of immunosuppressive cells and molecules can induce more potent antitumor T cell responses and make this strategy hold promise in promoting a patient response for malignant glioma treatment. Here we will review the past and current progresses and discuss a new hope in adoptive T cell therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:25009822

  16. Treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas with 13-cis-retinoic acid naphthalene triazole.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pi-Feng; Gu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Li, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma are challenges to clinical biologists at present. The patients with glioblastoma have median survival of less than 12 months, despite advances in radiotherapeutical, chemotherapeutical and conventional surgical modalities. Retinoic acids are known to effect in vitro proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in colon, prostate, lung, and leukemia cancers. Retinoids are known to have anti-proliferation, anti-migration, and anti-invasive activity against human malignant gliomas, suggesting that retinoids are suitable anticancer agents to inhibit progression of tumors. Recurrent malignant cerebral gliomas have been treated with ATRA and 13-cis RA. However, the side effects associated with the use of high doses of retinoic acid demand for some more potent derivative free from such effects. The present clinical trials are undertaken to investigate the clinical safety and possible efficacy of administering retinoic acid naphthalene triazole (RANT) to patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. The toxicities observed in the patients during RANT treatment were mild. These preliminary results suggest that RANT is more potent compared to RA against recurrent malignant gliomas.

  17. The EGF Receptor Promotes the Malignant Potential of Glioma by Regulating Amino Acid Transport System xc(-).

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Okazaki, Shogo; Ohmura, Mitsuyo; Ishikawa, Miyuki; Sampetrean, Oltea; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Yoshikawa, Momoko; Seishima, Ryo; Iwasaki, Yoshimi; Morikawa, Takayuki; Abe, Shinya; Takao, Ayumi; Shimizu, Misato; Masuko, Takashi; Nagane, Motoo; Furnari, Frank B; Akiyama, Tetsu; Suematsu, Makoto; Baba, Eishi; Akashi, Koichi; Saya, Hideyuki; Nagano, Osamu

    2016-05-15

    Extracellular free amino acids contribute to the interaction between a tumor and its microenvironment through effects on cellular metabolism and malignant behavior. System xc(-) is composed of xCT and CD98hc subunits and functions as a plasma membrane antiporter for the uptake of extracellular cystine in exchange for intracellular glutamate. Here, we show that the EGFR interacts with xCT and thereby promotes its cell surface expression and function in human glioma cells. EGFR-expressing glioma cells manifested both enhanced antioxidant capacity as a result of increased cystine uptake, as well as increased glutamate, which promotes matrix invasion. Imaging mass spectrometry also revealed that brain tumors formed in mice by human glioma cells stably overexpressing EGFR contained higher levels of reduced glutathione compared with those formed by parental cells. Targeted inhibition of xCT suppressed the EGFR-dependent enhancement of antioxidant capacity in glioma cells, as well as tumor growth and invasiveness. Our findings establish a new functional role for EGFR in promoting the malignant potential of glioma cells through interaction with xCT at the cell surface. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2954-63. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Characterization of highly proliferative secondary tumor clusters along host blood vessels in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Yang, Wei-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extensive invasion of tumor cells into normal brain tissue, a life‑threatening feature of malignant gliomas. How invasive tumor cells migrate into normal brain tissue and form a secondary tumor structure remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the morphological and phenotypic changes of glioma cells during invasion in a C6 glioma model were investigated. C6 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the right putamen region of adult Sprague‑Dawley rats. The brain tissue sections were then subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining. High magnification views of the tissue sections revealed that C6 cells formed tumor spheroids following implantation and marked invasion was observed shortly after spheroid formation. In the later stages of invasion, certain tumor cells invaded the perivascular space and formed small tumor clusters. These small tumor clusters exhibited certain common features, including tumor cell multilayers surrounding an arteriole, which occurred up to several millimeters away from the primary tumor mass; a high proliferation rate; and similar gene expression profiles to the primary tumor. In conclusion, the present study revealed that invading tumor cells are capable of forming highly proliferative cell clusters along arterioles near the tumor margin, which may be a possible cause of the recurrence of malignant glioma.

  19. Characterization of highly proliferative secondary tumor clusters along host blood vessels in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-CHUNG; CHENG, CHUN-YU; YANG, WEI-HSUN; CHEN, WEN-CHENG; CHANG, PEY-JIUM

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extensive invasion of tumor cells into normal brain tissue, a life-threatening feature of malignant gliomas. How invasive tumor cells migrate into normal brain tissue and form a secondary tumor structure remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the morphological and phenotypic changes of glioma cells during invasion in a C6 glioma model were investigated. C6 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the right putamen region of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The brain tissue sections were then subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining. High magnification views of the tissue sections revealed that C6 cells formed tumor spheroids following implantation and marked invasion was observed shortly after spheroid formation. In the later stages of invasion, certain tumor cells invaded the perivascular space and formed small tumor clusters. These small tumor clusters exhibited certain common features, including tumor cell multilayers surrounding an arteriole, which occurred up to several millimeters away from the primary tumor mass; a high proliferation rate; and similar gene expression profiles to the primary tumor. In conclusion, the present study revealed that invading tumor cells are capable of forming highly proliferative cell clusters along arterioles near the tumor margin, which may be a possible cause of the recurrence of malignant glioma. PMID:26299849

  20. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  1. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morshed, Ramin A; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma.

  2. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Muroski, Megan E.; Morshed, Ramin A.; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S.; Cowburn, Russell P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26734932

  3. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Ciarlantini, Matias; Gandolfi Donadío, Lucia; Comin, María Julieta; Alonso, Daniel F; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models. PMID:25378937

  4. Epigenetic silencing of KAZALD1 confers a better prognosis and is associated with malignant transformation/progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Feng, Ying; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Chuanlu; Yan, Wei; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Quangeng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2013-11-01

    In order to more thoroughly analyze aberrant DNA methylation in glioma, we applied a large cohort methylation microarray including 119 glioma samples. Six genes, ADCY1, KAZALD1, KLF4, SLMAP, TETRAN and TP53INP1, were screened out through significance analysis of microarray (SAM), survival Cox-regression and certain other pre-set conditions. We focused on the KAZALD1 oncogene. KAZALD1, also known as IGFBP-rP10, belongs to the IGFBP family. We found that KAZALD1 was hypomethylated in high-grade glioma (anaplastic gliomas and glioblastomas) compared to low-grade glioma (astrocytoma, oligodendrocytoma and oligoastrocytoma) using methylation microarrays (p<0.001). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 91 glioma samples showed that the KAZALD1 expression scores of high-grade glioma samples were higher compared to the scores of low-grade gliomas (p<0.001). In high-grade gliomas, overall survival (OS) was shorter for patients with KAZALD1 hypomethylation or overexpression compared to those without. Decreased KAZALD1 expression in glioma inhibited cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of these observations and the results from subset analysis, it is reasonable to conclude that KAZALD1 promoter hypomethylation is an important prognostic biomarker in glioma. KAZALD1 promotes glioma malignant progression through invasion and proliferation. PMID:24002581

  5. Ketolytic and glycolytic enzymatic expression profiles in malignant gliomas: implication for ketogenic diet therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies in animal models, based on the hypothesis that malignant glioma cells are more dependent on glycolysis for energy generation, have shown promising results using ketogenic diet (KD) therapy as an alternative treatment strategy for malignant glioma, effectively starving glioma cells while providing ketone bodies as an energy source for normal neurons and glial cells. In order to test this treatment strategy in humans, we investigated the relative expression of several key enzymes involved in ketolytic and glycolytic metabolism in human anaplastic glioma (WHO grade III) and glioblastoma (GBM, WHO grade IV). Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections from 22 brain biopsies (17 GBM, 3 anaplastic astrocytoma and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) using antibodies raised against glycolytic and ketolytic enzymes. The glycolytic enzymes included hexokinase-II (HK2) and pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2). The ketone body metabolic enzymes included: succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (OXCT1), 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and BDH2), and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1). The immunoreactivities were graded using a semi-quantitative scale based on the percentage of positive cells: POS (>20%), LOW (5-20%), and very low (VLOW) (<5%). Focal non-neoplastic “normal” brain tissue within the biopsy specimens served as internal controls. Results The rate limiting mitochondrial ketolytic enzymes (OXCT1 and BDH1) were either LOW or VLOW, concordantly in 14 of the 17 GBMs and in 1 of 5 anaplastic gliomas, whereas at least one of the glycolytic enzymes was POS in 13 of these 17 GBMs and all 5 anaplastic gliomas. Cytosolic BDH2 and mitochondrial ACTAT1 were, surprisingly, POS in most of these tumors. Conclusion Our results showing that malignant gliomas have differential expression of ketolytic and glycolytic enzymes are consistent with previous studies that have shown that these are genetically

  6. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12-15 months for glioblastomas and 2-5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas.

  7. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) analysis of heritable effects of radiation-induced malignant transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitzelsberger, Horst; Fung, Jingly; Janish, C.; McNamara, George; Bryant, P. E.; Riches, A. C.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    1999-05-01

    Radiocarcinogenesis is widely recognized as occupational, environmental and therapeutical hazard, but the underlying mechanisms and cellular targets have not yet been identified. We applied SKY to study chromosomal rearrangements leading to malignant transformation of irradiated thyroid epithelial cells. SKY is a recently developed technique to detect translocations involving non-homologous based on unique staining of all 24 human chromosomes by hybridization with a mixture of whole chromosome painting probes. A tuneable interferometer mounted on a fluorescence microscope in front of a CCD camera allows to record the 400 nm - 1000 nm fluorescence spectrum for each pixel in the image. After background correction, spectra recorded for each pixel are compared to reference spectra stored previously for each chromosome-specific probe. Thus, pixel spectra can be associated with specific chromosomes and displayed in 'classification' colors, which are defined so that even small translocations become readily discernible. SKY analysis was performed on several radiation-transformed cell lines. Line S48T was generated from a primary tumor of a child exposed to elevated levels of radiation following the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Subclones were generated from the human thyroid epithelial cell line (HTori-3) by exposure to gamma or alpha irradiation. SKY analysis revealed multiple translocations and, combined with G-banding, allowed the definition of targets for positional cloning of tumor related genes.

  8. Interstitial chemotherapy with biodegradable BCNU (Gliadel®) wafers in the treatment of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Daniela A; Desjardins, Annick; Quinn, Jennifer A; Affronti, Mary L; Friedman, Henry S

    2007-01-01

    Malignant gliomas represent the majority of primary brain tumors, and the prognosis of the patients afflicted with these tumors has been historically dismal, with almost uniform progressive neurologic impairment and rapid death. Even with multimodal treatment using surgery, focal radiation, and chemotherapy, no major strides were made until recently. The development of interstitial BCNU wafers (carmustine wafers, Gliadel®) has led to promising results in the treatment of a selected patients with malignant gliomas, as well as with other intracranial malignancies.BCNU is one of the first systemic chemotherapies which had obtained United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the treatment of brain tumors. However, systemic use has been hampered by the modest prolongation of survival and by the prolonged myelosuppression and potentially fatal pulmonary toxicity. The development of interstitial therapies with BCNU represented a great step forward, allowing direct delivery to the tumor bed, with virtually no systemic toxicities. Clinical studies of BCNU wafers have showed good efficacy in both newly diagnosed and recurrent gliomas, as well as a possible therapeutic role in other primary or secondary intracranial malignancies. New studies are currently underway trying to improve the efficacy of the BCNU wafers (Gliadel®) by combining them with different systemic chemotherapies. An overview of the current knowledge ranging from the preclinical developments, to the efficacy and safety seen in the clinical trials and in clinical practice following the drug approval to the future avenues of research is therefore timely. PMID:18472995

  9. Clinical aggressiveness of malignant gliomas is linked to augmented metabolism of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Lasky, Joseph L; Lin, Henry J; Lai, Albert; Hai, Yang; Guo, Xiuqing; Quinn, Michael; Nelson, Stanley F; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nghiemphu, P Leia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine, glutamate, asparagine, and aspartate are involved in an enzyme-network that controls nitrogen metabolism. Branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase-1 (BCAT1) promotes proliferation of gliomas with wild-type IDH1 and is closely connected to the network. We hypothesized that metabolism of asparagine, glutamine, and branched-chain-amino-acids is associated with progression of malignant gliomas. Gene expression for asparagine synthetase (ASNS), glutaminase (GLS), and BCAT1 were analyzed in 164 gliomas from 156 patients [33-anaplastic gliomas (AG) and 131-glioblastomas (GBM), 64 of which were recurrent GBMs]. ASNS and GLS were twofold higher in GBMs versus AGs. BCAT1 was also higher in GBMs. ASNS expression was twofold higher in recurrent versus new GBMs. Five patients had serial samples: 4-showed higher ASNS and 3-higher GLS at recurrence. We analyzed grade and treatment in 4 groups: (1) low ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 (n = 96); (2) low ASNS and GLS, but high BCAT1 (n = 26); (3) high ASNS or GLS, but low BCAT1 (n = 25); and (4) high ASNS or GLS and high BCAT1 (n = 17). Ninety-one  % of patients (29/32) with grade-III lesions were in group 1. In contrast, 95 % of patients (62/65) in groups 2-4 had GBMs. Treatment was similar in 4 groups (radiotherapy-80 %; temozolomide-30 %; other chemotherapy-50 %). High expression of ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 were each associated with poor survival in the entire group. The combination of lower ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 levels correlated with better survival for newly diagnosed GBMs (66 patients; P = 0.0039). Only tumors with lower enzymes showed improved outcome with temozolomide. IDH1(WT) gliomas had higher expression of these genes. Manipulation of amino acid metabolism in malignant gliomas may be further studied for therapeutics development. PMID:26922345

  10. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  11. Inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical channels impairs cytokinesis in human malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, V. C.; Sontheimer, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glial-derived primary brain tumours, gliomas, are among the fastest growing malignancies and present a huge clinical challenge. Research suggests an important, yet poorly understood, role of ion channels in growth control of normal and malignant cells. In this study, we sought to functionally characterize Transient Receptor Potential Canoncial (TRPC) channels in glioma cell proliferation. TRPC channels form non-selective cation channels that have been suggested to represent a Ca2+ influx pathway impacting cellular growth. Materials and Methods Employing a combination of molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques, we characterized TRPC channels in glioma cells. Results We showed consistent expression of four channel family members (TRPC-1, -3, -5, -6) in glioma cell lines and acute patient-derived tissues. These channels gave rise to small, non-voltage-dependent cation currents that were blocked by the TRPC inhibitors GdCl3, 2-APB, or SKF96365. Importantly, TRPC channels contributed to the resting conductance of glioma cells and their acute pharmacological inhibition caused an ~10 mV hyperpolarization of the cells’ resting potential. Additionally, chronic application of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365 caused near complete growth arrest. A detailed analysis, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and time-lapse microscopy, showed that growth inhibition occurred at the G2 + M phase of the cell cycle with cytokinesis defects. Cells underwent incomplete cell divisions and became multinucleate, enlarged cells. Conclusions Nuclear atypia and enlarged cells are histopathological hallmarks for glioblastoma multiforme, the highest grade glioma, suggesting that a defect in TRPC channel function may contribute to cellular abnormalities in these tumours. PMID:18211288

  12. The management of lomustine overdose in malignant glioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Tritschler, Isabel; Palla, Antonella; Renner, Christoph; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh

    2014-01-01

    Lomustine is an oral alkylating drug commonly used for brain tumor patients. Recently, the lomustine-containing PCV polychemotherapy regime (procarbazine, CCNU/lomustine, and vincristine) in combination with radiotherapy has become the standard of care for anaplastic oligodendroglioma with 1p/19q codeletion and high-risk low-grade glioma. Here, we review the literature of all reported cases of lomustine overdose, highlight complications by exemplifying a case of inadvertent lomustine overdose, and outline the management of this potential complication of outpatient PCV therapy. PMID:26034630

  13. Malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by the brain glioma niche in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuping; Zou, Xifeng; Duan, Deyi; Liu, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Normal human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can develop neoplastic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties after coculture with transformed hESCs in vitro. In the present study, the influence of the tumor microenvironment on malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was studied after allografting a mixture of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled BMSCs and C6 glioma cells into the rat brain to understand the influence of the cellular environment, especially the tumor environment, on the transformation of grafted BMSCs in the rat brain. We performed intracerebral transplantation in the rat brain using EGFP-labeled BMSCs coinjected with C6 tumor cells. After transplantation, the EGFP-labeled cells were isolated from the tumor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the characteristics of the recovered cells were investigated. Glioma-specific biomarkers of the sorted cells and the biological characteristics of the tumors were analyzed. The BMSCs isolated from the cografts were transformed into glioma CSCs, as indicated by the marked expression of the glioma marker GFAP in glioma cells, and of Nestin and CD133 in neural stem cells and CSCs, as well as rapid cell growth, decreased level of the tumor suppressor gene p53, increased level of the oncogene murine double minute gene 2 (MDM2), and recapitulation of glioma tissues in the brain. These data suggest that BMSCs can be transformed into CSCs, which can be further directed toward glioma formation under certain conditions, supporting the notion that the tumor microenvironment is involved in transforming normal BMSCs into glial CSCs. PMID:26590986

  14. Intraoperative vascular DIVA surgery reveals angiogenic hotspots in tumor zones of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Fan, Zheng; Buslei, Rolf; Merkel, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas belong to the most threatening tumor entities and are hallmarked by rapid proliferation, hypervascularization and an invasive growth pattern. The primary obstacle in surgical treatment lies in differentiation between healthy and pathological tissue at the tumor margins, where current visualization methods reach their limits. Here, we report on a novel technique (vascular dual intraoperative visualization approach - vDIVA) enabling visualization of different tumor zones (TZ I–III) on the basis of angiogenic hotspots. We investigated glioblastoma patients who underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery with simultaneous intraoperative ICG fluorescence angiography. This vDIVA technique revealed hypervascularized areas which were further histologically investigated. Neuropathological assessments revealed tissue areas at the resection margins corresponding to TZ II, and postoperative CD34- and Map2 immunostaining confirmed these angiogenic hotspots to be occupied by glioma cells. Hence, the vascular architecture in this transitional zone could be well differentiated from both primary tumor bulk and healthy brain parenchyma. These data demonstrate that ICG fluorescence angiography improves state-of-the-art glioma surgery techniques and facilitates the future characterization of polyclonal attributes of malignant gliomas. PMID:25609379

  15. Interstitial chemotherapy for malignant glioma: Future prospects in the era of multimodal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The advent of interstitial chemotherapy has significantly increased therapeutic options for patients with malignant glioma. Interstitial chemotherapy can deliver high concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents, directly at the site of the brain tumor while bypassing systemic toxicities. Gliadel, a locally implanted polymer that releases the alkylating agent carmustine, given alone and in combination with various other antitumor and resistance modifying therapies, has significantly increased the median survival for patients with malignant glioma. Convection enhanced delivery, a technique used to directly infuse drugs into brain tissue, has shown promise for the delivery of immunotoxins, monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. Preclinical studies include delivery of chemotherapeutic and immunomodulating agents by polymer and microchips. Interstitial chemotherapy was shown to maximize local efficacy and is an important strategy for the efficacy of any multimodal approach. PMID:25722936

  16. The Potential of Tetrandrine against Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tseng, Sheng-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Patients with malignant gliomas have poor prognoses, and the majority of the patients have local tumor recurrence after various treatments including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Thus it is mandatory to develop better therapies for treatment of these malignant brain tumors. Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has antitumor effects against some cancers. Tetrandrine affects the cell cycle, production of reactive oxygen species, mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, and reverses multidrug resistance in various cancer cells. Since tetrandrine is a highly lipid-soluble and hydrophobic molecule with a low molecular weight, it may cross the blood brain barrier; thus, it could be used for the treatment of gliomas. Tetrandrine inhibits the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and the expression of BK channel has a positive correlation with tumor malignancy grade in human gliomas. Furthermore, tetrandrine also exerts cytotoxic effects, and induces apoptosis and radiosensitization in glioma cells by elimination of radiation-induced cell cycle perturbation. It also has anti-angiogenesis effects in gliomas, and exerts an antitumor effect on subcutaneous and intracerebral gliomas. Tetrandrine is a radiosensitizer and also a multidrug resistance reversing agent. Tetrandrine can probably be combined with radiotherapy or other chemotherapeutic agents to treat gliomas. Nonetheless, it is important to determine the balance between the safety and efficacy of tetrandrine in patients with malignant gliomas before any clinical application.

  17. Bevacizumab and irinotecan in recurrent malignant glioma, a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja; Moltara, Maja Ebert; Boc, Marko; Rebersek, Martina; Ocvirk, Janja

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment options of recurrent malignant gliomas are very limited and with a poor survival benefit. The results from phase II trials suggest that the combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan is beneficial. Patients and methods. The medical documentation of 19 adult patients with recurrent malignant gliomas was retrospectively reviewed. All patients received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan (340 mg/m2 or 125 mg/m2) every two weeks. Patient clinical characteristics, drug toxicities, response rate, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Between August 2008 and November 2011, 19 patients with recurrent malignant gliomas (median age 44.7, male 73.7%, WHO performance status 0–2) were treated with bevacizumab/irinotecan regimen. Thirteen patients had glioblastoma, 5 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. With exception of one patient, all patients had initially a standard therapy with primary resection followed by postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Radiological response was confirmed after 3 months in 9 patients (1 complete response, 8 partial responses), seven patients had stable disease and three patients have progressed. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3–8.3) with six-month PFS rate 52.6%. The median OS was 7.7 months (95% CI: 6.6–8.7), while six-month and twelve-month survival rates were 68.4% and 31.6%, respectively. There were 16 cases of hematopoietic toxicity grade (G) 1–2. Non-hematopoietic toxicity was present in 14 cases, all G1-2, except for one patient with proteinuria G3. No grade 4 toxicities, no thromboembolic event and no intracranial hemorrhage were observed. Conclusions In recurrent malignant gliomas combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan might be an active regimen with acceptable toxicity. PMID:25810706

  18. PM-16IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE FACTORS, MDSC AND ARGINASE, ARE ELEVATED IN DOGS WITH MALIGNANT GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, Liz; Goulart, Michelle; Seiler, Charles; Olin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy for malignant gliomas has striking efficacy in rodent models but very limited effects in clinical trials, which may reflect immunological differences between induced and spontaneous tumors. The monocytes that heavily infiltrate GBM develop myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) phenotype, and these immunosuppressive cells are increased in GBM patients, but not in murine models. Canine primary brain tumors may offer a more faithful representation of the human disease due to similarities in clinical and pathobiological characteristics. We were recently first to identify MDSC in dogs and found significantly increased in number in dogs with advanced cancers. To add further support to pet dogs with glioma as a translational model, we assessed whether canine glioma patients also have elevated numbers of MDSC relative to healthy dogs. MDSC secrete arginase that removes L-arginine from the microenvironment profoundly impairing T cell proliferation and function. Therefore we also measured serum levels of arginase 1 in all dogs. The mean percentage of monocytic MDSC in peripheral blood of dogs with glioma (n = 26) was 7.51 ± 1.31, which was significantly greater than healthy controls (n = 10) with 0.74 ± 0.34 (P< 0.0001). The median percentages of granulocytic MDSC did not differ between dogs with glioma versus controls, 15.95% and 12.5% respectively. There were also significantly increased levels of arginase in the serum of dogs with gliomas, 8.00 ± 3.32 U/L, relative to that of healthy controls, 2.40 ± 1.40 U/L (P < 0.0001). These data demonstrate that some of the immunosuppressive mechanisms present in human gliomas patients are also found in dogs with malignant gliomas. These findings lend further support that the pet dog with spontaneous brain cancer that shares our environment is an excellent translational model for the human disease. We are currently working to correlate changes in numbers of MDSC and arginase levels in serum with disease burden as

  19. Targeted delivery of antitumoral therapy to glioma and other malignancies with synthetic chlorotoxin (TM-601).

    PubMed

    Mamelak, Adam N; Jacoby, Douglas B

    2007-03-01

    Targeted therapies for cancer is a rapidly advancing field, but the identification of tumor-specific ligands has proven difficult. Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a small, 36 amino acid neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the Giant Yellow Israeli scorpion Leiurus Quinquestriatus. Interestingly, the peptide has been found to preferentially bind to a variety of human malignancies, but shows little or no binding to normal human tissues. A synthetic version of this peptide (TM-601) has been manufactured and covalently linked to iodine 131 (131I-TM-601) as a means of targeting radiation to tumor cells. Preclinical studies and Phase I clinical trials have been completed in patients with recurrent glioma, a type of malignant brain tumor. These studies demonstrated that intracavitary dosing of 131I-TM-601 appears safe, minimally toxic, and binds malignant glioma with high affinity and for long durations. A Phase II trial of this agent using higher doses of radioactivity and repeated local administrations is underway. In addition, enrolment has begun in a Phase I trial evaluating whether systemically delivered 131I-TM-601 can be used to image metastatic solid tumors and primary gliomas. Due to its small size, selective tumor binding properties, minimal toxicity and relative ease of manipulation, CTX represents a potentially important targeting agent for many cancers.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Bevacizumab With Hypofractionated Stereotactic Irradiation for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, Philip H. Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Beal, Kathryn; Mohile, Nimish A.; Karimi, Sasan; Hou, Bob L.; Lymberis, Stella; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chang, Jenghwa

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies suggest that inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves glioma response to radiotherapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has shown promise in recurrent gliomas, but the safety and efficacy of concurrent bevacizumab with brain irradiation has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the safety and activity of this combination in malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: After prior treatment with standard radiation therapy patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic gliomas (AG) received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) every 2 weeks of 28-day cycles until tumor progression. Patients also received 30 Gy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) in five fractions after the first cycle of bevacizumab. Results: Twenty-five patients (20 GBM, 5 AG; median age 56 years; median Karnofsky Performance Status 90) received a median of seven cycles of bevacizumab. One patient did not undergo HFSRT because overlap with prior radiotherapy would exceed the safe dose allowed to the optic chiasm. Three patients discontinued treatment because of Grade 3 central nervous system intratumoral hemorrhage, wound dehiscence, and bowel perforation. Other nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were transient. No radiation necrosis was seen in these previously irradiated patients. For the GBM cohort, overall response rate was 50%, 6-month progression-free survival was 65%; median overall survival was 12.5 months, and 1-year survival was 54%. Discussion: Bevacizumab with HFSRT is safe and well tolerated. Radiographic responses, duration of disease control, and survival suggest that this regimen is active in recurrent malignant glioma.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Adjuvant Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Sampson, John H.; Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine B.; Friedman, Henry S.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and multiagent systemic therapies were reviewed to determine the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on survival and toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with salvage SRS from September 2002 to March 2010. All patients had experienced progression after treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy. Salvage SRS was typically administered only after multiple postchemoradiation salvage systemic therapies had failed. Results: 63 patients were treated with SRS for recurrent high-grade glioma; 49 patients had World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 4 disease. Median follow-up was 31 months from primary diagnosis and 7 months from SRS. Median overall survival from primary diagnosis was 41 months for all patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival from SRS (OS-SRS) were 6 and 10 months for all patients, respectively. The 1-year OS-SRS for patients with Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant (concurrent with or after SRS) bevacizumab was 50% vs. 22% for patients not receiving adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.005). Median PFS for patients with a WHO Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant bevacizumab was 5.2 months vs. 2.1 months for patients who did not receive adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.014). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and age were not significantly different between treatment groups. Treatment-related Grade 3/4 toxicity for patients receiving and not receiving adjuvant BVZ was 10% and 14%, respectively (p = 0.58).On multivariate analysis, the relative risk of death and progression with adjuvant bevacizumab was 0.37 (confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.82) and 0.45 (CI 0.21-0.97). KPS >70 and age <50 years were significantly associated with improved survival. Conclusions: The combination of salvage radiosurgery and bevacizumab to treat recurrent malignant

  2. Identification of novel genetic alterations in samples of malignant glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Milinkovic, Vedrana; Bankovic, Jasna; Rakic, Miodrag; Stankovic, Tijana; Skender-Gazibara, Milica; Ruzdijic, Sabera; Tanic, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant human brain tumor. High level of genomic instability detected in glioma cells implies that numerous genetic alterations accumulate during glioma pathogenesis. We investigated alterations in AP-PCR DNA profiles of 30 glioma patients, and detected specific changes in 11 genes not previously associated with this disease: LHFPL3, SGCG, HTR4, ITGB1, CPS1, PROS1, GP2, KCNG2, PDE4D, KIR3DL3, and INPP5A. Further correlations revealed that 8 genes might play important role in pathogenesis of glial tumors, while changes in GP2, KCNG2 and KIR3DL3 should be considered as passenger mutations, consequence of high level of genomic instability. Identified genes have a significant role in signal transduction or cell adhesion, which are important processes for cancer development and progression. According to our results, LHFPL3 might be characteristic of primary glioblastoma, SGCG, HTR4, ITGB1, CPS1, PROS1 and INPP5A were detected predominantly in anaplastic astrocytoma, suggesting their role in progression of secondary glioblastoma, while alterations of PDE4D seem to have important role in development of both glioblastoma subtypes. Some of the identified genes showed significant association with p53, p16, and EGFR, but there was no significant correlation between loss of PTEN and any of identified genes. In conclusion our study revealed genetic alterations that were not previously associated with glioma pathogenesis and could be potentially used as molecular markers of different glioblastoma subtypes. PMID:24358143

  3. Concurrent Chemotherapy of Malignant Glioma in Rats by Using Multidrug-Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Huang, Yin-Chen; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Yang, Shun-Tai; Liu, Shou-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme has a poor prognosis and is highly chemoresistant. In this study, we implanted biodegradable 1,3-bis[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitroso-urea-, irinotecan-, and cisplatin-eluting poly[(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide] (BIC/PLGA) and virgin nanofibrous membranes on the brain surface of C6 glioma-bearing rats in concurrent and virgin groups, respectively. The concentrations of all applied drugs were significantly higher in the brain than in the blood for more than 8 weeks in all studied rats. Tumor growth was more rapid in the vehicle-treated group, and tumor volumes were significantly higher in the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, the average survival time was significantly shorter in the vehicle-treated group (P = 0.026), and the BIC/PLGA nanofibrous membranes significantly reduced the risk of mortality (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the results suggested that the BIC/PLGA nanofibers reduced the malignancy of C6 glioma. The experimental findings indicate that the multianticancer drug (i.e., BIC)-eluting PLGA nanofibers are favorable candidates for treating malignant glioma.

  4. Concurrent Chemotherapy of Malignant Glioma in Rats by Using Multidrug-Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Huang, Yin-Chen; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Yang, Shun-Tai; Liu, Shou-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme has a poor prognosis and is highly chemoresistant. In this study, we implanted biodegradable 1,3-bis[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitroso-urea-, irinotecan-, and cisplatin-eluting poly[(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide] (BIC/PLGA) and virgin nanofibrous membranes on the brain surface of C6 glioma-bearing rats in concurrent and virgin groups, respectively. The concentrations of all applied drugs were significantly higher in the brain than in the blood for more than 8 weeks in all studied rats. Tumor growth was more rapid in the vehicle-treated group, and tumor volumes were significantly higher in the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, the average survival time was significantly shorter in the vehicle-treated group (P = 0.026), and the BIC/PLGA nanofibrous membranes significantly reduced the risk of mortality (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the results suggested that the BIC/PLGA nanofibers reduced the malignancy of C6 glioma. The experimental findings indicate that the multianticancer drug (i.e., BIC)-eluting PLGA nanofibers are favorable candidates for treating malignant glioma. PMID:27471070

  5. Proton beam irradiation stimulates migration and invasion of human U87 malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zaboronok, Alexander; Isobe, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Eisuke; Takada, Kenta; Sakae, Takeji; Tsurushima, Hideo; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Migration and invasion of malignant glioma play a major role in tumor progression and can be increased by low doses of gamma or X-ray irradiation, especially when the migrated tumor cells are located at a distance from the main tumor mass or postoperative cavity and are irradiated in fractions. We studied the influence of proton beam irradiation on migration and invasion of human U87 malignant glioma (U87MG) cells. Irradiation at 4 and 8 Gy increased cell migration by 9.8% (±4, P = 0.032) and 11.6% (±6.6, P = 0.031) and invasion by 45.1% (±16.5, P = 0.04) and 40.5% (±12.7, P = 0.041), respectively. After irradiation at 2 and 16 Gy, cell motility did not differ from that at 0 Gy. We determined that an increase in proton beam irradiation dose to over 16 Gy might provide tumor growth control, although additional specific treatment might be necessary to prevent the potentially increased motility of glioma cells during proton beam therapy. PMID:24187331

  6. Concurrent Chemotherapy of Malignant Glioma in Rats by Using Multidrug-Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Huang, Yin-Chen; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Yang, Shun-Tai; Liu, Shou-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme has a poor prognosis and is highly chemoresistant. In this study, we implanted biodegradable 1,3-bis[2-chloroethyl]-1-nitroso-urea-, irinotecan-, and cisplatin-eluting poly[(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide] (BIC/PLGA) and virgin nanofibrous membranes on the brain surface of C6 glioma-bearing rats in concurrent and virgin groups, respectively. The concentrations of all applied drugs were significantly higher in the brain than in the blood for more than 8 weeks in all studied rats. Tumor growth was more rapid in the vehicle-treated group, and tumor volumes were significantly higher in the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, the average survival time was significantly shorter in the vehicle-treated group (P = 0.026), and the BIC/PLGA nanofibrous membranes significantly reduced the risk of mortality (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the results suggested that the BIC/PLGA nanofibers reduced the malignancy of C6 glioma. The experimental findings indicate that the multianticancer drug (i.e., BIC)-eluting PLGA nanofibers are favorable candidates for treating malignant glioma. PMID:27471070

  7. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy.

  8. The deadly connection between endoplasmic reticulum, Ca2+, protein synthesis, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Wu, Jian-He; Vallejo, Matthew; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in Ca2+ signaling and protein processing. Accumulation of unfolded proteins following ER Ca2+ depletion triggers the ER stress response (ERSR), which facilitates protein folding and removal of damaged proteins and can induce cell death. Unfolded proteins bind to chaperones, such as the glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 and cause the release of GRP78-repressed proteins executing ERSR. Methods Several glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes were used to analyze ERSR using standard western blots, reverse transcription–PCR, viability assays, and single cell Ca2+ imaging. Results ERSR induction with thapsigargin results in a more intense ERSR associated with a larger loss of ER Ca2+, activation of ER-associated caspases (4/12) and caspase 3, and a higher rate of malignant glioma cell death than in normal glial cells. Malignant glioma cells have higher levels of protein synthesis and expression of the translocon (a component of the ribosomal complex, guiding protein entry in the ER), the activity of which is associated with the loss of ER Ca2+. Our experiments confirm increased expression of the translocon in malignant glioma cells. In addition, blockade of the ribosome-translocon complex with agents differently affecting translocon Ca2+ permeability causes opposite effects on ERSR deployment and death of malignant glioma cells. Conclusions Excessive ER Ca2+ loss due to translocon activity appears to be responsible for the enhancement of ERSR, leading to the death of glioma cells. The results reveal a characteristic of malignant glioma cells that could be exploited to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat incurable glial malignancies. PMID:24569545

  9. Potential Application of Temozolomide in Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based TRAIL Gene Therapy Against Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Muk; Woo, Ji Sun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Ryu, Chung Heon; Jang, Jae-Deog

    2014-01-01

    Because the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively kills tumor cells, it is one of the most promising candidates for cancer treatment. TRAIL-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-TRAIL) provide targeted and prolonged delivery of TRAIL in glioma therapy. However, acquired resistance to TRAIL of glioma cells is a major problem to be overcome. We showed a potential therapy that used MSC-TRAIL combined with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide (TMZ). The antitumor effects of the combination with MSC-TRAIL and TMZ on human glioma cells were determined by using an in vitro coculture system and an in vivo experimental xenografted mouse model. Intracellular signaling events that are responsible for the TMZ-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis were also evaluated. Treatment of either TRAIL-sensitive or -resistant human glioma cells with TMZ and MSC-TRAIL resulted in a significant enhancement of apoptosis compared with the administration of each agent alone. We demonstrated that TMZ effectively increased the sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated upregulation of the death receptor 5 and downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins, such as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein. Subsequently, this combined treatment resulted in a substantial increase in caspase activation. Furthermore, in vivo survival experiments and bioluminescence imaging analyses showed that treatment using MSC-TRAIL combined with TMZ had greater therapeutic efficacy than did single-agent treatments. These results suggest that the combination of clinically relevant TMZ and MSC-TRAIL is a potential therapeutic strategy for improving the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:24436439

  10. A phase II trial of tamoxifen and bortezomib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Odia, Yazmín; Kreisl, Teri N; Aregawi, Dawit; Innis, Ellen K; Fine, Howard A

    2015-10-01

    NF-kB inhibition by bortezomib enhances tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in preclinical glioma models. We conducted a single institution, phase II trial to evaluate efficacy and safety of high dose tamoxifen with bortezomib in adults with recurrent malignant gliomas. The primary endpoint was radiographic response. Concurrent enzyme inducing anticonvulsants and grade ≥2 peripheral neuropathy were exclusion criteria. Patients received tamoxifen (120 mg PO twice daily) and bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2 IV on days 3, 6, 10, 13, 24, 27, 31, and 34) per 6-week cycles. We enrolled 42 patients with anaplastic gliomas (AGs, n = 12) and glioblastomas (GBMs, n = 30), 32 males and 10 females. Median age was 38 years (range 22-65) and 48 years (range 19-68) for AGs and GBMs, respectively. median karnofsky performance status was 90% (range 70-100) for AGs and 80% (range 60-100) for GBMs. Median prior therapies was 3, ranging 1-7. Grade ≥3 toxicities included lymphopenia (4/42), hypophosphatemia (3/42), thromobocytopenia (2/42), and 1/42 with hyponatremia, headache, dyspnea, or DVT. One patient withdrew consent, two were removed for toxicity, and all others discontinued for progression. Among 40 patients evaluable for response, only one achieved stable disease for 3 months; all others progressed rapidly. For AGs and GBMs respectively, median progression-free survival was 5.9 and 5.7 weeks and median overall survival was 25.6 and 14.7 weeks. The study was closed due to poor accrual and therapeutic futility. Combination tamoxifen and bortezomib has no activity in recurrent malignant gliomas. Poor penetration across blood brain barrier of bortezomib likely limited efficacy.

  11. Collaborative labeling of malignant glioma with WebMILL: a first look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Eesha; Asman, Andrew J.; Xu, Zhoubing; Chambless, Lola; Thompson, Reid; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common form of primary neoplasm in the central nervous system, and one of the most rapidly fatal of all human malignancies. They are treated by maximal surgical resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Herein, we seek to improve the methods available to quantify the extent of tumors using newly presented, collaborative labeling techniques on magnetic resonance imaging. Traditionally, labeling medical images has entailed that expert raters operate on one image at a time, which is resource intensive and not practical for very large datasets. Using many, minimally trained raters to label images has the possibility of minimizing laboratory requirements and allowing high degrees of parallelism. A successful effort also has the possibility of reducing overall cost. This potentially transformative technology presents a new set of problems, because one must pose the labeling challenge in a manner accessible to people with little or no background in labeling medical images and raters cannot be expected to read detailed instructions. Hence, a different training method has to be employed. The training must appeal to all types of learners and have the same concepts presented in multiple ways to ensure that all the subjects understand the basics of labeling. Our overall objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of studying malignant glioma morphometry through statistical analysis of the collaborative efforts of many, minimally-trained raters. This study presents preliminary results on optimization of the WebMILL framework for neoplasm labeling and investigates the initial contributions of 78 raters labeling 98 whole-brain datasets.

  12. Phase I Dose Escalation Trial of Vandetanib With Fractionated Radiosurgery in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Emma C.; Damek, Denise; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Liu, Arthur K.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin; Chen, Changhu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vandetanib with fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with a recurrent malignant glioma and T1-enhancing recurrent tumor {<=}6 cm were eligible. Vandetanib was given orally, once per day, 7 days a week, starting at least 7 days before SRS and continued until a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) or disease progression. The planned vandetanib daily dose was 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg for the cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and was escalated using a standard 3+3 design. A total SRS dose of 36 Gy, 12 Gy per fraction, was delivered over 3 consecutive days. The MTD was defined as the dose of vandetanib at which less than 33% of patients developed DLTs, defined by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3 as any Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity and Grade 4 or greater hematologic toxicity. Results: Ten patients were treated, 6 on cohort 1 and 4 on cohort 2. Treatment characteristics were: 7 men, 3 women; median age, 40 years (range, 22-72); 7 GBM, 3 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA); median initial radiation (RT) dose, 60 Gy (range, 59.4-70); median interval since initial RT, 14.5 months (range, 7-123); All patients received SRS per protocol. The median follow-up time was 4 months (range, 1-10 months). Median time on vandetanib was 3 months (range 1-11). One of 6 patients in the first cohort developed a DLT of Grade 3 hemothorax while on anticoagulation. The MTD was reached when 2 of the 4 patients enrolled in the second cohort developed DLTs. Six patients had radiographic response, 2 with stable disease. Conclusion: The MTD of vandetanib, with SRS in recurrent malignant glioma, is 100 mg daily. Further evaluation of safety and efficacy is warranted.

  13. PD-1 marks dysfunctional regulatory T cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Daniel E.; Goods, Brittany A.; Lucca, Liliana E.; Lerner, Benjamin A.; Raddassi, Khadir; van Dijk, David; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Duan, Xiangguo; Gunel, Murat; Coric, Vlad; Krishnaswamy, Smita; Hafler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies targeting the immune checkpoint receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) have shown remarkable efficacy in treating cancer. CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ Tregs are critical regulators of immune responses in autoimmunity and malignancies, but the functional status of human Tregs expressing PD-1 remains unclear. We examined functional and molecular features of PD-1hi Tregs in healthy subjects and patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), combining functional assays, RNA sequencing, and cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF). In both patients with GBM and healthy subjects, circulating PD-1hi Tregs displayed reduced suppression of CD4+ effector T cells, production of IFN-γ, and molecular signatures of exhaustion. Transcriptional profiling of tumor-resident Tregs revealed that several genes coexpressed with PD-1 and associated with IFN-γ production and exhaustion as well as enrichment in exhaustion signatures compared with circulating PD-1hi Tregs. CyTOF analysis of circulating and tumor-infiltrating Tregs from patients with GBM treated with PD-1-blocking antibodies revealed that treatment shifts the profile of circulating Tregs toward a more exhausted phenotype reminiscent of that of tumor-infiltrating Tregs, further increasing IFN-γ production. Thus, high PD-1 expression on human Tregs identifies dysfunctional, exhausted Tregs secreting IFN-γ that exist in healthy individuals and are enriched in tumor infiltrates, possibly losing function as they attempt to modulate the antitumoral immune responses. PMID:27182555

  14. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy. PMID:25853310

  15. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy. PMID:25853310

  16. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy.

  17. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, as well as changes in behavior and personality, are also fairly common in mixed glioma patients. ... Cerebri: Symptoms are often nonspecific and can include personality and behavioral changes, memory disturbance, increased intracranial pressure ...

  18. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  19. Optimization of combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and fractionated radiotherapy for malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J. . E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to optimize the combined treatment regimen using arsenic trioxide (ATO) and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Nude mice with human glioma xenograft tumors were treated with fractionated local tumor radiation of 250 cGy/fraction/day and 5 mg/kg ATO for 5-10 days. Results: Time course experiments demonstrated that maximal tumor growth delay occurred when ATO was administered between 0 and 4 h after radiation. The combination treatment of ATO and radiation synergistically inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor growth delay time of 13.2 days, compared with 1.4 days and 6.5 days for ATO and radiation alone (p < 0.01), respectively. The use of concurrent therapy of radiation and ATO initially, followed by ATO as maintenance therapy, was superior to the use of preloading with ATO before combined therapy and produced a tumor growth delay time of 22.7 days as compared with 11.7 days for the ATO preloading regimen (p < 0.01). The maintenance dose of ATO after concurrent therapy was effective and important for continued inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusions: The combined use of fractionated radiation and ATO is effective for the treatment of glioma xenograft tumors. ATO was most effective when administered 0-4 h after radiation without pretreatment with ATO. These results have important implications for the optimization of treatment regimen using ATO and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors.

  20. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  1. Increased age of transformed mouse neural progenitor/stem cells recapitulates age-dependent clinical features of human glioma malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Andrei M.; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Stoll, Elizabeth A.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; Beyer, Richard P.; Plotnik, David A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Silber, John R.; Born, Donald E.; Kosai, Yoshito; Horner, Philip J.; Rostomily, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing age is the most robust predictor of greater malignancy and treatment resistance in human gliomas. However, the adverse association of clinical course with aging is rarely considered in animal glioma models, impeding delineation of the relative importance of organismal versus progenitor cell aging in the genesis of glioma malignancy. To address this limitation, we implanted transformed neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the presumed cells of glioma origin, from 3 and 18month old mice into 3 and 20-month host animals. Transplantation with progenitors from older animals resulted in significantly shorter (p ≤ 0.0001) median survival in both 3month (37.5 vs 83 days) and 20-month (38 vs 67 days) hosts, indicating that age-dependent changes intrinsic to NSPCs rather than host animal age accounted for greater malignancy. Subsequent analyses revealed that increased invasiveness, genomic instability, resistance to therapeutic agents and tolerance to hypoxic stress accompanied aging in transformed NSPCs. Greater tolerance to hypoxia in older progenitor cells, as evidenced by elevated HIF-1 promoter reporter activity and hypoxia response gene (HRG) expression, mirror the upregulation of HRGs in cohorts of older vs younger glioma patients revealed by analysis of gene expression databases, suggesting that differential response to hypoxic stress may underlie age-dependent differences in invasion, genomic instability and treatment resistance. Our study provides strong evidence that progenitor cell aging is responsible for promoting the hallmarks of age-dependent glioma malignancy and that consideration of progenitor aging will facilitate development of physiologically and clinically relevant animal models of human gliomas. PMID:22958206

  2. Dual inhibition of sodium-mediated proton and calcium efflux triggers non-apoptotic cell death in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Harley, William; Floyd, Candace; Dunn, Tamara; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Hegde, Manu; Palandoken, Hasan; Nantz, Michael H.; Leon, Leonardo; Carraway, K L; Lyeth, Bruce; Gorin, Fredric A.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant glioma cells maintain an elevated intracellular pH (pHi) within hypoxic-ischemic tumor microenvironments through persistent activation of sodium-proton transport (McLean et al., 2000). Amiloride has been reported to selectively kill human malignant glioma cell lines but not primary astrocytes (Hegde et al., 2004). While amiloride reduces pHi of malignant gliomas by inhibiting isoform 1 of sodium-proton exchange (NHE1), direct acidification was shown to be cytostatic rather than cytotoxic. At cytotoxic concentrations, amiloride has multiple drug targets including inhibition of NHE1 and sodium calcium exchange. Amiloride's glioma cytotoxicity can be explained, at least in part, by dual inhibition of NHE1 and of Na+-dependent calcium efflux by isoform 1.1 of the sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1.1) , which increases [Ca2+]i and initiates glioma cell demise. As a result of persistent NHE1 activity, cytosolic free levels of sodium ([Na+]i) in U87 and C6 glioma cells are elevated 3-fold, as compared with normal astrocytes. Basal cytosolic free calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) also are increased 5-fold. 2′, 4′-dichlorobenzamil (DCB) inhibits the sodium-dependent calcium transporter (NCX1.1) much more potently than NHE1. DCB was employed in a concentration-dependent fashion in glioma cells to selectively inhibit the forward mode of NCX1.1 at ≤1uM, while dually inhibiting both NHE1 and NCX1.1 at ≥20uM. DCB (1uM) was not cytotoxic to glioma cells, while DCB (20μM) further increased basal elevated levels of [Ca2+]i in glioma cells that was followed by cell demise. Cariporide and SEA0400 are more specific inhibitors of NHE1 and NCX1.1 than amiloride or DCB, respectively. Individually, Cariporide and SEA0400 are not cytotoxic, but in combination induced glioma cell death. Like amiloride, the combination of Cariporide and SEA0400 produced glioma cell death in the absence of demonstrable caspase-activation. PMID:20869350

  3. Olig2-Dependent Reciprocal Shift in PDGF and EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Tumor Phenotype and Mitotic Growth in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fanghui; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haibo; He, Danyang; Xu, Lingli; Wang, Jincheng; He, Xuelian; Deng, Yaqi; Lu, Ellen E; Liu, Xue; Verma, Ravinder; Bu, Hong; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Burns, Dennis; Xin, Mei; Rubin, Joshua B; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Canoll, Peter; Holland, Eric C; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas exhibit extensive heterogeneity and poor prognosis. Here we identify mitotic Olig2-expressing cells as tumor-propagating cells in proneural gliomas, elimination of which blocks tumor initiation and progression. Intriguingly, deletion of Olig2 resulted in tumors that grow, albeit at a decelerated rate. Genome occupancy and expression profiling analyses reveal that Olig2 directly activates cell-proliferation machinery to promote tumorigenesis. Olig2 deletion causes a tumor phenotypic shift from an oligodendrocyte precursor-correlated proneural toward an astroglia-associated gene expression pattern, manifest in downregulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and reciprocal upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Olig2 deletion further sensitizes glioma cells to EGFR inhibitors and extends the lifespan of animals. Thus, Olig2-orchestrated receptor signaling drives mitotic growth and regulates glioma phenotypic plasticity. Targeting Olig2 may circumvent resistance to EGFR-targeted drugs. PMID:27165742

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Modifications of Sox2 Contribute to the Invasive Phenotype of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Marta M.; Diez-Valle, Ricardo; Manterola, Lorea; Rubio, Angel; Liu, Dan; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Urquiza, Leire; Jauregi, Patricia; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; Sampron, Nicolás; Aramburu, Ander; Tejada-Solís, Sonia; Vicente, Carmen; Odero, María D.; Bandrés, Eva; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Idoate, Miguel A.; Lang, Frederick F.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2011-01-01

    We undertook this study to understand how the transcription factor Sox2 contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumor. We initially looked for unbalanced genomic rearrangements in the Sox2 locus in 42 GBM samples and found that Sox2 was amplified in 11.5% and overexpressed in all the samples. These results prompted us to further investigate the mechanisms involved in Sox2 overexpression in GBM. We analyzed the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter because high CpG density promoters are associated with key developmental genes. The Sox2 promoter presented a CpG island that was hypomethylated in all the patient samples when compared to normal cell lines. Treatment of Sox2-negative glioma cell lines with 5-azacitidine resulted in the re-expression of Sox2 and in a change in the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter. We further confirmed these results by analyzing data from GBM cases generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observed Sox2 overexpression (86%; N = 414), Sox2 gene amplification (8.5%; N = 492), and Sox 2 promoter hypomethylation (100%; N = 258), suggesting the relevance of this factor in the malignant phenotype of GBMs. To further explore the role of Sox2, we performed in vitro analysis with brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) and established glioma cell lines. Downmodulation of Sox2 in BTSCs resulted in the loss of their self-renewal properties. Surprisingly, ectopic expression of Sox2 in established glioma cells was not sufficient to support self-renewal, suggesting that additional factors are required. Furthermore, we observed that ectopic Sox2 expression was sufficient to induce invasion and migration of glioma cells, and knockdown experiments demonstrated that Sox2 was essential for maintaining these properties. Altogether, our data underscore the importance of a pleiotropic role of Sox2 and suggest that it could be used as a therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:22069467

  5. A small-molecule IAP inhibitor overcomes resistance to cytotoxic therapies in malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Keating, Joanna; Kesari, Santosh; Fast, Eva M.; Zawel, Leigh; Ramakrishna, Naren; Barnes, Jessica; Kieran, Mark W.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Sophie E.M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the use of the small-molecule Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP) inhibitor LBW242 in combination with the standard-of-care therapies of irradiation and temozolomide for malignant gliomas. In vitro assays demonstrated that LBW242 enhanced the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy, and clonogenic assays showed that the combination therapy led to a synergistic anti-glioma effect in multiple cell lines. Neurosphere assays revealed that the combination of radiation and LBW242 led to a pro-apoptotic effect in these glioma–initiating cell-enriched assays, with a corresponding inhibition of primary tumor cell growth. Athymic mice bearing established human malignant glioma tumor xenografts treated with LBW242 plus radiation and temozolomide demonstrated a synergistic suppression of tumor growth. Taken together, these experiments show that the pro-apoptotic and anti-glioma effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy can be enhanced by the addition of a small-molecule IAP inhibitor. These results are readily translatable to clinical trial and offer the potential for improved treatment outcomes for patients with glioma. PMID:21724651

  6. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin-transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa-Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa-Mn time and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa-Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases-9, -7 and -3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa-Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa-Mn-induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa-Mn-treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa-Mn-induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa-Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa-Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti-glioma therapeutic option. PMID:27432745

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Antigens in Malignant Gliomas as Targets for Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Daniel; Hegde, Meenakshi; Ahmed, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Over the last decade, investigators have reliably identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, nucleic acids, and virions in most high-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM). This discovery is significant because HCMV gene products can be targeted by immune-based therapies. In this review, we describe the current level of understanding regarding the presence and role in pathogenesis of HCMV in GBM. We describe our success detecting and expanding HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill GBM cells and explain how these cells can be used as a platform for enhanced cellular therapies. We discuss alternative approaches that capitalize on HCMV infection to treat patients with HCMV-positive tumors. Adoptive cellular therapy for HCMV-positive GBM has been tried in a small number of patients with some benefit, but we reason why, to date, these approaches generally fail to generate long-term remission or cure. We conjecture how cellular therapy for GBM can be improved and describe the barriers that must be overcome to cure these patients. PMID:25505736

  8. Novel recombinant adenoviral vector that targets the interleukin-13 receptor alpha2 chain permits effective gene transfer to malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ulasov, Ilya V; Tyler, Matthew A; Han, Yu; Glasgow, Joel N; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2007-02-01

    Transduction of malignant glioma with adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors is limited by the low levels of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, malignant brain tumors have been found to overexpress a glioma-associated receptor, interleukin-13 receptor alpha2 chain (IL-13Ralpha2), a marker of both glial transformation and tumor grade. To selectively target Ad5 to IL-13Ralpha2, we constructed a replication-deficient adenoviral vector that possesses an IL-13 ligand presented by a T4 phage fibritin shaft, and designated the new virus LU-13. Western blot and sequence analyses confirmed proper trimerization and ligand presentation by the T4 fibritin shaft. Confocal microscopy analysis of primary glioma suspensions incubated with viral recombinants showed that LU-13 colocalized with IL-13Ralpha2. Luciferase transduction assays conducted in both primary and passaged glioma cell cultures exhibited at least 10-fold enhanced gene transduction. Moreover, the virus preferentially bound to glioma cells, as documented by increased adenoviral E4 DNA copy number. In vitro competition assays performed with anti-human IL-13 monoclonal antibody confirmed significant attenuation of LU-13 transduction. These results were further confirmed in vivo, where LU-13 showed a 300-fold increase in transgene expression. In summary, we describe here the development of a novel and targeted adenoviral vector that binds IL-13Ralpha2. Our findings confirm the ability of LU-13 to bind IL-13Ralpha2 and increase transgene expression, making it an attractive gene therapy vector for the treatment of malignant glioma in a clinical setting.

  9. MicroRNA-93 promotes the malignant phenotypes of human glioma cells and induces their chemoresistance to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Quan; Jiang, Bing; Peng, Renjun; Zou, Qin; Yang, Wenren; Yang, Xiaosheng; Wu, Xiaobing; Chen, Zigui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, can induce mRNA degradation or repress translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of its target mRNA. Recently, some specific miRNAs, e.g. miR-93, have been found to be involved in pathological processes by targeting some oncogenes or tumor suppressors in glioma. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-93 in the biological behaviors and chemoresistance of glioma cells remains unclear. In the present study, in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR data indicated that miR-93 was significantly upregulated in glioma patients (n=43) compared with normal brain tissues (n=8). Moreover, the upregulated miR-93 level was significantly associated with the advanced malignancy. We also found that upregulation of miR-93 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells, and that miR-93 was involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression by mediating the protein levels of P21, P27, P53 and Cyclin D1. P21 was further identified as a direct target of miR-93. Knockdown of P21 attenuated the suppressive effects of miR-93 inhibition on cell cycle progression and colony formation. In addition, inhibition of miR-93 enhanced the chemosensitization of glioma cells to temozolomide (TMZ). Based on these above data, our study demonstrates that miR-93, upregulated in glioma, promotes the proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion of human glioma cells and suppresses their chemosensitivity to TMZ. Therefore, miR-93 may become a promising diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:27185265

  10. Metronomic chemotherapy with daily, oral etoposide plus bevacizumab for recurrent malignant glioma: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, D A; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, J J; Gururangan, S; Sampson, J H; Sathornsumetee, S; McLendon, R E; Herndon, J E; Marcello, J E; Norfleet, J; Friedman, A H; Bigner, D D; Friedman, H S

    2009-01-01

    Background: We evaluated bevacizumab with metronomic etoposide among recurrent malignant glioma patients in a phase 2, open-label trial. Methods: A total of59 patients, including 27 with glioblastoma (GBM) and 32 with grade 3 malignant glioma, received 10 mg kg−1 bevacizumab biweekly and 50 mg m−2 etoposide daily for 21 consecutive days each month. The primary end point was a 6-month progression-free survival, and secondary end points included safety and overall survival. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR-2, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) were assessed semiquantitatively in archival tumours using immunohistochemistry and were correlated with outcome. Results: Among grade 3 and GBM patients, the 6-month progression-free survivals were 40.6% and 44.4%, the radiographic response rates were 22% and 37% and the median survivals were 63.1 and 44.4 weeks, respectively. Hypertension predicted better outcome among both grade 3 and GBM patients, whereas high CA9 and low VEGF were associated with poorer progression-free survival (PFS) among those with GBM. The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events included neutropaenia (24%), thrombosis (12%), infection (8%) and hypertension (3%). Two patients had asymptomatic, grade 1 intracranial haemorrhage and one on-study death occurred because of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Bevacizumab with metronomic etoposide has increased toxicity compared with previous reports of bevacizumab monotherapy. Its anti-tumour activity is similar to that of bevacizumab monotherapy or bevacizumab plus irinotecan. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00612430). PMID:19920819

  11. IDH mutation is associated with higher risk of malignant transformation in low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Leu, Severina; von Felten, Stefanie; Frank, Stephan; Boulay, Jean-Louis; Mariani, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Acquisition of IDH1 or IDH2 mutation (IDHmut) is among the earliest genetic events that take place in the development of most low-grade glioma (LGG). IDHmut has been associated with longer overall patient survival. However, its impact on malignant transformation (MT) remains to be defined. A collection of 210 archived adult LGG previously stratified by IDHmut, MGMT methylation (MGMTmet), 1p/19q combined loss of heterozygosity (1p19qloh) and TP53 immunopositivity (TP53pos) status was analyzed. We used multistate models to assess MT-free survival, considering one initial, one transient (MT), and one absorbing state (death). Missing explanatory variables were multiply imputed. Overall, although associated with a lower risk of death (HR(DEATH) = 0.35, P = 0.0023), IDHmut had a non-significantly higher risk of MT (HR(MT) = 1.84; P = 0.1683) compared to IDH wild type (IDHwt). The double combination of IDHmut and MGMTmet and the triple combination of IDHmut, MGMTmet and 1p/19qloh, despite significantly lower hazards for death (HR(DEATH) versus IDHwt: 0.35, P = 0.0194 and 0.15, P = 0.0008, respectively), had non-significantly different hazards for MT. Conversely, the triple combination of IDHmut/MGMTmet/TP53pos, with a non-significantly different hazard for death, had a significantly higher hazard for MT than IDHwt (HR(MT) versus IDHwt: 2.83; P = 0.0452). Although IDHmut status is associated with longer overall patient survival, all IDHmut/MGMTmet subsets consistently showed higher risks of MT than of death, compared to IDHwt LGG. This supports the findings that molecular events relevant to IDH mutations impact early glioma development prior to malignant transformation. PMID:26780338

  12. Plant thymidine kinase 1: a novel efficient suicide gene for malignant glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahidul; Knecht, Wolfgang; Willer, Mette; Rozpedowska, Elzbieta; Kristoffersen, Peter; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Almqvist, Per M; Gojkovic, Zoran; Piskur, Jure; Ekström, Tomas J

    2010-06-01

    The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. Targeted suicide gene therapy exploits the enzymatic conversion of a prodrug, such as a nucleoside analog, into a cytotoxic compound. Although this therapeutic strategy has been considered a promising regimen for central nervous system (CNS) tumors, several obstacles have been encountered such as inefficient gene transfer to the tumor cells, limited prodrug penetration into the CNS, and inefficient enzymatic activity of the suicide gene. We report here the cloning and successful application of a novel thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) from the tomato plant, with favorable characteristics in vitro and in vivo. This enzyme (toTK1) is highly specific for the nucleoside analog prodrug zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT), which is known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. An important feature of toTK1 is that it efficiently phosphorylates its substrate AZT not only to AZT monophosphate, but also to AZT diphosphate, with excellent kinetics. The efficiency of the toTK1/AZT system was confirmed when toTK1-transduced human glioblastoma (GBM) cells displayed a 500-fold increased sensitivity to AZT compared with wild-type cells. In addition, when neural progenitor cells were used as delivery vectors for toTK1 in intracranial GBM xenografts in nude rats, substantial attenuation of tumor growth was achieved in animals exposed to AZT, and survival of the animals was significantly improved compared with controls. The novel toTK1/AZT suicide gene therapy system in combination with stem cell-mediated gene delivery promises new treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:20154339

  13. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  14. Development of Resistance to EGFR-Targeted Therapy in Malignant Glioma Can Occur through EGFR-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klingler, Stefan; Guo, Baofeng; Yao, Jun; Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Ling; Vaseva, Angelina V; Chen, Sida; Canoll, Peter; Horner, James W; Wang, Y Alan; Paik, Ji-Hye; Ying, Haoqiang; Zheng, Hongwu

    2015-05-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly amplified, mutated, and overexpressed in human malignant gliomas. Despite its prevalence and growth-promoting functions, therapeutic strategies to inhibit EGFR kinase activity have not been translated into profound beneficial effects in glioma clinical trials. To determine the roles of oncogenic EGFR signaling in gliomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we generated a novel glioma mouse model driven by inducible expression of a mutant EGFR (EGFR*). Using combined genetic and pharmacologic interventions, we revealed that EGFR*-driven gliomas were insensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, although they could efficiently inhibit EGFR* autophosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. This is in contrast with the genetic suppression of EGFR* induction that led to significant tumor regression and prolonged animal survival. However, despite their initial response to genetic EGFR* extinction, all tumors would relapse and propagate independent of EGFR*. We further showed that EGFR*-independent tumor cells existed prior to treatment and were responsible for relapse following genetic EGFR* suppression. And, the addition of a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor could significantly delay relapse and prolong animal survival. Our findings shed mechanistic insight into EGFR drug resistance in glioma and provide a platform to test therapies targeting aberrant EGFR signaling in this setting.

  15. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Elting, Linda S. . E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D.; Chambers, Mark S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

  16. MiR-135a and MRP1 play pivotal roles in the selective lethality of phenethyl isothiocyanate to malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Taolan; Shao, Yingying; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Liou, Yu-Ligh; Li, Qing; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Amounting evidence has demonstrated that phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a strong inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and functions as a selective killer to various human cancer cells. However, it remains obscure whether PEITC has potential selective lethality to malignant glioma cells. Thus in this study, we performed multiple analysis such as MTT assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, flow cytometry, foci formation, RT-PCR, Western blot, and transfection to explore the selective lethality of PEITC to malignant glioma cells and the underlying mechanisms. We found that PEITC induced a selective apoptosis and suppressed tumorigenicity and migration of malignant glioma cells. Furthermore, we found PEITC significantly induced GSH depletion, ROS production, caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation, and miR-135a upregulation in malignant glioma cells but not in normal cells. Moreover, PEITC activated the miR-135a-mitochondria dependent apoptosis pathway as demonstrated by downregulation of STAT6, SMAD5 and Bcl-xl while upregulation of Bax expression and Cytochrome-C release in malignant glioma cell lines but not in the immortalized human normal glial HEB cells. Correspondingly, the above PEITC-induced activation of the ROS-MiR-135a-Mitochondria dependent apoptosis pathways in malignant glioma was attenuated by pre-transfection with miR-135a inhibitor, pre-treatment with multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) inhibitor Sch B, or combination with glutathione (GSH). These results revealed that PEITC selectively induced apoptosis of malignant glioma cells through MRP1-mediated export of GSH to activate ROS-MiR-135a-Mitochondria dependent apoptosis pathway, suggesting a potential application of PEITC for treating glioma. PMID:27293991

  17. Downregulation of miR-544 in tissue, but not in serum, is a novel biomarker of malignant transformation in glioma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruimin; Zhang, Guojun; Wang, Huimin; Lv, Hong; Fang, Fang; Kang, Xixiong

    2012-12-01

    Low-grade glioma is predisposed to progress to anaplastic astrocytoma and eventually secondary glioblastoma. The malignant transformation may involve the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of miR-544 in glioma progression and discuss whether it may be a novel biomarker of malignant transformation. The expression of miR-544 was measured in a series of 198 glioma samples (63 low-grade glioma, 44 anaplastic astrocytoma and 91 glioblastoma tumors) using microarrays. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to validate the expression levels of miR-544 in tissue and serum samples in an independent validated cohort (25 low-grade glioma, 21 anaplastic astrocytoma and 20 glioblastoma tumors). A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the correlation between miR-544 levels of tissue and serum samples. Microarrays revealed that the expression levels of miR-544 decreased significantly in anaplastic gliomas (P<0.01) or glioblastoma (P<0.01) compared with low-grade gliomas. In an independent cohort of glioma patients, miR-544 exhibited a progression-associated downregulation in glioma tumors. The levels of miR-544 in serum samples tended to be lower in anaplastic and glioblastoma patients compared with low-grade gliomas, but with no significant difference. The Pearson correlation analysis revealed a weakly positive correlation between tissue and serum levels of miR-544. These data support a significant role for miR-544 aberration in the malignant transformation of glioma. The downregulation of miR-544 in tissue may be used as a novel biomarker.

  18. Downregulation of miR-544 in tissue, but not in serum, is a novel biomarker of malignant transformation in glioma

    PubMed Central

    MA, RUIMIN; ZHANG, GUOJUN; WANG, HUIMIN; LV, HONG; FANG, FANG; KANG, XIXIONG

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade glioma is predisposed to progress to anaplastic astrocytoma and eventually secondary glioblastoma. The malignant transformation may involve the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of miR-544 in glioma progression and discuss whether it may be a novel biomarker of malignant transformation. The expression of miR-544 was measured in a series of 198 glioma samples (63 low-grade glioma, 44 anaplastic astrocytoma and 91 glioblastoma tumors) using microarrays. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to validate the expression levels of miR-544 in tissue and serum samples in an independent validated cohort (25 low-grade glioma, 21 anaplastic astrocytoma and 20 glioblastoma tumors). A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the correlation between miR-544 levels of tissue and serum samples. Microarrays revealed that the expression levels of miR-544 decreased significantly in anaplastic gliomas (P<0.01) or glioblastoma (P<0.01) compared with low-grade gliomas. In an independent cohort of glioma patients, miR-544 exhibited a progression-associated downregulation in glioma tumors. The levels of miR-544 in serum samples tended to be lower in anaplastic and glioblastoma patients compared with low-grade gliomas, but with no significant difference. The Pearson correlation analysis revealed a weakly positive correlation between tissue and serum levels of miR-544. These data support a significant role for miR-544 aberration in the malignant transformation of glioma. The downregulation of miR-544 in tissue may be used as a novel biomarker. PMID:23205130

  19. Raman spectroscopy for in situ- evaluation of high-grade malignant gliomas induced in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    1997-05-01

    Each year, more people at younger ages are diagnosed with primary brain tumors. Current histological discrimination between normal and diseased tissue occurs after tissue excision. A reliable optical biopsy for open craniotomy would optimize the amount and types of tissue removal by making an accurate evaluation before excision. The presented work is part of a study investigating the clinical diagnostic potential of Raman spectroscopy for gliomas. It has been shown that the optical properties of in vitro tissue are strongly dependent upon sample preparation. The investigation of the effects of time latency, paraformalin tissue fixation, and tissue perfusion with carbogen-bubbled cortical transport solution on their respective Raman spectra of brain tissue and tumors will be discussed, as well as their implications on the study of neurological tissue. The studies are conducted with in situ tissue samples from scid mice and 785 nm pulsed alexandrite laser excitation. Results illustrating positive qualitative and quantitative variations between Raman spectra of normal and malignant brain tissue will be presented.

  20. rhGM-CSF ameliorates neutropenia in patients with malignant glioma treated with BCNU.

    PubMed Central

    Rampling, R.; Steward, W.; Paul, J.; Macham, M. A.; Harvey, E.; Eckley, D.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrosoureas are the drugs most effective in the treatment of patients with intracerebral malignant glioma. Their limiting toxicity is delayed myelosuppression. A prospective, randomised crossover study of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was performed in patients receiving BCNU for relapsed glioblastoma, to investigate whether the resulting haematological toxicity profile could be modified by rhGM-CSF. Adequate data for analysis were obtained in 13 patients. Following BCNU, the nadir neutrophil count was higher in 12 out of 13 patients during the rhGM-CSF-protected cycles compared with the unprotected cycles. The median nadir was also significantly higher (1.79, CI 0.76-3.52, P < 0.005). Five episodes of neutropenia (< 2 x 10(9) l-1) occurred during the unprotected cycles compared with none in the rhGM-CSF-protected cycles (P = 0.076). There was no evidence of any effect on platelets. This result shows that the haematological toxicity profile following therapeutic doses of BCNU can be modified. It suggests that rhGM-CSF and other growth factors should be investigated for clinical efficacy in chemotherapy using nitrosoureas. PMID:8123485

  1. Postoperative modified stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Toshihiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kouichi

    2002-06-01

    To achieve local control of malignant glioma, we designed a postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator (micro-MLC). The purpose of this study was to clarify the feasibility of this treatment. The treatment was performed in six patients who met the following eligibility criteria: (1) supratentorial tumor, (2) residual tumor volume < or = 40 cm3, and (3) Karnofsky performance status > or = 70. The three planning target volumes (PTVs), which consisted of restricted PTV (RPTV), intermediate PTV (IPTV), and extended PTV (EPTV), defined as the residual tumor plus a 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm margins, respectively, and total dose delivery of 60-68 Gy, 52-60 Gy, and 44-52 Gy to the isocenters of RPTV, IPTV, and EPTV, respectively, in 4 Gy per fraction at five fractions per week, were established. The beam arrangement and the conformal blockade with a micro-MLC for the optimal treatment plan were designed. The treatment plans showed the high dose conformation to EPTV, the appropriate dose gradients in the three PTVs with the high dose homogeneity to RPTV, and the tolerated dose to critical structures. Following the plans, treatment was performed. The clinical findings more than 12 months after the treatment supported its possible use. We conclude that this treatment is feasible at least in selected patients.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of the functional microRNA–mRNA regulatory network identifies miRNA signatures associated with glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Bai, Jing; Li, Shengli; Zhao, Zheng; Shao, Tingting; Jiang, Tao; Ren, Huan; Kang, Chunsheng; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Glioma is the most common and fatal primary brain tumour with poor prognosis; however, the functional roles of miRNAs in glioma malignant progression are insufficiently understood. Here, we used an integrated approach to identify miRNA functional targets during glioma malignant progression by combining the paired expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs across 160 Chinese glioma patients, and further constructed the functional miRNA–mRNA regulatory network. As a result, most tumour-suppressive miRNAs in glioma progression were newly discovered, whose functions were widely involved in gliomagenesis. Moreover, three miRNA signatures, with different combinations of hub miRNAs (regulations≥30) were constructed, which could independently predict the survival of patients with all gliomas, high-grade glioma and glioblastoma. Our network-based method increased the ability to identify the prognostic biomarkers, when compared with the traditional method and random conditions. Hsa-miR-524-5p and hsa-miR-628-5p, shared by these three signatures, acted as protective factors and their expression decreased gradually during glioma progression. Functional analysis of these miRNA signatures highlighted their critical roles in cell cycle and cell proliferation in glioblastoma malignant progression, especially hsa-miR-524-5p and hsa-miR-628-5p exhibited dominant regulatory activities. Therefore, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more effective and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanism of glioma malignant progression. PMID:24194606

  3. Temsirolimus and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  4. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  5. A Case of Congenital Malignant Spinal Cord Glioma as a Cause of Congenital Ascites in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Karber, Bianca; Omesi, Lenore; Chang, Sunny; Handel, Andrew; Hegedus, Monica; Maduekwe, Echezona

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ascites is rare, but when it occurs, urinary ascites secondary to posterior urethral valve obstruction is the most common, and tumors are the least. Among the tumors in the pediatric population, the central nervous system tumors are common, but spinal cord tumors are rare. We describe a very rare case of congenital malignant spinal cord glioma presenting as isolated congenital ascites secondary to neurogenic bladder. A female infant was diagnosed sonographically with isolated congenital ascites at 40 weeks' gestational age, with uneventful development prior to 40 weeks' gestational age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine done within the first week of life identified a lobulated spinal mass with heterogeneous enhancement within the conus medullaris. Spinal fluid analysis showed evidence of small round blue cells and the pathology from the excision biopsy of the mass confirmed a WHO grade III or IV malignant glioma. The postoperative course was uneventful with resolution of the ascites and spontaneous micturition. The patient was discharged home without an indwelling urinary catheter. We report the first documented case of a newborn infant with isolated congenital ascites from neurogenic bladder secondary to a spinal cord glioma. PMID:27597917

  6. A Case of Congenital Malignant Spinal Cord Glioma as a Cause of Congenital Ascites in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Omesi, Lenore; Chang, Sunny; Handel, Andrew; Hegedus, Monica; Maduekwe, Echezona

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ascites is rare, but when it occurs, urinary ascites secondary to posterior urethral valve obstruction is the most common, and tumors are the least. Among the tumors in the pediatric population, the central nervous system tumors are common, but spinal cord tumors are rare. We describe a very rare case of congenital malignant spinal cord glioma presenting as isolated congenital ascites secondary to neurogenic bladder. A female infant was diagnosed sonographically with isolated congenital ascites at 40 weeks' gestational age, with uneventful development prior to 40 weeks' gestational age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine done within the first week of life identified a lobulated spinal mass with heterogeneous enhancement within the conus medullaris. Spinal fluid analysis showed evidence of small round blue cells and the pathology from the excision biopsy of the mass confirmed a WHO grade III or IV malignant glioma. The postoperative course was uneventful with resolution of the ascites and spontaneous micturition. The patient was discharged home without an indwelling urinary catheter. We report the first documented case of a newborn infant with isolated congenital ascites from neurogenic bladder secondary to a spinal cord glioma. PMID:27597917

  7. A Case of Congenital Malignant Spinal Cord Glioma as a Cause of Congenital Ascites in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Omesi, Lenore; Chang, Sunny; Handel, Andrew; Hegedus, Monica; Maduekwe, Echezona

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ascites is rare, but when it occurs, urinary ascites secondary to posterior urethral valve obstruction is the most common, and tumors are the least. Among the tumors in the pediatric population, the central nervous system tumors are common, but spinal cord tumors are rare. We describe a very rare case of congenital malignant spinal cord glioma presenting as isolated congenital ascites secondary to neurogenic bladder. A female infant was diagnosed sonographically with isolated congenital ascites at 40 weeks' gestational age, with uneventful development prior to 40 weeks' gestational age. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine done within the first week of life identified a lobulated spinal mass with heterogeneous enhancement within the conus medullaris. Spinal fluid analysis showed evidence of small round blue cells and the pathology from the excision biopsy of the mass confirmed a WHO grade III or IV malignant glioma. The postoperative course was uneventful with resolution of the ascites and spontaneous micturition. The patient was discharged home without an indwelling urinary catheter. We report the first documented case of a newborn infant with isolated congenital ascites from neurogenic bladder secondary to a spinal cord glioma.

  8. miR-148b-3p inhibits malignant biological behaviors of human glioma cells induced by high HOTAIR expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Liang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non coding (lnc)RNA and microRNA (miRNA/miR) both regulate the expression of key genes in tumorigenesis and have considerable theranostic potential. Rapid advances in bioinformatics indicate that miRNA may potentially interact with lncRNA to modulate their regulatory roles. miR-148b-3p has been reported to have a vital role in regulating tumor progression. However, the expression pattern of miR-148b-3p in glioma remains largely unknown, and interactions between miR-148b-3p and lncRNA has yet to be identified. The aim of the present study was to insight into the regulatory role of miR-148b-3p in glioma. Using online software, the HOTAIR gene was identified as a possible lncRNA target of miR-148b-3p in the present study. siRNA was used to suppress the expression of HOTAIR and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of miR-148b-3p. The results confirmed that HOTAIR mRNA expression was inversely correlated with miR-148b-3p expression in A172 glioma cells. Furthermore, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to detect the viability of cells, flow cytometry was performed to test cell cycle and a matrigel invasion assay was performed to test cell invasion. The results showed that HOTAIR promotes factors associated with malignancy, including cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and invasion, whereas miR-148b-3p suppresses malignancy. Bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-148b-3p modulates HOTAIR expression by directly targeting the HOTAIR gene sequence. In summary, the results indicated that miR-148b-3p inhibits malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells by directly targeting HOTAIR. The current data provide important evidence for understanding the key roles of the lncRNA miRNA functional network in glioma. PMID:27446363

  9. Malignant Glioma with Neuronal Marker Expression : A Clinicopathological Study of 18 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Rye; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do Hyun; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant gliomas with neuronal marker expression (MGwNM) are rare and poorly characterized. Increasingly diverse types of MGwNM have been described and these reported cases underscore the dilemmas in the classification and diagnosis of those tumors. The aim of this study is to provide additional insights into MGwNM and present the clinicopathological features of 18 patients. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 18 patients diagnosed as MGwNM at our institute between January 2006 and December 2012. Macroscopic total resection was performed in 11 patients (61%). We evaluated the methylation status of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and expression of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH-1) in all cases, and deletions of 1p and 19q in available cases. Results The estimated median overall survival was 21.2 months. The median progression-free survival was 6.3 months. Six patients (33%) had MGMT methylation but IDH1 mutation was found in only one patient (6%). Gene analysis for 1p19q performed in nine patients revealed no deletion in six, 19q deletion only in two, and 1p deletion only in one. The extent of resection was significantly correlated with progression free survival on both univariate analysis and multivariate analysis (p=0.002 and p=0.013, respectively). Conclusion In this study, the overall survival of MGwNM was not superior to glioblastoma. The extent of resection has a significant prognostic impact on progression-free survival. Further studies of the prognostic factors related to chemo-radio therapy, similar to studies with glioblastoma, are mandatory to improve survival. PMID:26885285

  10. Sustained elevation of Snail promotes glial-mesenchymal transition after irradiation in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Mahabir, Roshan; Tanino, Mishie; Elmansuri, Aiman; Wang, Lei; Kimura, Taichi; Itoh, Tamio; Ohba, Yusuke; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Tsuda, Masumi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Background Ionizing irradiation is an effective treatment for malignant glioma (MG); however, a higher rate of recurrence with more aggressive phenotypes is a vital issue. Although epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in irradiation-induced cancer progression, the role for such phenotypic transition in MG remains unknown. Methods To investigate the mechanism of irradiation-dependent tumor progression in MG, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) and qRT-PCR using primary and recurrent MG specimens, MG cell lines, and primary culture cells of MG. siRNA technique was used for MG cell lines. Results In 22 cases of clinically recurrent MG, the expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and CD44 was found to be increased by IHC. In paired identical MG of 7 patients, the expression of collagen, MMPs, and YKL-40 were also elevated in the recurrent MGs, suggesting the The Cancer Genome Atlas-based mesenchymal subtype. Among EMT regulators, sustained elevation of Snail was observed in MG cells at 21 days after irradiation. Cells exhibited an upregulation of migration, invasion, numbers of focal adhesion, and MMP-2 production, and all of these mesenchymal features were abrogated by Snail knockdown. Intriguingly, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and GSK-3β were increased after irradiation in a Snail-dependent manner, and TGF-β was elevated in both fibroblasts and macrophages but not in MG cells after irradiation. It was noteworthy that irradiated cells also expressed stemness features such as SOX2 expression and tumor-forming potential in vivo. Conclusions We here propose a novel concept of glial-mesenchymal transition after irradiation in which the sustained Snail expression plays an essential role. PMID:24357458

  11. The effects of sequential treatments on hippocampal volumes in malignant glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Shantell C; Lee, Brian; Shantharam, Shruti; Yu, Hon J; Su, Lydia; Billimek, John; Bota, Daniela A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are very aggressive tumors. In an effort to improve the outcome, the patients receive multi-modal therapies such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy (temozolomide followed in many cases by bevacizumab). The survivors are affected by multiple learning and memory deficits. Greater deterioration over time in hippocampal specific cognitive tasks was shown in patients receiving bevacizumab in addition to radiation and temozolomide for a longer period of time (RTOG 0825). The rate of hippocampal atrophy in patients treated with radiation and temozolomide followed by bevacizumab is not yet determined, and is the goal of the present study. We used the serial MRIs obtained as parts of standard clinical care in patients with MG. Measurements were done using the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) software. The hippocampus in the contralateral hemisphere was manually traced and measured, to avoid morphological structure changes induced by the tumor, radiation fields or surgical markers. We determined a longitudinal progression of hippocampal atrophy-with the maximum volume loss (33.26 %) for the patients that were on treatment for 5 years. There was no detectable hippocampal atrophy during the chemo-radiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide. A significant decrease in the absolute hippocampus volume was noted after 6 months of continuous bevacizumab treatment (p < 0.05). The hippocampal volume loss progressed over the next 3 years, and was higher than the one previously reported in Alzheimer disease patients. The hippocampal volume loss is minimal during the 1 month after diagnosis, when the patients receive chemo-radiation and adjuvant temozolomide. However, prolonged treatment including bevacizumab is associated with a significant rate of hippocampal volume loss. PMID:27393350

  12. Treatment of newly diagnosed malignant glioma in the elderly people: new trials that impact therapy.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glioblastoma (GB), World Health Organization Grade 4 glioma, is the most common malignant primary brain tumour with an annual incidence of 12,943 cases in the United States . It is a tumour of the elderly people with a median age of onset of 64 years, although children and young adults are also affected. GB is associated with a poor prognosis; despite best treatment, most community-based patients will not survive 1 year . Cures are rare and overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years are 26-48% and 12%, respectively, in highly selected, contemporary, clinical trial eligible patients . For protocol eligible US patients, the median survival is 16-17 months, which is partly a reflection of improved supportive care, recognition of pseudoprogression, exclusion of patients undergoing biopsy only and availability of bevacizumab at recurrence . Initial treatment for patients with high performance [Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) > 60 and age < 71 years) consists of maximal safe surgical resection followed by adjuvant focal, external beam radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and post-RT TMZ for 6 months . TMZ and carmustine (BCNU) biodegradable wafer (Gliadel) are the only adjuvant chemotherapies that have improved survival in randomised GB clinical trials . The current standard treatment is based upon a European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) randomised, phase 3 trial of 573 patients with newly diagnosed GB (age 19-71 years and World Health Organization Performance Status ≤ 2) that compared RT alone [total dose 60 Gray (Gy)] to TMZ chemotherapy in combination with RT (total 60 Gy), followed by 6 months of post-RT TMZ (4,6,8).

  13. Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Bevacizumab in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alvin R.; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Desjardins, Annick; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Peters, Katherine B.; Allen, Karen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Craciunescu, Oana; Vredenburgh, James J.; Friedman, Henry S.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Virtually all patients with malignant glioma (MG) eventually recur. This study evaluates the safety of concurrent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and bevacizumab (BVZ), an antiangiogenic agent, in treatment of recurrent MG. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with recurrent MG, treated at initial diagnosis with surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy/temozolomide and then at least 1 salvage chemotherapy regimen, were enrolled in this prospective trial. Lesions <3 cm in diameter were treated in a single fraction, whereas those 3 to 5 cm in diameter received 5 5-Gy fractions. BVZ was administered immediately before SRS and 2 weeks later. Neurocognitive testing (Mini-Mental Status Exam, Trail Making Test A/B), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) quality-of-life assessment, physical exam, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were performed immediately before SRS and 1 week and 2 months following completion of SRS. The primary endpoint was central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included survival, quality of life, microvascular properties as measured by DCE-MRI, steroid usage, and performance status. Results: One grade 3 (severe headache) and 2 grade 2 CNS toxicities were observed. No patients experienced grade 4 to 5 toxicity or intracranial hemorrhage. Neurocognition, quality of life, and Karnofsky performance status did not change significantly with treatment. DCE-MRI results suggest a significant decline in tumor perfusion and permeability 1 week after SRS and further decline by 2 months. Conclusions: Treatment of recurrent MG with concurrent SRS and BVZ was not associated with excessive toxicity in this prospective trial. A randomized trial of concurrent SRS/BVZ versus conventional salvage therapy is needed to establish the efficacy of this approach.

  14. Type-3 metabotropic glutamate receptors regulate chemoresistance in glioma stem cells, and their levels are inversely related to survival in patients with malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ciceroni, C; Bonelli, M; Mastrantoni, E; Niccolini, C; Laurenza, M; Larocca, L M; Pallini, R; Traficante, A; Spinsanti, P; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Arcella, A; De Maria, R; Nicoletti, F; Battaglia, G; Melchiorri, D

    2013-03-01

    Drug treatment of malignant gliomas is limited by the intrinsic resistance of glioma stem cells (GSCs) to chemotherapy. GSCs isolated from human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) expressed metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu3 receptors). The DNA-alkylating agent, temozolomide, killed GSCs only if mGlu3 receptors were knocked down or pharmacologically inhibited. In contrast, mGlu3 receptor blockade did not affect the action of paclitaxel, etoposide, cis-platinum, and irinotecan. mGlu3 receptor blockade enabled temozolomide toxicity by inhibiting a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/nuclear factor-κB pathway that supports the expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), an enzyme that confers resistance against DNA-alkylating agents. In mice implanted with GSCs into the brain, temozolomide combined with mGlu3 receptor blockade substantially reduced tumor growth. Finally, 87 patients with GBM undergoing surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide survived for longer time if tumor cells expressed low levels of mGlu3 receptors. In addition, the methylation state of the MGMT gene promoter in tumor extracts influenced survival only in those patients with low expression of mGlu3 receptors in the tumor. These data encourage the use of mGlu3 receptor antagonists as add-on drugs in the treatment of GBM, and suggest that the transcript of mGlu3 receptors should be measured in tumor specimens for a correct prediction of patients' survival in response to temozolomide treatment. PMID:23175182

  15. Inter-Relationship between Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity and Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in the Human T98G Glioma and the Epithelial HaCaT Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, investigations in both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance have been a focus of radiation oncology and biology research, since both conditions occur primarily in tumor cell lines. There has been significant progress in elucidating their signaling pathways, however uncertainties exist when they are studied together with radiation-induced bystander effects. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further investigate this relationship using the T98G glioma and HaCaT cell lines. T98G glioma cells have demonstrated a strong transition from hyper-radiosensitivity to induced radioresistance, and HaCaT cells do not show low-dose hypersensitivity. Both cell lines were paired using a mix-and-match protocol, which involved growing nonirradiated cells in culture media from irradiated cells and covering all possible combinations between them. The end points analyzed were clonogenic cell survival and live calcium measurements through the cellular membrane. Our data demonstrated that T98G cells produced bystander signals that decreased the survival of both reporter T98G and HaCaT cells. The bystander effect occurred only when T98G cells were exposed to doses below 1 Gy, which was corroborated by the induction of calcium fluxes. However, when bystander signals originated from HaCaT cells, the survival fraction increased in reporter T98G cells while it decreased in HaCaT cells. Moreover, the corresponding calcium data showed no calcium fluxes in T98G cells, while HaCaT cells displayed a biphasic calcium profile. In conclusion, our findings indicate a possible link between low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and bystander effects. This relationship varies depending on which cell line functions as the source of bystander signals. This further suggests that the bystander mechanisms are more complex than previously expected and caution should be taken when extrapolating bystander results across all cell lines and all radiation doses

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials. PMID:23443138

  17. Design and synthesis of a MAO-B-selectively activated prodrug based on MPTP: a mitochondria-targeting chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Martyn A; Han, Junyan; Baskin, Alexandra M; Baskin, David S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastomas, are extremely difficult to treat. The median survival for glioblastoma patients with optimal therapeutic intervention is 15 months. We developed a novel MAO-B-selectively activated prodrug, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-2-(1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)propanamide (MP-MUS), for the treatment of gliomas based on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The design of neutral MP-MUS involved the use of a seeker molecule capable of binding to mitochondrial MAO-B, which is up-regulated ≥fourfold in glioma cells. Once the binding occurs, MP-MUS is converted into a positively charged moiety, P(+) -MUS, which accumulates inside mitochondria at a theoretical maximal value of 1000:1 gradient. The LD50 of MP-MUS against glioma cells is 75 μM, which is two- to threefold more potent than temozolomide, a primary drug for gliomas. Importantly, MP-MUS was found to be selectively toxic toward glioma cells. In the concentration range of 150-180 μM MP-MUS killed 90-95 % of glioma cells, but stimulated the growth of normal human astrocytes. Moreover, maturation of MP-MUS is highly dependent on MAO-B, and inhibition of MAO-B activity with selegiline protected human glioma cells from apoptosis. PMID:25677185

  18. AEG-1/MTDH-activated autophagy enhances human malignant glioma susceptibility to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meijuan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Li; Shi, Lei; Gao, Rui; Ou, Yingwei; Chen, Xuguan; Wang, Zhongchang; Jiang, Aiqin; Liu, Kunmei; Xiao, Ming; Ni, Ping; Wu, Dandan; He, Wenping; Sun, Geng; Li, Ping; Zhai, Sulan; Wang, Xuerong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly regulated process activated in response to metabolic stress and other microenvironmental changes. Astrocyte elevated gene 1 (AEG-1) reportedly induces protective autophagy. Our results indicate that AEG-1 also enhances the susceptibility of malignant glioma cells to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through induction of autophagy. TGF-β1 induced autophagy and activated AEG-1 via Smad2/3 phosphorylation in malignant glioma cells. Also increased was oncogene cyclin D1 and EMT markers, which promoted tumor progression. Inhibition of autophagy using siRNA-BECN1 and siRNA-AEG-1 suppressed EMT. In tumor samples from patients with malignant glioma, immunohistochemical assays showed that expression levels of TGF-β1, AEG-1, and markers of autophagy and EMT, all gradually increase with glioblastoma progression. In vivo siRNA-AEG-1 administration to rats implanted with C6 glioma cells inhibited tumor growth and increased the incidence of apoptosis among tumor cells. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the invasiveness and progression of malignant gliomas. PMID:26909607

  19. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Progressive Malignant Glioma or Ependymoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Childhood Cerebellar Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

  20. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 associates with the malignant status and poor prognosis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang-xiao; Wang, Hong-jie; Li, Xiao-rong; Li, Tao; Su, Gang; Yang, Pan; Wu, Jian-wen

    2015-05-01

    The metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a bona fide long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). LncRNA MALAT1 was discovered as a prognostic factor for lung cancer metastasis but also has been linked to several other human tumor entities. However, little is known about the role of lncRNA MALAT1 in glioma patients. The aim of this study was to identify the role of lncRNA MALAT1 in the pathogenesis of glioma; we analyzed the relationship of lncRNA MALAT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics in glioma patients. In our results, lncRNA MALAT1 expression was increased in glioma tissues compared with paired adjacent brain normal tissues (P < 0.001). Furthermore, lncRNA MALAT1 was associated significantly with WHO grade (I-II vs. III-IV; P = 0.007) and tumor size (< 3 cm vs. T ≥ 3 cm; P = 0.008). However, lncRNA MALAT1 expression was not associated significantly with age (<45 vs. ≥ 45, P = 0.343), gender (female vs. male, P = 0.196), family history of cancer (yes vs. no, P = 0.665), and tumor location (supratentorial vs. infratentorial, P = 0.170). Moreover, the level of lncRNA MALAT1 expression was markedly correlated with the glioma patients' overall survival (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis suggested that increased lncRNA MALAT1 expression was a poor independent prognostic predictor for glioma patients (P = 0.002). In conclusion, lncRNA MALAT1 plays an important role on glioma progression and prognosis and may serve as a convictive prognostic biomarker for glioma patients.

  1. Local delivery of rapamycin: a toxicity and efficacy study in an experimental malignant glioma model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Betty; Wadsworth, Scott; Recinos, Violette; Mehta, Vivek; Vellimana, Ananth; Li, Khan; Rosenblatt, Joel; Do, Hiep; Gallia, Gary L.; Siu, I-Mei; Wicks, Robert T.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Zhao, Ming; Brem, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Rapamycin, an anti-proliferative agent, is effective in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and recurrent breast cancers. We proposed that this potent mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of gliomas as well. We examined the cytotoxicity of rapamycin against a rodent glioma cell line, determined the toxicity of rapamycin when delivered intracranially, and investigated the efficacy of local delivery of rapamycin for the treatment of experimental malignant glioma in vivo. We also examined the dose-dependent efficacy of rapamycin and the effect when locally delivered rapamycin was combined with radiation therapy. Rapamycin was cytotoxic to 9L cells, causing 34% growth inhibition at a concentration of 0.01 µg/mL. No in vivo toxicity was observed when rapamycin was incorporated into biodegradable caprolactone-glycolide (35:65) polymer beads at 0.3%, 3%, and 30% loading doses and implanted intracranially. Three separate efficacy studies were performed to test the reproducibility of the effect of the rapamycin beads as well as the validity of this treatment approach. Animals treated with the highest dose of rapamycin beads tested (30%) consistently demonstrated significantly longer survival durations than the control and placebo groups. All dose-escalating rapamycin bead treatment groups (0.3%, 3% and 30%), treated both concurrently with tumor and in a delayed manner after tumor placement, experienced a significant increase in survival, compared with controls. Radiation therapy in addition to the simultaneous treatment with 30% rapamycin beads led to significantly longer survival duration than either therapy alone. These results suggest that the local delivery of rapamycin for the treatment of gliomas should be further investigated. PMID:21727209

  2. A new technique of brachytherapy for malignant gliomas with caesium-137: a new method utilizing a remote afterloading system.

    PubMed

    Ashpole, R D; Snyman, H; Bullimore, J A; Appleby, H J; Cummins, B H; Coakham, H B

    1990-11-01

    Failure of conventional treatment to cure malignant gliomas has stimulated interest in various forms of brachytherapy. We describe a new method of using intracranial radiation utilizing a remotely-controlled afterloading system with a modified endotracheal tube as the applicator. The system used is the Selectron LDM/MDR (Nucleotron) which is a sophisticated machine widely available at radiotherapy centres and primarily used to treat gynaecological malignancies. It uses Caesium-137 in the form of spherical pellets in a linear source train within a sealed system. The applicator is implanted at the time of surgical resection. The inflated balloon stabilises the applicator and allows a suitable dose distribution at a distance from the source train to be achieved. Details of the implantation and radiation procedures as well as the dosimetry calculation are presented. The advantages are simplicity of use, the elimination of radiation risk to personnel and the combination of cytoreduction and applicator implantation in one surgical procedure.

  3. Aurantiamide acetate suppresses the growth of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Li-hui; Yang, Bing-xian; Tian, Jin-kui; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of aurantiamide acetate isolated from the aerial parts of Clematis terniflora DC against gliomas. Human malignant glioma U87 and U251 cells were incubated with different concentrations (0–100 μM) of aurantiamide acetate. Aurantiamide acetate greatly decreased the cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It induced moderate mitochondrial fragmentation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. No significant difference was found in the alternation of other intracellular organelles, although F-actin structure was slightly disturbed. Apparent ultrastructure alternation with increased autophagosome and autolysosome accumulation was observed in aurantiamide acetate-treated cells. The expression of LC3-II was greatly up-regulated in cells exposed to aurantiamide acetate (P < 0.05 compared with control). The cytoplasmic accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes induced by aurantiamide acetate treatment was confirmed by fluorescent reporter protein labelling. Administration of chloroquine (CQ), which inhibits the fusion step of autophagosomes, further increased the accumulation of autophagosomes in the cytoplasm of U87 cells. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine, Bafilomycin A1 or CQ had no influence on aurantiamide acetate-induced cytotoxicity, whereas autophagy stimulator rapamycin significantly suppressed aurantiamide acetate-induced cell death. The anti-tumour effects of aurantiamide acetate were further evaluated in tumour-bearing nude mice. Intratumoural injection of aurantiamide acetate obviously suppressed tumour growth, and increased number of autophagic vacuoles was observed in tumour tissues of animals receiving aurantiamide acetate. Our findings suggest that aurantiamide acetate may suppress the growth of malignant gliomas by blocking autophagic flux. PMID:25704599

  4. Adenoviral p16/CDKN2 gene transfer to malignant glioma: role of p16 in growth, invasion, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Lim, Su-Young; Kim, Young-Yim; Oh, Chang-Wan; Chung, You-Nam; Kim, Chae-Yong; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2003-01-01

    In gliomas, a high frequency of homozygous p16 gene deletions have been demonstrated, which are believed to be linked with malignant progression. The aim of this study was to assess the role of p16 in growth, invasion, and senescence. The human glioma cell lines U87 MG and U373 MG were transduced with Ad-p16, and cell viability was assessed by trypan blue staining. To examine the mechanism of cell growth inhibition, cell cycle analyses and annexin assays were performed. The invasive potential of Ad-p16 transduced cells was evaluated using a Matrigel invasion assay, and trimolecular complex (MMP-2/MT1-MMP/TIMP-2) synthesis was proven by zymography and Western blotting. To establish the link between p16 and cell senescence, we stained for Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase activity. A cell proliferation assay demonstrated that Ad-p16 treatment significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, this cell growth inhibition was induced by cell cycle arrest, not by apoptosis. In vitro treatment of malignant glioma cells with Ad-p16 significantly decreased their invasive potential by Matrigel invasion assay. However, we were unable to demonstrate any differences in the constitutive productions and secretions of MMP-2, MT1-MMP, and TIMP-2, among the mock-treated, Ad-lacZ-transduced, and Ad-p16-transduced cells. p16 expression caused an enlargement of all cells, and these were morphologically similar to senescent cells. Staining for Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase activity showed that the enlarged cells stained positively. Taken together these data strongly suggest that the anti-cancer effect of p16 is modulated by p16-mediated cell cycle arrest and by the induction of senescence.

  5. Enhanced radiosensitivity and radiation-induced apoptosis in glioma CD133-positive cells by knockdown of SirT1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.-J.; Hsu, C.-C.; Yung, M.-C.; Chen, K.-Y.; Tzao Ching; Wu, W.-F.; Chou, H.-Y.; Lee, Y.-Y.; Lu, K.-H.; Chiou, S.-H.; Ma, H.-I

    2009-03-06

    CD133-expressing glioma cells play a critical role in tumor recovery after treatment and are resistant to radiotherapy. Herein, we demonstrated that glioblastoma-derived CD133-positive cells (GBM-CD133{sup +}) are capable of self-renewal and express high levels of embryonic stem cell genes and SirT1 compared to GBM-CD133{sup -} cells. To evaluate the role of SirT1 in GBM-CD133{sup +}, we used a lentiviral vector expressing shRNA to knock-down SirT1 expression (sh-SirT1) in GBM-CD133{sup +}. Silencing of SirT1 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of GBM-CD133{sup +} to radiation and increased the level of radiation-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, knock-down of SirT1 increased the effectiveness of radiotherapy in the inhibition of tumor growth in nude mice transplanted with GBM-CD133{sup +}. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that the mean survival rate of GBM-CD133{sup +} mice treated with radiotherapy was significantly improved by Sh-SirT1 as well. In sum, these results suggest that SirT1 is a potential target for increasing the sensitivity of GBM and glioblastoma-associated cancer stem cells to radiotherapy.

  6. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H.; Carlsson, J.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  7. Accumulation of 99mTc-low-density lipoprotein in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Leppälä, J.; Kallio, M.; Nikula, T.; Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Savolainen, S.; Gylling, H.; Hiltunen, J.; Callaway, J.

    1995-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake in gliomas was studied to find out if LDL has potential as a drug carrier of boron, especially for boron neutron capture therapy. Single photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed 2 h and 20 h after intravenous injection of autologous 99mTc-labelled LDL in four patients with untreated and five patients with recurrent glioma. 99mTc-LDL uptake was compared with the uptake of 99mTc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA), an established blood pool marker. The intra- and peritumoral distributions of radioactivity in the SPET images were not identical for radiolabelled LDL and HSA. The mean LDL tumour to brain ratio, determined from transversal SPET slices at 20 h post injection, was 1.5 in untreated and 2.2 in recurrent gliomas; the corresponding ratios for HSA were 1.6 and 3.4. The brain to blood ratio remained constant at 2 h and 20 h in both types of tumours. These data are not consistent with highly selective, homogeneous uptake of LDL in gliomas. However, the different tumoral distribution and rate of uptake of 99mTc-LDL, as compared with 99mTc-HSA, indicate that the uptake of LDL is different from that of HSA and that further studies on the mechanism of LDL uptake in glioma are warranted. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7841057

  8. Intake of high-fat diet stimulates the risk of ultraviolet radiation-induced skin tumors and malignant progression of papillomas to carcinoma in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that administration of a high-fat diet (HF-diet) to C57BL/6 mice exacerbates their response to short-term UVB radiation-induced inflammation in the skin. To explore the effects of an HF-diet on UVB-induced tumorigenesis, we have used the SKH-1 hairless mouse model in which the mice are exposed to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm{sup 2}) three times a week for 24 weeks. The development of UVB-induced skin tumors was rapid and the tumor multiplicity and tumor size were significantly higher (P < 0.01–0.005) in the mice fed an HF-diet than the mice fed a control-diet (C-diet). Moreover, the malignant progression of UVB-induced papillomas to carcinomas was higher in HF-diet-fed mice. On analysis of tumors and tumor-uninvolved skin samples from the tumor-bearing mice, we found that administration of an HF-diet significantly enhanced the levels of UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (P < 0.01), and PGE{sub 2} receptors, and activation of NF-κB in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. In addition the HF-diet enhanced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.01), interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.01) and IL-6 (P < 0.05) in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that HF-diet enhanced the levels of epidermal cell proliferation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt at Ser{sup 473} in UVB-exposed skin and skin tumors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the regular consumption of an HF-diet increases the risk of photocarcinogenesis in mice and that this is associated with enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators in the UVB-exposed skin and tumors. - Highlights: • Consumption of high-fat diet increases UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice. • Intake of high-fat diet stimulates progression of UV-induced papilloma to carcinoma. • Intake of high-fat diet enhances inflammation in UV-exposed skin • Regular

  9. Hypotaurine evokes a malignant phenotype in glioma through aberrant hypoxic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nesvick, Cody L.; Feldman, Michael J.; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Liu, Huailei; Chu, Huiying; Yang, Fengxu; Tang, Ling; Tian, Jing; Zhao, Shiguang; Li, Guohui; Heiss, John D.; Liu, Yang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has shown significant potential in identifying small molecules specific to tumor phenotypes. In this study we analyzed resected tissue metabolites using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and found that tissue hypotaurine levels strongly and positively correlated with glioma grade. In vitro studies were conducted to show that hypotaurine activates hypoxia signaling through the competitive inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2. This leads to the activation of hypoxia signaling as well as to the enhancement of glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In contrast, taurine, the oxidation metabolite of hypotaurine, decreased intracellular hypotaurine and resulted in glioma cell growth arrest. Lastly, a glioblastoma xenograft mice model was supplemented with taurine feed and exhibited impaired tumor growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypotaurine is an aberrantly produced oncometabolite, mediating tumor molecular pathophysiology and progression. The hypotaurine metabolic pathway may provide a potentially new target for glioblastoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26934654

  10. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial.

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B; Blume, Jeffrey D; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K; Herman, Benjamin; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M

    2009-03-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies. PMID:18925402

  11. Delivery of Molecularly Targeted Therapy to Malignant Glioma, a Disease of the Whole Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sagar; Sane, Ramola; Oberoi, Rajneet; Ohlfest, John R.; Elmquist, William

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, due to its invasive nature, can be considered a disease of the entire brain. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have only a marginal impact on patient survival. A crucial challenge faced by cancer researchers is to effectively deliver drugs to invasive glioma cells residing in a sanctuary within the central nervous system. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts delivery of many small and large molecules into the brain. Drug delivery to the brain is further restricted by active efflux transporters present at the BBB, which transport drugs out of the brain back into the blood. Current clinical assessment of drug delivery and hence efficacy is based on the measured drug levels in the bulk tumor mass that is usually removed by surgery. Mounting evidence suggests that the inevitable relapse and lethality of glioblastoma multiforme is due to a failure to effectively treat invasive glioma cells. These invasive cells hide in areas of the brain that are shielded by an intact BBB where they continue to grow and give rise to the recurrent tumor. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutics to the invasive glioma cells is therefore critical, and long-term efficacy will depend upon the ability of a molecularly targeted agent to penetrate an intact and functional BBB throughout the entire brain. This review highlights the various aspects of the BBB, and also the brain–tumor-cell barrier, a barrier due to expression of efflux transporters in tumor cells, that together can significantly influence drug response. It then discusses the special challenge of glioma as a disease of the whole brain, which lends particular emphasis to the need to effectively deliver drugs across the BBB to reach both the central tumor and the invasive glioma cells. PMID:21676290

  12. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  13. Artemether Combined with shRNA Interference of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Significantly Inhibited the Malignant Biological Behavior of Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Xue, Yi-Xue; Yao, Yi-Long; Yu, Bo; Liu, Yun-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells. U87 human glioma cells were treated with artemether at various concentrations and shRNA interfering technology was employed to silence the expression of VCAM-1. Cell viability, migration, invasiveness and apoptosis were assessed with MTT, wound healing, Transwell and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) was checked by Western blot assay. Results showed that artemether and shRNA-VCAM-1 not only significantly inhibited the migration, invasiveness and expression of MMP-2/9 and p-Akt, but also promoted the apoptosis of U87 cells. Combined treatment of both displayed the maximum inhibitory effects on the malignant biological behavior of glioma cells. Our work revealed the potential therapeutic effects of artemether and antiVCAM-1 in the treatments of gliomas. PMID:23593320

  14. Analysis of p53 mutation and epidermal growth factor receptor amplification in recurrent gliomas with malignant progression

    SciTech Connect

    Reifenberger, J.; Ring, G.U.; Gies, U.

    1996-07-01

    Genomic alterations and expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) were investigated in 22 patients with primary World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas that on recurrence had progressed to malignant gliomas of WHO grades III or IV. Mutations of the p53 gene (exons 5 to 8) were found in 12 of 22 primary tumors (10 of 13 astrocytomas, 1 of 7 oligodendrogliomas, 1 of 2 oligoastrocytomas). In each of these cases identical p53 mutations were present in the respective malignant recurrences. In all instances in which the p53 mutation was associated with p53 protein accumulation (10 of 12 cases), the percentage of p53 immunopositive tumor cells had increased from the primary to the recurrent tumor. None of the primary low-grade and none of the recurrent high-grade tumors (7 anaplastic astrocytomas, 10 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, 4 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and 5 glioblastomas) showed evidence of EGFR gene amplification. Our results thus demonstrate that p53 is mutated in a high fraction of low-grade astrocytomas with progression to anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas and that progression in such cases is frequently associated with an increase in the fraction of p53 immunopositive tumor cells. The general absence of EGFR amplification in our tumor series supports the hypothesis that the significance of p53 mutation and EGFR amplification may be different in glioblastomas that developed by progression from low-grade astrocytomas (secondary glioblastomas) compared to glioblastomas that developed rapidly in a de novo manner without a history of previous low-grade tumor (primary glioblastomas). 54 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Immunotherapeutic approach with oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Renata; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODNs) are strong activators of both innate and specific immunity, driving the immune response towards the Th1 phenotype. In cancer patients, CpG-ODNs can be used to activate the innate immunity and trigger a tumor-specific immune response. Several clinical trials are on-going worldwide in various cancers. In this chapter, we will focus on the potential applications of CpG-ODNs in glioma. So far, CpG-ODN has mainly been used by intratumoral injections. Indeed, human gliomas display a locally invasive pattern of growth and rarely metastasize, making local treatment clinically relevant. PMID:22639162

  16. Focused Ultrasound Enhances Central Nervous System Delivery of Bevacizumab for Malignant Glioma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Lin, Chung-Yin; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Chai, Wen-Yen; Chu, Po-Chun; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Yang, Liang-Yo; Kuo, John S; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-monitored transcranial focused ultrasound can enhance the delivery of the antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab into the central nervous system (CNS) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment. Materials and Methods All animal experiments were approved by the animal committee and adhered to experimental animal care guidelines. Transcranial focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles was used to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enhance bevacizumab penetration into the CNS in healthy and glioma-bearing mice. Bevacizumab concentration was quantitated with high-performance liquid chromatography, and Western blot testing was performed to confirm the specific biologic form in the CNS. Penetration of bevacizumab into brain tissue was estimated in vivo by means of contrast material-enhanced MR imaging and quantitative gallium 68 ((68)Ga)-bevacizumab micro-positron emission tomography, and glioma progression was longitudinally followed with T2-weighted MR imaging. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and cluster of differentiation 31 immunostaining were used to assess morphologic changes and vascular inhibition at histologic examination. The two-tailed Student t test and the Mantel-Cox log-rank test were used for statistical analyses, with a significance level of .05. Results Focused ultrasound significantly enhanced bevacizumab penetration into the CNS by 5.7- to 56.7-fold compared with that in nonexposed brain (both P < .0001). Contrast-enhanced MR imaging indexes correlated with bevacizumab concentration (r = 0.748-0.857) in vivo. Focused ultrasound-enhanced bevacizumab delivery significantly retarded glioma progression, with a significantly increased median survival (median increase in survival time = 135% in the group treated with bevacizumab and focused ultrasound, P < .0001; as compared with 48% in the group treated with bevacizumab alone, P = .0002). Conclusion Focused ultrasound

  17. A phase I trial of erlotinib in patients with nonprogressive glioblastoma multiforme postradiation therapy, and recurrent malignant gliomas and meningiomas†

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this phase I study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas (MGs) or recurrent meningiomas on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Dose escalation was by a standard 3 × 3 design. The initial starting dose of erlotinib was 150 mg daily. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed, then dose escalation occurs as follows: 200 mg/day, 275 mg/day, and then increased in 125 mg increments until the MTD was reached. The MTD was defined as the dose where ≤1 of 6 patients experienced a DLT and the dose above had 2 or more DLTs. The MTD was 650 mg/day; the observed DLTs were grade 3 rash in 2 patients at 775 mg/day. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a significant influence of EIAEDs on the metabolism of erlotinib when compared with our phase II data published separately. Primary toxicities were rash and diarrhea. The MTD of erlotinib in patients receiving EIAEDs is substantially higher than the standard dose of 150 mg. This has important implications for further development of this drug in the treatment of MG as well as the optimal management of patients with other malignancies such as NSCLC who are on enzyme-inducing drugs. PMID:20150371

  18. Identification of histological markers for malignant glioma by genome-wide expression analysis: dynein, alpha-PIX and sorcin.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takashi; Kouno, Jun; Adachi, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Teramoto, Akira; Matsumoto, Koshi; Sugisaki, Yuichi; Onda, Masamitsu; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant class of glial neoplasm (grade IV in WHO criteria), carries the worst clinical prognosis among primary brain tumors in adults. To identify a set of genes involved in the tumorigenesis of GBM, we evaluated expression profiles of GBM tissues from 11 patients using a cDNA microarray representing 25,344 human genes. By comparing the profiles with those of normal brain tissue, we identified a number of differentially expressed genes: 54 with increased expression and 45 with reduced expression in GBMs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments with 6 of those genes confirmed higher expression of DNCH2, ARHGEF6, NPM1 and SRI and lower expression of NRGN and TM4SF2 in GBM tumors. Immunohistochemical staining for 3 of the respective gene products, dynein (product of DNCH2), alpha-PIX (product of ARHGEF6), and sorcin (product of SRI) indicated that this technique might be useful for histological grading of glial tumors. To establish criteria for this diagnostic approach, we scored glial tumor tissues of different histological grades according to the staining results; the scores were significantly higher in anaplastic astrocytomas and GBMs than in diffuse astrocytomas or normal brain tissues. These findings indicated that levels of these three proteins might serve as histological markers for malignant glioma classification. PMID:16320026

  19. Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiuping; Meng, Qingming; Xu, Xuebin; Zhi, Tongle; Shi, Qiong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of Bex2 markedly increased in glioma tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bex2 over-expression promoted cell proliferation, while its down-regulation inhibited cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bex2 down-regulation promoted cell apoptosis via JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. -- Abstract: The function of Bex2, a member of the Brain Expressed X-linked gene family, in glioma is controversial and its mechanism is largely unknown. We report here that Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The expression level of Bex2 is markedly increased in glioma tissues. We observed that Bex2 over-expression promotes cell proliferation, while down-regulation of Bex2 inhibits cell growth. Furthermore, Bex2 down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and activates the JNK pathway; these effects were abolished by administration of the JNK specific inhibitor, (SP600125). Thus, Bex2 may be an important player during the development of glioma.

  20. A phase II trial of erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and nonprogressive glioblastoma multiforme postradiation therapy†

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Aldape, Kenneth A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with (a) recurrent malignant glioma (MG): glioblastoma (GBM) or recurrent anaplastic glioma (AG), and (b) nonprogressive (NP) GBM following radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Primary objective for recurrent MG was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and overall survival at 12 months for NP GBM post-RT. Secondary objectives for recurrent MGs were response, survival, assessment of toxicity, and pharmacokinetics (PKs). Treatment with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs was not allowed. Patients received 150 mg/day erlotinib. Patients requiring surgery were treated 7 days prior to tumor removal for PK analysis and effects of erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and intracellular signaling pathways. Ninety-six patients were evaluable (53 recurrent MG and 43 NP GBM); 5 patients were not evaluable for response. PFS-6 in recurrent GBM was 3% with a median PFS of 2 months; PFS-6 in recurrent AG was 27% with a median PFS of 2 months. Twelve-month survival was 57% in NP GBMs post-RT. Primary toxicity was dermatologic. The tissue-to-plasma ratio normalized to nanograms per gram dry weight for erlotinib and OSI-420 ranged from 25% to 44% and 30% to 59%, respectively, for pretreated surgical patients. No effect on EGFR or intratumoral signaling was seen. Patients with NP GBM post-RT who developed rash in cycle 1 had improved survival (P < .001). Single-agent activity of erlotinib is minimal for recurrent MGs and marginally beneficial following RT for NP GBM patients. Development of rash in cycle 1 correlates with survival in patients with NP GBM after RT. PMID:20150372

  1. Connexin 30 expression inhibits growth of human malignant gliomas but protects them against radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Artesi, Maria; Kroonen, Jerome; Bredel, Markus; Nguyen-Khac, Minh; Deprez, Manuel; Schoysman, Laurent; Poulet, Christophe; Chakravarti, Arnab; Kim, Hyunsoo; Scholtens, Denise; Seute, Tatjana; Rogister, Bernard; Bours, Vincent; Robe, Pierre A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas remain ominous tumors that almost invariably escape treatment. Connexins are a family of transmembrane, gap junction-forming proteins, some members of which were reported to act as tumor suppressors and to modulate cellular metabolism in response to cytotoxic stress. Methods We analyzed the copy number and expression of the connexin (Cx)30 gene gap junction beta-6 (GJB6), as well as of its protein immunoreactivity in several public and proprietary repositories of glioblastomas, and their influence on patient survival. We evaluated the effect of the expression of this gap junction protein on the growth, DNA repair and energy metabolism, and treatment resistance of these tumors. Results The GJB6 gene was deleted in 25.8% of 751 analyzed tumors and mutated in 15.8% of 158 tumors. Cx30 immunoreactivity was absent in 28.9% of 145 tumors. Restoration of Cx30 expression in human glioblastoma cells reduced their growth in vitro and as xenografts in the striatum of immunodeficient mice. Cx30 immunoreactivity was, however, found to adversely affect survival in 2 independent retrospective cohorts of glioblastoma patients. Cx30 was found in clonogenic assays to protect glioblastoma cells against radiation-induced mortality and to decrease radiation-induced DNA damage. This radioprotection correlated with a heat shock protein 90–dependent mitochondrial translocation of Cx30 following radiation and an improved ATP production following this genotoxic stress. Conclusion These results underline the complex relationship between potential tumor suppressors and treatment resistance in glioblastomas and single out GJB6/Cx30 as a potential biomarker and target for therapeutic intervention in these tumors. PMID:25155356

  2. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  3. RHPN2 Drives Mesenchymal Transformation in Malignant Glioma by Triggering RhoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Danussi, Carla; Akavia, Uri David; Niola, Francesco; Jovic, Andreja; Lasorella, Anna; Pe’er, Dana; Iavarone, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mesenchymal (MES) transformation is a hallmark of aggressive glioblastoma (GBM). Here we report the development of an unbiased method for computational integration of copy number variation, expression and mutation data from large datasets. Using this method we identified RHPN2 as a central genetic determinant of the MES phenotype of human GBM. Notably, amplification of the human RHPN2 gene on chromosome 19 correlates with a dramatic decrease in the survival of glioma patients. Ectopic expression of RHPN2 in neural stem cells and astrocytes triggered the expression of MES genes and promoted an invasive phenotype without impacting cell proliferation. Mechanistically, these effects were implemented through RHPN2-mediated activation of RhoA, a master regulator of cell migration and invasion. Our results define RHPN2 amplification as a central genetic determinant of a highly aggressive phenotype that directs the worst clinical outcomes in GBM patients. PMID:23774217

  4. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  5. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture.

  6. Combination treatment of TRAIL, DFMO and radiation for malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Tsamis, Konstantinos I; Vartholomatos, Evrysthenis; Peponi, Evangelia; Tzima, Eftychia; Tasiou, Ifigeneia; Lykoudis, Efstathios; Tsekeris, Pericles; Kyritsis, Athanasios P

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown potent and cancer-selective killing activity and drawn considerable attention as a promising therapy for cancer. Another promising cancer therapy is difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, which is oraly administered and well tolerated. Nevertheless, many types of cancer, including gliomas, have exhibited resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and similarly the potency of DFMO should be enhanced to optimize therapeutic efficacy. In this study we sought to determine whether DFMO, in combination with TRAIL and radiation, could result in an enhanced anti-glioma effect in vitro. We investigated the effect of DFMO, TRAIL and radiation in various combinations on a panel of glioblastoma cell lines (A172, T98G, D54, U251MG). Viability and proliferation of the cells were examined with trypan blue exclusion assay, crystal violet and xCELLigence system. Apoptosis (Annexin-PI), cell cycle and activation of caspase-8 were tested with flow cytometry. BAD protein levels were determined by Western blot analysis. DFMO induced BAD overexpression. Combination treatment with DFMO, TRAIL and radiation significantly reduced cell viability in all cell lines tested. Increased induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest was confirmed with flow cytometry in A172 and D54 cell lines, while enhanced activation of annexin and caspase-8 was revealed in U251MG and T98G cells. The treatment of glioblastoma cell lines with combination of DFMO, TRAIL and radiation showed an enhanced effect. This combination treatment may represent a novel strategy for targeting glioblastoma. PMID:25935110

  7. Effect of disease burden on health-related quality of life in patients with malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Osoba, D.; Brada, M.; Prados, M. D.; Yung, W. K.

    2000-01-01

    The burden imposed by disease recurrence in patients with high-grade gliomas is not well documented. We studied the frequency of self-report symptoms and the effects on health-related quality of life in patients who had recurrent glioblastoma multiforme or anaplastic astrocytoma and who had a Karnofsky performance score > or = 70. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 Items (QLQ-C30) and the Brain Cancer Module (BCM20) before initiation of treatment for first recurrence of disease. Six symptoms (fatigue, uncertainty about the future, motor difficulties, drowsiness, communication difficulties, and headache) were reported with a frequency > 50% by both groups of patients. An additional two symptoms (visual problems and pain) were also reported with frequencies of > 50% by patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Most of the symptoms were likely due to recurrence, but previous radiation therapy and on-going corticosteroid treatment may have also been casual factors for fatigue, whereas uncertainty about the future and pain were probably nonspecific for brain cancer. Problems with motor functioning, vision, leg strength, and pain were reported more frequently by patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme than by those with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. Scores on health-related quality-of-life functioning scales were similar in the two groups. Finally, the scores for patients who had recurrent high-grade gliomas and a Karnofsky performance score > or = 70 were compared with the reported health-related quality of life scores of patients with other cancers. Their scores were similar to those of patients with metastatic cancers and worse than those of patients with localized cancers. PMID:11265231

  8. Radiation injury of boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Nagahiro, S; Mizobuchi, Y; Toi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Kumada, H

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the radiation injury in acute or delayed stage after boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma. Eighteen patients with malignant glioma underwent mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beam and sodium borocaptate between 1998 and 2004. The radiation dose (i.e. physical dose of boron n-alpha reaction) in the protocol used between 1998 and 2000 (Protocol A, n = 8) prescribed a maximum tumor volume dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a new dose-escalated protocol was introduced (Protocol B, n = 4); it prescribes a minimum tumor volume dose of 18 Gy or, alternatively, a minimum target volume dose of 15 Gy. Since 2002, the radiation dose was reduced to 80-90% dose of Protocol B because of acute radiation injury. A new Protocol was applied to 6 glioblastoma patients (Protocol C, n = 6). The average values of the maximum vascular dose of brain surface in Protocol A, B and C were 11.4+/-4.2 Gy, 15.7+/-1.2 and 13.9+/-3.6 Gy, respectively. Acute radiation injury such as a generalized convulsion within 1 week after BNCT was recognized in three patients of Protocol B. Delayed radiation injury such as a neurological deterioration appeared 3-6 months after BNCT, and it was recognized in 1 patient in Protocol A, 5 patients in Protocol B. According to acute radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 15.8+/-1.3 Gy in positive and was 12.6+/-4.3 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. According to the delayed radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 13.8+/-3.8 Gy in positive and was 13.6+/-4.9 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. The dose escalation is limited because most patients in Protocol B suffered from acute radiation injury. We conclude that the maximum vascular dose does not exceed over 12 Gy to avoid the delayed radiation injury, especially, it should be limited under 10 Gy in the case that tumor

  9. Early Detection of Malignant Transformation in Resected WHO II Low-Grade Glioma Using Diffusion Tensor-Derived Quantitative Measures

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Martin T.; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.; Binczyk, Francisczek; Laun, Frederik B.; Weber, Christian; Bonekamp, David; Tarnawski, Rafal; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara; Polanska, Joanna; Majchrzak, Henryk; Stieltjes, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Objective Here, we retrospectively investigate the value of voxel-wisely plotted diffusion tensor-derived (DTI) axial, radial and mean diffusivity for the early detection of malignant transformation (MT) in WHO II glioma compared to contrast-enhanced images. Materials and Methods Forty-seven patients underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging follow-up between 2006–2014 after gross-tumor resection of intra-axial WHO II glioma. Axial/Mean/Radial diffusivity maps (AD/MD/RD) were generated from DTI data. ADmin/MDmin/RDmin values were quantified within tumor regions-of-interest generated by two independent readers including tumor contrast-to-noise (CNR). Sensitivity/specificity and area-under-the-curve (AUC) were calculated using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis. Inter-reader agreement was assessed (Cohen’s kappa). Results Eighteen patients demonstrated malignant transformation (MT) confirmed in 8/18 by histopathology and in 10/18 through imaging follow-up. Twelve of 18 patients (66.6%) with MT showed diffusion restriction timely coincidental with contrast-enhancement (CE). In the remaining six patients (33.3%), the diffusion restriction preceded the CE. The mean gain in detection time using DTI was (0.8±0.5 years, p = 0.028). Compared to MDmin and RDmin, ROC-analysis showed best diagnostic value for ADmin (sensitivity/specificity 94.94%/89.7%, AUC 0.96; p<0.0001) to detect MT. CNR was highest for AD (1.83±0.14), compared to MD (1.31±0.19; p<0.003) and RD (0.90±0.23; p<0.0001). Cohen’s Kappa was 0.77 for ADmin, 0.71 for MDmin and 0.65 for RDmin (p<0.0001, respectively). Conclusion MT is detectable at the same time point or earlier compared to T1w-CE by diffusion restriction in diffusion-tensor-derived maps. AD demonstrated highest sensitivity/specificity/tumor-contrast compared to radial or mean diffusivity (= apparent diffusion coefficient) to detect MT. PMID:27741525

  10. QL-09TRAJECTORY OF QUALITY OF LIFE AT END OF LIFE IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA: SUPPORT FOR THE TERMINAL DROP THEORY

    PubMed Central

    Farace, Elana; Sheehan, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about quality of life (QOL) at end-of-life (EOL) in malignant brain tumor patients, which limits clinicians ability to best to help patients at this stage. The QOL trajectory at EOL has commonly been hypothesized to be "terminal decline," a linear relationship to time before death with a relatively gradual decline. Alternately, QOL at EOL could be hypothesized to be analogous to the "terminal drop" theory of cognitive aging, wherein the patient QOL has a curvilinear relationship to time before death; a relatively flat curve with a rapid decline a short time before death. 89 patients with malignant glioma were enrolled in this NCI funded study of QOL and neurocognition. Patients completed the EORTC-QLQ-C30 at three month intervals until death. Mean length of follow-up was 224 days (median 155 days). Mean age of patients was 52 years (range 18-80). The gender ratio was 49% men and 51% women. One patient was Latino (so 97% Non-Hispanic), 69 participants were Caucasian, one was African American, and one was Native American. The mean educational level was 13 years (range 8-20). Twenty-eight patients had glioblastoma (grade IV), nine had a grade III oligodendroglioma, and six had a grade III oligoastrocytoma. Data were plotted over time to determine if the shape of the curve resembles terminal decline or terminal drop. Interestingly, as can be seen from the graph, Global QOL slightly improved over time. Growth Curve Analysis confirms this finding. Results of this study may supporting the terminal drop theory but may also illustrate response shift, a conundrum for QOL researchers in which patients' perspective changes and thus they report improved QOL. Longer follow-up is necessary to delineate this pattern. A better understanding of QOL at EOL will improve medical and psychosocial palliative care.

  11. Apoptotic effects of γ-mangostin from the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana on human malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Ju; Yang, Ling-Ling

    2010-12-07

    Gliomas are a common type of primary brain tumor with glioblastoma multiforme accounting for the majority of human brain tumors. In this paper, high grade human malignant glioblastomas (MGs) including U87 MG and GBM 8401 were used to evaluate the antitumor effects of γ-mangostin, a xanthone derivative isolated and purified from the hull of the tropical fruit Garcinia mangostana. The γ-mangostin showed potent antiproliferative activity toward MGs in dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, flow cytometric analysis of cell morphology in the apoptotic cells revealed an increase in hypodiploid cells in γ-mangostin treated U87 MG and GBM 8401 cells, while significant enhancement of intracellular peroxide production was detected in the same γ-mangostin treated cells by DCHDA assay and DiOC(6)(3) stain. g-Mangostin induced apoptosis, which in turn mediates cytotoxicity in human MG cells was prevented by the addition of catalase. Naturally derived medicines and herbal therapies are drawing increasing attention in regard to the treatment of many health issues, and this includes the testing of new phytochemicals or nutrients for brain tumor patients. This has led to γ-mangostin being identified as a potential leading compound for the development of an anti-brain tumor agent.

  12. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  13. Tamoxifen-Induced Cell Death of Malignant Glioma Cells Is Brought About by Oxidative-Stress-Mediated Alterations in the Expression of BCL2 Family Members and Is Enhanced on miR-21 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Harmalkar, Mugdha; Upraity, Shailendra; Kazi, Sadaf; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2015-10-01

    High-grade gliomas are refractory to the current mode of treatment primarily due to their inherent resistance to cell death. Tamoxifen has been reported to inhibit growth and induce cell death of glioma cells in vitro, in an estrogen-receptor-independent manner. Delineating the molecular mechanism underlying tamoxifen-induced cell death of human glioma cells would help in identifying pathways/genes that could be targeted to induce tumor-cell-specific cell death. In the present study, tamoxifen was found to bring about autophagic cell death of human glioma cells that was accompanied by oxidative stress induction, JNK activation, downregulation of anti-autophagic BCL2 family members, viz. BCL2 and BCL-XL, and increased expression of the pro-autophagic members BCL-Xs and BAK. Oxidative stress induction appears to be primarily responsible for the tamoxifen-induced cell death since the cell death, JNK activation, and the alterations in the expression levels of BCL2 family members were abrogated on pretreatment with antioxidant vitamin E. MiR-21, an oncogenic miRNA, is known to be highly upregulated in malignant glioma. Inhibition of miR-21 activity was found to enhance tamoxifen-induced cell death of U87 MG malignant glioma cells. Tamoxifen treatment coupled with miR-21 inhibition could therefore be an effective strategy for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  14. Heparan sulfate sulfatase SULF2 regulates PDGFRα signaling and growth in human and mouse malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joanna J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ward, Anna; Lum, David H.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Rosen, Steven D.; Rowitch, David H.; Werb, Zena

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a uniformly lethal brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse invasion and abnormal activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways, presenting a major challenge to effective therapy. The activation of many RTK pathways is regulated by extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), suggesting these molecules may be effective targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we demonstrated that the extracellular sulfatase, SULF2, an enzyme that regulates multiple HSPG-dependent RTK signaling pathways, was expressed in primary human GBM tumors and cell lines. Knockdown of SULF2 in human GBM cell lines and generation of gliomas from Sulf2–/– tumorigenic neurospheres resulted in decreased growth in vivo in mice. We found a striking SULF2 dependence in activity of PDGFRα, a major signaling pathway in GBM. Ablation of SULF2 resulted in decreased PDGFRα phosphorylation and decreased downstream MAPK signaling activity. Interestingly, in a survey of SULF2 levels in different subtypes of GBM, the proneural subtype, characterized by aberrations in PDGFRα, demonstrated the strongest SULF2 expression. Therefore, in addition to its potential as an upstream target for therapy of GBM, SULF2 may help identify a subset of GBMs that are more dependent on exogenous growth factor–mediated signaling. Our results suggest the bioavailability of growth factors from the microenvironment is a significant contributor to tumor growth in a major subset of human GBM. PMID:22293178

  15. Human Phospholipase D Activity Transiently Regulates Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Thomas P.; Hill, Salisha; Rose, Kristie L.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Brown, H. Alex

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells reorganize their metabolic pathways to fuel demanding rates of proliferation. Oftentimes, these metabolic phenotypes lie downstream of prominent oncogenes. The lipid signaling molecule phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is produced by the hydrolytic enzyme phospholipase D (PLD), has been identified as a critical regulatory molecule for oncogenic signaling in many cancers. In an effort to identify novel regulatory mechanisms for PtdOH, we screened various cancer cell lines, assessing whether treatment of cancer models with PLD inhibitors altered production of intracellular metabolites. Preliminary findings lead us to focus on how deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) are altered upon PLD inhibitor treatment in gliomas. Using a combination of proteomics and small molecule intracellular metabolomics, we show herein that PtdOH acutely regulates the production of these pyrimidine metabolites through activation of CAD via mTOR signaling pathways independently of Akt. These changes are responsible for decreases in dNTP production after PLD inhibitor treatment. Our data identify a novel regulatory role for PLD activity in specific cancer types. PMID:25646564

  16. Phase I study of iniparib concurrent with monthly or continuous temozolomide dosing schedules in patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Grossman, Stuart A; Mikkelsen, Tom; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Peereboom, David; Nabors, L Burt; Chi, Andrew S; Emmons, Gary; Garcia Ribas, Ignacio; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiaobu

    2015-10-01

    Iniparib is a prodrug that converts to highly reactive cytotoxic metabolites intracellularly with activity in preclinical glioma models. We investigated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of iniparib with monthly (m) and continuous (c) temozolomide (TMZ) dosing schedules in patients with malignant gliomas (MG). Adults with newly diagnosed MG who had successfully completed ≥80% of radiation (RT) and TMZ without toxicity received mTMZ dosing (150-200 mg/m(2) days 1-5/28 days) or cTMZ dosing (75 mg/m(2)/days × 6 weeks) in conjunction with iniparib (i.v. 2 days/week) in the adjuvant setting. Iniparib was dose escalated using a modified continual reassessment method (mCRM). 43 patients (32 male; 34 GBM, 8 AA, 1 gliosarcoma; median age 54 years; median KPS 90) were enrolled across 4 dose levels. In the mTMZ group, 2/4 patients had dose limiting toxicities (DLT) at 19 mg/kg/week (rash/hypersensitivity). At 17.2 mg/kg/week, 1/9 patients had a DLT (grade 3 fatigue). Additional grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia, lymphopenia, and nausea. In the cTMZ group, one DLT (thromboembolic event) occurred at 10.2 mg/kg/week. Dose escalation stopped at 16 mg/kg/week based on mCRM. The mean maximum plasma concentration of iniparib increased with dose. Concentration of the two major circulating metabolites, 4-iodo-3-aminobenzamide and 4-iodo-3-aminobenzoic acid, was ≤5% of the corresponding iniparib concentration. Iniparib is well tolerated, at doses higher than previously investigated, in combination with TMZ after completion of RT + TMZ in patients with MG. Recommended phase 2 dosing of iniparib based on mCRM is 17.2 mg/kg/week with mTMZ and 16 mg/kg/week with cTMZ. An efficacy study of TMZ/RT + iniparib followed by TMZ + iniparib in newly diagnosed GBM using these doses has completed enrollment. Survival assessment is ongoing. PMID:26285766

  17. Phase I study of iniparib concurrent with monthly or continuous temozolomide dosing schedules in patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri O.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Peereboom, David; Nabors, L. Burt; Chi, Andrew S.; Emmons, Gary; Ribas, Ignacio Garcia; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiaobu

    2016-01-01

    Background Iniparib is a prodrug that converts to highly reactive cytotoxic metabolites intracellularly with activity in preclinical glioma models. We investigated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of iniparib with monthly (m) and continuous (c) temozolomide (TMZ) dosing schedules in patients with malignant gliomas (MG). Methods Adults with newly diagnosed MG who had successfully completed ≥ 80% of radiation (RT) and TMZ without toxicity received mTMZ dosing (150-200 mg/m2 days 1-5/28 days) or cTMZ dosing (75 mg/m2/d × 6weeks) in conjunction with iniparib (i.v. 2 days/wk) in the adjuvant setting. Iniparib was dose escalated using a modified continual reassessment method (mCRM). Results 43 patients (32 male; 34 GBM, 8 AA, 1 gliosarcoma; median age 54 yrs; median KPS 90) were enrolled across 4 dose levels. In the mTMZ group, 2/4 patients had dose limiting toxicities (DLT) at 19mg/kg/week (rash/hypersensitivity). At 17.2mg/kg/week, 1/9 patients had a DLT (grade 3 fatigue). Additional grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia, lymphopenia, and nausea. In the cTMZ group, one DLT (thromboembolic event) occurred at 10.2mg/kg/wk. Dose escalation stopped at 16mg/kg/week based on mCRM. The mean maximum plasma concentration of iniparib increased with dose. Concentration of the two major circulating metabolites, 4-iodo-3-aminobenzamide and 4-iodo-3-aminobenzoic acid, was ≤ 5% of the corresponding iniparib concentration. Conclusions Iniparib is well tolerated, at doses higher than previously investigated, in combination with TMZ after completion of RT + TMZ in patients with MG. Recommended phase 2 dosing of iniparib based on mCRM is 17.2mg/kg/wk with mTMZ and 16mg/kg/wk with cTMZ. An efficacy study of TMZ/RT + iniparib followed by TMZ + iniparib in newly diagnosed GBM using these doses has completed enrollment. Survival assessment is ongoing. PMID:26285766

  18. A phase II trial evaluating the effects and intra-tumoral penetration of bortezomib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Raizer, Jeffrey J; Chandler, James P; Ferrarese, Roberto; Grimm, Sean A; Levy, Robert M; Muro, Kenji; Rosenow, Joshua; Helenowski, Irene; Rademaker, Alfred; Paton, Martin; Bredel, Markus

    2016-08-01

    One resistance mechanism in malignant gliomas (MG) involves nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Bortezomib prevents proteasomal degradation of NF-κB inhibitor α (NFKBIA), an endogenous regulator of NF-κB signaling, thereby limiting the effects of NF-κB on tumor survival and resistance. A presurgical phase II trial of bortezomib in recurrent MG was performed to determine drug concentration in tumor tissue and effects on NFKBIA. Patients were enrolled after signing an IRB approved informed consent. Treatment was bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) IV on days 1, 4 and 8 and then surgery on day 8 or 9. Post-operatively, treatment was Temozolomide (TMZ) 75 mg/m(2) PO on days 1-7 and 14-21 and bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) on days 7 and 21 [1 cycle was (1) month]. Ten patients were enrolled (8 M and 2 F) with 9 having surgery. Median age and KPS were 50 (42-64) and 90 % (70-100). The median cycles post-operatively was 2 (0-4). The trial was stopped as no patient had a PFS-6. All patients are deceased. Paired plasma and tumor bortezomib concentration measurements revealed higher drug concentrations in tumor than in plasma; NFKBIA protein levels were similar in drug-treated vs. drug-naïve tumor specimens. Nuclear 20S proteasome was less in postoperative samples. Postoperative treatment with TMZ and bortezomib did not show clinical activity. Bortezomib appears to sequester in tumor but pharmacological effects on NFKBIA were not seen, possibly obscured due to downregulation of NFKBIA during tumor progression. Changes in nuclear 20S could be marker of bortezomib effect on tumor. PMID:27300524

  19. A Multicenter Phase I/II Study of the BCNU Implant (Gliadel ® Wafer) for Japanese Patients with Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomokazu; NISHIKAWA, Ryo; SUGIYAMA, Kazuhiko; NONOGUCHI, Naosuke; KAWABATA, Noriyuki; MISHIMA, Kazuhiko; ADACHI, Jun-ichi; KURISU, Kaoru; YAMASAKI, Fumiyuki; TOMINAGA, Teiji; KUMABE, Toshihiro; UEKI, Keisuke; HIGUCHI, Fumi; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; TAKESHIMA, Hideo; YAMASHITA, Shinji; ARITA, Kazunori; HIRANO, Hirofumi; YAMADA, Shinobu; MATSUTANI, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel® Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe. PMID:24739422

  20. Neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated on a phase Ib trial evaluating topotecan by convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Jennifer A.; Dave, Amie N.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Sands, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative, invasive tumors that are resistant to conventional treatment, and disease progression is often accompanied by physical and mental debilitation. Neurocognitive functioning (NCF) and quality of life (QoL) were evaluated as part of a prospective phase Ib dose-escalation study of topotecan by convection-enhanced delivery (CED) for adult patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods Sixteen patients were enrolled, and NCF and QoL were evaluated using the Cognitive Stability Index and SF-36 at baseline and monthly for 4 months post treatment. Descriptive analyses included the reliable change index for serial evaluations and correlations for associations between outcome variables and age, tumor volume, total topotecan dose, and treatment effect. Results Individual classifications of response to treatment indicated that a majority of patients reported stable scores over the follow-up period. Demographic and treatment-related variables were not associated with outcomes. Baseline processing speed scores were invalid for 6 subjects. Higher rates of valid scores were observed on subsequent administrations. Conclusions As the first study to use CED of any kind to evaluate the impact of CED on NCF or QoL, there was no evidence of severe detriment to either outcome. Long-term evaluation is necessary to track changes in NCF and QoL related to disease progression. Invalid scores suggest that computer-based assessments may not be suitable for all patients with malignant gliomas, especially those with cognitive deficits secondary to their disease. Future trials should include a wider range of sensitive measures to assess the impact of CED on patient NCF and QoL. PMID:26034621

  1. Safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of bevacizumab after osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Boockvar, John A.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Kovanlikaya, Ilham I; Fralin, Sherese; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Seedial, Stephen M.; Pannullo, Susan C.; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Stieg, Philip; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Knopman, Jared; Scheff, Ronald J.; Christos, Paul; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Riina, Howard A.

    2013-01-01

    Object The authors assessed the safety and maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of bevacizumab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods A total of 30 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. Results The authors report no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of bevacizumab up to 15 mg/kg after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. Two groups of patients were studied; those without prior bevacizumab exposure (naïve patients; Group I) and those who had received previous intravenous bevacizumab (exposed patients; Group II). Radiographic changes demonstrated on MR imaging were assessed at 1 month postprocedure. In Group I patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 34.7%, a median reduction in the volume of tumor enhancement of 46.9%, a median MR perfusion (MRP) reduction of 32.14%, and a T2-weighted/FLAIR signal decrease in 9 (47.4%) of 19 patients. In Group II patients, MR imaging at 1 month showed a median reduction in the area of tumor enhancement of 15.2%, a median volume reduction of 8.3%, a median MRP reduction of 25.5%, and a T2-weighted FLAIR decrease in 0 (0%) of 11 patients. Conclusions The authors conclude that SIACI of mannitol followed by bevacizumab (up to 15 mg/kg) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. Magnetic resonance imaging shows that SIACI treatment with bevacizumab can lead to reduction in tumor area, volume, perfusion, and T2-weighted/FLAIR signal. PMID:20964595

  2. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  3. CD8 T Cell–Independent Antitumor Response and Its Potential for Treatment of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors continue to represent a devastating diagnosis with no real chance for cure. Despite an increasing list of potential salvage therapies, standard-of-care for these patients has not changed in over a decade. Immunotherapy has been seen as an exciting option, with the potential to offer specific and long lasting tumor clearance. The “gold standard” in immunotherapy has been the development of a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response to potentiate tumor clearance and immunological memory. While many advances have been made in the field of immunotherapy, few therapies have seen true success. Many of the same principles used to develop immunotherapy in tumors of the peripheral organs have been applied to brain tumor immunotherapy. The immune-specialized nature of the brain should call into question whether this approach is appropriate. Recent results from our own experiments require a rethinking of current dogma. Perhaps a CD8 T cell response is not sufficient for an organ as immunologically unique as the brain. Examination of previously elucidated principles of the brain’s immune-specialized status and known immunological preferences should generate discussion and experimentation to address the failure of current therapies. PMID:27472363

  4. CD8 T Cell-Independent Antitumor Response and Its Potential for Treatment of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Katherine A; Griffith, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors continue to represent a devastating diagnosis with no real chance for cure. Despite an increasing list of potential salvage therapies, standard-of-care for these patients has not changed in over a decade. Immunotherapy has been seen as an exciting option, with the potential to offer specific and long lasting tumor clearance. The "gold standard" in immunotherapy has been the development of a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response to potentiate tumor clearance and immunological memory. While many advances have been made in the field of immunotherapy, few therapies have seen true success. Many of the same principles used to develop immunotherapy in tumors of the peripheral organs have been applied to brain tumor immunotherapy. The immune-specialized nature of the brain should call into question whether this approach is appropriate. Recent results from our own experiments require a rethinking of current dogma. Perhaps a CD8 T cell response is not sufficient for an organ as immunologically unique as the brain. Examination of previously elucidated principles of the brain's immune-specialized status and known immunological preferences should generate discussion and experimentation to address the failure of current therapies. PMID:27472363

  5. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  6. Personalized care in neuro-oncology coming of age: why we need MGMT and 1p/19q testing for malignant glioma patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E; van den Bent, Martin; Tonn, Joerg C; Sanson, Marc; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido

    2012-09-01

    Histological subtyping and grading by malignancy are the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. They shall provide clinicians with guidance as to the course of disease to be expected and the choices of treatment to be made. Nonetheless, patients with histologically identical tumors may have very different outcomes, notably in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas of WHO grades II and III. In gliomas of adulthood, 3 molecular markers have undergone extensive studies in recent years: 1p/19q chromosomal codeletion, O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2. However, the assessment of these molecular markers has so far not been implemented in clinical routine because of the lack of therapeutic implications. In fact, these markers were considered to be prognostic irrespective of whether patients were receiving radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or both (1p/19q, IDH1/2), or of limited value because testing is too complex and no chemotherapy alternative to temozolomide was available (MGMT). In 2012, this situation has changed: long-term follow-up of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 26951 trials demonstrated an overall survival benefit from the addition to RT of chemotherapy with procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine confined to patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with (vs without) 1p/19q codeletion. Furthermore, in elderly glioblastoma patients, the NOA-08 and the Nordic trial of RT alone versus temozolomide alone demonstrated a profound impact of MGMT promoter methylation on outcome by therapy and thus established MGMT as a predictive biomarker in this patient population. These recent results call for the routine implementation of 1p/19q and MGMT testing at least in subpopulations of malignant glioma patients and represent an

  7. LDI-glycerol polyurethane implants exhibit controlled release of DB-67 and anti-tumor activity in vitro against malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Wesley N; Pollack, Ian F; Petoud, Stéphane; Zamboni, William C; Zhang, Jianying; Beckman, Eric J

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a biodegradable and biocompatible polyurethane drug delivery system based on lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and glycerol for the controlled release of 7-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (DB-67). DB-67 has yet to be implemented in any clinical therapies due to the inability to delivered it in sufficient quantities to impact tumor growth and disease progression. To remedy this, DB-67 was covalently incorporated into our delivery system by way of an organometallic urethane catalyst and was found to be dispersed evenly throughout the LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that the LDI-glycerol discs are uniform and possess a pore distribution typical of the non-solvent casting technique used to prepare them. The release rates of DB-67 from the LDI-glycerol discs were found to vary with both time and temperature and were shown capable of delivering therapeutic concentrations of DB-67 in vitro. Cellular proliferation assays demonstrate that empty LDI-glycerol discs alone do not significantly alter the growth of malignant human glioma cell lines (U87, T98G, LN229 and SG388). DB-67-loaded LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs were found to inhibit cellular proliferation by 50% on average in all the malignant glioma cell lines tested. These results clearly demonstrate the long-term, slow release of DB-67 from LDI-glycerol polyurethane discs and their potential for postoperative intracranial chemotherapy of cancers. PMID:18440882

  8. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Dendritic Cell Based Vaccines that Utilize Myeloid Rather than Plasmacytoid Cells Offer a Superior Survival Advantage in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L.; Miska, Jason; Wainwright, Derek A.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Pytel, Peter; Han, Yu; Tobias, Alex; Zhang, Lingjiao; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) that are traditionally divided into two distinct subsets: myeloid DC (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DC (pDCs). pDCs are known for their ability to secrete large amount of IFN-α. Apart from IFN-α production, pDCs can also process antigen and induce T-cell immunity or tolerance. In several solid tumors, pDCs have been shown to play a critical role in promoting tumor immunosuppression. We investigated the role of pDCs in the process of glioma progression in the syngeneic murine model of glioma. We show that glioma-infiltrating pDCs are the major APC in glioma and are deficient in IFN-α secretion (p < 0.05). pDC depletion leads to increased survival of the mice bearing intracranial tumor by decreasing the number of regulatory T-cells (Treg) and by decreasing the suppressive capabilities of Tregs. We subsequently compared the ability of mDCs and pDCs to generate effective anti-glioma immunity in a GL261-OVA mouse model of glioma. Our data suggest that mature pDCs and mDCs isolated from naïve mice can be effectively activated and loaded with SIINFEKL antigen in vitro. Upon intra-dermal injection in the hind leg, a fraction of both types of DCs migrate to the brain and lymph nodes.. Compared to mice vaccinated with pDC or control mice, mice vaccinated with mDCs generated a robust Th1 type immune response, characterized by high frequency of CD4+Tbet+ T-cells and CD8+Siinfekel+ T-cells. This robust anti-tumor T-cell response resulted in tumor eradication and long-term survival in 60% of the animals (p<0.001). PMID:26026061

  10. Low c-Met expression levels are prognostic for and predict the benefits of temozolomide chemotherapy in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Yang; Yang, Pei; Liu, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Chuan-Bao; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Yin-Yan; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Wen-Bin; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant c-Met has been implicated in the development of many cancers. The objective of this study was to identify an unfavorable prognostic marker that might guide decisions regarding clinical treatment strategies for high-grade gliomas. C-Met expression was measured using immunohistochemistry in 783 gliomas, and we further analyzed c-Met mRNA levels using the Agilent Whole Genome mRNA Microarray in 286 frozen samples. In vitro, we performed cell migration and invasion assays. Cell sensitivity to temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy was determined using MTT assays. Both mRNA and protein levels of c-Met were significantly associated with tumor grade progression and inversely correlated with overall and progression-free survival in high-grade gliomas (all P < 0.0001). These findings were nearly consistent at the mRNA level across 3 independent cohorts. Multivariable analysis indicated that c-Met was an independent prognostic marker after adjusting for age, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score, the extent of resection, radiotherapy, TMZ chemotherapy, and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status. Further analysis in vitro revealed that downregulating the expression of c-Met dramatically inhibited cell migration and invasion capacities, enhanced sensitivity to TMZ chemotherapy in H4 and U87 glioma cells. Our results suggest that c-Met may serve as a potential predictive maker for clinical decision making. PMID:26879272

  11. [Utility of hyperbaric oxygenation in radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors--a literature review].

    PubMed

    Beppu, Takaaki; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 50 years, hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy has been used in a wide variety of medical conditions; this theraphy causes an increase in oxygen tension in blood and tissues. In the treatment of malignant gliomas, HBO therapy is used for the radiosensitization of cells in combination with radiotherapy (RT). Further, HBO therapy is applied for the treatment and prevention of radiation-induced brain necrosis that is the most serious complication observed after radiosurgery. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the manner in which HBO therapy contributes to clinical fields in cases of RT administration for malignant brain tumors.

  12. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines that Utilize Myeloid Rather than Plasmacytoid Cells Offer a Superior Survival Advantage in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Miska, Jason; Wainwright, Derek A; Ahmed, Atique U; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Pytel, Peter; Han, Yu; Tobias, Alex; Zhang, Lingjiao; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that are traditionally divided into two distinct subsets, myeloid DC (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DC (pDCs). pDCs are known for their ability to secrete large amounts of IFN-α. Apart from IFN-α production, pDCs can also process Ag and induce T cell immunity or tolerance. In several solid tumors, pDCs have been shown to play a critical role in promoting tumor immunosuppression. We investigated the role of pDCs in the process of glioma progression in the syngeneic murine model of glioma. We show that glioma-infiltrating pDCs are the major APC in glioma and are deficient in IFN-α secretion (p < 0.05). pDC depletion leads to increased survival of the mice bearing intracranial tumor by decreasing the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and by decreasing the suppressive capabilities of Tregs. We subsequently compared the ability of mDCs and pDCs to generate effective antiglioma immunity in a GL261-OVA mouse model of glioma. Our data suggest that mature pDCs and mDCs isolated from naive mice can be effectively activated and loaded with SIINFEKL Ag in vitro. Upon intradermal injection in the hindleg, a fraction of both types of DCs migrate to the brain and lymph nodes. Compared to mice vaccinated with pDC or control mice, mice vaccinated with mDCs generate a robust Th1 type immune response, characterized by high frequency of CD4(+)T-bet(+) T cells and CD8(+)SIINFEKEL(+) T cells. This robust antitumor T cell response results in tumor eradication and long-term survival in 60% of the animals (p < 0.001). PMID:26026061

  13. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines that Utilize Myeloid Rather than Plasmacytoid Cells Offer a Superior Survival Advantage in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Miska, Jason; Wainwright, Derek A; Ahmed, Atique U; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Pytel, Peter; Han, Yu; Tobias, Alex; Zhang, Lingjiao; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that are traditionally divided into two distinct subsets, myeloid DC (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DC (pDCs). pDCs are known for their ability to secrete large amounts of IFN-α. Apart from IFN-α production, pDCs can also process Ag and induce T cell immunity or tolerance. In several solid tumors, pDCs have been shown to play a critical role in promoting tumor immunosuppression. We investigated the role of pDCs in the process of glioma progression in the syngeneic murine model of glioma. We show that glioma-infiltrating pDCs are the major APC in glioma and are deficient in IFN-α secretion (p < 0.05). pDC depletion leads to increased survival of the mice bearing intracranial tumor by decreasing the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and by decreasing the suppressive capabilities of Tregs. We subsequently compared the ability of mDCs and pDCs to generate effective antiglioma immunity in a GL261-OVA mouse model of glioma. Our data suggest that mature pDCs and mDCs isolated from naive mice can be effectively activated and loaded with SIINFEKL Ag in vitro. Upon intradermal injection in the hindleg, a fraction of both types of DCs migrate to the brain and lymph nodes. Compared to mice vaccinated with pDC or control mice, mice vaccinated with mDCs generate a robust Th1 type immune response, characterized by high frequency of CD4(+)T-bet(+) T cells and CD8(+)SIINFEKEL(+) T cells. This robust antitumor T cell response results in tumor eradication and long-term survival in 60% of the animals (p < 0.001).

  14. Effects of temozolomide (TMZ) on the expression and interaction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and DNA repair proteins in human malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Castro, Gisela Natalia; Cayado-Gutiérrez, Niubys; Zoppino, Felipe Carlos Martín; Fanelli, Mariel Andrea; Cuello-Carrión, Fernando Darío; Sottile, Mayra; Nadin, Silvina Beatriz; Ciocca, Daniel Ramón

    2015-03-01

    We previously reported the association of HSPA1A and HSPB1 with high-grade astrocytomas, suggesting that these proteins might be involved in disease outcome and response to treatment. With the aim to better understand the resistance/susceptibility processes associated to temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, the current study was performed in three human malignant glioma cell lines by focusing on several levels: (a) apoptotic index and senescence, (b) DNA damage, and (c) interaction of HSPB1 with players of the DNA damage response. Three human glioma cell lines, Gli36, U87, and DBTRG, were treated with TMZ evaluating cell viability and survival, apoptosis, senescence, and comets (comet assay). The expression of HSPA (HSPA1A and HSPA8), HSPB1, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), MLH1, and MSH2 was determined by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. Immunoprecipitation was used to analyze protein interaction. The cell lines exhibited differences in viability, apoptosis, and senescence after TMZ administration. We then focused on Gli36 cells (relatively unstudied) which showed very low recovery capacity following TMZ treatment, and this was related to high DNA damage levels; however, the cells maintained their viability. In these cells, MGMT, MSH2, HSPA, and HSPB1 levels increased significantly after TMZ administration. In addition, MSH2 and HSPB1 proteins appeared co-localized by confocal microscopy. This co-localization increased after TMZ treatment, and in immunoprecipitation analysis, MSH2 and HSPB1 appeared interacting. In contrast, HSPB1 did not interact with MGMT. We show in glioma cells the biological effects of TMZ and how this drug affects the expression levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs), MGMT, MSH2, and MLH1. In Gli36 cells, the results suggest that interactions between HSPB1 and MSH2, including co-nuclear localization, may be important in determining cell sensitivity to TMZ. PMID:25155585

  15. Postirradiation cerebellar glioma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, C.; Edwards, M.S.; Davis, R.L.; Ablin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed an anaplastic astrocytoma of the cerebellum 7 years after irradiation of the central nervous system and prophylactic chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The fact that the astrocytoma was anaplastic and infiltrative was unusual for astroglial tumors at this site. It is proposed that this is a radiation-induced glioma.

  16. Polyacrylamide gel substrates that simulate the mechanical stiffness of normal and malignant neuronal tissues increase protoporphyin IX synthesis in glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Carolyn J.; Fisher, Carl; Scheffler, Kira; Wan, Rachel; Maleki, Hoda; Liu, Haijiao; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig A.; Birngruber, Reginald; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-09-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) produced following the administration of exogenous 5d-aminolevulinic acid is clinically approved for photodynamic therapy and fluorescence-guided resection in various jurisdictions around the world. For both applications, quantification of PPIX forms the basis for accurate therapeutic dose calculation and identification of malignant tissues for resection. While it is well established that the PPIX synthesis and accumulation rates are subject to the cell's biochemical microenvironment, the effect of the physical microenvironment, such as matrix stiffness, has received little attention to date. Here we studied the proliferation rate and PPIX synthesis and accumulation in two glioma cell lines U373 and U118 cultured under five different substrate conditions, including the conventional tissue culture plastic and polyacrylamide gels that simulated tissue stiffness of normal brain (1 kPa) and glioblastoma tumors (12 kPa). We found that the proliferation rate increased with substrate stiffness for both cell lines, but not in a linear fashion. PPIX concentration was significantly higher in cells cultured on tissue-simulating gels than on the much stiffer tissue culture plastic for both cell lines. These findings, albeit preliminary, suggest that the physical microenvironment might be an important determinant of tumor aggressiveness and PPIX synthesis in glioma cells.

  17. Standard of care and future pharmacological treatment options for malignant glioma: an urgent need for screening and identification of novel tumor-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Batich, Kristen A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant gliomas (MGs) represent the most common primary brain tumors in adults, the most deadly of which is grade IV glioblastoma. Patients with glioblastoma undergoing current standard-of-care therapy have a median survival of 12 – 15 months. Areas covered Over the past 25 years, there have been modest advancements in the treatment of MGs. Assessment of therapeutic responses has continued to evolve to account for the increasing number of agents being tested in the clinic. Currently approved therapies for primary tumors have been extended for use in the setting of recurrent disease with modest efficacy. Agents initially approved for recurrent gliomas have begun to demonstrate efficacy against de novo tumors but will ultimately need to be evaluated in future studies for scheduling, timing and dosing relative to chemotherapy. Expert opinion Screening and identification of tumor-specific mutations is critical for the advancement of effective therapy that is both safe and precise for the patient. Two unique antigens found in glioblastoma are currently being employed as targets for immunotherapeutic vaccines, one of which has advanced to Phase III testing. Whole genome sequencing of MGs has yielded two other novel mutations that offer great promise for the development of molecular inhibitors. PMID:25139628

  18. Comparison of 2 monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of BRAF V600E mutation in malignant melanoma, pulmonary carcinoma, gastrointestinal carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, and gliomas.

    PubMed

    Routhier, Caitlin Ann; Mochel, Mark C; Lynch, Kerry; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Louis, David N; Hoang, Mai P

    2013-11-01

    BRAF mutation is seen in a variety of human neoplasms including cutaneous malignant melanoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and others. Currently, there are 2 commercially available monoclonal antibodies for the detection of BRAF V600E mutation; however, a full and practical comparison of their performance in various tumor types on an automated staining platform has not been done. We investigated their sensitivity and specificity in detecting the BRAF V600E mutation in a series of 152 tumors including 31 malignant melanomas, 25 lung carcinomas, 32 gastrointestinal carcinomas, 23 thyroid carcinomas, 35 gliomas, and 6 other malignancies. In this series, the concordance rate between immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mutational analyses was 97% (148/152) for VE1 and 88% (131/149) for anti-B-Raf. The sensitivity and specificity were 98% (60/61) and 97% (88/91) for monoclonal VE1 and 95% (58/61) and 83% (73/88) for anti-B-Raf, respectively. There were 4 cases with discordant IHC and mutational results for monoclonal VE1 in contrast to 18 cases for anti-B-Raf. Our studies showed that IHC with monoclonal VE1 has a better performance compared with anti-B-Raf in an automated staining platform and confirmed that clone VE1 provides excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting the BRAF V600E mutation in a variety of tumor types in a clinical setting.

  19. L-[METHYL-{sup 11}C] Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Delineation in Malignant Gliomas: Impact on Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahasittiwat, Pawinee; Mizoe, Jun-etsu Hasegawa, Azusa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryou D.D.S.; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume (CTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 16 patients with malignant glioma (4 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma; 12 patients, glioblastoma multiforme) treated with surgery and carbon ion radiotherapy from April 2002 to Nov 2005. The MET-PET target volume was compared with gross tumor volume and CTV, defined by using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations with treatment results were evaluated between positive and negative extended volumes (EVs) of the MET-PET target for CTV. Results: Mean volumes of the MET-PET targets, CTV1 (defined by means of high-intensity volume on T2-weighted MRI), and CTV2 (defined by means of contrast-enhancement volume on T1-weighted MRI) were 6.35, 264.7, and 117.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean EVs of MET-PET targets for CTV1 and CTV2 were 0.6 and 2.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The MET-PET target volumes were included in CTV1 and CTV2 in 13 (81.3%) and 11 patients (68.8%), respectively. Patients with a negative EV for CTV1 had significantly greater survival rate (p = 0.0069), regional control (p = 0.0047), and distant control time (p = 0.0267) than those with a positive EV. Distant control time also was better in patients with a negative EV for CTV2 than those with a positive EV (p = 0.0401). Conclusions: For patients with malignant gliomas, MET-PET has a possibility to be a predictor of outcome in carbon ion radiotherapy. Direct use of MET-PET fused to planning computed tomography will be useful and yield favorable results for the therapy.

  20. The Effect of Chemoradiotherapy with SRC Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, PP2 and Temozolomide on Malignant Glioma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Cho, Bong Jun; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Jin-Ho; Chie, Eui Kyu; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Il Han; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effect of chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and temozolomide (TMZ) on malignant glioma cells using clonogenic assays and in vivo brain tumor model. Materials and Methods The effect of PP2 on radiosensitivity of U251 and T98G cells was investigated using clonogenic assays. The expression of E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2), Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured by Western blotting and an accumulation of γH2AX foci 6 hours after radiotherapy was measured after PP2 treatment. The effect of PP2 on migration, invasion, and vasculogenic mimicry formation (VMF) of U251 cells was evaluated. In an orthotopical brain tumor model with U251 cells, PP2 was injected intraperitoneally with or without oral TMZ before, during and after whole brain radiotherapy. Bioluminescence images were taken to visualize in vivo tumors and immunohistochemical staining of VEGF, CD31, EphA2, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1a was performed. Results PP2 increased radiosensitivity of U251 and T98G cells without decreasing survival of normal human astrocytes. Chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ resulted in increased accumulation of γH2AX foci. PP2 induced overexpression of E-cadherin and suppression of MMP2, VEGF, and EphA2. PP2 also compromised invasion, migration, and VMF of U251 cells. In brain tumors, chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ decreased tumor volume best, but not statistically significantly compared with chemoradiotherapy with TMZ. The expression of VEGF and CD31 was suppressed in PP2-treated tumors. Conclusion PP2 enhances radiosensitivity of malignant glioma cells and suppresses invasion and migration of U251 cells. Chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ resulted in non-significant tumor volume decrease. PMID:26044161

  1. Impact of meriolins, a new class of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, on malignant glioma proliferation and neo-angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Marie; Lecointre, Céline; Malleval, Céline; Desrues, Laurence; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Lejoncour, Vadim; Liger, François; Lyvinec, Gildas; Joseph, Benoît; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Honnorat, Jérôme; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most frequent and most aggressive primary brain tumors in adults. The median overall survival is limited to a few months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. It is now clearly established that hyperactivity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is one of the processes underlying hyperproliferation and tumoral growth. The marine natural products meridianins and variolins, characterized as CDK inhibitors, display a kinase-inhibitory activity associated with cytotoxic effects. In order to improve selectivity and efficiency of these CDK inhibitors, a series of hybrid compounds called meriolins have been synthesized. Methods The potential antitumoral activity of meriolins was investigated in vitro on glioma cell lines (SW1088 and U87), native neural cells, and a human endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C). The impact of intraperitoneal or intratumoral administrations of meriolin 15 was evaluated in vivo on 2 different nude mice-xenografted glioma models. Results Meriolins 3, 5, and 15 exhibited antiproliferative properties with nanomolar IC50 and induced cell-cycle arrest and CDK inhibition associated with apoptotic events in human glioma cell lines. These meriolins blocked the proliferation rate of HUV-EC-C through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In vivo, meriolin 15 provoked a robust reduction in tumor volume in spite of toxicity for highest doses, associated with inhibition of cell division, activation of caspase 3, reduction of CD133 cells, and modifications of the vascular architecture. Conclusion Meriolins, and meriolin 15 in particular, exhibit antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities on both glioma and intratumoral endothelial cells, constituting key promising therapeutic lead compounds for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24891448

  2. Lipid nanocapsules loaded with an organometallic tamoxifen derivative as a novel drug-carrier system for experimental malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Allard, Emilie; Passirani, Catherine; Garcion, Emmanuel; Pigeon, Pascal; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gérard; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2008-09-10

    Ferrocenyl diphenol tamoxifen derivative (Fc-diOH) is one of the most active molecules of a new class of organometallic drugs, showing in vitro antiproliferative effects on both hormone-dependent and independent breast cancer cells. For the first time, Fc-diOH was tested on a 9L glioma model according to two encapsulation strategies: lipid nanocapsules (LNC) and swollen micelles. LNC showed a higher drug loading capacity because of a larger oily core in their structure and were able to be up taken by glioma cells. The large amount of PEG present at the micellar interface prevented interaction with cytoplasm membrane which led to a low level of micelle cell uptake and no biological activity. On the contrary, Fc-diOH cytostatic activity was conserved after its encapsulation in LNC and was very effective on 9L-glioma cells as the IC(50) was about 0.6 microM. Interestingly, Fc-diOH-loaded LNC showed low toxicity levels when in contact with healthy cells, conferring a functional specificity of this compound on tumour cells. Finally, Fc-diOH LNC treatment was able to lower significantly both tumour mass and volume evolution after 9L-cell implantation into rats which evidenced for the first time the in vivo efficacy of this new kind of organometallic compound. PMID:18582507

  3. Essential Role of Cooperative NF-κB and Stat3 Recruitment to ICAM-1 Intronic Consensus Elements in the Regulation of Radiation-induced Invasion and Migration in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kesanakurti, Divya; Chetty, Chandramu; Maddirela, Dilip Rajasekhar; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2013-01-01

    Although radiotherapy improves survival in patients, GBMs tend to relapse with augmented tumor migration and invasion even after irradiation (IR). Aberrant NF-κB and Stat3 activation and interaction has been suggested in several human tumors. However, possible NF-κB/Stat3 interaction and the role of Stat3 in maintenance of NF-κB nuclear retention in glioblastoma (GBM) still remain unknown. Stat3 and NF-κB (p65) physically interact with one another in the nucleus in glioma tumors. Most importantly, GST pull-down assays identified that Stat3 binds to the p65 transactivation domain (TAD) and is present in the NF-κB DNA-binding complex. Irradiation significantly elevated nuclear phospho-p65/phospho-Stat3 interaction in correlation with increased ICAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels, migration and invasion in human glioma xenograft cell lines 4910 and 5310. ChIP and promoter luciferase activity assays confirmed the critical role of adjacent NF-κB (+399) and Stat3 (+479) binding motifs in the proximal intron-1 in elevating IR-induced ICAM-1 expression. Specific inhibition of Stat3 and NF-κB with Stat3.siRNA or JSH-23 severely inhibited IR-induced p65 recruitment onto ICAM-1 intron-1 and suppressed migratory properties in both cell lines. On the other hand, Stat3C- or IR-induced Stat3 promoter recruitment was significantly decreased in p65-knockdown cells, thereby suggesting the reciprocal regulation between p65 and Stat3. We also observed a significant increase in NF-κB enrichment on ICAM-1 intron-1 and ICAM-1 transactivation in Stat3C overexpressing cells. In in vivo orthotopic experiments, suppression of tumor growth in Stat3.si+IR-treated mice was associated with the inhibition of IR-induced p-p65/p-Stat3 nuclear-colocalization and ICAM-1 levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the crucial role of NF-κB/Stat3 nuclear association in IR-induced ICAM-1 regulation and implies that targeting NF-κB/Stat3 interaction may have future therapeutic significance

  4. Glial fibrillary acidic protein promoters direct adenovirus early 1A gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoters direct sodium iodide symporter expression for malignant glioma radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tan, Jian; Wang, Peng; Li, Ning; Li, Chengxia

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma can be treated with radioiodine following transfection with human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS is engineered with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoters to express early region 1A (E1A) and hNIS genes, which may be useful in targeted gene therapy. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was constructed and purified using the E1A and hNIS genes regulated by the hTERT and GFAP promoters, respectively. Glioma cells were infected by Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS. Selective replication ability of Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was then evaluated by plaque forming assay, transgene expression by Western blot, (125)I-iodide uptake and efflux, clonogenicity following (131)I-iodide treatment in the tumor cells, and radioiodine therapy using nude mouse model. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS could selectively replicate; the hNIS gene was successfully expressed under the GFAP promoter. Western blot analyses using E1A- and hNIS-specific antibodies revealed two bands of approximately 40 and 70 kDa. In addition, the cells showed about 93.4 and 107.1 times higher (125)I uptake in U251 and U87 cells than in the control cells, respectively. Clonogenic assay indicated that >90% of cells transfected with Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS were killed. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS-transfected and 2 mCi (131)I-injected U87 xenograft nude mice survived the longest among the three groups. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS has a good ability of selective replication and strong antitumor selectivity. An effective therapy of (131)I was achieved activity in malignant glioma cells after induction of tumor-specific iodide uptake activity by GFAP promoter-directed hNIS gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Tomato thymidine kinase-based suicide gene therapy for malignant glioma--an alternative for Herpes Simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Stedt, H; Samaranayake, H; Kurkipuro, J; Wirth, G; Christiansen, L S; Vuorio, T; Määttä, A-M; Piškur, J; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant gliomas (MGs) are the most common malignant primary brain tumors with a short life estimate accompanied by a marked reduction in the quality of life. Herpes Simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase ganciclovir (HSV-TK/GCV) system is the best characterized enzyme prodrug therapy in use. However, lipophobicity of GCV and low enzymatic activity of HSV-TK reduce the treatment efficacy. Tomato TK (ToTK) has shown high activity in combination with its specific substrate azidothymidine (AZT). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ToTK/AZT could be used as an alternative to HSV-TK/GCV therapy. Both treatments demonstrated cytotoxicity in human MG cells in vitro. In vivo, both treatments decreased tumor growth and tumors were smaller in comparison with controls in mouse orthotopic MG model. Survival of ToTK/AZT-treated mice was significantly increased compared with control mice (*P<0.05) but not as compared with HSV-TK/GCV-treated mice. No significant differences were observed in clinical chemistry safety analyses. We conclude that both treatments showed a beneficial treatment response in comparison to controls on tumor growth and ToTK/AZT also on survival. There were no significant differences between these treatments. Therefore ToTK/AZT could be considered as an alternative treatment option for MG because of its favorable therapeutic characteristics. PMID:25613481

  6. Upregulation of p72 Enhances Malignant Migration and Invasion of Glioma Cells by Repressing Beclin1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxing; Tian, He; Miao, Ye; Feng, Xu; Li, Yang; Wang, Honglei; Song, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    p72 is the member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family, which can unwind double-stranded RNA and is efficient for microRNA (miRNA, miR) processing. However, its specific role in glioma has not been elucidated. First, the expression of p72 in glioma cell lines and tissues was explored using Western blot. To explore the role of p72 on glioma progression, adenovirus inhibiting p72 was transfected into A172 and T98G cells. Cell autophagy was determined using GFP-LC3 dots, and cell apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry. The effect of Beclin1 was explored using GFP-LC3 dots, flow cytometry, and colony formation. The possible miRNAs that target the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Beclin1 were predicted using TargetScan. Dual luciferase reporter assay was applied to determine whether these miRNAs bind to the 3'-UTR of Beclin1. The expression of p72 was significantly increased in glioma cell lines and tissues. Autophagy-related protein Beclin1 was found to be significantly enhanced when p72 was inhibited. The accumulation of GFP-LC3 dots was significant in cells transfected with ad-sh-p72 compared with ad-con. Colony formation capacity and cell apoptosis were also found to be significantly decreased with p72 inhibition. Furthermore, upregulation of Beclin1 contributes to A172 cell autophagy, invasion, and apoptosis. Overexpression of p72 induces increased miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p expression in A172 and T98G cells. Beclin1 was the target gene of miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p. In conclusion, we found for the first time that overexpression of p72 decreased Beclin1 expression partially by increasing miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p expression in A172 and T98G cells. PMID:27301285

  7. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  8. CRNDE affects the malignant biological characteristics of human glioma stem cells by negatively regulating miR-186

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Li, Xiao-dong; Wang, Ping; Liu, Xiao-bai; Xue, Yi-xue; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Li, Zhi-qing; Wang, Zhen-hua; Liu, Yun-hui

    2015-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE) is a novel gene that activated early in colorectal neoplasia, but it is also up-regulated in many other solid tumors. Herein, the function and underlying mechanism of CRNDE in regulating glioma stem cells (GSCs) were investigated. We found that CRNDE expression was up-regulated while miR-186 expression was down-regulated in GSCs. Overexpression of CRNDE could promote the cellular proliferation, migration, invasion and inhibit the apoptosis in GSCs. Overexpression of miR-186 exerted functions of inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion of GSCs and promoting apoptosis. And CRNDE decreased the expression levels of XIAP and PAK7 by binding to miR-186 and negatively regulating it. In addition, miR-186 binded to XIAP and PAK7 3′UTR region, and decrease the expression of them, thus regulating the expression levels of downstream target proteins such as caspase 3, BAD, cyclin D1 and MARK2. The in vivo effect of CRNDE and miR-186 showed that the tumor formation rate was minimum in tumor-bearing nude mice with the knockdown of CRNDE and the overexpression of miR-186. In conclusion, CRNDE played an oncogenic role of GSCs through the negative regulation of miR-186. Both CRNDE and miR-186 could be regarded as potential targets in the glioma therapy. PMID:26231038

  9. Prolongation of life in rats with malignant glioma by intranasal siRNA/drug codelivery to the brain with cell-penetrating peptide-modified micelles.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Morisaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Shohei; Takashima, Yuuki

    2014-05-01

    New therapeutic strategies are required to develop candidate drugs and ensure efficient delivery of these drugs to the brain and the central nervous system (CNS). Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapies have been investigated as potential novel approaches for the treatment of brain disorders. Previously, we showed that Tat, a cell-penetrating peptide derived from HIV-Tat, and the modified block copolymers (MPEG-PCL-Tat) can form stable complexes with siRNA or can be loaded with an anticancer drug and efficiently deliver the drugs to the brain tissue via intranasal delivery. In this study, to develop a novel, efficient, and safe therapeutic strategy for managing brain disorders, we used MPEG-PCL-Tat micelles with a nose-to-brain delivery system to investigate its therapeutic effects on a rat model of malignant glioma using siRNA with a Raf-1 (siRaf-1)/camptothecin (CPT) codelivery system. MPEG-PCL-Tat and CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat can form a stable complex with siRNA with a particle size from 60 to 200 nm and a positive charge at N/P ratios up to 5. Additionally, MPEG-PCL-Tat/siRaf-1 and CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat/siRaf-1 have fostered cell death in rat glioma cells after the high cellular uptake of siRaf-1/drug by the MPEG-PCL-Tat carrier. Furthermore, compared to the unloaded MPEG-PCL-Tat/siRaf-1 complex, a CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat/siRaf-1 complex achieved the high therapeutic effect because of the additive effects of CPT and siRaf-1. These results indicate that drug/siRNA codelivery using MPEG-PCL-Tat nanomicelles with nose-to-brain delivery is an excellent therapeutic approach for brain and CNS diseases.

  10. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  11. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  12. Dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc with single arc and dual arc for malignant glioma involving the parietal lobe

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JUN; LEI, MINGJUN; YANG, ZHEN; FU, JUN; HUO, LEI; HONG, JIDONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the difference in treatment plan quality, monitor units (MUs) per fraction and dosimetric parameters between IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) and RapidArc with single arc (RA1) and dual arc (RA2) for malignant glioma involving the parietal lobe. Treatment plans for IMRT and RA1 and RA2 were prepared for 10 patients with malignant gliomas involving the parietal lobe. The Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test was used to compare the plan quality, monitor units and dosimetric parameters between IMRT and RA1 and RA2 through dose-volume histograms. Dnear-max (D2%) to the left lens, right lens and left optical nerve in RA1 were less compared with those in IMRT; D2% to the right lens and right optic nerve in RA2 were less compared with those in IMRT. D2% to the optic chiasma in RA2 was small compared with that in RA1. The median dose (D50%) to the right lens and right optic nerve in RA1 and RA2 was less compared with the identical parameters in IMRT, and D50% to the brain stem in RA2 was less compared with that in RA1. The volume receiving at least 45 Gy (V45) or V50 in normal brain tissue (whole brain minus the planning target volume 2; B-P) in RA1 was less compared with that in IMRT. V30, V35, V40, V45, or V50 in B-P in RA2 was less compared with that in IMRT. The MUs per fraction in RA1 and RA2 were significantly less compared with those in IMRT. All differences with a P-value<0.05 were considered to be significantly different. In conclusion, RA1 and RA2 markedly reduced the MUs per fraction, and spared partial organs at risk and B-P compared with IMRT. PMID:27330795

  13. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  14. Heterogeneity in malignant gliomas: a magnetic resonance analysis of spatial distribution of metabolite changes and regional blood volume.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marlies; Nafe, Reinhold; Jurcoane, Alina; Pilatus, Ulrich; Franz, Kea; Rieger, Johannes; Steinbach, Joachim P; Hattingen, Elke

    2011-07-01

    First-pass contrast-enhanced dynamic perfusion imaging provides information about the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), an increase of which indicates neovascularization. MR spectroscopic imaging informs about metabolite changes in brain tumors, with elevated choline (Cho) values revealing cell proliferation and density, and the glial metabolite creatine (Cr) representing high-energy storage. This study investigates metabolite changes within the tumor voxel of maximal rCBV value (rCBVmax). Anatomically coregistered parameter maps of rCBV, Cho and Cr were evaluated in 36 patients with primary or recurrent WHO grade III or IV gliomas. Apart from Cho and Cr values within the voxel of rCBVmax (Choperf, Crperf), the maximal Cho and Cr values of the tumor tissue were recorded (Chomax, Crmax). The correlation between these parameters was analyzed with Spearman’s rho test while a binomial test was performed to check whether Chomax = Choperf and Crmax = Crperf. We found that, in 29 of the 36 patients, neither Cho nor Cr had their maxima in the voxel of rCBVmax (Choperf, Crperf < Chomax, Crmax, P < 0.001). However, Choperf was highly correlated with Chomax (r = 0.76, P < 0.001) and Crperf with Crmax (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Further Choperf correlated with Crperf (r = 0.55, P < 0.001). Neither of the spectroscopic parameters (Chomax, Crmax, Choperf, Crperf,) correlated with rCBVmax. In conclusion, in WHO grade III and IV gliomas the voxel with maximal rCBV often differs from the voxel with the maximal Cho and Cr, indicating the spatial divergence between neovascularization and tumor cell proliferation, cell density and glial processes. However, tCho and tCr changes within the area of neovascularization are positively correlated with the maximal increase within the tumor tissue. These results demonstrate aspects of regional tumor heterogeneity as characterized by different MR modalities that, apart from histopathological grading might be crucial for neurosurgical biopsy

  15. Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) and adjuvant fractionated radiotherapeutic multimodal therapy for intracranial malignant glioma in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Garcia, P A; Pancotto, T; Rossmeisl, J H; Henao-Guerrero, N; Gustafson, N R; Daniel, G B; Robertson, J L; Ellis, T L; Davalos, R V

    2011-02-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) has shown promise as an ablative therapy for a variety of soft-tissue neoplasms. Here we describe the therapeutic planning aspects and first clinical application of N-TIRE for the treatment of an inoperable, spontaneous malignant intracranial glioma in a canine patient. The N-TIRE ablation was performed safely, effectively reduced the tumor volume and associated intracranial hypertension, and provided sufficient improvement in neurological function of the patient to safely undergo adjunctive fractionated radiotherapy (RT) according to current standards of care. Complete remission was achieved based on serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the brain, although progressive radiation encephalopathy resulted in the death of the dog 149 days after N-TIRE therapy. The length of survival of this patient was comparable to dogs with intracranial tumors treated via standard excisional surgery and adjunctive fractionated external beam RT. Our results illustrate the potential benefits of N-TIRE for in vivo ablation of undesirable brain tissue, especially when traditional methods of cytoreductive surgery are not possible or ideal, and highlight the potential radiosensitizing effects of N-TIRE on the brain. PMID:21214290

  16. Non-Thermal Irreversible Electroporation (N-TIRE) and Adjuvant Fractionated Radiotherapeutic Multimodal Therapy for Intracranial Malignant Glioma in a Canine Patient

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, P. A.; Pancotto, T.; Rossmeisl, J. H.; Henao-Guerrero, N.; Gustafson, N. R.; Daniel, G. B.; Robertson, J. L.; Ellis, T. L.; Davalos, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) has shown promise as an ablative therapy for a variety of soft-tissue neoplasms. Here we describe the therapeutic planning aspects and first clinical application of N-TIRE for the treatment of an inoperable, spontaneous malignant intracranial glioma in a canine patient. The N-TIRE ablation was performed safely, effectively reduced the tumor volume and associated intracranial hypertension, and provided sufficient improvement in neurological function of the patient to safely undergo adjunctive fractionated radiotherapy (RT) according to current standards of care. Complete remission was achieved based on serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the brain, although progressive radiation encephalopathy resulted in the death of the dog 149 days after N-TIRE therapy. The length of survival of this patient was comparable to dogs with intracranial tumors treated via standard excisional surgery and adjunctive fractionated external beam RT. Our results illustrate the potential benefits of N-TIRE for in vivo ablation of undesirable brain tissue, especially when traditional methods of cytoreductive surgery are not possible or ideal, and highlight the potential radiosensitizing effects of N-TIRE on the brain. PMID:21214290

  17. Treatment of malignant gliomas and brain metastases in adults with a combination of adriamycin, VM 26, and CCNU. Results of a phase II trail.

    PubMed

    Pouillart, P; Mathe, G; Thy, T H; Lheritier, J; Poisson, M; Huguenin, P; Gauthier, H; Morin, P; Parrot, R

    1976-11-01

    Forty-three patients with inoperable or recurring malignant gliomas, and 30 patients with multiple recurring brain metastases were treated with a combination of Adriamycin (45 mg/m2) and 4-dimethyl-epipodophyllotoxin D-thenylidene (VM 26) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days) with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days). These cycles of treatment were repeated as soon as the hematologic restoration was complete. The treatment was well tolerated and the clinical condition of 31 of 43 glioblastoma patients improved during the 2 months after the beginning of the treatment. Six of eight patients with breast cancer metastases, one of 13 with bronchial cancer matastases, and three of nine with other types of cancer metastases also benefitted from the treatment. Examination of the results obtained revealed the following characteristics: 1) This combination had a low degree of efficiency in the treatment of metastases to brain, except for breast cancer metastases; 2) there was no complete correlation between the clinical results observed and the cinegammagraphic developments; 3) the results obtained were similar, independent of the initial localization; and a 6-month median survival period was established, with 10 patients now in a state of apparently complete remission, 180 to 506 days after beginning of the treatment. PMID:1033028

  18. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  19. The influence of central review on outcome in malignant gliomas of the spinal cord: the CCG-945 experience.

    PubMed

    Bouffet, Eric; Allen, Jeffrey C; Boyett, James M; Yates, Allen; Gilles, Floyd; Burger, Peter C; Davis, Richard L; Becker, Laurence E; Pollack, Ian F; Finlay, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The impact of central pathology review on outcome has been described in pediatric patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). The objective of this report was to analyze the impact of the central pathology review on outcome in the subgroup of patients with institutional diagnosis of HGG of the spinal cord enrolled in the Children's Cancer Group 945 cooperative study. METHODS Five neuropathologists centrally reviewed the pathology of the 18 patients with HGG of the spinal cord who were enrolled in the study. These reviews were independent, and reviewers were blinded to clinical history and outcomes. A consensus diagnosis was established for each patient, based on the outcome of the review. RESULTS Of 18 patients, only 10 were confirmed to have HGG on central review. At a median follow-up of 12 years, event-free and overall survival for all 18 patients was 43.2% ± 13.3% and 50% ± 13.4%, respectively. After central review, 10-year event-free and overall survival for confirmed HGGs and discordant diagnoses was 30% ± 12.5% versus 58.3% ± 18.8% (p = 0.108) and 30% ± 12.5% versus 75% ± 14.2% (p = 0.0757), respectively. CONCLUSIONS The level of discordant diagnoses in children and adolescents with institutional diagnosis of HGG of the spinal cord was 44% in this experience. However, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients with confirmed and discordant diagnosis. This group of tumor deserves a specific attention in future trials. PMID:26684767

  20. Phase II study of 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy with radiotherapy for treating malignant glioma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, V. A.; Lamborn, K.; Wara, W.; Davis, R.; Edwards, M.; Rabbitt, J.; Malec, M.; Prados, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a single-arm phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy combined with 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine (TPDCV) chemotherapy for treating malignant astrocytoma in children and anaplastic ependymoma in patients of all ages. Between 1984 and 1992, 42 patients who had malignant astrocytomas (glioblastomas multiforme, anaplastic astrocytomas, or mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytomas) were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Of these patients, 40 were younger than 18 years, but 2 were older (22 and 23 years) when treated. Cranial radiation averaged 58 Gy. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until progression. Between 1989 and 1991, 17 patients with malignant ependymoma were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and craniospinal radiation. Radiation was given at an average dose of 54 Gy to the tumor, 28 Gy to the whole brain, and 31 Gy to the spinal axis. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until tumor progressed. Of the patients with glioblastoma multiforme, 13 of 17 died; the median time to progression was 49 weeks, and median survival was 85 weeks. The four patients surviving at this writing were followed a median 537 weeks (range 364-635 weeks). Of the patients with nonglioblastoma malignant astrocytoma, 14 of 25 died; the median time to progression was 224 weeks. Median survival was not reached in this group. The median follow-up for those surviving was 494 weeks. For the patients with ependymoma, 11 of 17 died with a median time to progression of 141 weeks. The median follow-up for the eight who survive was 469 weeks. Nine patients died with a median survival of 183 weeks. The combination of TPDCV and radiotherapy has activity against childhood anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and anaplastic ependymoma. The results of this study for children with glioblastoma were comparable to results in the literature, while the results for children with anaplastic

  1. Phase II study of 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy with radiotherapy for treating malignant glioma in children.

    PubMed

    Levin, V A; Lamborn, K; Wara, W; Davis, R; Edwards, M; Rabbitt, J; Malec, M; Prados, M D

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a single-arm phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy combined with 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine (TPDCV) chemotherapy for treating malignant astrocytoma in children and anaplastic ependymoma in patients of all ages. Between 1984 and 1992, 42 patients who had malignant astrocytomas (glioblastomas multiforme, anaplastic astrocytomas, or mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytomas) were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Of these patients, 40 were younger than 18 years, but 2 were older (22 and 23 years) when treated. Cranial radiation averaged 58 Gy. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until progression. Between 1989 and 1991, 17 patients with malignant ependymoma were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and craniospinal radiation. Radiation was given at an average dose of 54 Gy to the tumor, 28 Gy to the whole brain, and 31 Gy to the spinal axis. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until tumor progressed. Of the patients with glioblastoma multiforme, 13 of 17 died; the median time to progression was 49 weeks, and median survival was 85 weeks. The four patients surviving at this writing were followed a median 537 weeks (range 364-635 weeks). Of the patients with nonglioblastoma malignant astrocytoma, 14 of 25 died; the median time to progression was 224 weeks. Median survival was not reached in this group. The median follow-up for those surviving was 494 weeks. For the patients with ependymoma, 11 of 17 died with a median time to progression of 141 weeks. The median follow-up for the eight who survive was 469 weeks. Nine patients died with a median survival of 183 weeks. The combination of TPDCV and radiotherapy has activity against childhood anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and anaplastic ependymoma. The results of this study for children with glioblastoma were comparable to results in the literature, while the results for children with anaplastic

  2. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  3. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits malignant biological behaviors of human glioma cells via modulation of miR-326.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jing; Yao, Yi-long; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-hui; Ma, Jun; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-bai; Li, Zhi-qing; Wang, Zhen-hua; Xue, Yi-xue

    2015-09-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive primary adult brain tumor. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in a variety of biological properties of cancers. Here, we elucidated the function and the possible molecular mechanisms of lncRNA HOTAIR in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that HOTAIR expression was up-regulated in glioma tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of HOTAIR exerted tumor-suppressive function in glioma cells. Further, HOTAIR was confirmed to be the target of miR-326 and miR-326 mediated the tumor-suppressive effects of HOTAIR knockdown on glioma cell lines. Moreover, over-expressed miR-326 reduced the FGF1 expression which played an oncogenic role in glioma by activating PI3K/AKT and MEK 1/2 pathways. In addition, the in vivo studies also supported the above findings. Taken together, knockdown of HOTAIR up-regulated miR-326 expression, and further inducing the decreased expression of FGF1, these results provided a comprehensive analysis of HOTAIR-miR-326-FGF1 axis in human glioma and provided a new potential therapeutic strategy for glioma treatment.

  4. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits malignant biological behaviors of human glioma cells via modulation of miR-326

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jing; Yao, Yi-long; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-hui; Ma, Jun; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiao-bai; Li, Zhi-qing; Wang, Zhen-hua; Xue, Yi-xue

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive primary adult brain tumor. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in a variety of biological properties of cancers. Here, we elucidated the function and the possible molecular mechanisms of lncRNA HOTAIR in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that HOTAIR expression was up-regulated in glioma tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of HOTAIR exerted tumor-suppressive function in glioma cells. Further, HOTAIR was confirmed to be the target of miR-326 and miR-326 mediated the tumor-suppressive effects of HOTAIR knockdown on glioma cell lines. Moreover, over-expressed miR-326 reduced the FGF1 expression which played an oncogenic role in glioma by activating PI3K/AKT and MEK 1/2 pathways. In addition, the in vivo studies also supported the above findings. Taken together, knockdown of HOTAIR up-regulated miR-326 expression, and further inducing the decreased expression of FGF1, these results provided a comprehensive analysis of HOTAIR-miR-326-FGF1 axis in human glioma and provided a new potential therapeutic strategy for glioma treatment. PMID:26183397

  5. [Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced enteritis].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Baranyai, Zsolt; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Teknos, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Hegedus, László; Mayer, Arpád

    2010-09-01

    The number of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant diseases is increasing worldwide. During the radiotherapy of tumors in the minor pelvis and abdomen intestinal inflammation of different degree may occur even if special attention is paid. Irradiation to the minor pelvis causes in half of the cases radiation induced acute enteritis, whereas in 25% chronic enteritis and colitis will develop. Chronic enteritis following radiotherapy raises a number of diagnostic and therapeutic problems that can be solved only with cooperation of different specialties. Authors present a short review regarding therapeutical options of radiation induced enteritis.

  6. Convection-enhanced delivery of Ls-TPT enables an effective, continuous, low-dose chemotherapy against malignant glioma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryuta; Krauze, Michal T; Noble, Charles O; Drummond, Daryl C; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Berger, Mitchel S; Park, John W; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2006-07-01

    Treatment of malignant gliomas represents one of the most formidable challenges in oncology. The combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy yields median survivals of less than one year. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive surgical technique, convection-enhanced delivery (CED), for local administration of a novel nanoparticle liposome containing topotecan. CED of this liposomal topotecan (Ls-TPT) resulted in extended brain tissue retention (t1/2 = 1.5 days), whereas free topotecan was rapidly cleared (t1/2 = 0.1 days) after CED. The favorable pharmacokinetic profile of extended topotecan release for about seven days, along with biodistribution featuring perivascular accumulation of the nanoparticles, provided, in addition to the known topoisomerase I inhibition, an effective antiangiogenic therapy. In the rat intracranial U87MG tumor model, vascular targeting of Ls-TPT with CED was associated with reductions in laminin expression and vascular density compared to free topotecan or control treatments. A single CED treatment on day 7 showed that free topotecan conferred no survival benefit versus control. However, Ls-TPT produced a significant (P = 0.0002) survival benefit, with six of seven complete cures. Larger U87MG tumors, where CED of Ls-TPT on day 12 resulted in one of six cures, indicated the necessity to cover the entire tumor with the infused therapeutic agent. CED of Ls-TPT was also efficacious in the intracranial U251MG tumor model (P = 0.0005 versus control). We conclude that the combination of a novel nanoparticle Ls-TPT and CED administration was very effective in treating experimental brain tumors.

  7. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Combination With Gefitinib in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, Amanda L.; Damek, Denise M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Lillehei, Kevin; Stuhr, Kelly; Chen Changhu

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with gefitinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had pathologically proved recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma. Patients started gefitinib (250 mg/day) 7 days before SRS and continued for 1 year or until disease progression. SRS was delivered in three fractions over 3 days. The planning target volume (PTV) was the T1-weighted MRI postcontrast enhancing lesion + 2 mm. The first cohort received an SRS dose of 18 Gy, and subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to the maximum dose of 36 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was any Grade 3 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2 of 6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Characteristics of the 15 patients enrolled were: 9 men, 6 women; median age, 47 years (range, 23-65 years); 11 glioblastoma, 4 AA; median prior RT dose, 60 Gy (range, 54-61.2 Gy); median interval since RT, 12 months (range, 3-57 months); median PTV, 41 cc (range, 12-151 cc). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range, 2-28 months). Median time on gefitinib was 5 months (range, 2-12 months). No patient experienced a DLT, and the SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy. Grade 1-2 gefitinib-related dermatitis and diarrhea were common (10 and 7 patients, respectively). Conclusion: Fractionated SRS to a dose of 36 Gy in three fractions is well tolerated with gefitinib at daily dose of 250 mg. Further studies of SRS and novel molecular targeted agents are warranted in this challenging clinical setting.

  8. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  9. Altered therapy schedules in postoperative treatment of patients with malignant gliomas. Twenty year experience of the Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Center in Kraków, 1973-1993.

    PubMed

    Gliński, B; Dymek, P; Skołyszewski, J

    1998-01-01

    Results of altered therapy schedules obtained in postoperative treatment of 294 patients with malignant gliomas over last 20 years are presented. During this period 135 patients received Conventional Irradiation and Chemotherapy (CICH), 61 patients received Conventional Irradiation (CI), 59 patients received Split Course High Fractional Dose Irradiation (SCHFDI), and 39 patients received Twice a Day Accelerated Irradiation (TDAI). Actuarial survival rates at 2, 3 and 5 years were 19%, 7%, 0% respectively for patients treated with CICH, and they were 21%, 10%, 0% for CI group, 24%, 12%, 0% for SCHFDI option and 15%, 8%, 0% for TDAI schedule. According to the Cox proportional hazard model, only age was significant factor in prognosis.

  10. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors. PMID:27209188

  11. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  12. Silence of MACC1 expression by RNA interference inhibits proliferation, invasion and metastasis, and promotes apoptosis in U251 human malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LONGFENG; LI, GANG; DAI, BING; TAN, WEI; ZHAO, HONGWEN; LI, XIAOFEI; WANG, AIPING

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) has been demonstrated not only in colon cancer, but also in various other types of cancer. Gliomas are the most common type of intracranial tumors, and recent studies have reported MACC1 to be involved in human glioma progression. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of MACC1 expression silencing in glioma cells using RNA interference, in order to determine the underlying biological mechanisms of glioma progression, including proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis. The expression levels of MACC1 were determined in various types of U251 glioma cells using western blot analyses. MACC1-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to silence the expression of MACC1 in the U251 cells. The results obtained following MACC1 silencing demonstrated a significant inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion and migration, as well as a marked enhancement of apoptosis. MACC1 shRNA-induced inhibition of cell proliferation was observed by colony forming and MTT assays, and cell apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry and Hoechst staining. In addition, inhibition of cell invasion and migration was assessed using wound healing and transwell assays. Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) revealed a G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest regulated by cyclins D1 and E; cell apoptosis regulated by caspase-3; and cell invasion and migration regulated by matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the expression levels of MACC1 were significantly correlated with the biological processes underlying glioma cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, MACC1 may serve as a promising novel therapeutic target in human glioma. Notably, the inhibition of MACC1 expression by shRNA may prove to be an effective genetic therapeutic strategy for glioma treatment. PMID:26043756

  13. [Symptoms and treatment of radiation-induced reactions].

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Anna; Idziak, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods of cancer treatment alone or in combination with chemotherapy. It is applied in about 60% of oncological patients. However, in spite of its clinical usefulness, radiotherapy is associated with a high risk of radiation-induced side effects, including dermatitis, enteritis, cystitis, pericarditis, pneumonia or depression, sexual function disorders, cardiomiopathy, coronary heart disease, anomalies of heart valves and development of second malignant tumor. The early diagnosis and proper treatment of radiation-induced side effects have a major impact on patients` quality of life and future prognosis. Radiation reactions can be categorized as acute or late, occurring before and after six months after radiotherapy. Among the most common acute reactions there were observed: skin rash, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, fever and radiation pneumonitis. Within reference to the late complications, we distinguish for instance fibrosis of organs, a radiation necrosis of bone, ulcers, fistulas, sexual dysfunction and the development of second malignant carcinomas. PMID:26039025

  14. IUdR polymers for combined continuous low-dose rate and high-dose rate sensitization of experimental human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Dillehay, L E; Williams, J R; Shastri, V R; Williams, J A

    2001-04-20

    Local polymeric delivery enhances IUdR radiosensitization of human malignant gliomas (MG). The combined low-dose rate (LDR) (0.03 Gy/h) and fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) treatments result in cures of experimental MGs. To enhance efficacy, we combined polymeric IUdR delivery, LDR, and HDR for treatments of both subcutaneous and intracranial MGs. In vitro: Cells (U251 MG) were trypsinized and replated in triplicate 1 day prior to LDR irradiation in media either without (control) or with 10 microM IUdR. After 72 hr, LDR irradiation cells were acutely irradiated (1.1 Gy/min) with increasing (0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, or 10 Gy) single doses. Implantable IUdR polymers [(poly(bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-propane) (PCPP): sebaic acid (PCPP:SA), 20:80] (50% loading; 10 mg) were synthesized. In vivo: For flank vs. intracranial tumors, mice had 6 x 10(6) subcutaneous vs. 2 x 10(5) intracranial cells. For intracranial or subcutaneous MGs, mice had intratumoral blank (empty) vs. IUdR polymer treatments. One day after implantation, mice had immediate external LDR (3 cGy/h x 3 days total body irradiation) or HDR (2 Gy BID x 4 days to tumor site) or concurrent treatments. For the in vitro IUdR treatments, LDR resulted in a striking increase in cell-killing when combined with HDR. For the in vivo LDR treatments of flank tumors, the growth delay was greater for the IUdR vs. blank polymer treatments. For the combined LDR and HDR, the IUdR treatments resulted in a dramatic decrease in tumor volumes. On day 60 the log V/V0 were -1.7 +/- 0.22 for combined LDR + HDR + IUdR polymer (P < 0.05 vs. combined LDR + HDR + blank polymer). Survival for the intracranial controls was 22.9 +/- 1.2 days. For the blank polymer + LDR vs. blank polymer + LDR + HDR treatments, survival was 25.3 +/- 1.7 (P = NS) vs. 48.1 +/- 3.5 days (P < 0.05). For IUdR polymer + LDR treatment survival was 27.3 +/- 2.3 days (P = NS). The most striking improvement in survival followed the IUdR polymer + LDR + HDR treatment: 66

  15. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  16. Lowering Whole-Body Radiation Doses in Pediatric Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Through the Use of Unflattened Photon Beams;Flattening filter; Pediatric; Intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Second cancers; Radiation-induced malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Jason; Ramtohul, Mark; Ford, Dan

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been linked with an increased risk of secondary cancer induction due to the extra leakage radiation associated with delivery of these techniques. Removal of the flattening filter offers a simple way of reducing head leakage, and it may be possible to generate equivalent IMRT plans and to deliver these on a standard linear accelerator operating in unflattened mode. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Precise linear accelerator has been commissioned to operate in both conventional and unflattened modes (energy matched at 6 MV) and a direct comparison made between the treatment planning and delivery of pediatric intracranial treatments using both approaches. These plans have been evaluated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Plans generated in unflattened mode are clinically identical to those for conventional IMRT but can be delivered with greatly reduced leakage radiation. Measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom at clinically relevant positions including the thyroid, lung, ovaries, and testes show an average reduction in peripheral doses of 23.7%, 29.9%, 64.9%, and 70.0%, respectively, for identical plan delivery compared to conventional IMRT. Conclusions: IMRT delivery in unflattened mode removes an unwanted and unnecessary source of scatter from the treatment head and lowers leakage doses by up to 70%, thereby reducing the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Removal of the flattening filter is recommended for IMRT treatments.

  17. Combination of lentivirus-mediated silencing of PPM1D and temozolomide chemotherapy eradicates malignant glioma through cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Ye, Jing-An; Hou, Chong-Xian; Zhou, Dong; Zhan, Sheng-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is approved for use as first-line treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, GBM shows chemoresistance shortly after the initiation of treatment. In order to detect whether silencing of human protein phosphatase 1D magnesium dependent (PPM1D) gene could increase the effects of TMZ in glioma cells, glioma cells U87-MG were infected with lentiviral shRNA vector targeting PPM1D silencing. After PPM1D silencing was established, cells were treated with TMZ. The multiple functions of human glioma cells after PPM1D silencing and TMZ chemotherapy were detected by flow cytometry and MTT assay. Significantly differentially expressed genes were distinguished by microarray-based gene expression profiling and analyzed by gene pathway enrichment analysis and ontology assessment. Western blotting was used to establish the protein expression of the core genes. PPM1D gene silencing improves TMZ induced cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. When PPM1D gene silencing combined with TMZ was performed in glioma cells, 367 genes were upregulated and 444 genes were downregulated compared with negative control. The most significant differential expression pathway was pathway in cancer and IGFR1R, PIK3R1, MAPK8 and EP300 are core genes in the network. Western blotting showed that MAPK8 and PIK3R1 protein expression levels were upregulated and RB1 protein expression was decreased. It was consistent with that detected in gene expression profiling. In conclusion, PPM1D gene silencing combined with TMZ eradicates glioma cells through cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. PIK3R1/AKT pathway plays a role in the multiple functions of glioma cells after PPM1D silencing and TMZ chemotherapy. PMID:27633132

  18. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  19. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  20. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy.

  1. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  2. Taxol-mediated augmentation of CD95 ligand-induced apoptosis of human malignant glioma cells: association with bcl-2 phosphorylation but neither activation of p53 nor G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, W.; Wagenknecht, B.; Grimmel, C.; Dichgans, J.; Weller, M.

    1998-01-01

    The anti-tumour alkaloid taxol shows strong cytotoxic and antiproliferative activity in two human malignant glioma cell lines, T98G and LN-229. CD95 (Fas/APO-1) ligand is a novel cytotoxic cytokine of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family that exerts prominent antiglioma activity. At clinically relevant taxol concentrations of 5-100 nM, taxol and CD95 ligand showed significant synergistic cytotoxicity and growth inhibition. High concentrations of taxol induced G/M cell cycle arrest in both cell lines. The synergy of taxol and CD95 ligand was independent of cell cycle effects of taxol as synergy was achieved at much lower taxol concentrations than G2/M arrest and as cell cycle effects of taxol were unaffected by co-exposure to CD95 ligand. Similarly, high concentrations of taxol were required to induce p53 activity in the p53 wild-type cell line LN-229. This effect was not modulated by CD95 ligand, suggesting that synergy is also independent of p53 activation. However, taxol induced a mobility shift of the bcl-2 protein on immunoblot analysis, indicative of bcl-2 phosphorylation. Bcl-2 phosphorylation on serine was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and phosphoserine immunoblot analysis. Considering (1) that phosphorylation of bcl-2 interferes with its heterodimerization with bax and (2) the inhibition of CD95-mediated apoptosis by bcl-2, we propose that taxol sensitizes malignant glioma cells to CD95 ligand by increasing the functional bax/bcl-2 rheostat in favour of bax and thus cell death. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9472635

  3. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  4. Co-administration of NVP-AEW541 and dasatinib induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis through Bax activation in malignant human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Daniel R; Jane, Esther P; Pollack, Ian F

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents a largely incurable tumor for which novel therapeutic strategies are required. We report the effect of NVP-AEW541, an inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) kinase activity on growth and signaling in a panel of glioma cell lines. NVP-AEW541 blocked phosphorylation of IGF-IR in a dose- and time-dependent manner and inhibited proliferation and clonogenicity with median effective concentrations of 2.5-10 microM. NVP-AEW541 also induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria. Because concentrations of NVP-AEW541 required to significantly inhibit glioma cell viability and downstream signaling also inhibited non-neoplastic astrocytes, we questioned whether differential efficacy could be enhanced by combination with inhibition of other tyrosine kinases dysregulated in gliomas. Dasatinib was selected as a combination agent based on its distinct inhibitory profile for other relevant signaling targets. Combined treatment with NVP-AEW541 and dasatinib induced significantly more apoptosis than either agent alone in glioma cells, but not non-neoplastic astrocytes, and synergistically inhibited clonogenic survival. Mechanistic studies indicated that combination of NVP-AEW541 and dasatinib significantly reduced pERK and pAkt and markedly increased AIF release, Bax oligomerization and loss of mitochondrial potential compared to each agent alone. Overexpression of Bcl-2 and Akt significantly attenuated NVP-AEW541 and dasatinib-induced Bax activation and cell death. Our data indicate that activation of Bax plays a critical role in mediating NVP-AEW541 and dasatinib-induced apoptosis, and suggest the potential value of combining IGFR inhibition with other classes of tyrosine kinase inhibitors to potentiate therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Unique biology of gliomas: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are terrifying primary brain tumors for which patient outlook remains bleak. Recent research provides novel insights into the unique biology of gliomas. For example, these tumors exhibit an unexpected pluripotency that enables them to grow their own vasculature. They have an unusual ability to navigate tortuous extracellular pathways as they invade, and they use neurotransmitters to inflict damage and create room for growth. Here, we review studies that illustrate the importance of considering interactions of gliomas with their native brain environment. Such studies suggest that gliomas constitute a neurodegenerative disease caused by the malignant growth of brain support cells. The chosen examples illustrate how targeted research into the biology of gliomas is yielding new and much needed therapeutic approaches to this challenging nervous system disease. PMID:22683220

  6. A mathematical model of pre-diagnostic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Marc; Hao, Wenrui; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Rempala, Grzegorz A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their location, the malignant gliomas of the brain in humans are very difficult to treat in advanced stages. Blood-based biomarkers for glioma are needed for more accurate evaluation of treatment response as well as early diagnosis. However, biomarker research in primary brain tumors is challenging given their relative rarity and genetic diversity. It is further complicated by variations in the permeability of the blood brain barrier that affects the amount of marker released into the bloodstream. Inspired by recent temporal data indicating a possible decrease in serum glucose levels in patients with gliomas yet to be diagnosed, we present an ordinary differential equation model to capture early stage glioma growth. The model contains glioma-glucose-immune interactions and poses a potential mechanism by which this glucose drop can be explained. We present numerical simulations, parameter sensitivity analysis, linear stability analysis and a numerical experiment whereby we show how a dormant glioma can become malignant. PMID:26073722

  7. High expression of VEGF and PI3K in glioma stem cells provides new criteria for the grading of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEI; ZHANG, LUYAO; SHEN, WEIGAO; LIU, YANBO; LUO, YINAN

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a type of tumor derived from glial cells, which is associated with a high level of incidence and mortality. At present, the generation of a fast and efficient method to evaluate the malignancy grade of glioma is required. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are currently attracting attention in oncological studies; therefore, the present study aimed to investigate novel biomarkers of glioma CSCs, in order to provide new criteria for the grading of glioma. The mRNA expression levels of CD133, (sex determining region Y)-box 2, nestin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) were detected in 15 human samples of high-malignancy glioma and 12 human samples of low-malignancy glioma in vitro. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF and PI3K were higher in the high-malignancy group, as compared with in the low-malignancy group. In conclusion, the mRNA expression levels of VEGF and PI3K in glioma CSCs may be considered a novel criteria for the grading of glioma. PMID:26893649

  8. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  9. Radiation-induced salivary gland tumors: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Smith, S A

    1976-09-01

    I discuss radiation-induced salivary gland tumors, with special emphasis on those tumors thought to be secondary to childhood head and neck irradiation for benign diseases. I report such a case and review the literature. Statistically, 77.6% of irradiation-induced tumors occur in the parotid gland and 22.4% in the submaxillary and minor salivary glands. A greater proportion of malignant tumors are noted in the submaxillary and minor salivary glands. At present, there is no demonstrable relationship between tumor occurrence and the amount of radiation recieved. Young children are more susceptible to irradiation-induced salivary tumors than older individuals.

  10. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  11. A phase I/II trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin for adults with recurrent malignant glioma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 03-03

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Alfred Yung, W.K.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Chang, Susan M.; Lieberman, Frank S.; Prados, Michael D.; Fine, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Romidepsin, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown activity in preclinical glioma models. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioma on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma who were not receiving EIAEDs. Two dose cohorts were studied in the phase I component of the trial (13.3 and 17.7 mg/m2/d). Patients in the phase II component were treated with intravenous romidepsin at a dosage of 13.3 mg/m2/day on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Eight patients were treated on the phase I component. A similar romidepsin pharmacokinetic profile was demonstrated between patients receiving EIAEDs to those not receving EIAEDs. Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma were accrued to the phase II component. There was no objective radiographic response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). To date, 34 patients (97%) have died, with a median survival duration of 34 weeks. Despite in vitro studies showing that romidepsin is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, no decrease in exposure to romidepsin was seen in patients receiving potent CYP3A4 inducers. Romidepsin, at its standard dose and schedule, was ineffective for patients with recurrent glioblastomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00085540. PMID:21377994

  12. A phase I/II trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin for adults with recurrent malignant glioma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 03-03.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kuhn, John G; Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Chang, Susan M; Lieberman, Frank S; Prados, Michael D; Fine, Howard A

    2011-05-01

    Romidepsin, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown activity in preclinical glioma models. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioma on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma who were not receiving EIAEDs. Two dose cohorts were studied in the phase I component of the trial (13.3 and 17.7 mg/m(2)/d). Patients in the phase II component were treated with intravenous romidepsin at a dosage of 13.3 mg/m(2)/day on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Eight patients were treated on the phase I component. A similar romidepsin pharmacokinetic profile was demonstrated between patients receiving EIAEDs to those not receving EIAEDs. Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma were accrued to the phase II component. There was no objective radiographic response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). To date, 34 patients (97%) have died, with a median survival duration of 34 weeks. Despite in vitro studies showing that romidepsin is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, no decrease in exposure to romidepsin was seen in patients receiving potent CYP3A4 inducers. Romidepsin, at its standard dose and schedule, was ineffective for patients with recurrent glioblastomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00085540.

  13. GSK1904529A, an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor, inhibits glioma tumor growth, induces apoptosis and inhibits migration

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, QIANG; ZHANG, JUNXIA; CUI, QINYING; LI, XIAODONG; GAO, GE; WANG, YANFEN; XU, YUPING; GAO, XIAOQUN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignancy of the central nervous system, with a poor prognosis. The therapeutic options for malignant gliomas are limited and far from satisfactory, and novel treatment strategies are urgently required to improve the outcome of the disease. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, motility and survival. The dysregulation of this signaling pathway has been implicated in the development of malignant gliomas. In the present study, GSK1904529A, a small molecule inhibitor of IGF-1R, suppressed glioma cell viability, induced glioma cell apoptosis and inhibited glioma cell migration in vitro. In addition, GSK1904529A inhibited glioma tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested GSK1904529A as a promising agent for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:26035416

  14. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  15. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Souba, W.W.; McKenna, R.J. Jr.; Meis, J.; Benjamin, R.; Raymond, A.K.; Mountain, C.F.

    1986-02-01

    Sixteen patients are presented who had sarcomas of the chest wall at a site where a prior malignancy had been irradiated. The first malignancies included breast cancer (ten cases), Hodgkin's disease (four cases), and others (two cases). Radiation doses varied from 4200 to 5500 R (mean, 4900 R). The latency period ranged from 5 to 28 years (mean, 13 years). The histologic types of the radiation-induced sarcomas were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, nine cases; osteosarcoma, six cases; and malignant mesenchymoma, one case. The only long-term survivor is alive and well 12 years after resection of a clavicular chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Three cases were recently diagnosed. Despite aggressive multimodality treatment, the remaining 13 patients have all died from their sarcomas (mean survival, 13.5 months). All patients have apparently been cured of their first malignancies. Chemotherapy was ineffective. No treatment, including forequarter amputation, appeared to palliate the patients with supraclavicular soft tissue sarcomas. Major chest wall resection offered good palliation for seven of eight patients with sarcomas arising in the sternum or lateral chest wall. Close follow-up is needed to detect signs of these sarcomas in the ever-increasing number of patients receiving therapeutic irradiation.

  16. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  17. Phase I/II study of erlotinib and temsirolimus for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium trial 04-02

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Lieberman, Frank S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Drappatz, Jan; Groves, Morris D.; Santagata, Sandro; Ligon, Azra H.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Wright, John J.; Dancey, Janet; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Prados, Michael D.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) may have synergistic antitumor effects in high-grade glioma patients. Methods We conducted a phase I/II study of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg/day) and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Patients initially received temsirolimus 50 mg weekly, and the dose adjusted based on toxicities. In the phase II component, the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) among glioblastoma patients. Results Twenty-two patients enrolled in phase I, 47 in phase II. Twelve phase I patients treated at the maximum tolerated dosage were included in the phase II cohort for analysis. The maximum tolerated dosage was 15 mg temsirolimus weekly with erlotinib 150 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were rash and mucositis. Among 42 evaluable glioblastoma patients, 12 (29%) achieved stable disease, but there were no responses, and PFS6 was 13%. Among 16 anaplastic glioma patients, 1 (6%) achieved complete response, 1 (6%) partial response, and 2 (12.5%) stable disease, with PFS6 of 8%. Tumor levels of both drugs were low, and posttreatment tissue in 3 patients showed no reduction in the mTOR target phosphorylated (phospho-)S6S235/236 but possible compensatory increase in phospho-AktS473. Presence of EGFR variant III, phospho-EGFR, and EGFR amplification did not correlate with survival, but patients with elevated phospho–extracellular signal-regulated kinase or reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog protein expression had decreased progression-free survival at 4 months. Conclusion Because of increased toxicity, the maximum tolerated dosage of temsirolimus in combination with erlotinib proved lower than expected. Insufficient tumor drug levels and redundant signaling pathways may partly explain the minimal antitumor activity noted. PMID:24470557

  18. Role of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) in the expansion of glioma-initiating cells by fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Hyejin; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of glioma stem-like cells. {yields} Inhibition of LCK prevents acquisition of fractionated radiation-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. {yields} LCK activity is critical for the maintenance of self-renewal in glioma stem-like cells. -- Abstract: Brain cancers frequently recur or progress as focal masses after treatment with ionizing radiation. Radiation used to target gliomas may expand the cancer stem cell population and enhance the aggressiveness of tumors; however, the mechanisms underlying the expansion of cancer stem cell population after radiation have remained unclear. In this study, we show that LCK (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and acquisition of resistance to anticancer treatments. Fractionated radiation caused a selective increase in the activity of LCK, a Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The activities of other Src family kinases Src, Fyn, and Lyn were not significantly increased. Moreover, knockdown of LCK expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively blocked fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the CD133{sup +} cell population. siRNA targeting of LCK also suppressed fractionated radiation-induced expression of the glioma stem cell marker proteins CD133, Nestin, and Musashi. Expression of the known self-renewal-related proteins Notch2 and Sox2 in glioma cells treated with fractionated radiation was also downregulated by LCK inhibition. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of LCK effectively restored the sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin and etoposide. These results indicate that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase LCK is critically involved in fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and

  19. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  20. In Vivo Measurement of Glioma-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisook; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The normal blood–brain barrier (BBB) consists of tight interendothelial cell junctions and adjacent astrocyte end feet separated by a basal lamina surrounding the endothelium. The interactions between the different cell types of BBB are disrupted in distinct patterns in the microenvironment of glioma. Malignant gliomas infiltrate the surrounding normal brain parenchyma; a process associated with vascular permeability (VP) and breakdown of the BBB. Herein, we describe methods to quantitatively measure glioma-induced vascular permeability, utilizing an orthotopic xenograft model of glioma. PMID:21874468

  1. Clinical phase-I study of Na[sub 2]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH (BSH) in patients with malignant glioma as precondition for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Haritz, D. ); Gabel, D. ); Huiskamp, R. )

    1994-03-30

    Within the European collaboration on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a clinical Phase I study is being carried out to establish BNCT as an alternative treatment modality for malignant glioma (WHO III/IV). Data about the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and toxicity of the boron compound Na[sub 2]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH (BSH) are of great importance to avoid radiation damage of healthy tissue and to deliver a sufficient radiation dose. Twenty four patients suffering from a glioblastoma multiforme entered the study to date, infused with a maximum concentration of up to 50 mg BSH/kg. Boron concentration measurements in tissues, urine, and blood were carried out, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and quantitative neutron capture radiography (QNCR). A cross-calibration of these determination techniques was carried out. In tumor tissue, confirmed by histopathology of small biopsies, they found a consistently high but heterogeneous boron uptake. Necrotic parts contain much lower amounts of boron; normal brain tissue has shown no significant uptake. In skin, bone, muscle, and dura mater only small amounts of boron were found. In blood samples, they found biphasic kinetics, but with variations of the half-lives from patient to patient. The compound is mainly excreted through the urine, but an additional entero-hapatic pathway can be demonstrated. Systematic investigations revealed no toxic side effect of the intravenously administered BSH. Comparable data were obtained by using ICP-AES and QNCR for boron concentration measurements. Taking into account the radiobiological considerations of the neutron beam source, they found promising facts that BNCT could be a useful irradiation method for highly malignant brain tumors. Favorable amounts of the boron compound BSH were found in tumor tissue, whereas healthy brain tissue has shown no significant uptake. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. More Complete Removal of Malignant Brain Tumors by Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Benign Neoplasms, Brain; Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasms, Benign; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant; Brain Tumor, Primary; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Brain Tumors; Intracranial Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Brain; Neoplasms, Intracranial; Primary Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Tumors; Gliomas; Glioblastoma

  3. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful. PMID:21846069

  4. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful.

  5. Glioma-associated endothelial cells are chemoresistant to temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Virrey, Jenilyn J; Golden, Encouse B; Sivakumar, Walavan; Wang, Weijun; Pen, Ligaya; Schönthal, Axel H; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2009-10-01

    Temozolomide is considered the standard of care and drug of choice for the treatment of initially diagnosed malignant gliomas. Although well tolerated, temozolomide still has limited clinical efficacy. Following drug treatment, patient prognosis still remains poor; tumor recurrence is almost universal. We hypothesized that this lack of effectiveness with temozolomide is because this drug does not target the glioma microenvironment, which is highly vascular in malignant gliomas. To test this hypothesis we analyzed the effects of temozolomide on the tumor vasculature in vitro and in vivo. We found that this drug did not affect the viability or proliferation rate of endothelial cells isolated from human glioma specimens, although temozolomide was highly cytotoxic to the glioma cell lines U87MG and U251. Furthermore, temozolomide did not inhibit the migration of these glioma-associated endothelial cells, a key mechanism responsible for tumor angiogenesis. In in vivo studies, using the intracranial glioma mouse model, temozolomide did not cause a pronounced effect on microvessel density. Our findings show that temozolomide has no apparent effect on the glioma vascular microenvironment. Thus combination therapy with anti-vascular agents may enhance temozolomide effectiveness as glioma therapeutic protocol.

  6. Noninvasive Monitoring of Glioma Growth in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Francesco; Ceresa, Davide; Appolloni, Irene; Marubbi, Daniela; Malatesta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and deadly primary malignant brain tumors. In vivo orthotopic models could doubtless represent an appropriate tool to test novel treatment for gliomas. However, methods commonly used to monitor the growth of glioma inside the mouse brain are time consuming and invasive. We tested the reliability of a minimally invasive procedure, based on a secreted luciferase (Gaussia luciferase), to frequently monitor the changes of glioma size. Gluc activity was evaluated from blood samples collected from the tail tip of mice twice a week, allowing to make a growth curve for the tumors. We validated the correlation between Gluc activity and tumor size by analysing the tumor after brain dissection. We found that this method is reliable for monitoring human glioma transplanted in immunodeficient mice, but it has strong limitation in immunocompetent models, where an immune response against the luciferase is developed during the first weeks after transplant.

  7. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  8. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-min; Wang, Yan-hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  9. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yan-Hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-Sheng

    2016-04-26

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  10. Slit2/Robo1 signaling in glioma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun; Li, Wen-Liang; Fu, Li; Gu, Feng; Ma, Yong-Jie

    2010-12-01

    Slit2/Robo1 is a conserved ligand-receptor system, which greatly affects the distribution, migration, axon guidance and branching of neuron cells. Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 have different distribution patterns in gliomas. The expression of Slit2 is at very low levels in pilocytic astrocytoma, fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma, while Robo1 is highly expressed in different grades of gliomas at both mRNA and protein levels. Acquisition of insidious invasiveness by malignant glioma cells involves multiple genetic alterations in signaling pathways. Although the specific mechanisms of tumor-suppressive effect of Slit2/Robo1 have not been elucidated, it has been proved that Slit2/Robo1 signaling inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion by inactivation of Cdc42-GTP. With the research development on the molecular mechanisms of Slit2/Robo1 signaling in glioma invasion and migration, Slit2/Robo1 signaling may become a potential target for glioma prevention and treatment.

  11. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  12. Irradiation of the potential cancer stem cell niches in the adult brain improves progression-free survival of patients with malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults. The mechanisms leading to glioblastoma are not well understood but animal studies support that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in neural stem cells (NSC) is required and sufficient to induce glial cancers. This suggests that the NSC niches in the brain may harbor cancer stem cells (CSCs), Thus providing novel therapy targets. We hypothesize that higher radiation doses to these NSC niches improve patient survival by eradicating CSCs. Methods 55 adult patients with Grade 3 or Grade 4 glial cancer treated with radiotherapy at UCLA between February of 2003 and May of 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Using radiation planning software and patient radiological records, the SVZ and SGL were reconstructed for each of these patients and dosimetry data for these structures was calculated. Results Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we show that patients whose bilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) received greater than the median SVZ dose (= 43 Gy) had a significant improvement in progression-free survival if compared to patients who received less than the median dose (15.0 vs 7.2 months PFS; P = 0.028). Furthermore, a mean dose >43 Gy to the bilateral SVZ yielded a hazard ratio of 0.73 (P = 0.019). Importantly, similarly analyzing total prescription dose failed to illustrate a statistically significant impact. Conclusions Our study leads us to hypothesize that in glioma targeted radiotherapy of the stem cell niches in the adult brain could yield significant benefits over radiotherapy of the primary tumor mass alone and that damage caused by smaller fractions of radiation maybe less efficiently detected by the DNA repair mechanisms in CSCs. PMID:20663133

  13. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  14. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  15. Compound 331 selectively induces glioma cell death by upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Niu, Tianhui; Huang, Yafei; Zhu, Haichuan; Zhong, Wu; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS). Up to date, the prognosis of glioma is still very poor, effective therapy with less side-effect is very necessary. Herein, we identify a compound named as "331" selectively induced cell death in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. Compound 331 upregulated miR-494 and downregulated CDC20 in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. These results suggest that compound 331 could be a potential drug selectively targeting glioma cells through upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20. PMID:26153143

  16. Compound 331 selectively induces glioma cell death by upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Niu, Tianhui; Huang, Yafei; Zhu, Haichuan; Zhong, Wu; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS). Up to date, the prognosis of glioma is still very poor, effective therapy with less side-effect is very necessary. Herein, we identify a compound named as “331” selectively induced cell death in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. Compound 331 upregulated miR-494 and downregulated CDC20 in glioma cells but not in astrocytes. These results suggest that compound 331 could be a potential drug selectively targeting glioma cells through upregulating miR-494 and downregulating CDC20. PMID:26153143

  17. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  19. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  20. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  1. Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog1 (Gli1)-Aquaporin1 pathway promotes glioma cell metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-qiang; Ye, Ming; Yu, Pei-gen; Xiao, Chun; Lin, Feng-yun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog1 (Gli1) is known to be activated in malignant glioma; however, its downstream pathway has not been fully explained. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Gli1-Aquaporin1 (AQP1) signal pathway in glioma cell survival. Our data suggests that both Gli1 and AQP1 are upregulated in glioma tissues, as in comparison to in normal tissues. These up-regulation phenomena were also observed in glioma U251 and U87 cells. It was demonstrated that Gli1 positively regulated the AQP1 expression. By luciferase reporter gene and ChIP assay, we observed that this modulation process was realized by combination of Gli1 with AQP1 promotor. In addition, knock down of Gli1 by siRNA interference reduced the viability of glioma cells as well as suppressed cell metastasis. Also, the inhibitory effects of cell survival by silenced Gli1 were abrogated by AQP1 overexpression. In summary, glioma cell survival is a regulatory process and can be mediated by Gli1-AQP1 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 394-399] PMID:27157540

  2. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  3. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  4. Using bioluminescence imaging in glioma research.

    PubMed

    Luwor, Rodney B; Stylli, Stanley S; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumour and has the worst prognosis. Over the last decade, the use of bioluminescence imaging technology has rapidly become widespread to further understand the mechanisms that drive GBM development and progression. Pre-clinical evaluation and optimisation of therapeutic efficacy in GBM research has also utilised this simple non-invasive technology. Here we summarise recent advances made in glioma biology and therapeutic intervention using bioluminescence imaging. This review also describes the current knowledge regarding the use of luciferase-based reporters in examining the role of specific cancer signalling cascades that promote glioma progression.

  5. AT1 receptor is present in glioma cells; its blockage reduces the growth of rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, E; Arrieta, O; Guevara, P; Duarte-Rojo, A; Sotelo, J

    2001-01-01

    Malignancy of neoplasms is partly dependent on angiogenesis. Angiotensin II mediates angiogenesis and transcription of growth-related factors through stimulation of the AT1 receptor (AT1R). Losartan, a drug used mostly for treatment of hypertension, binds strongly to this receptor. We found the presence of AT1 receptor on C6 glioma cells and studied the effect of Losartan on the growth and angiogenesis of C6 rat glioma; Losartan in dose of 80 mg/kg induced 79% reduction of tumoural volume with a significant decrease of vascular density, mitotic index and cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate the conspicuous presence of AT1R in malignant glial cells and a favourable therapeutic response in experimental glioma by selective blockage of the AT1 receptor. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720480

  6. Pleiotrophin, an angiogenic and mitogenic growth factor, is expressed in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Mentlein, Rolf; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2002-11-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a mitogenic/angiogenic, 15.3 kDa heparin-binding peptide that is found in embryonic or early postnatal, but rarely in adult, tissues. Since developmentally regulated factors often re-appear in malignant cells, we examined PTN expression in human glioma cell lines, cell cultures derived from solid gliomas and glioma sections. PTN mRNA or protein was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, western blot or enzyme-linked immunoassay in all WHO III and IV grade gliomas and cells analyzed in vitro or in situ. One WHO II grade glioma investigated was PTN negative. In vitro, PTN was synthesized in perinuclear regions of glioma cells, secreted into the cultivation medium, but its production varied considerably between glioma cells cultivated from different solid gliomas or glioma cell lines. In situ, PTN expression was restricted to distinct parts/cells of the tumour. PTN did not influence the proliferation of glioma cells themselves, but stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA of microglial cells. Furthermore, in Boyden chamber assays, PTN showed a strong chemotactic effect on murine BV-2 microglial cells. PTN is supposed to be a paracrine growth/angiogenic factor that is produced by gliomas and contributes to their malignancy by targeting endothelial and microglial cells.

  7. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  8. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  9. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  10. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  11. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  12. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis.

  13. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  14. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  15. Glioma cells escaped from cytotoxicity of temozolomide and vincristine by communicating with human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiliang; Wang, Donghai; Du, Xinwen; He, Ying; Chen, Songyu; Shao, Qianqian; Ma, Chao; Huang, Bin; Chen, Anjing; Zhao, Peng; Qu, Xun; Li, Xingang

    2015-03-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs remains a great obstacle to successful treatment of gliomas. Understanding the mechanism of glioma chemoresistance is conducive to develop effective strategies to overcome resistance. Astrocytes are the major stromal cells in the brain and have been demonstrated to play a key role in the malignant phenotype of gliomas. However, little is known regarding its role in glioma chemoresistance. In our study, we established a co-culture system of human astrocytes and glioma in vitro to simulate tumor microenvironment. Our results showed that astrocytes significantly reduced glioma cell apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic drugs temozolomide and vincristine. This protective effect was dependent on direct contact between astrocytes and glioma cells through Cx43-GJC. Moreover, in human glioma specimens, we found astrocytes infiltrating around the tumor, with a reactive appearance, suggesting that these astrocytes would play the same chemoprotective effect on gliomas in vivo. Our results expand the understanding of the interaction between astrocytes and glioma cells and provide a possible explanation for unsatisfactory clinical outcomes of chemotherapeutic drugs. Cx43-GJC between astrocytes and glioma cells may be a potential target for overcoming chemoresistance in gliomas clinically. PMID:25631631

  16. Subjective Quality of Life in Persons with Low-Grade Glioma and Their Next of Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edvardsson, Tanja I.; Ahlstrom, Gerd I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma have a longer survival than patients with highly malignant glioma, and for this reason questions of quality of life (QoL) are of particular importance to such patients as well as to their next of kin. No studies have been found in which both adult patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin have estimated…

  17. Radiation-induced meningioma: a distinct molecular genetic pattern?

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Y; Chernova, O; Juen, S S; Somerville, R P; Israel, Z; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2000-07-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas arise after low-dose irradiation treatment of certain medical conditions and are recognized as clinically separate from sporadic meningioma. These tumors are often aggressive or malignant, they are likely to be multiple, and they have a high recurrence rate following treatment compared with sporadic meningiomas. To understand the molecular mechanism by which radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) arise, we compared genetic changes in 7 RIM and 8 sporadic meningioma (SM) samples. The presence of mutations in the 17 exons of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, which has been shown to be inactivated in sporadic meningiomas, was analyzed in RIM and SM using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. In contrast to SM, which showed NF2 mutations in 50% of specimens, no mutations were found in RIM. In addition, Western blot analysis of schwannomin/merlin protein, the NF2 gene product, demonstrated protein levels comparable to normal brain in 4/4 RIM tumor samples analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genomic regions, which were reported for SM, was also analyzed in all cases of RIM using 22 polymorphic DNA markers. Allele losses were found on chromosomes 1p (4/7), 9p (2/7), 19q (2/7), 22q (2/7), and 18q (1/7). From these observations we conclude that unlike sporadic meningiomas, NF2 gene inactivation and chromosome 22q deletions are far less frequent in RIM, and their role in meningioma development following low dose irradiation is less significant. Other chromosomal lesions, especially loss of 1p, possibly induced by irradiation, may be more important in the development of these tumors. PMID:10901233

  18. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  19. The molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Graeber, Manuel B.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia, which contribute substantially to the tumor mass of glioblastoma, have been shown to play an important role in glioma growth and invasion. While a large number of experimental studies on functional attributes of microglia in glioma provide evidence for their tumor-supporting roles, there also exist hints in support of their anti-tumor properties. Microglial activities during glioma progression seem multifaceted. They have been attributed to the receptors expressed on the microglia surface, to glioma-derived molecules that have an effect on microglia, and to the molecules released by microglia in response to their environment under glioma control, which can have autocrine effects. In this paper, the microglia and glioma literature is reviewed. We provide a synopsis of the molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma in order to help establish a rational basis for their potential therapeutic use. The ability of microglia precursors to cross the blood–brain barrier makes them an attractive target for the development of novel cell-based treatments of malignant glioma. PMID:22573310

  20. Genetic characterization of adult infratentorial gliomas.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Tomoru; Hirose, Yuichi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Ikeda, Eiji; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    Adult infratentorial gliomas are rare and have not been well studied. We therefore conducted genetic analysis of those tumors to see if there was any characteristic that could be relevant in clinical management and understanding of tumorigenesis. Nineteen adult infratentorial gliomas were analyzed for chromosomal aberration by comparative genomic hybridization, and for expression of p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by immunohistochemistry. The most frequent chromosomal aberration was the gain of 7p, and five of the seven cerebellar or fourth ventricle malignant gliomas had that aberration. However, the gain of 7q, the characteristic abnormality of supratentorial astrocytomas commonly associated with the gaining of 7p, was observed only in 1 of 11 adult infratentorial astrocytic tumors. Combined losses of 1p and 19q, the genetic hallmark of oligodendroglioma, were not observed. Results of immunohistochemistry of p53 and EGFR were comparable to those reported in supratentorial gliomas. Our findings might suggest the presence of distinct tumorigenic pathway in adult infratentorial gliomas.

  1. Cell surface GRP78 as a biomarker and target for suppressing glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bo Ram; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Chung, Bo-Ryehn; Kim, Woong; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-01-01

    High-grade glioma is a highly malignant and metastatic brain cancer, resistant to many existing anticancer treatments. In such glioma cancer cells, the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) is particularly highly up-regulated. Former studies have thus targeted mutation-free GRP78 not only to detect glioma cancer cells specifically but also to enhance cytotoxic effect. We focus on cell surface-expressed GRP78 as a target for suppressing high-grade glioma cell lines. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line, highly malignant glioma cells, was first injected into 5-week-old athymic mice to confirm and compare GRP78 expression in vivo in xenografted and normal brain tissue. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were utilized to detect surface-localized GRP78 in diverse high-grade glioma cell lines. By treating glioma cell lines with the polyclonal N-20 antibody against surface-localized GRP78, we subsequently studied the significance of surface GRP78 to the survival and growth of the glioma cell lines. We found that inhibiting the function of surface GRP78 suppressed cancer cell survival and growth proving that the surface-expressed GRP78 is a vital receptor involved in the proliferation of high-grade glioma. Our findings provide opportunities to target surface GRP78 as a biomarker for high-grade glioma and to develop effective cell-specific anticancer therapy. PMID:27713511

  2. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  3. Selective Targeting to Glioma with Nucleic Acid Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Shraddha; Arora, Mohit; Lawrence, Clare Louise; Lea, Robert William; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Tim; Alder, Jane Elizabeth; Shaw, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterised by a rapid growth rate and high capacity for invasive infiltration to surrounding brain tissue; hence, diagnosis and treatment is difficult and patient survival is poor. Aptamers contribute a promising and unique technology for the in vitro imaging of live cells and tissues, with a potentially bright future in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for malignant glioma. The binding selectivity, uptake capacity and binding target of two DNA aptamers, SA43 and SA44, were investigated in glioma cells and patient tissues. The binding assay showed that SA43 and SA44 bound with strong affinity (Kd, 21.56 ± 4.60 nM and Kd, 21.11 ± 3.30 nM respectively) to the target U87MG cells. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry showed that the aptamers were able to actively internalise in U87MG and 1321N1 glioma cells compared to the non-cancerous and non-glioma cell types. Confocal microscopy confirmed staining in the cytoplasm, and co-localisation studies with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomal markers suggested internalisation and compartmentalisation within the endomembrane system. Both aptamers selectively bound to Ku 70 and Ku 80 DNA repair proteins as determined by aptoprecipitation (AP) followed by mass spectrometry analysis and confirmation by Western blot. In addition, aptohistochemical (AHC) staining on paraffin embedded, formalin fixed patient tissues revealed that the binding selectivity was significantly higher for SA43 aptamer in glioma tissues (grade I, II, III and IV) compared to the non-cancerous tissues, whereas SA44 did not show selectivity towards glioma tissues. The results indicate that SA43 aptamer can differentiate between glioma and non-cancerous cells and tissues and therefore, shows promise for histological diagnosis of glioma. PMID:26252900

  4. Molecular biology of gliomas: present and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, R.; Agnoletti, A.; Quattrucci, F.; Garbossa, D.; Calamo Specchia, F. M.; Bozzaro, M.; Fornaro, R.; Mencarani, C.; Lanotte, M.; Spaziante, R.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant brain tumours are one of the most relevant causes of morbidity and mortality across a wide range of individuals. Malignant glioma is the most common intra axial tumor in the adult. Many researches on this theme brought advances in the knowledge of gliomas biology and pathogenesis and to the development of new agents for targeted molecular therapy. Recent studies focused on either tumor metabolism analysis or epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis or maintenance of brain tumors. This Review summarizes these developments analyzing molecular pathology and possible further developments for targeted therapies. PMID:25147764

  5. Molecular biology of gliomas: present and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Altieri, R; Agnoletti, A; Quattrucci, F; Garbossa, D; Calamo Specchia, F M; Bozzaro, M; Fornaro, R; Mencarani, C; Lanotte, M; Spaziante, R; Ducati, A

    2014-09-01

    Malignant brain tumours are one of the most relevant causes of morbidity and mortality across a wide range of individuals. Malignant glioma is the most common intra axial tumor in the adult. Many researches on this theme brought advances in the knowledge of gliomas biology and pathogenesis and to the development of new agents for targeted molecular therapy. Recent studies focused on either tumor metabolism analysis or epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis or maintenance of brain tumors. This Review summarizes these developments analyzing molecular pathology and possible further developments for targeted therapies.

  6. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  7. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  8. Slit2 inhibits glioma cell invasion in the brain by suppression of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yiin, Jia-Jean; Hu, Bo; Jarzynka, Michael J; Feng, Haizhong; Liu, Kui-Wei; Wu, Jane Y; Ma, Hsin-I; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    Acquisition of insidious invasiveness by malignant glioma cells involves multiple genetic alterations in signaling pathways. Slit2, a chemorepulsive factor, controls cell migration of neuronal and glial cells during development and inhibits chemotaxic migration of various types of cells in vitro. However, the role of Slit2 in vitro remains controversial, and the biological significance of Slit2 expression in cancer cell invasion in vivo has not yet been determined. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Slit2 expression on the migration and invasion of invasive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. By reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, Slit2 was found to be expressed at lower levels in primary glioma specimens and invasive glioma cells compared with normal human brain cells and astrocytes. Ectopic expression of Slit2 or treatment with recombinant Slit2 on glioma cells attenuates cell migration and invasion through inhibition of Cdc42 activity in vitro. Cellular depletion of Robo1, a cognate receptor for Slit2, prevented Slit2 inhibition of Cdc42 activity and glioma cell migration. In vivo, expression of Slit2 by invasive SNB19 glioma cells markedly inhibited glioma cell infiltration into the brain of mice. Moreover, impediment of glioma cell invasion by Slit2 did not affect the expression of N-cadherin and beta-catenin in glioma cells. These results provide the first evidence demonstrating that Slit2-Robo1 inhibits glioma invasion through attenuating Cdc42 activity in vitro and in the brain. Understanding the mechanisms of Slit2-Robo1 inhibition of glioma cell invasion will foster new treatments for malignant gliomas.

  9. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  10. Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

  11. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  12. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  13. Chlorotoxin inhibits glioma cell invasion via matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Deshane, Jessy; Garner, Craig C; Sontheimer, Harald

    2003-02-01

    Primary brain tumors (gliomas) have the unusual ability to diffusely infiltrate the normal brain thereby evading surgical treatment. Chlorotoxin is a scorpion toxin that specifically binds to the surface of glioma cells and impairs their ability to invade. Using a recombinant His-Cltx we isolated and identified the principal Cltx receptor on the surface of glioma cells as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). MMP-2 is specifically up-regulated in gliomas and related cancers, but is not normally expressed in brain. We demonstrate that Cltx specifically and selectively interacts with MMP-2 isoforms, but not with MMP-1, -3, and -9, which are also expressed in malignant glioma cells. Importantly, we show that the anti-invasive effect of Cltx on glioma cells can be explained by its interactions with MMP-2. Cltx exerts a dual effect on MMP-2: it inhibits the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and causes a reduction in the surface expression of MMP-2. These findings suggest that Cltx is a specific MMP-2 inhibitor with significant therapeutic potential for gliomas and other diseases that invoke the activity of MMP-2.

  14. Proteomics of gliomas: initial biomarker discovery and evolution of technology.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Juliya; Peng, Junmin; Ritchie, James C; Van Meir, Erwin G

    2011-09-01

    Gliomas are a group of aggressive brain tumors that diffusely infiltrate adjacent brain tissues, rendering them largely incurable, even with multiple treatment modalities and agents. Mostly asymptomatic at early stages, they present in several subtypes with astrocytic or oligodendrocytic features and invariably progress to malignant forms. Gliomas are difficult to classify precisely because of interobserver variability during histopathologic grading. Identifying biological signatures of each glioma subtype through protein biomarker profiling of tumor or tumor-proximal fluids is therefore of high priority. Such profiling not only may provide clues regarding tumor classification but may identify clinical biomarkers and pathologic targets for the development of personalized treatments. In the past decade, differential proteomic profiling techniques have utilized tumor, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma from glioma patients to identify the first candidate diagnostic, prognostic, predictive, and therapeutic response markers, highlighting the potential for glioma biomarker discovery. The number of markers identified, however, has been limited, their reproducibility between studies is unclear, and none have been validated for clinical use. Recent technological advancements in methodologies for high-throughput profiling, which provide easy access, rapid screening, low sample consumption, and accurate protein identification, are anticipated to accelerate brain tumor biomarker discovery. Reliable tools for biomarker verification forecast translation of the biomarkers into clinical diagnostics in the foreseeable future. Herein we update the reader on the recent trends and directions in glioma proteomics, including key findings and established and emerging technologies for analysis, together with challenges we are still facing in identifying and verifying potential glioma biomarkers.

  15. Clinical utility of 5-aminolevulinic acid HCl to better visualize and more completely remove gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Halani, Sameer H; Adamson, D Cory

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is typically the first line of treatment for gliomas. However, the neurosurgeon faces a major challenge in achieving maximal resection in high-grade gliomas as these infiltrative tumors make it difficult to discern tumor margins from normal brain with conventional white-light microscopy alone. To aid in resection of these infiltrative tumors, fluorescence-guided surgery has gained much popularity in intraoperative visualization of malignant gliomas, with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) leading the way. First introduced in an article in Neurosurgery, 5-ALA has since become a safe, effective, and inexpensive method to visualize and improve resection of gliomas. This has undoubtedly led to improvements in the clinical course of patients as demonstrated by the increased overall and progression-free survival in patients with such devastating disease. This literature review aims to discuss the major studies and trials demonstrating the clinical utility of 5-ALA and its ability to aid in complete resection of malignant gliomas.

  16. Chlorotoxin-conjugated onconase as a potential anti-glioma drug

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOMIN; GUO, ZHANYUN

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are rarely curable malignant brain tumors arising from normal glial cells. The scorpion-derived small peptide, chlorotoxin (CTX), can selectively bind malignant gliomas. In the present study, a CTX-conjugated onconase (Onc), a small cytotoxic ribonuclease, was prepared as a potential anti-glioma drug. In this conjugate, recombinant CTX was covalently linked with recombinant Onc by reversible disulfide linkage. The chemically conjugated CTX-Onc showed much higher cytotoxicity to the cultured glioma U251 and SHG-44 cells than the physical mixture of CTX and Onc (CTX + Onc). In the nude mouse models bearing subcutaneous U251 or SHG-44 tumors, the CTX-Onc conjugate also showed improved anti-tumor effects than the CTX + Onc control. These results suggested that the reversible chemical-conjugated CTX promoted the tumor targeting of Onc, and thus the present CTX-Onc conjugate could be further developed as a potential targeted anti-glioma drug. PMID:25663909

  17. Unlocking the promise of oncolytic virotherapy in glioma: combination with chemotherapy to enhance efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Drew A; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Polster, Sean P; Murphy, Jason P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a relentless burden to both patients and clinicians, and calls for innovation to overcome the limitations in current management. Glioma therapy using viruses has been investigated to accentuate the nature of a virus, killing a host tumor cell during its replication. As virus mediated approaches progress with promising therapeutic advantages, combination therapy with chemotherapy and oncolytic viruses has emerged as a more synergistic and possibly efficacious therapy. Here, we will review malignant glioma as well as prior experience with oncolytic viruses, chemotherapy and combination of the two, examining how the combination can be optimized in the future. PMID:25996044

  18. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  19. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  20. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  1. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  2. Molecular Biology in Pediatric High-Grade Glioma: Impact on Prognosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Daniela; Ruggiero, Antonio; Martini, Maurizio; Rizzo, Valentina; Maurizi, Palma; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are the main cause of death in children with brain tumours. Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, their prognosis remains poor and the treatment is still challenging. To date, surgery followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide is the standard therapy. However, increasing knowledge of glioma biology is starting to impact drug development towards targeted therapies. The identification of agents directed against molecular targets aims at going beyond the traditional therapeutic approach in order to develop a personalized therapy and improve the outcome of pediatric high-grade gliomas. In this paper, we critically review the literature regarding the genetic abnormalities implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric malignant gliomas and the current development of molecularly targeted therapies. In particular, we analyse the impact of molecular biology on the prognosis and treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma, comparing it to that of adult gliomas. PMID:26448930

  3. Genetic epidemiology of glioma.

    PubMed

    Malmer, B; Iselius, L; Holmberg, E; Collins, A; Henriksson, R; Grönberg, H

    2001-02-01

    The present study performed a segregation analysis of a cohort of first-degree relatives (FDR) of glioma patients. The families with two or more gliomas were also expanded to determine if any more gliomas could be detected, and if any other types of cancers were associated. These glioma-prone families (n = 24/432) were extended to include first-, second- and third-degree relatives (n = 807) and a cohort was assembled, the standardized incidence risk for other types of cancer calculated and the pedigrees investigated for a possible mode of inheritance. A segregation analysis of the 2141 FDR in 297 families, performed using the Pointer software, did not clearly reject a multifactorial model chi(2)(3) = 6.13, P< 0.2. However, when letting all parameters be free, the recessive model provided the best fit. In the extended families, no increased risk of other types of cancer was found. This population-based study proposes that familial glioma occurs in about 5% of all glioma cases and that 1% have a possible autosomal dominant inheritance. This first segregation analysis performed in familial glioma must be cautiously interpreted, but an autosomal recessive gene provided the best fit, which could possibly explain 2% of all glioma cases. PMID:11161412

  4. Genetic epidemiology of glioma.

    PubMed

    Malmer, B; Iselius, L; Holmberg, E; Collins, A; Henriksson, R; Grönberg, H

    2001-02-01

    The present study performed a segregation analysis of a cohort of first-degree relatives (FDR) of glioma patients. The families with two or more gliomas were also expanded to determine if any more gliomas could be detected, and if any other types of cancers were associated. These glioma-prone families (n = 24/432) were extended to include first-, second- and third-degree relatives (n = 807) and a cohort was assembled, the standardized incidence risk for other types of cancer calculated and the pedigrees investigated for a possible mode of inheritance. A segregation analysis of the 2141 FDR in 297 families, performed using the Pointer software, did not clearly reject a multifactorial model chi(2)(3) = 6.13, P< 0.2. However, when letting all parameters be free, the recessive model provided the best fit. In the extended families, no increased risk of other types of cancer was found. This population-based study proposes that familial glioma occurs in about 5% of all glioma cases and that 1% have a possible autosomal dominant inheritance. This first segregation analysis performed in familial glioma must be cautiously interpreted, but an autosomal recessive gene provided the best fit, which could possibly explain 2% of all glioma cases.

  5. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yisong; Pan, Changcun; Meng, Guolu; Xiao, Xinru; Wu, Zhen; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-11-01

    SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) di- and tri-methyltransferase that forms a transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase II and plays an important role in early embryonic lineage commitment through the activation of lineage-specific genes. SMYD3 activates the transcription of oncogenes and cell cycle genes in gastric and breast cancer cells. However, the contribution of SMYD3 in glioma tumorigenesis remains unknown. Here, we determined the expression of SMYD3 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that SMYD3 was overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with the glioma grade. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced SMYD3 expression promoted glioma LN-18 cell proliferation. Inhibition of SMYD3 expression in glioma T98G cells suppressed their anchorage‑independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that SMYD3 regulated the expression of p53 protein, which is essential in SMYD3‑induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that SMYD3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity through p53. Therefore, SMYD3 may be a new potential therapeutic target for human malignant glioma. PMID:26328527

  6. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yisong; Pan, Changcun; Meng, Guolu; Xiao, Xinru; Wu, Zhen; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-11-01

    SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) di- and tri-methyltransferase that forms a transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase II and plays an important role in early embryonic lineage commitment through the activation of lineage-specific genes. SMYD3 activates the transcription of oncogenes and cell cycle genes in gastric and breast cancer cells. However, the contribution of SMYD3 in glioma tumorigenesis remains unknown. Here, we determined the expression of SMYD3 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that SMYD3 was overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with the glioma grade. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced SMYD3 expression promoted glioma LN-18 cell proliferation. Inhibition of SMYD3 expression in glioma T98G cells suppressed their anchorage‑independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that SMYD3 regulated the expression of p53 protein, which is essential in SMYD3‑induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that SMYD3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity through p53. Therefore, SMYD3 may be a new potential therapeutic target for human malignant glioma.

  7. Aplysin induces apoptosis in glioma cells through HSP90/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, An-jing; Gong, Li-li; Yao, Wei-cheng; Ge, Na; Lu, Lu-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is one of the most common malignancies in the world. However, an effective regiment is lacking. Increasing evidence indicated that PI3K/AKT signaling is critical for the survival of glioma. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of aplysin on the survival and proliferation of GL26 glioma cells and the involved mechanisms. The data showed that aplysin suppressed the viability of glioma cells in both dose- and time-dependent manners. It also induced G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells. Western blot assays revealed that aplysin treatment changed p-AKT expression by impairing the formation of Heat shock protein 90/AKT complex. Aplysin significantly increased the survival time of mice-bearing glioma and reduced the weights of the established gliomas. Collectively, aplysin can inhibit the proliferation of GL26 glioma cells and induce apoptosis in vitro, perhaps through suppressing PI3K/AKT pathway. It can also inhibit glioma growth in vivo and prolong the survival of mice. Thus, aplysin may be a novel therapeutic drug for glioma. PMID:25377176

  8. Theory Of Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Johnston, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    Improved theory of radiation-induced attenuation of light in optical fibers accounts for effects of dose rates. Based on kinetic aspects of fundamental physics of color centers induced in optical fibers by radiation. Induced attenuation is proportional to density of color centers, and part of this density decays by thermal-annealing/recombination process after irradiation.

  9. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  10. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal Appearing White Matter in Patients with Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, V.; Tsien, C.I.; Chenevert, T.L.; Ross, B.D.; Lawrence, T.S.; Junck, L.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify radiation-induced changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) before, during and after radiation therapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor MRI. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. Temporal changes were assessed before, during, and till 45 weeks after start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water , fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ⊥) and parallel (λ∥) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, FA decreased and , λ∥, and λ⊥ increased linearly and significantly over time (p< 0.01). At 45 weeks after start of RT, λ⊥ increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, while λ∥ increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ⊥ and λ∥ were dose-dependent starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ⊥ and λ∥ were not sustained after 32 weeks indicating the transition from the focal to diffuse effects. Conclusions: The acute and sub-acute changes in normal appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. DT-MR imaging is potentially a marker for assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury. PMID:18313524

  11. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Vijaya Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  12. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Zircon occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and maintains much information on thermal history, metamorphic process and natural radiation dose accumulated in the mineral. U-Pb zircon dating (e.g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) image has been used for identification of internal zones and domains having different chemical compositions and/or structures with a high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is derived from various types of emission centers, which are derived from impurities such as rare earth elements (REE) and structural defects. In fact, the CL features of zircon are closely related to metamorphic process and radiation from contained radionuclides as well as geochemical condition of its formation. Most zircon has yellow emission, which seems to be assigned to UO2 centers or radiation-induced defect during metamictization of the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th. In this study, the radiation effects on zircon CL have been studied for He+ ion-implanted samples annealed at various temperatures to clarify radiation-induced defect centers involved with the yellow CL emission in zircon. Single crystals of zircon from Malawi (MZ), Takidani granodiorite (TZ) and Kurobegawa granite (KZ) were selected for He+ ion implantation experiments. The polished plates of the samples were implanted by He+ ion 4.0 MeV corresponding to energy of alpha particle from 238 U and 232Th. CL spectra in the range from 300 to 800 nm with 1 nm step were measured by a scanning electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL). CL spectra of untreated and annealed zircon show emission bands at ~370 nm assigned to intrinsic defect centers and at ~480, ~580 and ~760 nm to trivalent Dy impurity centers (Cesbron et al., 1995; Gaft et al, 2005). CL emissions in the yellow-region were observed in untreated zircon. The TZ and KZ indicate

  13. Combination Therapy for Gliomas Using Temozolomide and Interferon-Beta Secreting Human Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Ryu, Chung Heon; Kim, Mi Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Malignant gliomas are the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system and the prognosis of patients with gliomas is poor. The combination of interferon-bata (IFN-β) and temozolomide (TMZ) has shown significant additive antitumor effects in human glioma xenograft models. Considering that the poor survival of patients with human malignant gliomas relates partly to the inability to deliver therapeutic agents to the tumor, the tropism of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for malignant gliomas can be exploited to therapeutic advantages. We investigated the combination effects of TMZ and MSCs that secrete IFN-β on gliomas. Methods We engineered human MSCs to secret mouse IFN-β (MSC-IFN-β) via adenoviral transduction and confirmed their secretory capacity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to determine the effects of the combined TMZ and MSC-IFN-β treatment. Results In vitro, the combination of MSC-IFN-β and TMZ showed significantly enhanced antitumor effects in GL26 mouse glioma cells. In vivo, the combined MSC-IFN-β and TMZ therapy significantly reduced the tumor size and improved the survival rates compared to each treatment alone. Conclusion These results suggest that MSCs can be used as an effective delivery vehicle so that the combination of MSC-IFN-β and TMZ could be considered as a new option for the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:26113958

  14. Overview of current immunotherapeutic strategies for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Kamran, Neha; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro Ricardo; Castro, Maria Graciela

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies of immunotherapy for malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme) have brought new knowledge and new hope for improving the prognosis of this incurable disease. Some clinical trials have reached Phase III, following positive outcomes in Phase I and II, with respect to safety and immunological end points. Results are encouraging especially when considering the promise of sustained efficacy by inducing antitumor immunological memory. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of tumor-induced immune suppression led to the development of drugs targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints, which are used in active clinical trials for glioblastoma multiforme. Insights related to the heterogeneity of the disease bring new challenges for the management of glioma and underscore a likely cause of therapeutic failure. An emerging therapeutic strategy is represented by a combinatorial, personalized approach, including the standard of care: surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with added active immunotherapy and multiagent targeting of immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:26598957

  15. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  16. Pathophysiology of glioma cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Adn, Mahmoudreza; Saikali, Stephan; Guegan, Yvon; Hamlat, Abderrahmane

    2006-01-01

    Fluid filled cystic cavities are accompaniments of some cerebral gliomas. These tumoural cysts together with peritumoural vasogenic brain oedema add to the morbid effects of the gliomas in terms of mass effect and increased intracranial pressure. Although different mechanisms have been suggested as to the pathogenesis of glioma-associated cysts, it is still unclear why these cysts appear in only a limited number of cerebral gliomas while brain oedema, a probable precursor of glioma cysts, is a usual accompaniment of most gliomas. Here, the authors present a two-hit hypothesis of brain glioma cyst formation. We suggest that after the formation of vasogenic tumoural brain oedema, microvascular phenomena may lead to the formation of microcysts, which might later become confluent and grow to form macroscopic cysts. Progress in the understanding of pathogenesis of cerebral glioma cysts might set targets for treatment of brain edema and glioma cysts.

  17. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  18. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  19. Temozolomide/PLGA microparticles plus vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic glioma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Yue, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, He; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Min

    2010-11-01

    Temozolomide (TM) has anti-tumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. Implantable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles of TM (TM-MS) have been developed, enhancing the cytotoxicity of TM to Glioma C6 cells. Vatalanib, as anti-angiogenic agent, has also shown anti-tumor activity with malignant gliomas. We examined the combined effects of TM-MS and vatalanib in a rat orthotopic glioma model and found TM-MS offered a greater tumor inhibition than TM, and combination treatment with both of them improved the survival time versus single agent therapy. The combination treatment also demonstrated an inhibition to rat glioma tumors, a significant decrease in cell proliferation, an increase in apoptosis, and a lower microvessel density within the glioma tumors. The results suggest that TM-MS can more effectively inhibit tumor than TM, and combination treatment with TM-MS and vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis and may prove to be a promising therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:20816959

  20. microRNA-149 targets caspase-2 in glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenfeng; Wang, Jiwen; Chen, Huanjun; Yao, Yanli; Liu, Houbao; Ding, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common form of intrinsic primary brain tumors worldwide. Alterations in microRNAs play a role in highly invasive malignant glioma, but detail mechanism still unknown. In this study, the role and mechanism of microRNA-149 (miR-149) in glioma are investigated. We show that miR-149 is expressed at substantially higher levels in glioma than in normal tissues. Stable overexpression of miR-149 augments potent prosurvival activity, as evidenced by promotion of cell viability, inhibition of apoptosis, and induced xenografted tumor growth in vivo. We further show that Caspase-2 is identified as a functional target of miR-149 and expression of caspase-2 is inversely associated with miR-149 in vitro. In addition, miR-149 promotes tumor survival in the U87-MG and A172 cell lines and it targets caspase-2 via inactivation of the p53 and p21 pathways. There results support a special role for miR-149 by targeting Caspase-2 to impact on p53 signaling pathway. We speculate that miR-149 has distinct biological functions in p53 wild type cells and p53 mutation cells, and the mechanisms involved remain to be explored in future. Our study suggests that targeting miR-149 may be a novel therapy strategy for treating p53 wild type glioma tumors in humans. PMID:27049919

  1. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  2. MiR-129 triggers autophagic flux by regulating a novel Notch-1/ E2F7/Beclin-1 axis to impair the viability of human malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yingying; Lian, Haiwei; Tu, Huilin; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Peng, Biwen; Zhou, Beiyan; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of autophagy have been implicated in an increasing number of human cancers, including glioma. To date, there is a wealth of evidence indicating that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute significantly to autophagy in a variety of cancers. Previous studies have suggested that miR-129 functioned as an important inhibitor of the cell cycle and could promote the apoptosis of many cancer cell lines in vitro. Here, we reported that miR-129 acted as a potent inducer of autophagy. Forced expression of miR-129 could induce autophagic flux by targetedly suppressing Notch-1 in glioma cells. The autophagy induced by miR-129 could restrain the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and upregulate Beclin-1. Moreover, we demonstrated that E2F transcription factor 7 (E2F7) could also trigger autophagic flux by upregulating Beclin-1 and mediating miR-129-induced autophagy. Additionally, knockdown of Notch-1 could upregulate the expression of E2F7, whereas downregulation of E2F7 alleviated shNotch-1-induced autophagic flux. In particular, knockdown of endogenous Beclin-1 could effectively reduce autophagic flux stimulated by miR-129 and E2F7. Interestingly, upon attenuation of miR-129- or E2F7-triggered autophagic flux rescued cell viability suppressed by them. More importantly, intratumoral injection of pHAGE-miR-129 lentivirus in a nude mouse xenograft model significantly restrained tumor growth and triggered autophagy. In conclusion, these findings identify a new function for miR-129 as a potent inducer of autophagy through a novel Notch-1/E2F7/Beclin-1 axis in glioma. PMID:26824182

  3. Prospective, high-throughput molecular profiling of human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Tracy T.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Borger, Darrell; Stiles, Charles D.; Wang, Daphne L.; Curry, William T.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Ligon, Keith L.; Ellisen, Leif; Louis, David N.; Iafrate, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas consist of multiple histologic and molecular subtypes with different clinical phenotypes and responsiveness to treatment. However, enrollment criteria for clinical trials still largely do not take into account these underlying molecular differences. We have incorporated a high-throughput tumor genotyping program based on the ABI SNaPshot platform as well as other molecular diagnostic tests into the standard evaluation of glioma patients in order to assess whether prospective molecular profiling would allow rational patient selection onto clinical trials. From 218 gliomas we prospectively collected SNaPshot genotyping data on 68 mutated loci from 15 key cancer genes along with data from clinical assays for gene amplification (EGFR, PDGFRA, MET), 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation. SNaPshot mutations and focal gene amplifications were detected in 38.5 and 47.1 % of glioblastomas, respectively. Genetic alterations in EGFR, IDH1 and PIK3CA closely matched frequencies reported in recent studies. In addition, we identified events that are rare in gliomas although are known driver mutations in other cancer types, such as mutations of AKT1, BRAF and KRAS. Patients with genetic alterations that activate signaling pathways were enrolled onto genetically selective clinical trials for malignant glioma as well as for other solid cancers. High-throughput molecular profiling incorporated into the routine clinical evaluation of glioma patients may enable the rational selection of patients for targeted therapy clinical trials and thereby improve the likelihood that such trials succeed. PMID:22821383

  4. Ubiquitin-specific protease 28 is overexpressed in human glioblastomas and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity by regulating MYC expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengwu; Song, Qimin; Xue, Jian; Zhao, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC, which is dysregulated in the majority of gliomas, is difficult to target directly. Deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific protease 28 (USP28) stabilizes oncogenic factors, including MYC. However, the contribution of USP28 in tumorigenesis, particularly in glioma, is unknown. Here, we determined the expression of USP28 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that USP28 is overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of USP28 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with glioma grade. Meanwhile, the level of USP28 protein expression in human glioblastoma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced USP28 expression promotes SW1783 glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, gliomas that arose from USP28-transfected SW1783 cells displayed tumorigenicity in nude mouse model systems. Inhibition of USP28 expression in glioblastoma U373 cells suppressed anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, USP28 regulates the expression of MYC protein, which is essential in USP28-induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that USP28 is overexpressed in human glioblastomas and it contributes to glioma tumorigenicity. Therefore, USP28 could be a new target of therapy for human malignant glioma. PMID:26209720

  5. Ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes: on the role of cytosolic factors.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Zerihun; Van Laethem, An; Garmyn, Marjan; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2005-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidences have established solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation as the leading cause of skin cancers. Specifically, the frequency of non-melanoma skin cancer, one of the malignancies with the most rapidly increasing incidence, is directly related to the total exposure to solar UV light. As part of a general effort to elucidate the components of cellular signal transduction pathways, the mechanisms of cellular responses to UV radiation have received considerable attention over the last few years. These efforts were driven mainly by the conviction that understanding how normal cells respond to extracellular stimuli such as exposure to UV radiation will undoubtedly help in deciphering what goes wrong in a variety of clinical disorders including skin cancers and will assist in the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Studies over the last decade have established that UV radiation induces a bewildering array of signal transduction pathways, some of which could lead to apoptotic cell death. UV-induced cell death by apoptosis is considered to be a natural protective mechanism that removes damaged keratinocytes and circumvents the risk of malignant transformation. In this review, we summarize some of the most important findings regarding the response and role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in UVA and UVB radiation-induced signaling to apoptosis in keratinocytes. We will also briefly discuss what is known about the role of the BCL-2 family of proteins, the emerging role of lysosomal proteases and other important cytosolic signaling proteins in UV-induced apoptosis.

  6. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  7. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  8. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  9. Regulation of glioma cell phenotype in 3D matrices by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Pedron, Sara; Becka, Eftalda; Harley, Brendan A C

    2013-10-01

    Human glioblastoma multiforme (hGBM) is the most common, aggressive, and deadly form of brain cancer. A major obstacle to understanding the impact of extracellular cues on glioblastoma invasion is the absence of model matrix systems able to replicate compositional and structural elements of the glioma mass as well as the surrounding brain tissue. Contact with a primary extracellular matrix component in the brain, hyaluronan, is believed to play a pivotal role in glioma cell invasion and malignancy. In this study we report use of gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogel platforms to evaluate the effect of extracellular (composition, mechanics, HA incorporation) and intracellular (epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression) factors on the malignant transformation of U87MG glioma cells. Three-dimensional culture platforms elicit significantly different responses of U87MG glioma cells versus standard 2D culture. Critically, grafting brain-mimetic hyaluronic acid (HA) into the hydrogel network was found to induce significant, dose-dependent alterations of markers of glioma malignancy versus non-grafted 3D gelatin or PEG hydrogels. Clustering of glioma cells was observed exclusively in HA containing gels and expression profiles of malignancy-associated genes were found to vary biphasically with incorporated HA content. We also found HA-induced expression of MMP-2 is blocked by +EGFR signaling, suggesting a connection between CD44 and EGFR in glioma malignancy. Together, this work describes an adaptable platform for manipulating the local extracellular microenvironment surrounding glioma cells and highlights the importance of developing such systems for investigating the etiology and early growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. PMID:23827186

  10. MiR-203 sensitizes glioma cells to temozolomide and inhibits glioma cell invasion by targeting E2F3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guodong; Wu, Jun; Xiao, Gelei; Huo, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant and fatal primary tumor in the central nervous system in adults. Recent data has suggested a profound role for microRNAs (miRs) in cancer progression. The present study demonstrated, via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, that miR-203 expression was markedly lower in highly invasive U87MG glioma cells and glioma tissues. Wound healing and Transwell assays demonstrated that restoration of miR-203 expression inhibited U87MG cell migration and invasion. Restoration of miR-203 expression additionally sensitized the cells to temozolomide (TMZ) as determined by MTS assay. By contrast, miR-203 inhibition in A172 cells exerted opposite effects. Bioinformatic analysis combined with experimental analysis revealed that miR-203 directly targeted E2F3 via the conserved miR-203 target site within the E2F3 3'-untranslational region. E2F3 knockdown with specific small hairpin RNA also inhibited U87MG cell migration and invasion, and sensitized them to TMZ. Importantly, miR-203 and E2F3 showed inverse expression patterns in invasive glioma tissues, as demonstrated by qPCR and luciferase assay. These results suggested that miR-203 may function as a tumor suppressor in glioma progression and that the miR-203/E2F3 axis may be a novel candidate in the development of rational therapeutic strategies for glioma.

  11. KIF23 is an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma, transcriptionally regulated by TCF-4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihua; Zhang, Chuanbao; Yang, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Hongjun; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Tao

    2016-04-26

    Kinesin family member 23 (KIF23), a nuclear protein and a key regulator of cellular cytokinesis, has been found to be overexpressed as an oncogene in glioma. However, the prognostic and clinicopathological features of glioma with KIF23 expression was not clear yet. Here, we analyzed KIF23 expression pattern by using whole genome mRNA expression microarray data from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) database (http://www.cgga.org.cn), and found that KIF23 overexpression was significantly associated with high grade glioma as well as the higher mortality in survival analysis (log-rank test, p<0.01). The results of the three other validation datasets showed similar findings. Furthermore, KIF23 also served as an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma patients. Finally, functional assay showed that reduction of KIF23 suppressed glioma cell proliferation both in vivo and vitro. Additionally, we found that KIF23 was regulated by TCF-4 at transcriptionally level. Therefore, this evidence indicates KIF23 over-expression is associated with glioma malignancy and conferred a worse survival time in glioma, which suggests KIF23 is a new novel prognostic biomarker with potential therapeutic implications in glioma. PMID:27013586

  12. KIF23 is an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma, transcriptionally regulated by TCF-4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Hongjun; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin family member 23 (KIF23), a nuclear protein and a key regulator of cellular cytokinesis, has been found to be overexpressed as an oncogene in glioma. However, the prognostic and clinicopathological features of glioma with KIF23 expression was not clear yet. Here, we analyzed KIF23 expression pattern by using whole genome mRNA expression microarray data from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) database (http://www.cgga.org.cn), and found that KIF23 overexpression was significantly associated with high grade glioma as well as the higher mortality in survival analysis (log-rank test, p<0.01). The results of the three other validation datasets showed similar findings. Furthermore, KIF23 also served as an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma patients. Finally, functional assay showed that reduction of KIF23 suppressed glioma cell proliferation both in vivo and vitro. Additionally, we found that KIF23 was regulated by TCF-4 at transcriptionally level. Therefore, this evidence indicates KIF23 over-expression is associated with glioma malignancy and conferred a worse survival time in glioma, which suggests KIF23 is a new novel prognostic biomarker with potential therapeutic implications in glioma. PMID:27013586

  13. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  14. GSK-3β regulates tumor growth and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhumei; Li, Charlie; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xue; Jiang, Chengfei; Qian, Xu; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Ding, Lianshu; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioma accounts for the majority of primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Methods Glioma specimens and normal brain tissues were analyzed for the expression levels of GSK-3β and p-GSK-3β (Ser9) by tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Western blotting. Glioma cells over-expressing GSK-3β were used to analyze biological functions both in vitro and in vivo. Results The levels of p-GSK-3β (Ser9), but not total GSK-3β, are significantly up-regulated in glioma tissues compared to normal tissues, and are significantly correlated with the glioma grades. Ectopic expression of GSK-3β decreased the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K1; and inhibited β-catenin, HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Forced expression of GSK-3β in glioma cells significantly inhibited both tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Conclusions These results reveal that GSK-3β regulates mTOR/p70S6K1 signaling pathway and inhibits glioma progression in vivo; its inactivation via p-GSK-3β (Ser9) is associated with glioma development, which is new mechanism that may be helpful in developing GSK-3β-based treatment of glioma in the future. PMID:26388612

  15. Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Kohanbash, Gary; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Hoji, Aki; Ueda, Ryo; Fujita, Mitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective immunotherapy strategies for glioma requires adequate understanding of the unique immunological microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) and CNS tumors. Although the CNS is often considered to be an immunologically privileged site and poses unique challenges for the delivery of effector cells and molecules, recent advances in technology and discoveries in CNS immunology suggest novel mechanisms that may significantly improve the efficacy of immunotherapy against gliomas. In this review, we first summarize recent advances in the CNS and CNS tumor immunology. We address factors that may promote immune escape of gliomas. We also review advances in passive and active immunotherapy strategies for glioma, with an emphasis on lessons learned from recent early-phase clinical trials. We also discuss novel immunotherapy strategies that have been recently tested in non-CNS tumors and show great potential for application to gliomas. Finally, we discuss how each of these promising strategies can be combined to achieve clinical benefit for patients with gliomas. PMID:19348609

  16. Radiotherapy-Induced Malignancies: Review of Clinical Features, Pathobiology, and Evolving Approaches for Mitigating Risk

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Steve; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant effects of radiation therapy on normal tissues is mutagenesis, which is the basis for radiation-induced malignancies. Radiation-induced malignancies are late complications arising after radiotherapy, increasing in frequency among survivors of both pediatric and adult cancers. Genetic backgrounds harboring germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes are recognized risk factors. Some success has been found with using genome wide association studies to identify germline polymorphisms associated with susceptibility. The insights generated by genetics, epidemiology, and the development of experimental models are defining potential strategies to offer to individuals at risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Concurrent technological efforts are developing novel radiotherapy delivery to reduce irradiation of normal tissues, and thereby, to mitigate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies. The goal of this review is to discuss epidemiologic, modeling, and radiotherapy delivery data, where these lines of research intersect and their potential impact on patient care. PMID:23565507

  17. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  18. Radiation-induced reactions in polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscoglio, Michael Benedict

    Since the 1950's, there has been a considerable interest in the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of polymer systems. Radiation induced chemical changes that were found to be helpful in producing specialty polymers, but also potentially harmful by degrading the physical performance of the material. Therefore, solute molecules, which act as excited state quenchers, and free radical scavengers, have been incorporated into the polymers in order to regulate the crosslinking, scission and desaturation reactions. This work is focused on using spectroscopic techniques to characterize the physical properties of polymeric media and the reactions occurring within them following pulsed radiolysis. This is done primarily by using arene doped polymer films which have highly absorbing excited states and radical ions that are easily monitored by transient studies. The probes are used to characterize the polymeric microenvironment, to monitor reaction rates, and to interfere in the radical reactions. Photophysical and photochemical characterization of partially crystalline polyethylene complements data previously obtained by conventional physical techniques for polymer characterization. Probe molecules are excluded from crystalline zones and distributed in a networked structure of amorphous zones. Upon high energy radiolysis, it is found that polyolefin systems efficiently donate all radical ions and excited states to the solute molecules, even when the energy is absorbed within the polymer crystalline zones. Studies of the subsequent reactions of the solute excited states and radical ions reveal information about their long term effectiveness as protectants. It is found that highly excited states formed by the recombination of solute radical ions are energetic enough to cause dissociation of halo-arenes. Also, arenes are found to become attached to the polymer chain through a polymer-aryl radical intermediate. These intermediates have been isolated and

  19. Silencing of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene enhances glioma radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Youl; Yoo, Young Hyun; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •Silencing of the IDPm gene enhances IR-induced autophagy in glioma cells. •Autophagy inhibition augmented apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells. •Results offer a redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are elevated in organisms that have been exposed to ionizing radiation and are protagonists in the induction of cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage are primary functions of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) via the supply of NADPH for antioxidant systems. In the present study, we report an autophagic response to ionizing radiation in A172 glioma cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the IDPm gene. Autophagy in A172 transfectant cells was associated with enhanced autophagolysosome formation and GFP–LC3 punctuation/aggregation. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine augmented apoptotic cell death of irradiated A172 cells transfected with IDPm siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy functions as a survival mechanism in A172 cells against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and the sensitizing effect of IDPm siRNA and autophagy inhibitor on the ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death of glioma cells offers a novel redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Altered expression of connexin43 and phosphorylation connexin43 in glioma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin-Yun; Jiang, Qiu-Hua; Hong, Tao; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Rui-Jin; Huang, Jin-Qing; Hu, Kun; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the connexin (Cx43) and phosphorylation Cx43 (p-Cx43) expression of human glioma tumors and correlate their expression with degrees of malignancy and proliferation, apoptosis, and migration activity of tumors. Cx43 and p-Cx43 expression were examined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The U251 cell viability was measured by MTT analysis. The apoptosis and migration were also evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and fluoroblok transwell chambers, respectively. We found that the Cx43 expression were significantly downregulated in in malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) and the p-Cx43 expression levels of malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV) were significantly increased (P<0.05), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) at immunohistochemical analysis. After treatment of cells with a specific inhibitor of PKC, MAPK, and PTK inhibitors, the cell viability and migration were significantly decreased, while the apoptosis was slightly induced. In conclusion, the Cx43 expression level is inversely correlated with the tumor grade and proliferation and migration activity of tumor. Higher p-Cx43 expression level in high tumor grade suggests that a complex mechanism is involved in the suppression of tumor growth by connexins. PMID:26191122

  1. MicroRNA-544 inhibits glioma proliferation, invasion and migration but induces cell apoptosis by targeting PARK7

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shiguang; Dai, Yan; Li, Cheng; Fang, Xiao; Han, Huijing; Wang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a common type of primary brain tumor. The survival rate in people with malignant gliomas is extremely low associated with the lack of effective treatment. Here, we firstly observed that miR-544 expression is downregulated in glioma tissues and its overexpression in glioma cell line dramatically reduces cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, we found that the tumor growth in nude mouse was as well inhibited by miR-544 overexpressed in glioma cell. Our further investigation showed that the inhibitor role of miR-544 in tumor development was related to the downregulated expression of Park7 gene which has been demonstrated as a functional downstream target of miR-544. Thus, our discovery suggested that miR-544 might used as a therapeutic reagent for the treatment of glioma in the future. PMID:27186306

  2. MicroRNA-544 inhibits glioma proliferation, invasion and migration but induces cell apoptosis by targeting PARK7.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shiguang; Dai, Yan; Li, Cheng; Fang, Xiao; Han, Huijing; Wang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a common type of primary brain tumor. The survival rate in people with malignant gliomas is extremely low associated with the lack of effective treatment. Here, we firstly observed that miR-544 expression is downregulated in glioma tissues and its overexpression in glioma cell line dramatically reduces cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, we found that the tumor growth in nude mouse was as well inhibited by miR-544 overexpressed in glioma cell. Our further investigation showed that the inhibitor role of miR-544 in tumor development was related to the downregulated expression of Park7 gene which has been demonstrated as a functional downstream target of miR-544. Thus, our discovery suggested that miR-544 might used as a therapeutic reagent for the treatment of glioma in the future.

  3. Melatonergic system-based two-gene index is prognostic in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kinker, Gabriela S; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia E; Muxel, Sandra M; Marie, Suely K N; Markus, Regina P; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas, the most common primary brain tumors in adults, are classified into four malignancy grades according to morphological features. Recent studies have shown that melatonin treatment induces cytotoxicity in glioma-initiating cells and reduces the invasion and migration of glioma cell lines, inhibiting the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) oncopathway. Given that C6 rat glioma cells produce melatonin, we investigated the correlation between the capacity of gliomas to synthesize/metabolize melatonin and their overall malignancy. We first characterized the melatonergic system of human gliomas cell lines with different grades of aggressiveness (HOG, T98G, and U87MG) and demonstrated that glioma-synthesized melatonin exerts an autocrine antiproliferative effect. Accordingly, the sensitivity to exogenous melatonin was higher for the most aggressive cell line, U87MG, which synthesized/accumulated less melatonin. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseq data of 351 glioma patients, we designed a predictive model of the content of melatonin in the tumor microenvironment, the ASMT:CYP1B1 index, combining the gene expression levels of melatonin synthesis and metabolism enzymes. The ASMT:CYP1B1 index negatively correlated with tumor grade, as well as with the expression of pro-proliferation and anti-apoptotic NFκB target genes. More importantly, the index was a grade- and histological type-independent prognostic factor. Even when considering only high-grade glioma patients, a low ASMT:CYP1B1 value, which suggests decreased melatonin and enhanced aggressiveness, was strongly associated with poor survival. Overall, our data reveal the prognostic value of the melatonergic system of gliomas and provide insights into the therapeutic role of melatonin. PMID:26510398

  4. Secondary Malignancy Risk Following Proton Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Bree R.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced secondary malignancies are a significant, yet uncommon cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. Secondary malignancy risk is dependent upon multiple factors including patient age, the biological and genetic predisposition of the individual, the volume and location of tissue irradiated, and the dose of radiation received. Proton therapy (PRT) is an advanced particle therapy with unique dosimetric properties resulting in reduced entrance dose and minimal to no exit dose when compared with standard photon radiation therapy. Multiple dosimetric studies in varying cancer subtypes have demonstrated that PRT enables the delivery of adequate target volume coverage with reduced integral dose delivered to surrounding tissues, and modeling studies taking into account dosimetry and radiation cell biology have estimated a significantly reduced risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy with PRT. Clinical data are emerging supporting the lower incidence of secondary malignancies after PRT compared with historical photon data, though longer follow-up in proton treated cohorts is awaited. This article reviews the current dosimetric and clinical literature evaluating the incidence of and risk factors associated with radiation-induced secondary malignancy following PRT. PMID:26636040

  5. Glioma-initiating cells and molecular pathology: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Atsushi; Kinjo, Sayano; Yuki, Kanako; Kato, Takenori; Ohno, Masasuke; Motomura, Kazuya; Iwami, Kenichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gliomas harbor a small population of cells, termed glioma-initiating cells (GICs), characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. The development of therapeutic strategies targeted toward GIC signaling may improve the treatment of malignant gliomas. The characterization of GICs provides a clue to elucidating histological heterogeneity and treatment failure. The role of the stem cell marker CD133 in the initiation and progression of brain tumors is still uncertain. Here, we review some of the signaling mechanisms involved in GIC biology, such as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), sonic hedgehog, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways, maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), BMI1, and Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling. In addition, we discuss the role of microRNAs in GICs by focusing on microRNA-21 regulation by type I interferon.

  6. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  7. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  8. The epidemiology of glioma in adults: a “state of the science” review

    PubMed Central

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; Bauchet, Luc; Davis, Faith G.; Deltour, Isabelle; Fisher, James L.; Langer, Chelsea Eastman; Pekmezci, Melike; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Turner, Michelle C.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing 81% of malignant brain tumors. Although relatively rare, they cause significant mortality and morbidity. Glioblastoma, the most common glioma histology (∼45% of all gliomas), has a 5-year relative survival of ∼5%. A small portion of these tumors are caused by Mendelian disorders, including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genomic analyses of glioma have also produced new evidence about risk and prognosis. Recently discovered biomarkers that indicate improved survival include O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and a glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified heritable risk alleles within 7 genes that are associated with increased risk of glioma. Many risk factors have been examined as potential contributors to glioma risk. Most significantly, these include an increase in risk by exposure to ionizing radiation and a decrease in risk by history of allergies or atopic disease(s). The potential influence of occupational exposures and cellular phones has also been examined, with inconclusive results. We provide a “state of the science” review of current research into causes and risk factors for gliomas in adults. PMID:24842956

  9. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gliomas using chlorotoxin-based bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongjun; Zhao, Jinhua; Qiao, Wenli; Chen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastoma multiforme, are the most widely distributed and deadliest brain tumors because of their resistance to surgical and medical treatment. Research of glioma-specific bioconjugates for diagnosis and therapy developed rapidly during the past several years. Many studies have demonstrated that chlorotoxin (CTX) and Buthus martensii Karsch chlorotoxin (BmK CT) specifically inhibited glioma cells growth and metastasis, and accelerated tumor apoptosis. The bioconjugates of CTX or BmK CT with other molecules have played an increasing role in diagnostic imaging and treatment of gliomas. To date, CTX-based bioconjugates have achieved great success in phase I/II clinical trials about safety profiles. Here, we will provide a review on the important role of ion channels in the underlying mechanisms of gliomas invasive growth and how CTX suppresses gliomas proliferation and migration. We will summarize the recent advances in the applications of CTX bioconjugates for gliomas diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we will review recent studies on BmK CT bioconjugates and compare their efficacies with CTX derivatives. Finally, we will address advantages and challenges in the use of CTX or BmK CT bioconjugates as specific agents for theranostic applications in gliomas.

  10. miR-101 inhibits glioma cell invasion via the downregulation of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyang; Zheng, Chuanyi; Bai, Enqi; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary tumor of the central nervous system. The present study aimed to demonstrate the role of miR-101 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the initiation and development of glioma. The expression of miR-101 and COX-2 in normal and malignant human glial cells and tissues was determined by western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The role of miR-101 on COX-2 expression was evaluated by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-101 and COX-2 in glioma cell proliferation and invasion was verified by CCK-8 test and Transwell assays, respectively. The present study demonstrated that miR-101 expression was downregulated while COX-2 was upregulated in glioma tissues and cells. Furthermore, transfection of miR-101 significantly downregulated COX-2 expression in both U373 and U87 glioma cells. In addition, further experiments revealed that overexpression of miR-101 resulted in significant inhibition of the in vitro proliferation and migration of glioma cells, and the in vivo growth of established tumors. Direct downregulation of COX-2 by transfection with corresponding small interfering RNA also inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells. These results indicate that downregulation of miR-101 is involved in the initiation and development of glioma via COX-2 upregulation.

  11. Transferrin modified PEG-PLA-resveratrol conjugates: in vitro and in vivo studies for glioma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wanhua; Li, Aimei; Jia, Zhijun; Yuan, Yi; Dai, Haifeng; Li, Hongxiu

    2013-10-15

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with a poor prognosis. In this study, we examined the effects of transferrin (Tf)-modified poly ethyleneglycol-poly lactic acid (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles conjugated with resveratrol (Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV) to glioma therapy in vitro and in vivo. The cell viability of Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV on C6 and U87 glioma cells was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity were investigated in Brain glioma bearing rat model of C6 glioma by i.p. administration of RSV-polymer conjugates. We found that the average diameter of each Tf-PEG-PLA-RSV is around 150 nm with 32 molecules of Tf on surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of PEG-PLA-RSV against C6 and U87 cells was higher than that of free RSV, and further the modification of Tf enhanced the cytotoxicity of the RSV-polymer conjugates as a result of the increased cellular uptake of the RSV-modified conjugates by glioma cells. In comparison with free RSV, RSV conjugates could significantly decrease tumor volume and accumulate in brain tumor, which resulted in prolonging the survival of C6 glioma-bearing rats. These results suggest that Tf-NP-RSV had a potential of therapeutic effect to glioma both in vitro and in vivo and might be a potential candidate for targeted therapy of glioma and worthy of further investigation.

  12. miR-101 inhibits glioma cell invasion via the downregulation of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyang; Zheng, Chuanyi; Bai, Enqi; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary tumor of the central nervous system. The present study aimed to demonstrate the role of miR-101 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the initiation and development of glioma. The expression of miR-101 and COX-2 in normal and malignant human glial cells and tissues was determined by western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The role of miR-101 on COX-2 expression was evaluated by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-101 and COX-2 in glioma cell proliferation and invasion was verified by CCK-8 test and Transwell assays, respectively. The present study demonstrated that miR-101 expression was downregulated while COX-2 was upregulated in glioma tissues and cells. Furthermore, transfection of miR-101 significantly downregulated COX-2 expression in both U373 and U87 glioma cells. In addition, further experiments revealed that overexpression of miR-101 resulted in significant inhibition of the in vitro proliferation and migration of glioma cells, and the in vivo growth of established tumors. Direct downregulation of COX-2 by transfection with corresponding small interfering RNA also inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells. These results indicate that downregulation of miR-101 is involved in the initiation and development of glioma via COX-2 upregulation. PMID:27698824

  13. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gliomas using chlorotoxin-based bioconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yongjun; Zhao, Jinhua; Qiao, Wenli; Chen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastoma multiforme, are the most widely distributed and deadliest brain tumors because of their resistance to surgical and medical treatment. Research of glioma-specific bioconjugates for diagnosis and therapy developed rapidly during the past several years. Many studies have demonstrated that chlorotoxin (CTX) and Buthus martensii Karsch chlorotoxin (BmK CT) specifically inhibited glioma cells growth and metastasis, and accelerated tumor apoptosis. The bioconjugates of CTX or BmK CT with other molecules have played an increasing role in diagnostic imaging and treatment of gliomas. To date, CTX-based bioconjugates have achieved great success in phase I/II clinical trials about safety profiles. Here, we will provide a review on the important role of ion channels in the underlying mechanisms of gliomas invasive growth and how CTX suppresses gliomas proliferation and migration. We will summarize the recent advances in the applications of CTX bioconjugates for gliomas diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we will review recent studies on BmK CT bioconjugates and compare their efficacies with CTX derivatives. Finally, we will address advantages and challenges in the use of CTX or BmK CT bioconjugates as specific agents for theranostic applications in gliomas. PMID:25143859

  14. Mcl-1 downregulation sensitizes glioma to bortezomib-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaobo; Hou, Kun; Zhao, Jinchuan; Han, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaona

    2015-05-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor, with dismal patient outcome and no effective therapeutic approaches available. Targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has recently emerged as a potent rational anticancer strategy. Bortezomib, a specific proteasome inhibitor, has been approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies as a single agent or as part of a combination therapy. However, bortezomib alone or in combination showed only minimal effects in the treatment of solid tumors. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is an anti-apoptotic protein which protects tumor cells against spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. In multiple myeloma, specific downregulation of Mcl-1 induces apoptosis. Furthermore, previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors induce Mcl-1 accumulation that, in turn, slows down their pro-apoptotic effects, and the cell survival in multiple myeloma is highly dependent on Mcl-1. In the present study, we investigated the role of Mcl-1 downregulation in bortezomib-induced apoptosis in gliomas. We observed that bortezomib triggers caspase-3 and PARP activation, upregulates cytochrome c expression and induces apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that effective targeting of Mcl-1 in glioma cells by gene silencing technology augments the glioma cell sensitivity to bortezomib-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Mcl-1 plays a critical role in bortezomib-induced apoptosis. Mcl-1 inhibitor in combination with bortezomib present a promising novel strategy to trigger cell death pathways in the treatment of gliomas.

  15. Chemotherapy for gliomas in mainland China: An overview

    PubMed Central

    SAI, KE; YANG, QUN-YING; SHEN, DONG; CHEN, ZHONG-PING

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is currently the standard treatment modality for malignant gliomas. Many patients with gliomas are treated in mainland China every year. The history and development of chemotherapy for glioma, however, are not well documented. In this study, an extensive literature search of Pubmed and major Chinese electronic databases was performed to identify clinical studies. A total of 210 publications were identified, with a total of 10,105 patients. Among these studies, 76.2% were retrospective and 23.8% were prospective. Chemotherapy was found to have been administered by the Department of Neurosurgery in 143 studies (68.1%). Oral or intravenous administration was found in 55.7% of studies, followed by intra-arterial (26.7%) and interstitial (15.7%) chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas were the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agents, as found in 133 studies (63.3%). Since 2003, 56 studies on temozolomide (TMZ) have been published. Studies on chemotherapy for gliomas began in the 1970s in mainland China but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rare. Much effort and collaboration should be made to carry out high-quality multicenter RCTs on chemotherapy for gliomas. PMID:23761809

  16. Roles of microRNA-99 family in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyu; Guo, Yong; Wu, Jun; Chen, Fenghua; Dai, Zhijie; Fan, Shuangshi; Li, Pengcheng; Song, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deregulation of microRNA (miR)-99 family members (miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100) has been reported to play a crucial role in many cancer types. However, their roles in human gliomas have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the expression patterns of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in glioma tissues and to evaluate their expression profiles with respect to tumor progression. Methods Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in glioma and matched non-neoplastic brain tissues. Then, the associations of their expression with various clinicopathological features of glioma patients were statistically analyzed. Moreover, the roles of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in regulating glioma cell migration and invasion were determined via transwell assay in vitro. Results Compared with non-neoplastic brain tissues, miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 expression levels were all significantly decreased in glioma tissues (all P<0.001). miR-99a-low, miR-99b-low, and miR-100-low expression more frequently occurred in glioma patients with low Karnofsky performance score (<90) and high World Health Organization grade (III–IV). Further functional experiments revealed that the enforced expression of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 resulted in the inhibition of cellular migration and invasion in glioma cells. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the aberrant expression of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 may be a common feature in human gliomas with aggressive clinicopathological features and may participate in malignant phenotypes of the tumors. These findings highlight the potential of the three miR-99 family members as novel therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:27382299

  17. Golgi Phosphoprotein 3 Inhibits the Apoptosis of Human Glioma Cells in Part by Downregulating N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Li, Mengyou; Tian, Xiuli; Li, QingZhe; Lu, Qingyang; Yan, Jinqiang; Jia, Qingbin; Zhang, Lianqun; Li, Xueyuan; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Background Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) has been reported to be involved in the development of several human cancers. Our previous study showed that GOLPH3 expression in glioma tissues was related to the severity of the malignancy of the cancer. However, the mechanism by which GOLPH3 affects cell apoptosis is largely unknown. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism of GOLPH3 in cell apoptosis. Material/Methods To analyze the biological role of GOLPH3 in glioma cells, we used GOLPH3 small interference RNA in apoptosis of glioma cells. The apoptosis of glioma cells was detected by flow cytometry. The expression level of GOLPH3 and NDRG1 protein was determined by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, to evaluate their association with glioma. Tumor tissues were collected from patients with glioma. Normal cerebral tissues were acquired from cerebral trauma patients undergoing internal decompression surgery. Results We confirm that the decrease of GOLPH3 that promotes the apoptosis of glioma cells may be regulated by the activation of NDRG1 and cleaved capcase 3. There was a inverse association between GOLPH3 and NDRG1 in glioma samples. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GOLPH3 and NDRG1 both play an important role in glioma etiology. Either GOLPH3 or NDRG1 might be a potential candidate for malignant glioma therapy. PMID:27698340

  18. Anti-gliomas Effect of Chlorotoxin-Conjugated Onconase at High Dose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Guo, Zhanyun

    2015-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are rarely curable malignant tumors in the central nervous system. Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a peptide derived from scorpion venom, which can selectively target malignant gliomas. Onconase (Onc) is a small cytotoxic ribonuclease derived from frogspawn that exhibits cytotoxicity against some tumor cells. In the present study, we found that CTX-conjugated Onc (CTX-Onc) shows better anti-tumor effect than the physical mixture of CTX and Onc (CTX + Onc) on the nude mice carrying subcutaneous glioblastoma cell-derived tumor. However, CTX-Onc does not show dose-dependent anti-tumor effect. In addition, apoptosis in tumor tissue does not show significant difference between the treatment groups. Our results confirmed that CTX-Onc has better anti-tumor effect than CTX + Onc and suggest that it can be potentially used for glioma therapy. PMID:27352327

  19. Anti-gliomas Effect of Chlorotoxin-Conjugated Onconase at High Dose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomin; Guo, Zhanyun

    2015-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are rarely curable malignant tumors in the central nervous system. Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a peptide derived from scorpion venom, which can selectively target malignant gliomas. Onconase (Onc) is a small cytotoxic ribonuclease derived from frogspawn that exhibits cytotoxicity against some tumor cells. In the present study, we found that CTX-conjugated Onc (CTX-Onc) shows better anti-tumor effect than the physical mixture of CTX and Onc (CTX + Onc) on the nude mice carrying subcutaneous glioblastoma cell-derived tumor. However, CTX-Onc does not show dose-dependent anti-tumor effect. In addition, apoptosis in tumor tissue does not show significant difference between the treatment groups. Our results confirmed that CTX-Onc has better anti-tumor effect than CTX + Onc and suggest that it can be potentially used for glioma therapy.

  20. Survivin and gliomas: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Rosilin Kotakkathu; Torp, Sverre Helge

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor, the diagnosis of which is challenging. In this respect, the use of immunohistochemical proliferation markers may aid diagnosis; survivin, also known as Baculoviral IAP Repeat Containing 5, is one such marker. Survivin is a unique member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein gene family, and is known for its dual function as an apoptosis inhibitor and mitosis regulator. Furthermore, survivin has been demonstrated to be overexpressed in a number of malignancies. The purpose of the present literature review was to gain an overview of studies published on the diagnostic and/or prognostic use of survivin in gliomas. Using PubMed, 19 studies matching the inclusion criteria were ultimately included in the present review. The majority of the studies identified revealed that survivin was significantly associated with other proliferation markers, histological malignancy grade, and inversely associated with prognosis. However, there were a number of inconsistencies between studies, which suggests a requirement for standardization of immunohistochemical procedures. PMID:27588117

  1. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  2. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    microcancers, arresting preneoplastic lesions, or correcting abnormal environments which predispose to high risk of malignant transformation.

  3. The Role of Alveolar Epithelium in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11–13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24–36 Gy) of 137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:23326473

  4. Differential expression and localization of TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Groft, L L; Muzik, H; Rewcastle, N B; Johnston, R N; Knäuper, V; Lafleur, M A; Forsyth, P A; Edwards, D R

    2001-01-01

    Studies have suggested that an imbalance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) may contribute to the malignant phenotype of gliomas. In this study, we have undertaken a detailed analysis of expression of the TIMP family in normal human brain and malignant gliomas at both the mRNA and protein level. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of total RNA from surgical tumour specimens revealed unique expression patterns for the 4 members of the TIMP family, with TIMP-1 and -4 showing positive and negative correlations, respectively, with glioma malignancy. By RT-PCR, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expression did not change with tumour grade. In situ hybridization localized TIMP-1 to glial tumour cells and also to the surrounding tumour vasculature. TIMP-4 transcripts were predominantly localized to tumour cells, though minor expression was found in vessels. Recombinant TIMP-4 reduced invasion of U251 glioma cells through Matrigel, and U87 clones overexpressing TIMP-4 showed reduced invasive capacity in vitro. TIMP-4, but not TIMP-1, blocked Membrane Type-1-MMP-mediated progelatinase-A (MMP-2) activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The differential expression and localization of individual TIMPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of human malignant gliomas, particularly with regard to tumour vascularization. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437402

  5. Braf Mutations Initiate the Development of Rat Gliomas Induced by Postnatal Exposure to N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Satomi, Kaishi; Oh, Ji Eun; Hutter, Barbara; Brors, Benedikt; Diessl, Nicolle; Liu, Hai-Kun; Wolf, Stephan; Wiestler, Otmar; Kleihues, Paul; Koelsch, Bernd; Kindler-Röhrborn, Andrea; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-10-01

    A single dose of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) during late prenatal or early postnatal development induces a high incidence of malignant schwannomas and gliomas in rats. Although T->A mutations in the transmembrane domain of the Neu (c-ErbB-2) gene are the driver mutations in ENU-induced malignant schwannomas, the molecular basis of ENU-induced gliomas remains enigmatic. We performed whole-genome sequencing of gliomas that developed in three BDIV and two BDIX rats exposed to a single dose of 80 mg ENU/kg body weight on postnatal day one. T:A->A:T and T:A->C:G mutations, which are typical for ENU-induced mutagenesis, were predominant (41% to 55% of all somatic single nucleotide mutations). T->A mutations were identified in all five rat gliomas at Braf codon 545 (V545E), which corresponds to the human BRAF V600E. Additional screening revealed that 33 gliomas in BDIV rats and 12 gliomas in BDIX rats all carried a Braf V545E mutation, whereas peritumoral brain tissue of either strain had the wild-type sequence. The gliomas were immunoreactive to BRAF V600E antibody. These results indicate that Braf mutation is a frequent early event in the development of rat gliomas caused by a single dose of ENU. PMID:27658714

  6. High levels of WNT-5A in human glioma correlate with increased presence of tumor-associated microglia/monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dijksterhuis, Jacomijn P; Arthofer, Elisa; Marinescu, Voichita D; Nelander, Sven; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Frederik; Mulder, Jan; Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-12-10

    Malignant gliomas are among the most severe types of cancer, and the most common primary brain tumors. Treatment options are limited and the prognosis is poor. WNT-5A, a member of the WNT family of lipoglycoproteins, plays a role in oncogenesis and tumor progression in various cancers, whereas the role of WNT-5A in glioma remains obscure. Based on the role of WNT-5A as an oncogene, its potential to regulate microglia cells and the glioma-promoting capacities of microglia cells, we hypothesize that WNT-5A has a role in regulation of immune functions in glioma. We investigated WNT-5A expression by in silico analysis of the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) transcript profiling of human glioblastoma samples and immunohistochemistry experiments of human glioma tissue microarrays (TMA). Our results reveal higher WNT-5A protein levels and mRNA expression in a subgroup of gliomas (WNT-5A(high)) compared to non-malignant control brain tissue. Furthermore, we show a significant correlation between WNT-5A in the tumor and presence of major histocompatibility complex Class II-positive microglia/monocytes. Our data pinpoint a positive correlation between WNT-5A and a proinflammatory signature in glioma. We identify increased presence of microglia/monocytes as an important aspect in the inflammatory transformation suggesting a novel role for WNT-5A in human glioma.

  7. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  9. Silencing Egr1 Attenuates Radiation-induced Apoptosis in Normal Tissues while Killing Cancer Cells and Delaying Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Diana Yi; Jacobs, Keith M; Hallahan, Dennis E; Thotala, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity reduces the therapeutic index of radiotherapy and decreases the quality of life for cancer survivors. Apoptosis is a key element of the radiation response in normal tissues like the hippocampus and small intestine, resulting in neurocognitive disorders and intestinal malabsorption. The Early Growth Response 1 (Egr1) transcription factor mediates radiation-induced apoptosis by activating the transcription of pro-apoptosis genes in response to ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we hypothesized that the genetic abrogation of Egr1 and the pharmacological inhibition of its transcriptional activity could attenuate radiation-induced apoptosis in normal tissues. We demonstrated that Egr1 null mice had less apoptosis in the hippocampus and intestine following irradiation as compared to their wild-type littermates. A similar result was achieved using Mithramycin A (MMA) to prevent binding of Egr1 to target promoters in the mouse intestine. Egr1 expression using shRNA dampened apoptosis and enhanced the clonogenic survival of irradiated HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells and IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Mechanistically, these events involved an abrogation of p53 induction by IR and an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax expression. In contrast, targeted silencing of Egr1 in two cancer cell lines (GL261 glioma cells, HCT116 colorectal cancer cells) was not radioprotective, since it reduced their growth while also sensitizing them to radiation-induced death. Further, Egr1 depletion delayed the growth of heterotopically implanted GL261 and HCT116 tumors. These results support the potential of silencing Egr1 in order to minimize the normal tissue complications associated with radiotherapy while enhancing tumor control. PMID:26206332

  10. Beneficial effects of sucralphate in radiation induced diarrhea. An open randomized study in gynecological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, R; Arevärn, M; Franzén, L; Persson, H; Stendahl, U

    1990-01-01

    In an open randomized study including 51 consecutive patients with gynaecological malignancies sucralphate was daily administered to patients receiving pelvic irradiation. Sucralphate, an aluminium hydroxide complex of sulphated sucrose used in the treatment of gastric ulcer, seems to be of value in preventing radiation-induced bowel discomfort. The most objective parameter, frequency of diarrhoea was almost 50% less in the sucralphate groups as compared to the controls. The patients receiving sucralphate in general displayed only minor alterations in bowel habits even at the end of the radiation treatment. The number of patients requiring symptomatic therapy with loperamide were markedly lower in the sucralphate group. Subjective discomfort such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite were also less common. A reduction in acute reactions to irradiation increases the possibility of carrying through planned treatment and avoids unfavourable intermissions, and thus curing the patient with cancer in the pelvis by means of radiotherapy. PMID:2245814

  11. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  12. Photodynamic therapy of supratentorial gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    We are reporting the results form intraoperative intracavitary PDT treatment in 56 patients with recurrent supratentorial gliomas who had failed previous surgery and radiotherapy. These patients received 2mg/kg Photofin iv. 12-36 hours prior to surgical resection of their tumor or tumor cyst drainage. The median survival times in weeks for glioblastoma (GBM), malignant astrocytoma (MA), malignant mixed astrocytoma-oligodendroglioma and ependymoma were 30, 40, >56 and >174 weeks, respectively. Eight patients with recurrent GBM who received >60 J/cm2 had a median survival of 58 weeks and 24 patients who received <60 J/cm2 survived 29 weeks. The survival of patients with recurrent glioblastoma who undergo surgical treatment alone is only 20 weeks. We are also reporting the results of PDT treatment in 20 patients with newly diagnosed MA or GBM treated with intracavitary Photofin-PDT at the time of their initial craniotomy. The median survival of the whole cohort was 44 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 40 percent and 15 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with GBM was 37 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 35 percent and 0 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with MA as 48 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 44 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Six patients with a Karnofsky score of >70 who received a light dose of >1260J had a median survival of 92 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 83 percent and 33 percent, respectively. The mortality rate in our total series of 93 PDT treatments or brain tumor is 3 percent. The combined serious mortality-morbidity rate is 8 percent.

  13. Association of BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism with glioma risk in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qian, Chunfa; Wang, Linxiong; Teng, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2014-03-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary brain malignancy in adults. The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of glioma. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association between BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism and glioma susceptibility. This case-control study was conducted in Chinese Han populations consisting of 248 glioma cases and 252 cancer-free controls. The BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism was detected by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and verified using DNA sequencing methods. Our data suggested that the genotype/allele of BCL2-938C>A polymorphism were statistically associated with the increased risk of glioma where the risk of glioma for genotype AA or allele A is significantly higher than wild genotype CC (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-4.10, p = 0.009) or allele C (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.06-1.82, p = 0.016), respectively. In addition, the BCL2-938AA genotype was significantly more common in patients with glioblastoma and in patients with grade IV glioma. Our findings indicate that the BCL2-938C>A polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to glioma in Chinese Han populations and might be used as molecular markers for evaluating glioma risk.

  14. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  15. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal. PMID:9257424

  16. Radiation-induced segregation in alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution of an Alloy X-750 heat under neutron irradiation was studied in order to understand the origin of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Both clustering of point defects and radiation-induced segregation at interfaces were observed. Although no significant changes in the precipitate structure were observed, boundaries exhibited additional depletion of Cr and Fe and enrichment of Ni.

  17. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  18. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  19. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  20. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  1. Cord Blood Stem Cell-Mediated Induction of Apoptosis in Glioma Downregulates X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Fassett, Daniel; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Background XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is one of the most important members of the apoptosis inhibitor family. XIAP is upregulated in various malignancies, including human glioblastoma. It promotes invasion, metastasis, growth and survival of malignant cells. We hypothesized that downregulation of XIAP by human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC) in glioma cells would cause them to undergo apoptotic death. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed the effect of hUCBSC on two malignant glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251) and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310). In co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC, proliferation of glioma cells was significantly inhibited. This is associated with increased cytotoxicity of glioma cells, which led to glioma cell death. Stem cells induced apoptosis in glioma cells, which was evaluated by TUNEL assay, FACS analyses and immunoblotting. The induction of apoptosis is associated with inhibition of XIAP in co-cultures of hUCBSC. Similar results were obtained by the treatment of glioma cells with shRNA to downregulate XIAP (siXIAP). Downregulation of XIAP resulted in activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 to trigger apoptosis in glioma cells. Apoptosis is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and upregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad. Cell death of glioma cells was marked by downregulation of Akt and phospho-Akt molecules. We observed similar results under in vivo conditions in U251- and 5310-injected nude mice brains, which were treated with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, Smac/DIABLO was found to be colocalized in the nucleus, showing that hUCBSC induced apoptosis is mediated by inhibition of XIAP and activation of Smac/DIABLO. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that downregulation of XIAP by hUCBSC treatment induces apoptosis, which led to the death of the glioma cells and xenograft cells. This study demonstrates the therapeutic

  2. Discrimination between two different grades of human glioma based on blood vessel infrared spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Forfar, Isabelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2015-09-01

    Gliomas are brain tumours classified into four grades with increasing malignancy from I to IV. The development and the progression of malignant glioma largely depend on the tumour vascularization. Due to their tissue heterogeneity, glioma cases can be difficult to classify into a specific grade using the gold standard of histological observation, hence the need to base classification on a quantitative and reliable analytical method for accurately grading the disease. Previous works focused specifically on vascularization study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proving this method to be a way forward to detect biochemical changes in the tumour tissue not detectable by visual techniques. In this project, we employed FTIR imaging using a focal plane array (FPA) detector and globar source to analyse large areas of glioma tumour tissue sections via molecular fingerprinting in view of helping to define markers of the tumour grade. Unsupervised multivariate analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis) of blood vessel spectral data, retrieved from the FPA images, revealed the fine structure of the borderline between two areas identified by a pathologist as grades III and IV. Spectroscopic indicators are found capable of discriminating different areas in the tumour tissue and are proposed as biomolecular markers for potential future use of grading gliomas. Graphical Abstract Infrared imaging of glioma blood vessels provides a means to revise the pathologists' line of demarcation separating grade III (GIII) from grade IV (GIV) parts. PMID:26168973

  3. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P < 0.05). In addition, tumors with high MTA3 expression were more likely to be of low WHO grade (P = 0.005) and reserve of body function (P = 0.014). Survival analysis showed that decreased MTA3 expression was independently associated with unfavorable overall survival of patients (P < 0.001). These results provide the first evidence that MTA3 expression was decreased in human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  4. Favorable Outcomes of Pediatric Patients Treated With Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System Who Develop Radiation-Induced Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients treated at the University of Florida who developed meningiomas after radiation to the central nervous system (CNS) for childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 10 patients aged {<=}19 years who received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a meningioma. We report the histology of the radiation-induced meningioma, treatment received, and ultimate outcome among this cohort of patients. Results: Meningioma was diagnosed at a median of 23.5 years after completion of the primary radiation. Fifty percent of second meningiomas were World Health Organization Grade 2 (atypical) or higher. All cases were managed with a single modality: resection alone (n = 7), fractionated radiotherapy (n = 2), and stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 1). The actuarial event-free survival and overall survival rate at 5 years after treatment for a radiation-induced meningioma was 89%. Three patients who underwent resection for retreatment experienced a Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation-induced meningiomas after treatment of pediatric CNS tumors are effectively managed with single-modality therapy. Such late-effect data inform the overall therapeutic ratio and support the continued role of selective irradiation in managing pediatric CNS malignancies.

  5. Ureteroiliac Artery Fistula Caused by a Metallic Memokath Ureteral Stent in a Radiation-Induced Ureteral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Das, Krishanu; Ordones, Flavio; Welikumbura, Sumudu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Memokath 051™ stents are increasingly used for management of benign and malignant ureteral strictures refractory to management with single or tandem polymeric Double-J ureteral stents. Migration, encrustation, and difficulty in extraction during stent exchange are the chief problems reported so far with these thermoexpandable metallic stents. We report an unusual complication of ureteroexternal iliac artery fistula (UEAF) caused by Memokath stent inserted for radiation-induced ureteral stricture. Case Presentation: A 71-year-old male with history of colorectal cancer (underwent extirpative surgery + chemoradiotherapy) and subsequently radiation-induced ureteral stricture had bilateral Memokath ureteral stents inserted. Three months later, he presented with sepsis and hemodynamic instability secondary to UEAF, confirmed on angiography. A covered vascular stent was inserted as an immediate management. Conclusion: Memokath stent insertion in radiation-induced ureteral strictures may be associated with an increased risk of erosion and the rare potential complication of UEAF. This potential risk needs to be considered in the overall setting of such strictures and the difficulty in treating them. Prompt imaging (angiography) and placement of an endovascular stent are the ideal immediate options in such cases. PMID:27785465

  6. The histone deacetylase SIRT6 suppresses the expression of the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Hao, Bin; Liu, Ying; Dai, Dongwei; Han, Guosheng; Li, Yanan; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Xiaoping; Yue, Zhijian; Wang, Laixing; Cao, Yiqun Liu, Jianmin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • PCBP2 expression is over-expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • SIRT6 is decreased in glioma and correlated with PCBP2. • SIRT6 inhibits PCBP2 expression by deacetylating H3K9. • SIRT6 inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: More than 80% of tumors that occur in the brain are malignant gliomas. The prognosis of glioma patients is still poor, which makes glioma an urgent subject of cancer research. Previous evidence and our present data show that PCBP2 is over-expressed in human glioma tissues and predicts poor outcome. However, the mechanism by which PCBP2 is regulated in glioma remains elusive. We find that SIRT6, one of the NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase SIRTUINs, is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and that the level of SIRT6 is negatively correlated with PCBP2 level while H3K9ac enrichment on the promoter of PCBP2 is positively correlated with PCBP2 expression. Furthermore, we identify PCBP2 as a target of SIRT6. We demonstrate that PCBP2 expression is inhibited by SIRT6, which depends upon deacetylating H3K9ac. Finally, our results reveal that SIRT6 inhibits glioma cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and glioma cell growth in vivo in a PCBP2 dependent manner. In summary, our findings implicate that SIRT6 inhibits PCBP2 expression through deacetylating H3K9ac and SIRT6 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma.

  7. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  8. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  9. Suprasellar chordoid glioma.

    PubMed

    Ricoy, J R; Lobato, R D; Báez, B; Cabello, A; Martínez, M A; Rodríguez, G

    2000-06-01

    Brat et al. (J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 57:288-290, 1998) reported eight cases of a new clinico-pathological entity, which occurs mainly in the third ventricle of middle-aged females, which they described as chordoid glioma of the third ventricle. We report a new case of a 41-year-old woman with a suprasellar chordoid glioma with histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. We discuss the differential diagnosis between chordoma, chordoid meningioma, germinoma and pituitary adenoma. Histologically, the tumour showed cords and lobules of isomorphic epithelioid cells in a vacuolated matrix with prominent multifocal lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in which some histiocytes and isolated Touton-type giant cells were seen; cells were immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein but negative for epithelial membrane antigen. Ultrastructural examination revealed abundant intermediate filament but no desmosomes, microvilli nor cilia were seen.

  10. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  11. Effect of treatment with baicalein on the intracerebral tumor growth and survival of orthotopic glioma models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Rong; Jiang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Baicalein, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has been proved as a promising chemopreventive compound for many cancers. The aim of this work was to assess the anti-tumor effect of baicalein in the orthotopic glioma models. It was found that treatment of mice with U87 gliomas with baicalein (20 and 40 mg/kg/day, i.p.) significantly inhibited the intracerebral tumor growth and prolonged the survival. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein suppressed cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein reduced tumor permeability, attenuated edema of tumors and brains, and improved tight junctions in gliomas. Finally, treatment with baicalein reduced the expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and VEGFR2 in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein also markedly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged the survival of rats with 9L gliomas. In conclusion, baicalein has an obvious anti-tumor activity in the orthotopic glioma models. Our results suggested that treatment with baicalein might be an effective therapy for recurrent malignant brain cancers through suppressing tumor growth and alleviating edema.

  12. miR-182-5p Induced by STAT3 Activation Promotes Glioma Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianfei; Zhou, Aidong; Wu, Yamei; Morris, Saint-Aaron; Lin, Kangyu; Amin, Samirkumar; Verhaak, Roeland; Fuller, Gregory; Xie, Keping; Heimberger, Amy B; Huang, Suyun

    2016-07-15

    Malignant glioma is an often fatal type of cancer. Aberrant activation of STAT3 leads to glioma tumorigenesis. STAT3-induced transcription of protein-coding genes has been extensively studied; however, little is known about STAT3-regulated miRNA gene transcription in glioma tumorigenesis. In this study, we found that abnormal activation or decreased expression of STAT3 promotes or inhibits the expression of miR-182-5p, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses determined that tumor suppressor protocadherin-8 (PCDH8) is a candidate target gene of miR-182-5p. miR-182-5p negatively regulated PCDH8 expression by directly targeting its 3'-untranslated region. PCDH8 knockdown induced the proliferative and invasive capacities of glioma cells. Silencing of PCDH8 or miR-182-5p mimics could reverse the inhibitory effect of WP1066, a STAT3 inhibitor, or STAT3 knockdown in vitro and in vivo on glioma progression. Clinically, expression levels of PCDH8 were inversely correlated with those of p-STAT3 or miR-182-5p in glioblastoma tissues. These findings reveal that the STAT3/miR-182-5p/PCDH8 axis has a critical role in glioma tumorigenesis and that targeting the axis may provide a new therapeutic approach for human glioma. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4293-304. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27246830

  13. Anti-EGFR function of EFEMP1 in glioma cells and patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanjie; Gao, Hengjun; Vo, Christopher; Ke, Chao; Pan, Francine; Yu, Liping; Siegel, Eric; Hess, Kenneth R.; Linskey, Mark E.; Zhou, Yi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    EGFR is one of the key oncogenes subjected to targeted therapy for several cancers, as it is known to be amplified and/or mutated in up to 40% of malignant gliomas. EFEMP1, a fibulin-like extracellular protein, exerts both tumor suppressive and oncogenic effects in various cancers and glioma cell models. Although EFEMP1's anti-cancer activity has most commonly been attributed to its anti-angiogenic effects, we showed for gliomas that EFEMP1's binding to EGFR accounts for its suppression of the intracranial tumorigenicity of glioma cells expressing high levels of EGFR. In gliomas where EFEMP1 expression, and thus the anti-EGFR effect of EFEMP1, was suppressed, heightened levels of EGFR expression were associated with unfavorable patient outcomes in prognostic models. Results from the current study clearly demonstrate the impact that the anti-EGFR function of EFEMP1 has on the expression of EGFR and patient prognosis. A glioma prognostic model also suggests EFEMP1's context-dependent oncogenic function in gliomas expressing low levels of EGFR. Hence the level of EFEMP1 expression may have a predictive value for choosing patients for anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:25594013

  14. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mabray, M C; Glastonbury, C M; Mamlouk, M D; Punch, G E; Solomon, D A; Cha, S

    2015-07-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare, with only 11 cases reported in the literature before 2014, including 8 with imaging. We present 8 additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by a glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion compared with the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature for recognizing direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerves.

  15. Polymersomes as an effective drug delivery system for glioma--a review.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Balakumar; Karanam, Vamshikrishna; Chellan, Vijaya Raghavan; Siram, Karthik; Natarajan, Tamil Selvan; Gregory, Marslin

    2014-07-01

    Glioma is one of the most commonly occurring malignant brain tumours which need proper treatment strategy. The current therapies for treating glioma like surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have failed in achieving satisfactory results and this forms a rationale for the development of novel drug delivery systems. Among them, polymersomes are superior novel carriers with diverse functions like enhanced stability, low permeability, tunable membrane properties, surface functionality, and long blood circulation time which make them suitable for cancer therapy. These are bilayered vesicles capable of encapsulating both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs used to target glioma effectively. In this review, we have discussed on general preparation, characterization, and targeting aspects of surface modified polymersomes for effective delivery of therapeutic agents to glioma.

  16. Estramustine binding protein and anti-proliferative effect of estramustine in human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    von Schoultz, E.; Lundblad, D.; Bergh, J.; Grankvist, K.; Henriksson, R.

    1988-01-01

    Four human cell lines derived from malignant gliomas were immunohistochemically examined for their content of estramustine-binding protein (EMBP). EMBP was detected in a large amount in all glioma cells during the entire cell cycle. EMBP has previously been demonstrated to be the major receptor protein in prostatic cancers for the cytostatic drug estramustine-phosphate (EMP). EMP caused a dose-dependent inhibition of exponentially growing cells by increasing the number of cells in G2/M stage of the cell cycle as monitored by flow cytofluorometry. The effect may be coupled to arrest of the glioma cells at metaphase. The presence of EMBP may suggest a selective binding and effect of EMP in glioma cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:3052561

  17. Imaging hypoxia in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Mendichovszky, I; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia plays a central role in tumour development, angiogenesis, growth and resistance to treatment. Owing to constant developments in medical imaging technology, significant advances have been made towards in vitro and in vivo imaging of hypoxia in a variety of tumours, including gliomas of the central nervous system. The aim of this article is to review the literature on imaging approaches currently available for measuring hypoxia in human gliomas and provide an insight into recent advances and future directions in this field. After a brief overview of hypoxia and its importance in gliomas, several methods of measuring hypoxia will be presented. These range from invasive monitoring by Eppendorf polarographic O2 microelectrodes, positron electron tomography (PET) tracers based on 2-nitroimidazole compounds [18F-labelled fluoro-misonidazole (18F-MISO) or 1-(2-[(18)F]fluoro-1-[hydroxymethyl]ethoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole (FRP-170)], 64Cu-ATSM Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) or 99mTc- and 68Ga-labelled metronidazole (MN) agents to advanced MRI methods, such as blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, oxygen-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:22433825

  18. Differential utilization of ketone bodies by neurons and glioma cell lines: a rationale for ketogenic diet as experimental glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even in the presence of oxygen, malignant cells often highly depend on glycolysis for energy generation, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. One strategy targeting this metabolic phenotype is glucose restriction by administration of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diet. Under these conditions, ketone bodies are generated serving as an important energy source at least for non-transformed cells. Methods To investigate whether a ketogenic diet might selectively impair energy metabolism in tumor cells, we characterized in vitro effects of the principle ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate in rat hippocampal neurons and five glioma cell lines. In vivo, a non-calorie-restricted ketogenic diet was examined in an orthotopic xenograft glioma mouse model. Results The ketone body metabolizing enzymes 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (BDH1 and 2), 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase 1 (OXCT1) and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) were expressed at the mRNA and protein level in all glioma cell lines. However, no activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway was observed in glioma cells, consistent with the absence of substantial 3-hydroxybutyrate metabolism and subsequent accumulation of succinate. Further, 3-hydroxybutyrate rescued hippocampal neurons from glucose withdrawal-induced cell death but did not protect glioma cell lines. In hypoxia, mRNA expression of OXCT1, ACAT1, BDH1 and 2 was downregulated. In vivo, the ketogenic diet led to a robust increase of blood 3-hydroxybutyrate, but did not alter blood glucose levels or improve survival. Conclusion In summary, glioma cells are incapable of compensating for glucose restriction by metabolizing ketone bodies in vitro, suggesting a potential disadvantage of tumor cells compared to normal cells under a carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diet. Further investigations are necessary to identify co-treatment modalities, e.g. glycolysis inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents that efficiently

  19. Ligand-dependent EphB1 signaling suppresses glioma invasion and correlates with patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lei; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Furuyama, Natsuki; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Takino, Takahisa; Dong, Yu; Sato, Hiroshi; Sai, Yoshimichi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Berens, Michael E.; Zhao, Shi-Guang; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive evidence implicates the Eph receptor family of tyrosine kinases and its ligand, ephrin, in glioma invasion, but it remains incompletely understood how these receptors affect chemotactic behavior of glioma. We sought to identify the Eph family members that correlate with patients' survival and to reveal the function of Eph in glioma invasion. Methods Clinical relevance of EphB genes was confirmed in a clinically annotated expression data set of 195 brain biopsy specimens. The function of EphB was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results Levels of mRNA of certain EphB members were significantly different in histological grades of glioma. According to Kaplan–Meier analysis, only the EphB1 level among 5 members of EphB emerged to be a powerful predictor of favorable survival in malignant glioma (n = 97, P = .0048), although the levels of EphB1 expression did not vary across the tumor grades. Immunoprecipitation showed that tyrosine phosphorylated EphB1 was not detected in all glioma cells tested. Forced overexpression and autophosphorylation of EphB1 in low expressor cell lines (U251, U87) did not affect cell migration or invasion in vitro, whereas EphB1 phosphorylation induced by ephrin-B2/Fc significantly decreased migration and invasion. Cells expressing ephrin-B2 showed noteworthy morphological changes consistent with migration induction; this alteration was negated by EphB1 overexpression. Concomitantly, overexpression of EphB1 abrogated the increased migration and invasion induced by ephrin-B2 in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions These data suggest that ligand-dependent EphB1 signaling negatively regulates glioma cell invasion, identifying EphB1 as a favorable prognostic factor in malignant glioma. PMID:24121831

  20. Estradiol Receptors Regulate Differential Connexin 43 Expression in F98 and C6 Glioma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Moinfar, Zahra; Dambach, Hannes; Schoenebeck, Bodo; Förster, Eckart; Prochnow, Nora; Faustmann, Pedro Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumour with male preponderance and poor prognosis. Glioma cells express variable amounts of connexin 43 (Cx43) and estrogen receptors (ERs). Both, Cx43 and ERs, play important roles in cell proliferation and migration. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 17-ß estradiol (E2) on Cx43 expression in two glioma cell lines with variable native expression of Cx43. Materials and Methods F98 and C6 rat glioma cells were cultured for 24 h in the presence of 10 nM or 100 nM E2, and the E2-antagonist, Fulvestrant. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. ERα, ERβ and Cx43 protein expressions were analysed by western blotting and Cx43 mRNA expression was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To quantify cell migration, an exclusive zone migration assay was used. Functional coupling of cells via gap junctions was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Results E2 reduced Cx43 expression in C6 cells, but increased Cx43 expression in F98 cultures. These effects were mediated via ERs. Moreover, E2 promoted C6 cell migration, but it did not affect F98 cell migration. The expression level of ERα was found to be high in C6, but low in F98 cells. ERβ was exclusively expressed in C6 cells. In addition, E2 treatment induced a significant decrease of ERβ in C6 cultures, while it decreased ERα expression in F98 glioma cells. Discussion These findings show that E2 differentially modulates Cx43 expression in F98 and C6 glioma cells, likely due to the differential expression of ERs in each of these cell lines. Our findings point to the molecular mechanisms that might contribute to the gender-specific differences in the malignancy of glioma and could have implications for therapeutic strategies against glioma. PMID:26919293

  1. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  2. Using Imaging Methods to Interrogate Radiation-Induced Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Weber, Thomas J.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of systems biology approaches to define radiation induced responses in cells and tissues. Such approaches frequently rely on global screening using various high throughput 'omics' platforms. Although these methods are ideal for obtaining an unbiased overview of cellular responses, they often cannot reflect the inherent heterogeneity of the system or provide detailed spatial information. Additionally, performing such studies with multiple sampling time points can be prohibitively expensive. Imaging provides a complementary method with high spatial and temporal resolution capable of following the dynamics of signaling processes. In this review, we utilize specific examples to illustrate how imaging approaches have furthered our understanding of radiation induced cellular signaling. Particular emphasis is placed on protein co-localization, and oscillatory and transient signaling dynamics.

  3. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  4. Radiation-induced lung injury: a hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.G.; Bryant, D.H.; Morgan, G.W.; Yeates, M.; Fernandez, V.; Penny, R.; Breit, S.N.

    1988-08-15

    Radiation pneumonitis occurs 6 to 12 weeks after thoracic irradiation, and is thought to be due to direct radiation-induced lung injury. Four patients who developed pneumonitis after unilateral thoracic irradiation for carcinoma of the breast were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan of the lung, and respiratory function tests. On the irradiated side of the chest, all four patients showed an increase in total cells recovered from the lavage fluid and a marked increase in the percentage of lymphocytes. When results for the unirradiated lung were compared with results for the irradiated lung, there was a comparable increase in total cells and percentage of lymphocytes. Gallium scans showed increases for both irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Prompt improvement was seen after corticosteroid therapy in all patients. The fact that abnormal findings occur equally in irradiated and unirradiated lung is inconsistent with simple direct radiation-induced injury and suggests an immunologically mediated mechanism such as a hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  5. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; He, Li; Bao, Guoqiang; He, Xin; Fan, Saijun; Wang, Haichao

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells, thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses. In this study we aimed to test the possibility that ionizing radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and extracellular release. Method Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and animals (rats) were exposed to X-ray radiation, and HMGB1 translocation and release were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. Results At a wide dose range (4.0 – 12.0 Gy), X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation, and triggered a time- and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo. The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability. Conclusion radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes. PMID:27331198

  6. Biological determinants of radiation-induced human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second in a three part series on the hypothetical risk from x-ray mammography. It will review those aspects of breast anatomy, histology, physiology, and pathology which are pertinent to radiation carcinogenesis. Radiation-induced breast cancers are histologically identical to the naturally occurring type in that they arise from the ductal epithelium and consist of a similar proportion of infiltrating and intraductal lesions. Possible explanations for the increased resistance to radiation effect in women over 30 years of age at time of exposure include regression of the glandular target tissue, hormonal changes, and parity. Examples of age-related sensitivity and hormonal dependence in other radiation-induced human and animal tumors will be discussed.

  7. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  8. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  9. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  10. Techniques for measuring radiation induced effects of acousto optic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.W.

    1995-08-01

    Innovative measurement techniques for determining radiation induced changes in acousto optic devices are briefly discussed. Measurements of acousto optic operational parameters such as signal transmission efficiency, diffraction efficiency, spatial intensity and bandwidth responses during electron irradiations are described. During exposure to pulsed electrons, only transient perturbations to the acousto optic operational parameters were experienced. Examples of new measurement procedures and typical data resulting from the measurements are presented.

  11. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  12. Repair of radiation induced genetic damage under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Pross, H D; Kost, M; Kiefer, J

    1994-10-01

    The influence of microgravity on the repair of radiation induced genetic damage in a temperature-conditional repair mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad 54-3) was investigated onboard the IML-1 mission (January 22nd-30th 1992, STS-42). Cells were irradiated before the flight, incubated under microgravity at the permissive (22 degrees C) and restrictive (36 degrees C) temperature and afterwards tested for survival. The results suggest that repair may be reduced under microgravity.

  13. Radiation-induced products of peptides and their enzymatic digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characterization of radiation-induced products of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on peptides and proteins. Furthermore, peptides containing radiation-altered amino acid residues might not be completely digestible by proteolytic enzymes. In this work, small homopeptides of Ala, Phe and Met were chosen as model peptides. Lysozyme was used to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on a small protein. All peptides and lysozyme were irradiated in diluted, oxygen free, N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions, using a /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-source. HPLC, capillary GC and GC-MS were applied to isolate and characterize the radiation-induced products. The enzymatic digestibility of the products was investigated using aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. It was found that irradiation of peptides examined in this work leads to racemization and alteration of amino acid residues and crosslinks between the peptide chains. In addition, it was established that exopeptidases act differently on radiation-induced dimers of peptides composed of aliphatic, aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids.

  14. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  15. Association between regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 polymorphism and susceptibility to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shujun; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Junle; Fu, Qiang; Shang, Peizhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glioma is the most devastating type of malignant brain tumors in adults. Genetic factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of glioma. In recent years, some studies found that there were significant association between regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 rs6010620 polymorphism and glioma susceptibility, however, the results were controversial. The aim of this study was to obtain a more exact estimation of the association between regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 rs6010620 polymorphism and glioma through a meta-analysis. Methods: The meta-analysis included 19 published case-control studies involving 8541 cases and 14226 controls. The included papers were searched from PubMed and Embase database. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were used to evaluate the association of regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 rs6010620 polymorphism with glioma. Results: A significant association between regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 rs6010620 polymorphism and glioma susceptibility was observed for GG vs. AA+AG (OR=1.28, 95% CI=1.14-1.43) and G vs. A (OR=1.07, 95% CI=1.03-1.10). Further subgroup analysis based on ethnicity showed similar results in Asians and Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis of source of control, a significant association between the G allele and glioma susceptibility were found in population-based group and hospital-based group. Conclusions: The meta-analysis suggested that regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 rs6010620 polymorphism was a risk factor for glioma. And this study also suggested that rs6010620 GG genotype and G allele may be indicators for the risk of glioma. PMID:25785045

  16. Human and rat glioma growth, invasion, and vascularization in a novel chick embryo brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Fotos, Joseph S; Little, Brian W; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the insidiously invasive nature of malignant gliomas are poorly understood, and their study would be facilitated by an in vivo model that is easy to manipulate and inexpensive. The developing chick embryo brain was assessed as a new xenograft model for the production, growth, and study of human and rat glioma cell lines. Three established glioma lines (U-87 MG, C6, and 9L) were injected into chick embryo brain ventricles on embryonic day (E) 5 and brains were examined after several days to two weeks after injection. All glioma lines survived, produced vascularized intraventricular tumors, and invaded the brain in a manner similar to that in rodents. Rat C6 glioma cells spread along vasculature and also invaded the neural tissue. Human U-87 glioma cells migrated along vasculature and exhibited slight invasion of neural tissue. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells were highly motile, but migrated only along the vasculature. A derivative of 9L cells that stably expressed the cell surface adhesion molecule NgCAM/L1 was produced and also injected into chick embryo brain ventricles to see if this protein could facilitate tumor cell migration away from the vasculature into areas such as axonal tracts. 9L/NgCAM cells, however, did not migrate away from the vasculature and, thus, this protein alone cannot be responsible for diffuse invasiveness of some gliomas. 9L/NgCAM cell motility was assessed in vitro using sophisticated time-lapse microscopy and quantitative analysis, and was significantly altered compared to parental 9L cells. These studies demonstrate that the chick embryo brain is a successful and novel xenograft model for mammalian gliomas and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new model for studying glioma tumor cell growth, vascularization, and invasiveness.

  17. Expressions of Endocan in Patients with Meningiomas and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Okan; Turkmen Inanir, Nursel

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endocan has been shown to be a marker for several cancers and may show degree of malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess tissue levels of endocan in common brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Patients and Methods. Endocan was assayed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in a total of 50 brain tumors (20 meningiomas, 19 LGGs, and 20 HGGs) and 15 controls. The results were compared to control brain tissues. Results. Each tumor group showed significant higher levels of endocan compared to controls (p < 0.05). In addition, endocan levels showed steady increase from the least (meningiomas) to the most (HGGs) malignant tumors and positive correlation was noted between the degree of malignancy and endocan level (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. Endocan, a vital molecule for angiogenesis, is expressed in common brain tumors and results suggest that endocan could be a marker for malignancy. PMID:27528791

  18. The Effect of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Radiation-Induced Second Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D. Davis, Sidney; Evans, Cherie; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Haynes, Matthew; Hunter, Alistair

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of carcinogenic risk for actual clinical scenarios. Method and Materials: Clinically equivalent IMRT plans were generated for prostate, breast, and head-and-neck cases treated with 3D-CRT. Two possible dose-response models for radiocarcinogenesis were generated based on A-bomb survivor data corrected for fractionation. Dose-volume histogram analysis was used to determine dose and its distribution to nontargeted tissues within the planning CT scan volume and thermoluminescent dosimetry for the rest of the body. Carcinogenic estimates were calculated with and without a correction factor accounting for cancer patients' advanced age and reduced longevity. Results: For the model assuming a plateau in risk above 2-Gy single-fraction-equivalent (SFE), IMRT and 3D-CRT produced risks of 1.7% and 2.1%, respectively, for prostate; 1.9% and 1.8%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.4-2.2% and 1.5-1.6%, respectively, depending on technique, for breast. Assuming a reduction in risk above 2-Gy SFE, risks for IMRT and 3D-CRT were 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively, for prostate; 1.4% and 1.2%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.3-1.8% vs. 1.3-1.6%, respectively, for breast. Applying a correction factor of 0.5 for cancer patients halved these risks and their relative differences. Conclusions: Carcinogenic risks were comparable in absolute terms between modalities. Risks are dependant on technique used. Risks with IMRT are influenced by monitor unit demand and are therefore software/hardware dependant. The dose-response model accounting for cell killing at higher doses fitted best with actual observed risks.

  19. Monitoring Oxygen Levels in Orthotopic Human Glioma Xenograft Following Carbogen Inhalation and Chemotherapy by Implantable Resonator Based Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huagang; Nemani, Venkata Krishnamurthy; Du, Gaixin; Montano, Ryan; Song, Rui; Gimi, Barjor; Swartz, Harold M.; Eastman, Alan; Khan, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical hallmark of glioma, and significantly compromises treatment efficacy. Unfortunately, techniques for monitoring glioma pO2 to facilitate translational research are lacking. Furthermore, poor prognoses of patients with malignant glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme, warrant effective strategies that can inhibit hypoxia and improve treatment outcome. EPR oximetry using implantable resonators was implemented for monitoring pO2 in normal cerebral tissue and U251 glioma in mice. Breathing carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2) was tested for hyperoxia in the normal brain and glioma xenografts. A new strategy to inhibit glioma growth by rationally combining gemcitabine and MK-8776, a cell cycle checkpoint inhibitor, was also investigated. The mean pO2 of left and right hemisphere were approximately 56 – 69 mmHg in the normal cerebral tissue of mice. The mean baseline pO2 of U251 glioma on the first and fifth day of measurement was 21.9 ± 3.7 and 14.1 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively. The mean brain pO2 including glioma increased by at least 100% on carbogen inhalation, although the response varied between the animals over days. Treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 significantly increased pO2 and inhibited glioma growth assessed by MRI. In conclusion, EPR oximetry with implantable resonators can be used to monitor the efficacy of carbogen inhalation and chemotherapy on orthotopic glioma in mice. The increase in glioma pO2 of mice breathing carbogen can be used to improve treatment outcome. The treatment with gemcitabine + MK-8776 is a promising strategy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25111969

  20. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  1. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  2. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy.

  3. NKG2D- and T-cell receptor-dependent lysis of malignant glioma cell lines by human γδ T cells: Modulation by temozolomide and A disintegrin and metalloproteases 10 and 17 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chitadze, Guranda; Lettau, Marcus; Luecke, Stefanie; Wang, Ting; Janssen, Ottmar; Fürst, Daniel; Mytilineos, Joannis; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Held-Feindt, Janka; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interaction of the MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family members expressed on tumor cells with the corresponding NKG2D receptor triggers cytotoxic effector functions in NK cells and γδ T cells. However, as a mechanism of tumor immune escape, NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) can be released from the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the NKG2DL system in different human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, the most lethal brain tumor in adults. Flow cytometric analysis and ELISA revealed that despite the expression of various NKG2DLs only ULBP2 is released as a soluble protein via the proteolytic activity of “a disintegrin and metalloproteases” (ADAM) 10 and 17. Moreover, we report that temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use for the treatment of GBM, increases the cell surface expression of NKG2DLs and sensitizes GBM cells to γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Both NKG2D and the T-cell receptor (TCR) are involved. The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells toward GBM cells is strongly enhanced in a TCR-dependent manner by stimulation with pyrophosphate antigens. These data clearly demonstrate the complexity of mechanisms regulating NKG2DL expression in GBM cells and further show that treatment with TMZ can increase the immunogenicity of GBM. Thus, TMZ might enhance the potential of the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded γδ T cells for the treatment of malignant glioblastoma. PMID:27141377

  4. Methods to Differentiate Radiation Necrosis and Recurrent Disease in Gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewell, Lars

    2007-03-01

    Given the difficulty in differentiating Radiation Induced Necrosis (RIN) and recurrent disease in glioma patients using conventional techniques (CT scans, MRI scans), researchers have looked for different imaging modalities. Among these different modalities are Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DWMRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). In DWMRI, an Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) is calculated for a Region Of Interest (ROI), and then monitored over time (longitudinally). In the brain, different anatomical features can complicate the interpretation of ADCs. In particular, the density and spatial variation of the cerebral spinal fluid filled fissures known as sulci can influence how a change in an ADC is explained. We have used the covariance of pixel intensity in T1 weighted MRI scans to study how intra-patient and inter-patient sulci density varies, and will present these results. MRS uses the shift in the MR signal due to the local chemical environment to determine the concentration of brain metabolites like choline and creatin. The ratio of metabolites such as these has been shown to have the power to discriminate between RIN and recurrent disease in glioma patients. At our institution, we have initiated a protocol whereby we will use DWMRI and MRS to study how best to utilize these complimentary forms of imaging.

  5. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events.

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1,